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Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes

January 1 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes Lauren Haynes is a folk herbalist, medicine maker, plant enthusiast, and the founder of Wooden Spoon Herbs, a small apothecary line based in the Appalachian mountains. Take a look at Lauren’s shop offerings, and you’ll be immersed in a world of plant-powered tinctures, salves, oxymels, and teas, each one more magical than the other. In this interview, Lauren tells us about self-care as a form of self-respect, kindness as a form of beauty, her favorite plants for stress, beauty, and colds (and more!), the importance of sourcing her ingredients locally and working with what’s available, as well as exercise, sustenance, inspiration, procrastination, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Oh, open and free, absolutely. Since I work from home, things end up being pretty routine: tea, emails, breakfast. But if I have my way I love to see how the day unfolds uninhibited. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Most mornings start with a hot tea or something creamy with raw milk and occasionally marshmallows. I check and return emails first thing, then Ill meditate and make some breakfast and get to work. On lazier mornings well go into the small town nearby and eat eggs benedict and read the paper. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My new favorite nighttime tool is the Flux app for my computer. It gradually turns your screen from blue light to orange with the arc of the day, so the blue light doesnt deter melatonin production come bedtime. Other than that, just reading a great book until my eyes get tired. Living out in the county where its dark and quiet helps me sleep soundly every night. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – smoked salmon omelette with sauteéd greens Lunch – egg salad sandwich with a bowl of good soup Snack – fruit or hummus or a little chocolate Dinner – soul food: pinto beans, cornbread, a baked sweet potato and collard greens, topped with hot sauce and ferments and a slice of blue cheese -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink tea most mornings. Sometimes matcha or Earl Grey, or sometimes just ginger and lemon balm, to ground and calm myself before a hectic day. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Um... yes, check. I have a major sweet tooth and Lilys stevia-sweetened chocolate bars save my life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Right now my regimen includes fish oil, Mothers Best beef liver pills, a tincture of medicinal mushrooms, and evening primrose oil. I also love using lymphatic herbs steeped in vinegar throughout the year. Every spring I steep whatever edible herbs are coming up naturally in raw apple cider vinegar: plantain, violet leaf, dead nettle, dandelion greens, chickweed and cleavers. That lasts me all year and keeps me feeling vital, just a spoonful a day. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I try to exercise but if I have a full schedule its the first thing I cut out. I live on a tract of wilderness, so walking a few miles a day is super easy and I do that interspersed with yoga when Im feeling too tired to get outside. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? A little bit of both! Its definitely hard to make the time for it since I work from home and just go, go, go. I definitely find walking in the woods pleasurable, so that keeps me motivated to exercise. I cant even imagine going to a gym... Maybe someday. Exercise is something Im starting to get excited about. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? True beauty is when someone makes you feel like your soul is illuminated by the way that they treat you. Thats what is beautiful to me. If I want external beauty, Ill just scroll Instagram for a bit, you know? But true kindness is actual beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Laidback is how I would describe my skincare routine. See also: erratic. I use a rosewater and witch hazel toner daily (Poppy & Someday), followed by a blend of rosehip and carrot seed oil (Zizia Botanicals). Sometimes I use a gentle rose quartz scrub on my face (Aquarian Soul), followed by oil cleansing, but usually Im pretty lowkey. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! Nettle and alfalfa infusions, and also evening primrose oil internally. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Drink tons of water, sleep as much as you can, and wear red lipstick. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Consistent routines are hard for me, but I am constantly checking in to make sure I dont get overwhelmed by stress, even if that means five minutes of yoga in the middle of the day. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I really love regular acupuncture treatments and massage, as well as daily meditation and moxibustion. Calming teas that ease tension, like ginger and chamomile. Also just goofing off as much as I can get away with. You cant be silly and stressed at the same time. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? My first line of defense is a few dropperfuls of fire cider. I make one called Sunshine Cider with turmeric and rosehips, but my friend Gretchen made me some with habanero peppers and that always helps me stay on the right side of health. Fire cider, a shot of elderberry syrup and then some red root tincture, an amazing lymphatic herb that relieves a sore throat. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely bleed together, as I work from home and run my business with my partner. I try to take the weekends off and get out of the house daily to break up the work mode, even if its just a drive to the post office. Luckily, I love my work because its a huge part of my life. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Honestly, mindfulness is key. Just checking in with myself constantly to see how Im feeling, why Im feeling that way and what I need. I just take little tea or chocolate breaks or go put some sun on my face or make a nourishing meal. A hot shower if Im feeling cold. Self massage if Im feeling anxious. Shutting the computer if Im getting tired. And making time for the little things that make me happy, like reading a book. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Cleaning up my diet was key for me in resolving a lot of health issues. In college I was just eating garbage and drinking alcohol and doing all the teenage things. Once I realized that youre literally what you eat, and started treating my body with respect, a lot shifted for me. I really feel like that small change helped align me with the path Im on now, which is 100% what Im supposed to be doing. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Im usually brimming with ideas and running myself ragged trying to make them all happen, so if I struggle with anything its occasional procrastination. Usually this looks like doing the easier things on my to-do list before the hard-hitting work chores, which isnt such a bad thing. I just kind of let myself have some slower times, because I work really hard. I may sip tea and pull tarot cards and then eventually get a burst of energy. Or sometimes I do nothing for like two full days. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So, so many. I love The Gift of Healing Herbs by Robin Rose Bennett and Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz, as well as so many books from the 70s by obscure hippies and natural living advocates. Living on the Earth by Alicia Bay Laurel, for example. Knowledge -- What was your path to studying herbology and founding Wooden Spoon Herbs? I came to herbs when looking for a path to self-sufficiency. I romanticized living off the land, providing all that I would need for myself through my connection to the earth. And thats basically how it happened. I got all the books I could find about herbalism, read them, and started making herbal remedies. I started selling them slowly and it just kind of took off. Then I got to put my business hat on and thats been such a rewarding challenge. -- Can you talk a little bit about your decision to work only with herbs native to your home region of Appalachia? Theres so much to say about this. When I started opening my eyes to the bounty that surrounded me, it struck me as absurd to order herbs from suppliers that sourced from the far corners of the earth, when we had so many of the same herbs that could be sourced from the bioregion of Appalachia. For example, why am I going to order nettle that comes from Croatia when my friend has an acre of it on her farm? And no offense to Croatia or the herbalists that use those sources, but it just wasnt for me. I saw the opportunity to create a righteous supply chain and source from local farmers and forage my materials. To this day I still source directly from small organic farms around the country. Appalachias medicinal herbs are legendary: ginseng, goldenseal, bloodroot. People from all over the world use these herbs exclusively. And many of the herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine grow in Appalachia, because when the continents were Pangea parts of what is now China and parts of Appalachia were the same land. The geography of these regions is still very similar, and that is really special. So I wanted to learn about these plants for myself, because they are my neighbors and we share the same space. Not to mention that my family has been on this land for at least five generations, probably more. Its my most recent ancestral tradition, and I think its really important to learn about the traditions of your own ancestors so that youre not co-opting someone elses. Our pasts are precious. Finally, I believe in slow, local medicine for the same reasons I believe in slow, local foods – because theyre more potent and they taste better. -- What are some of your best-selling products and what herbs is your customer most excited about at the moment? My bestsellers are the Anxiety Ally, Brain Tonic, Moontime Magic and Migraine Melter tinctures. Elderberry Sumac Syrup is always a hit, as well as the Golden Cocoa (adaptogenic golden milk meets hot chocolate). I also have some new, more esoteric offerings based on the elements, and the Spirit one has been selling really well. I think my customers are just always after herbs that ground and expand the spirit, which is super beautiful. That and herbs for stress, always. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment?  Podcasts! All the podcasts: Medicine Stories, Thats So Retrograde, So You Wanna Be A Witch, Being Boss. That and the color cobalt blue. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love seeking out hot springs, getting massages and acupuncture, going to the movies with my partner and eating at good restaurants. In the summer, swimming in the river behind my house and lying in the sun. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Caravan by Stephen Gaskin Song/­­Album – Tried So Hard by Gene Clark Piece of art – the entire Motherpeace tarot deck -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? My favorite mohair cardigan, a striped shirt, high-waisted leggings and denim, Poppy & Somedays Gypsy Rose Toner, whatever books Im reading, a notebook and Uniball pen, magazines, calming tinctures, bagged tea, thermos, Ricardo Medina botines, charcoal toothbrush -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jess Fuery, Beatrice Valenzuela, Shiva Rose, the founders of Cap Beauty, Ashley Neese, Connie Matisse of East Fork Pottery, jeweler Annika Kaplan, Erica Chidi Cohen, Rachel Craven, Beth Kirby of Local Milk, Rachel Budde of Fat and the Moon, Kristen Dilley of Nightingale Acupuncture, and, naturally, Ilana Glazer Photos by Beth Kirby and Lauren Haynes You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Peppermint Hot Chocolate Mousse

December 5 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Feasting On Fruit‘s latest recipe video is guaranteed to satisfy all of your chocolate cravings. See how she whips up a delicious, naturally sweetened, fluffy vegan chocolate mousse in no time flat — it will have you dashing to your blender before you can say “hot chocolate”! To make this dessert even more fun, serve it up in a jar and top with vegan marshmallows and chocolate sauce. If you’re dreaming curling up on the couch with some peppermint cocoa, but it’s not cold enough to enjoy a hot drink, this mousse is the perfect alternative! Here’s how it’s made: Read the full recipe here. The post Vegan Peppermint Hot Chocolate Mousse appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Mini Whoopie Pies

November 24 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | Preheat oven to 350°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Cream together sugar and butter with whisk until smooth and sugar begins to dissolve. Whisk in egg, milk, and vanilla extract. Add melted chocolate and cocoa, and mix until smooth. Stir in flour with wooden spoon or rubber spatula. Do not overmix. 2 | Transfer batter to 1-gal. resealable plastic bag or pastry bag fitted with small round tip. Trim 1/­­2-inch tip from corner of resealable plastic bag (if using) with scissors. Squeeze 40 1-inch dollops of batter onto baking sheet 2 inches apart. Bake 12 minutes, or until tops look dry and smooth. Cool 2 minutes on baking sheet; transfer to wire rack to cool completely. 3 | To assemble: Spoon 1/­­2 tsp. marshmallow cream on bottoms of 20 cookies. Top with remaining cookies.

5 Meatless Leftover Hacks You’ll Love for Thanksgiving

November 23 2015 Meatless Monday 

Thanksgiving is almost here, and with it comes the season of family gatherings, festive traditions, and delicious leftovers! After the feast, the leftovers remain - delicious spreads and dishes with enough servings to last the weekend and fill you up on Meatless Monday! Here are a few inventive ways to enjoy your favorite holiday foods after the family meal is done. Mashed Potatoes If youve had your fill of the standard side dish, transform the rest of your mashed potatoes into potato pancakes for Eggs in Purgatory - an excellent brunch option with eggs and marinara sauce. This recipe comes courtesy of the Food Network and Giada De Laurentiis, a gourmet supporter of Meatless Monday!   Stuffing Love that fabulous stuffing, but in the mood for a different presentation? Turn it into bite sized stuffing nuggets with this recipe for Second Day Fried Stuffing Bites with Cranberry Sauce Pesto. Youll even have a chance to use up that extra cranberry sauce making the pesto dipping sauce included in the recipe!   Vegetable Crudite Vegetable platters are a popular dish at any holiday table, and on the big day they are enjoyed with any number of dips and dressings. But sometimes theres a bit of fresh celery, broccoli or carrots leftover after all the dip is gone. Make breakfast the morning after the dinner party into a special event with this recipe for a leftover crudité frittata.   Sweet Potatoes or Sweet Potato Casserole Packed with beta carotene and vitamin A, sweet potatoes are a treasured favorite in fall meals across the US. Whether baking them, mashing them, or making a casserole, leftover sweet potatoes can be re-purposed in this recipe for flavorful biscuits! You can even make this dish with leftover sweet potato/­­marshmallow casserole, just mash it all together first and bake as directed!   Dinner Rolls Once the meal is over, those fresh baked dinner rolls can start to get just a little bit stale. But what are stale dinner rolls perfect for? Bread bowls! This recipe for customizable breakfast bread bowls isnt just a great way to make use of those extra rolls - you can fill them with all the other tasty leftovers you’ve got in the fridge.   Looking for seconds? Find more ideas on our Thanksgiving Pinterest board, or visit the Meatless Monday recipe archive for entrees, side dishes, and desserts that are sure to please your guests. Get creative with those tasty leftovers and have fun!   The post 5 Meatless Leftover Hacks You’ll Love for Thanksgiving appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Blackcurrant and Lavender Pie

September 4 2015 seitan is my motor 

Blackcurrant and Lavender PieToday’s Vegan Mofo challenge is called “Tell us about a weird food combination that you love.” Ha, good one. I don’t think I like a single weird food combination. I am very boring when it comes to flavours and sweet and sour is already too much for me. When I think about new recipes for this blog, I usually go for complementing and supporting flavours. Some of these combinations could be labeled as weird. For example, I like tart berries a lot and I like to exaggerate their flavour by pairing them with herbs. Black currants, sea buckthorn, blackthorn (sloe) are rarely sold at stores. They haven’t made it next to the much sweeter varieties such as raspberries, strawberries, and cultivated blueberries. Black currants, sea buckthorn berries, or sloes all have different flavours, but they have one thing in common. If you taste them, their flavour makes you think of Scandianvian forest, of moss and water drops on dark green leaves. You can smell conifers and moldy soil. Or in the case of sea buckthorn you can feel the wind in your face and hear the waves. These berries have a complex flavour, a hint of intractability, that is not pleasant for everyone. Some of their flavour comes from the essential oils and tannins present.  That is why they are not widely popular, I think. But this is what makes them so outstanding. Herbs usually have essential oils, too and that’s why they go so well with tart berries.  My favourite combination used to be berry plus rosemary, but this year I finally made use of the lavender bush in our yard. I used two teaspoons of dried lavender buds, but you can halve the amount, if you don’t trust this flavour combination. But that probably doesn’t count as weird anymore. If you don’t have black currants available you can use blueberries.   Print Black Currant and Lavender Pie IngredientsFor the crust 210 g (1 3/­­4 cups) flour 200 g (2 2/­­3 cups) ground hazelnuts 100 g (1 sifted cup) powdered sugar 100 g (1/­­2 cup) granulated brown sugar 110 g (1/­­2 cup) soft refined coconut oil 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) vegetable oil 1/­­2 teaspoon ground vanilla 1/­­2 teaspoon salt For the topping 450 g blackcurrant jam (storebought or homemade) 2 teaspoons dried lavender buds InstructionsTo make the crust, combine all ingredients except for the oils in a bowl. Add coconut and vegetable oil and knead until a crumbly dough forms. Reserve 1/­­4 of the dough for the topping and form the remaining dough into a disk. Wrap in foil and place in the fridge for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 200°C (400°F). Grease a round pie or tart pan with a diameter of 28 cm (11 inches). Roll the dough out between two sheets of plastic foil and press into the bottom and the edges of the pan. For the filling combine jam and lavender buds. (If the jam is very thick you can heat it for easier handling.) Pour into the crust and form the reserved dough into large crumbs. Distribute on top of the cake. Bake for 35 minutes and let cool completely before removing from the pan. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­09/­­blackcurrant-and-lavender-pie/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com

10 Supermarket Foods and Drinks That Aren’t Always Veg

June 22 2015 Vegetarian Times 

10 Supermarket Foods and Drinks That Aren’t Always Veg Grocery shopping can be intimidating for new vegetarians: off-limits ingredients abound, and questionable products seem to lurk in every aisle. Is there lard in those beans? Anchovies in that dressing? When in doubt, use this handy cheat sheet to identify the most common supermarket foods and drinks that might not pass the veg test--and learn how to replace them with suitable substitutions. 1. Alcohol You wont find an ingredients list on most bottles, but isinglass (fish bladders), gelatin (animal skin, bones, tendons, and ligaments), and crab shells are just a few of the fining agents sometimes used to clarify alcohol. Check out barnivore.com to see if your favorite wine, beer, or booze was made with veg-friendly fining agents. 2. Caesar Dressing Anchovies give this popular salad dressing its signature salty kick. We love Follow Your Hearts creamy fish-free alternative, which gets plenty of zing from veg Worcestershire sauce and a hint of mustard. Great for vegans, its made without Parmesan cheese and egg yolks, two other standard Caesar ingredients. 3. Cheese Parmesan, Romano, and other old-school-style cheeses typically contain animal rennet--a cheesemaking ingredient extracted from the stomachs of calves, kids (goats), or lambs thats often simply labeled enzymes. Read VT‘s shopping guide, and stick with cheeses that state theyre made with microbial or vegetable rennet, or no rennet at all. (Psst: BelGioioso makes a vegetarian Parmesan wedge.) 4. French Onion Soup Beef stock may be providing the rich base for this comfort-food classic, so check the fine print on any supermarket can. Ordering it at a restaurant? It might also contain Parmesan and Gruyere cheeses made with animal rennet. Ask your server. 5. Gummy Treats Along with gummy vitamins and Starburst candies, conventional gummy bears and worms get their chewy texture from gelatin. Come Halloween, offer trick-or-treaters gummy treats that use fruit pectin instead--we promise they won’t be able to taste the difference. 6. Jell-O This jiggly childhood dessert is almost synonymous with gelatin. Find veg equivalents in the baking aisle of natural foods stores, or make your own using a thickening agent such as arrowroot powder or agar powder, derived from algae. 7. Kimchi A Korean staple believed to aid digestion, this spicy concoction of pickled veggies is traditionally fermented with fish sauce or dried shrimp. Look for jars that skip the seafood, such as Mother-in-Laws Vegan Napa Cabbage Kimchi. Use kimchi to add heat to veggie burgers, eggs, rice, and tacos. 8. Marshmallows Sorry, smores lovers: your favorite fluffy pillows contain gelatin. That goes for marshmallow-y treats such as Peeps and Rice Krispies Treats too. Have your campfire fun with vegan marshmallows made by Dandies or Sweet & Sara; vegetarians can also grab Marshmallow Fluff, which is gelatin-free (but contains dried egg whites). 9. Refried Beans Look out for lard in cans of refried beans, especially traditional versions. Some Mexican restaurants may also use animal fat in their bean and tortilla recipes, so be sure to ask. Luckily, its easy to find vegetarian refried beans cooked in oil. Amys Kitchen and Pacific Foods make a few VT favorites. 10. Worcestershire Sauce You can find a laundry list of ingredients--including anchovies--in this umami-rich condiment added to burgers, barbecue sauces, Bloody Mary cocktails, and more. For equally pungent, veg Worcestershire, try Annies Naturals or The Wizards, or swap in soy sauce. Shop Smart Restocking your kitchen? Follow these pro tips for veg-savvy grocery shopping: Inspect the label Read all ingredients carefully to avoid mix-ups. The same brand may have a veg and a non-veg option of the same type of food, notes Lindsay Nixon, author of The Happy Herbivore Guide to Plant-Based Living. Go natural Change up your supermarket routine. Nixon suggests visiting health food stores for a wider variety of veg-friendly goodies. (And if youre lucky enough to live near an exclusively vegetarian market, hop to it.) Make it yourself Vegetarian versions of sauces can be expensive, says Nixon. A homemade version is a fraction of the cost! Get easy recipes for veg kimchi, Caesar dressing, French onion soup, and more in VT‘s extensive recipe database.

Rhubarb Vanilla Meringue Tart

May 6 2015 seitan is my motor 

Rhubarb Vanilla Meringue TartI am so behind on blogging, it’s embarrassing. My draft folder is full. But there is something that keeps me from posting here. One and a half months ago I took up learning another language. Right now my head is spinning. I am trying to memorise personal pronouns, tense prefixes and suffixes, and weekdays. Before that I spent three weeks learning to trill the r. Which I was never able to do before, and believe me, I tried. But now, with the help of several Youtube videos (especially this and this one), I can do it most of the time if it’s surrounded by some nice vowels. I also learned to read and write. Yes, that is right. I am learning to read and write all over again. Because I left my European comfort zone by taking up an Arabic class. I was always decent at learning languages – except for Latin, but that was because there’s no one to talk to unless you’re friends with the pope – and I guess that’s why I signed up for this new class without thinking twice. Well, it has been challenging. And slow. We learned to read, we’re practicing to write, and we’re doing tons of grammar. My small talk skills are still very lacking. But I guess I should be more patient.  I am getting a general concept of the language and that is very important and useful. It’s something you don’t feel you have at first when everything is written in letters you can’t read. When even the alphabet comes in a completely new order and with several letters you cannot pronounce. And when there’s not a single similarity to any other language you learned before. Because those languages were either related to Latin (Spanish) or Latin and German (English) or German (Norwegian). All of this is very exiting but naturally it steals a lot of time. Time I would normally spent cooking and photographing for this blog. Instead of baking or reading other blogs,  I am now watching Arabic Youtube videos. Last Sunday, when I tried to practice for a dictation exercise, I was reminded that there was about a kilo of rhubarb in our kitchen. And  I had promised to make a cake. But what cake? My brain was toasted, I had no ideas for any kind of recipe. So I looked at my blog and decided to do a simplified version of a rhubarb pie I posted four years ago (wow!). At that time I felt bad for putting the recipe up. It was a delicious cake but it called for an uncommon ingredient: dandelion honey. Rhubarb is such a simple and humble vegetable, so why add something as fancy to the ingredient list of this pie? I probably was just super exited about my little jar of vegan honey. (To be honest, it’s not really fancy. You can make it at home, it’s made from sugar, water, and dandelion flowers.)Whatever, last Sunday I rewrote the recipe. The tart/­­pie is now made with the most accessible ingredients you can think of. It’s a simple recipe, with a very tender, sweet crust and  a tart filling that calls only for a hint of sugar. But there is a little twist to it. I made another batch of marshmallow fluff  for an easy and super sweet and sticky meringue topping. A perfect Sunday treat and some brain food that made learning those letters and prefixes a lot easier. Notes: Refinded coconut oil is very common where I live. If you cannot get it and don’t mind the coconut flavour, use unrefined coconut oil instead. Margarine should work fine, too. To make the marshmallow fluff for this recipe, double the amount of sugar (100 g or 1 cup powdered sugar). You can also omit the fluff and use coconut whipped cream instead, or leave the tart naked. Print Rhubarb Vanilla Meringue Tart IngredientsFor the rhubarb filling 750 g rhubarb, sliced into 1 cm (1/­­2 inch) pieces (6 cups or 1 lb and 10 oz) 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar 1 tablespoon cornstarch For the crust 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 250 g flour (2 cups plus 1/­­2 tablespoon) 200 g (1/­­2 cup) sugar 110 g (1/­­2 cup) soft refined coconut oil, cubed zest of one orange For the custard 240 ml (1 cup) soy milk 30 g (1/­­4 cup) cornstarch 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar For the soft meringue 1 recipe marshmallow fluff made with 100 g (1 cup) powdered sugar InstructionsTo make the filling, combine rhubarb, sugar, and cornstarch. Let sit for about an hour and stir well from time to time. To make the crust, mix salt, flour, and sugar in a bowl. Add coconut oil and orange zest. Mix with your hands and form into a crumbly dough. Make sure the fat is incorporated well and there are no lumps of coconut oil remaining. Grease a springform pan (26-27 cm or 10 inch) with fat. Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F). Pour the dough into the pan. Press into the bottom and the sides of the pan. (Only line about 2.5 cm or 1 inch of the sides with dough. You just want a small border, so the filling doesnt leak.)Set aside. For the custard, combine soy milk, cornstarch, and sugar in a small saucepan. Whisk until the starch is dissolved and bring to a boil. Cook for 1-2 minutes, or until thickened. Pour over the crust. Sprinkle rhubarb on top. Bake for 40 minutes. While the tart is baking, prepare the marshmallow fluff. Transfer to a piping bag with a star tip right before the cake is done. Pipe dollops on top of the tart, increase the temperature to 200°C (400°F) and bake for another 10 minutes, until the meringue is browned. Let cool completely and remove from pan. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­05/­­rhubarb-vanilla-meringue-tart/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com Rhubarb Vanilla Meringue Tart is a post from: seitan is my motor

Vegan Fl?deboller (Soft Marshmallow Treats)

March 27 2015 seitan is my motor 

Vegan Fl?deboller (Soft Marshmallow Treats)Since my last post I have been experimenting a lot with turning chickpea brine into different kinds of egg white based things. All these years there has been a cheap and easy alternative to eggs and egg replacers and most of us didn’t know about it. I still think this is the most amazing food and baking related thing I ever heard about. So while I was determined to come up with a vegan macaron recipe, a couple of my German readers asked for a recipe for schokokuesse (chocolate kisses). And yes, why not? A schokokuss is a pile of marshmallow fluff or soft (unbaked) meringue that sits on a thin wafer and is covered in chocolate. They are similar to mallomars, but taller, looking like a bowler hat without the rim. In Denmark a very similar treat is called fl?deboller (cream buns). The meringue or marshmallow fluff is piped onto a cookie or a disk of marzipan and then covered in chocolate. In Germany schokokuesse are very popular for children’s birthday parties, where they are used for eating contests: The kids are not allowed to use their hands while eating a schokokuss and the person who eats the fastest wins. The best part of this being the kid’s pictures, of course. If you have never had a schokokuss or a fl?debolle I must warn you though. When I ate one yesterday I was remembered how sweet and rich they are. Even though I have a massive sweet tooth I can’t eat more than one at a time. That’s why I decided to keep the yield reasonable here. The recipe makes about 7-8 schokokuesse, which can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for a maximum of two days. Although these meringue treats are usually made with gelatin, I based my recipe on a version that did not call for a gelling agent. It is easier this way but since I was working with chickpea brine instead of egg whites, the result wasn’t as stiff and mousse like as the omni version. They do keep their shape perfectly but the texture of these vegan schokokuesse is a bit softer. It’s like whipped cream that is not perfectly stiff yet. To me it was close enough though, especially because they taste exactly like an egg white and gelatin based version – as far as I can remember. And F can confirm that these treats are perfect for any kind of birthday party eating contest: “Mum, if you eat this, the filling squeezes out and it’s all over your face!” Yup, quite true.    A couple of notes: Usually schokokuesse are made with thin round wafers. I didn’t have those on hand, so I used baking wafers with a diameter of 50 mm. If you cannot find those, you can use any kind of thin wafer or cookie as an alternative. This recipe uses hot sugar syrup that is poured into the chickpea meringue. Use heatproof equipment (bowl and whisk attachments) and work very carefully so that you don’t burn yourself. I used a handheld mixer for this but if you have a stand mixer, go for it, it’s probably better. Print Vegan Fl?deboller (Soft Marshmallow Treats) 7-8 marshmallow treats Ingredients60 ml (1/­­4 cup) chickpea brine from a can 1/­­4 teaspoon guar gum 1/­­8 teaspoon cream of tartar or 1/­­2 teaspoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon vanilla extract or 1/­­8 teaspoon ground vanilla 125 g (1/­­2 cup plus 2 tablespoons) sugar 1 tablespoon water 7-8 baking wafers or thin round cookies 150 g (5.3 oz) dark chocolate 1 tablespoon refined coconut oil InstructionsTo make the filling, combine chickpea brine and guar gum in a tall and narrow heatproof bowl and whip with a handheld blender for 2 minutes. Add cream of tartar or lemon juice and vanilla and whip for another 5 minutes or until them mixture is very stiff. Set aside. Combine sugar and water in a small pot and slowly bring to a boil, while stirring constantly. Cook into a syrup over high heat for 3-4 minutes. Remove from heat Briefly whip the chickpea mixture up again. Now carefully pour the hot sugar syrup in while still whipping. Make sure your bowl is very steady and take care not to burn yourself. (If you have a stand mixer its probably better for this step than a handheld one.) Whip until everything is well combined. Place 7-8 baking wafers or thin cookies (about 50 mm in diameter) on a piece of parchment paper. Scoop the meringue mixture into a pastry bag fitted with a star tip and pipe a generous amount on top of a wafer. (see picture) To make the chocolate coating, finely chop the chocolate. Combine with the coconut oil and melt in a water bath. Use a spoon to pour the chocolate over the marshmallow treats. Make sure not to miss a spot. Let rest for 5 minutes then use a dipping fork or a very thin spatula to transfer to a cookie rack. Move every 10 minutes or so so that the chocolate doesnt stick to the rack. Let dry completely.3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­03/­­vegan-floedeboller-schokokuesse/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com P.S. Charis from Floral Frosting came up with an amazing looking recipe for vegan macarons. Check it out here! Vegan Fl?deboller (Soft Marshmallow Treats) is a post from: seitan is my motor

Top Tips For Volcano Hiking Vegans

December 17 2014 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Guatemala is an outdoor adventurer’s paradise. There are over 30 volcanos dotted around the countrys rugged highlands, some of which are active. Marshmallow roasting on molten hot lava is permitted […]

Birkeskage {Danish Poppy Seed Cake}

September 10 2015 seitan is my motor 

Birkeskage {Danish Poppy Seed Cake}Thank you, Vegan Month of Food, for giving me the opportunity to put another recipe with poppy seeds on my blog! Poppy seeds are blue and that is today’s Vegan MoFo promt. And I cannot tell you how much I love poppy seeds. I love them so much that I’ll scoff at those lemon poppy seed muffins you probably like, because they don’t contain more than homeopathic doses of my favourite seeds. I am going for 100 % poppy seeds instead! This recipe is from a Danish baking book I bought while visiting Copenhagen (maybe two years ago?). The book was bigger and heavier than a luxury edition of the bible. That and the pretty pictures lured me into buying it. Bagebog by Claus Meyer has a lot of interesting recipes, and while some of them might be considered as Danish or at least Scandinavian, most seem to be international. So I am not sure about the authenticity of this birkeskage. Something similar might be served to you in many Eastern European countries, and even in German bakeries you can find Mohnkuchen varieties. I am still calling it Danish because it’s from a Danish book written in Danish! Smart, hm? The original recipe called for 4 eggs but those were easily replaced by both soy yoghurt and aquafaba. I made some more alterations, so that new recipe doesn’t have very much to do with the original version anymore. I have never tasted the original, obviously. But my version is a wonderfully moist and aromatic poppy seed cake with a delicate shortbread crust. Print Birgeskage {Danish Poppy Seed Cake} IngredientsFor the crust 80 g (1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons) refined coconut oil (softened) 2 tablespoons sugar 150 g (1 1/­­4 cups) all-purpose flour For the topping 80 g (1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons) refined coconut oil, softened 175 g (3/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons) sugar, divided 120 g (1/­­2 cup) sweetened soy yoghurt 180 g (1 1/­­4 cup) ground poppy seeds (Grind them in a small coffee mill. Make sure the mill is suitable for grinding oily seeds.) 45 g (1/­­4 cup) semolina 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) chickpea brine from a can juice from half a small lime InstructionsPreheat the oven to 180°C (350°F). Grease a rectangular pan (18 x 28 cm or 7 x 11 inch) and set aside. To make the crust, beat coconut oil and sugar until light and fluffy. Add sugar and mix until a crumbly dough forms. Make sure the fat is incorporated completely. Press the dough into the pan and place in the fridge. To make the topping, beat the coconut oil and 125 g sugar (1/­­2 cup plus 2 tablespoons) until fluffy. Add yoghurt, poppy seeds, and semolina and beat until smooth. Combine chickpea brine, remaining 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar, and lime juice in a second bowl. Beat until stiff peaks form. (I use a handheld blender. It takes about 5 minutes with this one, but beating time can be longer or shorter.) Fold the chickpea brine mixture into the poppy seed mixture until everything is smooth. Remove the pan from the fridge and pour topping over the crust. Smooth down the topping and bake for 45 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool completely before serving. This cake tastes best straight from the fridge where you can store it for several days. NotesAdapted from a recipe in Claus Meyers Bagebog. (Birkeskage, p. 246.) Lindhardt og Rindhof 2012 (K?benhavn). 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­09/­­birkeskage-danish-poppy-seed-cake/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com By the way, I did not skip yesterday’s promt “most retro recipe”. I made something and posted it on Instagram! I chose westfaelische Quarkspeise, which is a dessert made with German (or westfalian) Pumpernickel. Pumpernickel is a popular bread in the North of Germany. Most traditional versions are flourless and very different from what you might be used to in Northern America. It’s made with sourdough starter and whole rye berries or cracked rye, salt and water. That’s it. No molasses or sugar. It’s baked at a very low temperature for a very long time (around 24 hours). That way all the sugar present in the wheat berries caramelises and gives this rye bread the dark brown colour and a slightly sweet taste. Pumpernickel has a very unique texture that is chewy and al dente and still it melts in your mouth. Using the bread for desserts is super retro to me. These days it cannot compete with chia seeds, goji berries, or quinoa. Westfälische quarkspeise is a layered dessert made with toasted pumpernickel crumbs, chocolate shavings, quark (a cream cheese like curd cheese), and canned cherries. I used an online recipe and cheated big time when it came to the quark. But my version with whipped soy cream was just as good and since I also added some Kirschwasser, it was almost like a quick Black Forest dessert, especially since the pumpernickel goes just as well with cherries as chocolate!    

Coconut Raspberry Cupcakes and Raspberry Meringues

June 29 2015 seitan is my motor 

Coconut Raspberry Cupcakes and Raspberry Meringues Are cupcakes still a thing? Of course they are, especially during summer. I admit that mine do not look perfectly elegant and that is because I overfilled the tins out of lazyness. (And yeah, my piping skills could be better.) I had pulled a muffin pan for six muffins out of my huge collection of baking pans and didn’t want to go looking for a second one. If I had, I probably would have gotten eight servings out of this recipe. But if there can be jumbo muffins there can also be jumbo cupcakes, right? And I tried very hard to replace some elegance by adding meringues to these treats. Vegan meringues. I know, you’ve all heard the story by now. But probably not your non-vegan friends and aquaintances. Serve these raspberry flavoured meringues to everybody who’s going to tell you how vegans have to make so many food sacrifices. The meringue recipe is based on my vegan marshmallow fluff. But the idea to make meringues is one I got from révolution végétale and the vegan meringue facebook group. It’s best to prepare the meringues a day in advance for better time management. Keep them stored in an airtight container. They get sticky fast once they are exposed to air. The topping for these cupcakes is a whipped coconut cream topping. So while you are making the meringues, place a can of coconut milk in the fridge. Print Coconut Raspberry Cupcakes and Raspberry Meringues IngredientsFor the raspberries 150 g (1 1/­­2 cups) frozen or fresh raspberries For the meringues 60 ml (1/­­2 cup) chickpea brine from a can of chickpeas (aquafaba) 1/­­2 tablespoon guar or xanthan gum 50 g (1/­­2 cup) powdered sugar 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1 tablespoon raspberry juice (see recipe instructions) For the cupcakes 150 g (1 1/­­4 cup) all-purpose flour 30 g (1/­­4 cup) shredded, dried coconut 1 1/­­2 teaspoons baking powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 125g (1/­­2 cup plus 2 tablespoons) brown sugar 120 (1/­­2 cup) coconut milk* 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) vegetable oil 60 g (1/­­4 cup) cooked raspberries, drained (see recipe instructions) For the cupcake topping Coconut cream (the solid fat) scooped out from one 400 ml (14 oz) can of coconut milk** 1 tablespoon powdered sugar, or more to taste 1/­­2 - 1 tablespoon raspberry juice remaining coocked raspberries for garnish InstructionsTo make the cooked rasberries, place berries in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat and let cool completely. Reserve both the fruit and juice and store in the fridge. To make the meringues, preheat the oven to 100°C (212°F). Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. In a large bowl, combine chickpea brine and guar or xanthan gum. Whip for two minutes using a handheld mixer. Add sugar and raspberry juice and whip until very stiff. The fluff should keep its form so you can pipe it easily. This may take up to 10 minutes. Fill the fluff into a pastry bag with a star tip and pipe about 2 cm (1 inch) large (or larger) meringues onto the sheet. They wont spread so you can put them relatively close together. Bake 1 sheet at a time for 1 1/­­4 to 1 1/­­2 hours. Baking time can vary a lot, start checking on your meringues after 1 hour. If you went for larger meringues they might take up to 2 hours. They are done when completely dry. Make sure they dont start to brown. Let cool completely and store in an airtight container. To make the cupcakes, preheat oven to 180°C (350°F) and line 6 muffin tins with liners. Combine flour, shredded coconut, baking powder and salt in a large bowl. Stir to combine. Combine sugar, coconut milk, and oil in a second bowl and whisk to combine. Add to the dry ingredients and mix until all lumps are gone. Fold in cooked raspberries and fill into muffin tins. Bake for 30 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean. To make the topping, scoop out the coconut cream that has solidified at the top of the can and place it in a bowl. Add powdered sugar and whip on high spead until fluffy, for about three minutes. Add raspberry juice and whip again. (You can also fold the juice in right after whipping, and dont mix the cream and the juice completely. This makes for a nice pattern.) Place the coconut cream in a piping bag with a star tip and pipe onto your cupcakes. Decorate with cooked raspberries and meringues. Serve immediately. Notes*You can also use the liquid from your chilled can of coconut milk: Scoop out the coconut cream and place it back in the fridge. Then measure out 1/­­2 cup of the clear liquid and use insteead of coconut milk. **Place a 400 ml (14 oz) can of coconut milk in the fridge. Chill it for at least 8 hours, preferably more. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­06/­­coconut-raspberry-cupcakes-and-raspberry-meringues/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com   Coconut Raspberry Cupcakes and Raspberry Meringues is a post from: seitan is my motor

Rhubarb is the New Strawberry {Rhubarb Ice Cream}

June 9 2015 seitan is my motor 

Rhubarb is the New Strawberry {Rhubarb Ice Cream} Last year, when my father visited us in Dresden, he brought a box of strawberries from a grocery store around the corner. “Those aren’t good. You should not buy them,” I said. He tasted a berry and replied that they weren’t too bad. “But they are terrible compared to those we can get at home in our village!” I guess ten kilograms of childhood memories came out with that sentence. When we were children my dad would buy fresh strawberries on Sundays. Sometimes we helped him wash and slice them, sometimes he would even let us whip the cream. Nothing was better than those fresh strawberries. We ate them straight from the plant if we got the chance. For example during our bike rides, when we picked some at the edge of a field. Or when we emptied the patches in our neighbour’s garden. All these memories came back when I told my father that the strawberries here in the city weren’t good. He disagreed. He told me that the fruits back home weren’t that much better anymore. He even thought they were worse. I didn’t believe a word of what he said. That simply couldn’t be true. During this years Pentecost vacation F and I made a trip to my parents’ place. My father picked us up from the main station in Bremen. On our car ride to my parents’ village, we drove by several strawberry fields. I got exited and mentioned something about eating them for breakfast every day. My father said I should probably find something else to eat. They had changed the breed a couple of years ago, he elaborated. Those berries weren’t worth the trouble anymore. Yes, they kept well but most of the flavour was gone. Why would he say that? Some weird berry conspiracy theory? Did he not remember how we all loved to eat strawberries together? That he always would pick them up for us? The next day F and I prepared lunch. Suddenly my father stepped into the kitchen with a box of strawberries in his hand. I smiled. I told F that this would make such a wonderful dessert. Then I looked at the strawberries. They looked vary pale. I  asked my father, “Why did you bring these? Were the good ones sold out?” “No,” he replied. “They do all look like that now. I thought that if you tasted them you would finally believe me.” I was still in denial. I gave one to my daughter. “Taste it! The best strawberries you can get.” She tasted and then looked at me disgusted. I said: “But those are good.” It wasn’t true. I didn’t believe what I just said. I think I just wanted to share an important childhood memory with my daughter. But there was nothing to share. I was disappointed and those strawberries were just pale, sour, and watery. Okay, okay. Maybe this is all in my head. Maybe I am turning into one of these “everything was better in the old days” person now. Or maybe it was just the beginning of the season and I need to give those strawberries some more time to grow. There are other childhood memories to share or to improve. Like my relationship with rhubarb. This vegetable/­­fruit was something I mostly ignored when I was a kid. At least when it came to baked goods.  Our neighbours made tons of rhubarb cakes and many grown ups tried to trick me into liking it. They pretended it was great in desserts. They pretended it was sweet. But it wasn’t. There was never enough sugar in those cakes and a kilogram of whipped cream could not change that. Back then I thought those neighours wanted us to give up our sweet tooth. But that wasn’t true. Nobody tricked us. Rhubarb was something we did not appreciate very much.  We spent our afternoons stuffing our face with strawberries instead. Now that those strawberries are disenchanted I can finally appreciate the tartness of rhubarb. It’s now my daughter who refuses to eat it. But you can make very sugary things from rhubarb, too. Sugar can be used as a preservative, for example in jams. Or syrups.They are very simple to make and they can be kept in the fridge for 1 or 2 weeks. I made a batch for my ice cream recipe, but it’s also a base for refreshing lemonade. (Simply dillute it with (sparkling) water.) If you want something tarter, rhubarb compote is a great choice, depending on how much sugar you add. For my ice cream I didn’t use too much sugar, but if you want to pair the compote with oatmeal or grießpudding, you can double the amount of sugar used. Just adjust it to your taste. There are a couple of wonderful methods to make vegan ice cream, but I like to try something new from time to time. I admit it’s definitely not the easiest and fastest method to make ice cream. But I’ll also talk about a couple of  shortcuts in a minute. This version calls for whipped chickpea brine (called aquafaba), which improves the texture a lot and makes the ice cream light and easy to scoop. In fact, even after over a week in the freezer, this batch still had a consistency similar to soft serve. Since we’re  without an ice cream machine rightn now, I used my blender method for this recipe. That is a bit involved, but it will produce similar results to ice cream from a machine. If you thing this all sounds to complicated, I have a couple of ideas for you: You can leave out the aquafaba and make this into a “regular” coconut based ice cream. You can also use an ice cream machine, if you have one. If you wanto to use a machine and include the whipped aquafaba, churn the coconut milk and syrup mixture  and fold in the whipped chickpea liquid once the machine is done. Then proceed to freeze it, add the compote, and freeze until solid. If you don’t have an ice cream machine or a blender, make a simple semifreddo by combining the coconut milk and syrup mixture and the compote. Pour it into a container and freeze it until solid. Instead of scooping it out, you can slice it for serving. Another tip is to split up the workload and prepare both the syrup and the compote a day in advance. Print Rhubarb Ice Cream Ingredientsrhubarb syrup recipe only very slightly adapted from this recipe - For the syrup 500 g (4 cups) sliced rhubarb 240 ml (2 cups) water 250 g (1 1/­­4 cups) sugar juice from 1/­­2 lemon vanilla seeds scraped from 1 bean For the compote 200 g (1 2/­­3 cups) sliced rhubarb 100 g (1/­­2 cup) sugar For the ice cream 1 400 ml can full-fat coconut milk 2 tablespoons melted coconut oil or canola oil 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar 240 ml (1 cup) rhubarb syrup (see above) 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) brine from a can of chickpeas 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar a splash of lemon juice 1/­­2 a batch of rhubarb compote (see above) InstructionsTo make the syrup, combine sliced rhubarb and water in a small pot. Bring to a boil and cook until the rhubarb falls apart, about 5-10 minutes. Strain the liquid through a fine sieve and pour back into the (cleaned!) pot. (Discard the rhubarb pulp left in the sieve.) Add sugar, lemon juice, and vanilla. Boil for 10 minutes and make sure the mixture doesnt boil over. Let cool and pour into a sterilized jar. (Store leftovers in the fridge for up to two weeks.) To make the compote, combine rhubarb and sugar in a small pot and bring to a boil. Cook until the rhubarb falls apart. Set aside and let cool completely. To make the ice cream, combine coconut milk, oil, and sugar in a bowl and whisk. Add syrup and whisk again. Transfer to a shallow container such as a brownie pan and place in the freezer. Freeze for 2-3 hours, or until mostly solid. Once the coconut milk mixture is frozen, combine the chickpea brine and the remaining sugar. Whip the mixture with a hand held mixer or in a stand mixer until very stiff. This may take up to 10 minutes. You can add a splash of lemon juice to speed up the process. Cut the frozen coconut milk mixture into smaller pieces and transfer to a high speed blender. Blend until it has the consistency of soft serve. Pour into the chickpea fluff and fold the fluff into the coconut mixture until everything is smooth. Make sure to do this slowly and carefully. You dont want the chickpea foam to collapse too much. Pour into a container and freeze for another 2-3 hours. Fold in the rhubarb compote and freeze until solid. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­06/­­vegan-rhubarb-ice-cream/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com Rhubarb is the New Strawberry {Rhubarb Ice Cream} is a post from: seitan is my motor

Homemade Vegan Marshmallows

April 3 2015 seitan is my motor 

Homemade Vegan MarshmallowsIt’s been eight years now since I went vegan. It’s also been eight years since I started this blog. That is a reason to celebrate, don’t you think? But technically I am not even allowed to dance today. I am going to do it anyway. And eating a ton of these soft, fluffy, and sticky blog anniversary celebration marshmallows that melt the moment I pop them into my mouth. (After eight years I am allowed to use these clichés, don’t you think?) Anniversary miracle! Oh, wait. This is not a miracle. I cannot claim much of this idea for myself: The recipe is based on chickpea brine used ass egg replacer. I found that idea here. I honestly would not have thought that it would be possible to follow a regular marshmallow recipe and simply replace the eggs with chickpea brine and the gelatin with agar. But it worked and so I used David Lebovitz’s recipe and modified it slightly. I also got a lot of helpful tips from this recipe for vegan marshmallows, especially the idea to boil the agar before adding it to the remaining ingredients. (Gelatin is usually soaked but not boiled.) I have not had many marshmallows in my life. I do like to buy a package of Dandies from time to time though and when I compare my version to the storebought one, the biggest difference is that mine are softer and stickier. But in a good way. They have a light mousse like texture. And still you can cut them into all kinds of shapes. If you have some egg or bunny cutters around, these would make some gorgeous Easter treats as well! And you can toast them. A couple of recipe notes: 1. For this recipe you have to work with hot sugar syrup. Make sure all your equipment is heat proof. I only have a handheld mixer, but a stand mixer would be easier to work with. The recipe is a bit involved and you have to do a couple of things at the same time, so make sure you have everything in place. If you are new to baking and cooking maybe ask somebody to help you. 2. This recipe calls for syrup. I used a flavoured sugar syrup that is a mixture of inverted sugar syrup and glucose syrup. Golden syrup (lys sirup in Scandinavia) or light corn syrup should be fine, too. 3. I use my homemade vanilla sugar for flavouring. You can replace it with regular powdered sugar and a teaspoon of vanilla extract. Print Homemade Vegan Marshmallows IngredientsFor the marshmallows 120 ml (1/­­2 cup) plus 80 ml (1/­­3 cup) water 1 1/­­4 teaspoon agar powder 200 g (1 cup) sugar 100 g (1/­­3 cup) syrup (see notes above) 120 ml (1/­­2 cup) chickpea brine from a can 1/­­2 teaspoon guar gum 1/­­8 teaspoon cream of tartar or 1/­­2 teaspoon lemon juice 1 tablespoon homemade vanilla sugar (see note above) or powdered sugar plus 1 teaspoon vanilla extract For dusting 50 g (1/­­2 cup) powdered sugar 60 g (1/­­2 cup) corn starch InstructionsPlace 120 ml (1/­­2 cup) of water in a small saucepan and add agar powder. Dissolve and set aside. Combine sugar, syrup, and remaining water in another small saucepan fitted with a candy thermometer. Bring to a boil and cook for about 6 minutes over medium high heat until the mixture reaches 100°C (210°F). Bring the agar mixture to a boil at the same time, cook for one minute while stirring and remove from heat. While the syrup is still boiling combine chickpea brine, guar gum, and cream of tartar in a heatproof bowl. Beat for about two minutes, then add vanilla sugar (or powdered sugar and vanilla extract) and beat for another two minutes or until the mixture is very stiff. Very carefully pour the hot syrup into the chickpea brine mixture while still beating. Dont worry if your mixture deflates and liquefies. Continue to beat for two minutes until everything is mixed well. Add agar mixture and beat for another five minutes or until the bowl has cooled down. This step is important as you can beat in some more air and improve the texture. Sift together powdered sugar and starch. Dust a rectangular pan (18 x 28 cm or 7 x 11 inch - alternatively use a 8 x 8 inch square pan) with half of the starch and sugar mixture. Make sure the whole bottom is covered. Carefully pour the marshmallow mixture into the pan. Let cool for two hours (at room temperature) or until set. Cover with starch and sugar mixture and cut into small squares or use your favourite cookie cutter. Roll in starch and sugar again to avoid stickyness. Store in an airtight container. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­04/­­homemade-vegan-marshmallows/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com Homemade Vegan Marshmallows is a post from: seitan is my motor

Vegan Marshmallow Fluff from Chickpeas!

March 15 2015 seitan is my motor 

Vegan Marshmallow Fluff from Chickpeas!Vegan cuisine is very innovative. Sure, some people might say that if you try to recreate a vegan version of every animal product based food there is, that is not innovative. But it is, because so many people come up with the most mind blowing techniques or very unexpected ingredients to create these “fake” foods. And we must admit that they are often so much more amazing than the “real” thing. Last year a blogger posted a way to make a vegan version of beaten egg whites that works perfectly for all kinds of meringues. And the most fascinating thing is, they used brine from a can of beans or hearts of palm as a base for their recipe. And if you think about it, it makes sense. During the cooking process beans release starches and proteins. These compounds form a stiff and stable foam that rises to the top of the cooking liquid. The brine has starches and proteins, too. If you combine this liquid with sugar, the two ingredients act exactly like and egg white sugar mixture: The protein is turned into a foam and the sugar traps and stabilises the air bubbles. This is the easiest and most widely available method to make vegan egg white foams and it has been all over the internet for the last couple of weeks. Somebody already came up with a recipe for macarons and meringues have been popping up, too. People are very exited about this invention and trying it out like crazy. It’s amazing how innovative, adventurous and creative people have been over the last few weeks. I hopped on this train quite late, I saw a picture on instagram and then a link here and there. I didn’t do much research exept for reading that French blog post and I have been experimenting for two days now. I came up with my own versions of meringues and macarons and I plan to share them soon. (I posted a preliminary recipe for the macarons on facebook, but it’s not perfect yet.) But since both recipes are a bit tricky, let’s start with something foolproof here, that will totally win you over: marshmallow fluff made from chickpea brine. And no, it doesn’t taste like beans once you have whipped it up with sugar and vanilla. The picture above shows a basic foam, made from chickpea brine drained from a can and and powdered sugar only. I made a first attempt at meringues with this and it didn’t work out because the foam was too runny to pipe. Only later I learned that you just need to whip longer. I whipped for about 2 minutes when 10 would have been more appropriate. But impatience is sometimes a good thing. The blogger behind révolution végétale mentions two ingredients that will help stabilise your foam: guar gum and cream of tartar. Cream of tartar is often used in angel food cake and in meringue preparations. It helps to give more volume to regular egg white foams. Guar gum is a binder. Like xanthan gum it is often used in gluten free baking. You can also add it to ice creams to make them smoother. If you’ve ever worked with guar or xanthan gum you know that if you add too much, it will turn our slimy and gum like. For this recipe, the gum like texture is perfect as the gum will speed up the whipping process and change the texture of your foam greatly once the sugar is added. It changes from soft peaks to stiff peaks in a minute or so. Note that you cannot substitute cornstarch, agar agar, or tapioca starch here. Those have to be heated to swell and bind, while guar gum will swell once it’s combined with a liquid. Cornstarch or agar agar will do nothing to change the texture of your foam at this point. This bean fluff has a very firm but sticky consistency, just like melted marshmallows or marshmallow creme. The only downside:  It will probably creep up your beaters and stick to the mixer. It’s ean with a wet cloth, so I personally didn’t worry about it. Use  for ‘Smore pies, as a cookie filling or try some rice crispy treats. I used it as a base for my meringues, so stay tuned! If you are looking for a more delicate version you can put on top of pies, I suggest to leave out the guar gum and simply whip your foam until you have reached the desired consistency. Print Vegan Marshmallow Fluff Use this marshmallow fluff for Smore pies or as a cookie filling. Its also the base for my upcoming vegan meringue recipe, so stay tuned! Ingredients120 ml (1/­­2 cup) chickpea brine, drained from a can of chickpeas 1/­­2 tsp guar gum 1/­­8 tsp cream of tartar 50 g (1/­­2 cup) powdered sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla InstructionsCombine brine, guar gum, and cream of tartar in a large bowl. Beat with a handheld mixer for two minutes, until the mixture resembles lightly beaten egg whites. (See first picture) Add powdered sugar and vanilla and beat on high for five minutes, until the mixture is stiff and sticky. Transfer to a jar. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­03/­­vegan-marshmallow-fluff-from-chickpeas/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com Vegan Marshmallow Fluff from Chickpeas! is a post from: seitan is my motor


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