main course - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!










main course vegetarian recipes

Blossom – New York

August 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Blossom Restaurant has two locations in New York — one in Chelsea and one on the Upper West Side. We have visited the Chelsea twice! It is just around the corner from the beautiful High Line Park, which is truly a beautiful site! After a walk through the park, where I really really enjoyed all the beautiful flowers (very good job done by Piet Oudolf, the Dutch designer of the garden), we stumbled upon Blossom Restaurant by accident. We recognized the name while driving by in a yellow cab. So we asked the driver to stop and we went in for lunch. Not knowing the size of the portions, we ordered an entree. But after seeing the size of the salad we knew that we had ordered way too much! It was a very nice salad and the main course was even better. I had a wonderful portobello burger which I truly enjoyed. There is an easy going vibe at Blossom Restaurant and the menu is entirely vegan. For cautious carnivores, Blossom Restaurant offers one big surprise: all the eggless pastas and mock meats actually taste pretty good! For those who miss the taste of meat (I am not […] The post Blossom – New York appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday

May 15 2017 Meatless Monday 

Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday   The global travels of Master Chef Jean-Christian Jury inspired him to write the ultimate kitchen companion on vegan cooking, Vegan: The Cookbook. It features 450 delicious recipes from more than 150 countries. But before Jean-Christian delved into the world of vegan cuisine, he received a startling wakeup call - a heart failure, twice. Years of running several restaurants at the same time, 16-hour work days and a poor diet had finally caught up with the French-born chef. After a few months of recovery, he visited a detox center that specialized in healthy food, fresh smoothies and juices. This enlightening experience transformed his diet and lifestyle. Interestingly, this is the same idea behind Meatless Monday - eating plant-based foods to improve your health. By choosing not to eat meat just one day a week, you reduce your risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity and cancer.   Vegan: The Cookbook - for vegans, non-vegans and omnivores Jean-Christian promotes vegan foods, cooked with fresh ingredients, as a way to keep healthy, age gracefully and prevent many common diseases. His new cookbook offers recipes to satisfy all tastes, representing the cuisines of France, Greece, Italy, Vietnam, China and India. In addition, he explores less familiar fare, such as flavorful dishes from Timor and Papua New Guinea. There is no reason why vegan food cant be as delicious as non-plant-based cuisine. International Master Chef Jean-Christian Jury In 2007, Jean-Christian Jury opened his first vegan restaurant, La Mano Verde, in Berlin, Germany. He received an award for Best Vegan Restaurant on the Planet and was listed as one of Germanys 500 Best Restaurants (Der Feinschmecker 2015-2016).   Expert Guidance, Step by Step For his new cookbook, Jean-Christian specifically crafted his recipes for accuracy and ease of use. He intentionally selected ingredients that are readily available and provides simple step-by-step instructions as well as prep time and cooking time. To help you plan your meal, his book is neatly organized into chapters that cover Starters, Salads, Soups, Main Courses, Grains and Beans, Pasta and Noodles, and Desserts.   Get a Taste of Jean-Christian Jurys New Recipes To whet your appetite, heres a delectable sampler of five recipes found in the Vegan: The Cookbook. Go on and pick your favorite. At Meatless Monday, heres the one we cant wait to try.   Five-Spice Stir-Fried Soba Noodles The post Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sweet & Smoky Glazed Tofu Ham

December 21 2016 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Sweet & Smoky Glazed Tofu Ham Have you gone mad? Dont put an adorable pig at the center of your table! Put an adorable block of tofu instead! This is a sassy take on ham that will definitely bring smiles (or at least curious side glances) to your guests faces. Its also, as the title suggests, sweet and smoky and elegant in a 70s kind of way, with notes of orange and maple. Its easy to double the recipe, or even triple, if this will be your main course. There were a couple of times when writing Superfun Times Vegan Holiday Cookbook that I had to call on friends for help, and this recipe was one of them. Since I didn’t grow up eating ham (you guys, I’m JEWISH!), I wanted to make sure I got it right. Luckily, Joni Newman was able to help develop this little guy into a real crowd pleaser. Thanks, Joni! This is in the Easter section of the cookbook, but it would be great as a Christmas centerpiece, or even Hannukah!

Cauliflower Steaks with Mushroom Gravy

December 14 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Thick roasted cauliflower slabs are smothered in porcini mushroom gravy to create this satisfying and umami-packed vegan main course.

Stock Your Pantry with Plant-Based Protein

January 25 2016 Meatless Monday 

Stock Your Pantry with Plant-Based ProteinGearing up to go meatless on Mondays? Keep your kitchen and pantry stocked with plant-based foods that are rich in protein and flavor! When folks start eating meatless once a week, many wonder where they can get enough protein to stay healthy. The truth is, plants (especially pulses) are full of protein, and with just a little planning you can get all the nutrients you need from plant-based foods! Here are some of the most popular plant-based sources of proteins that Meatless Monday diners love. Lentils Nutrition: 1 cup = 18g protein Lentils are a protein powerhouse: 9 grams of protein in just half a cup! But protein is only part of the picture for lentils; these pulses add a significant serving of fiber, folate, iron, and potassium to your meal. Dried, canned, or pre-cooked, lentils are an essential in any pantry. Lentil Recipes for Meatless Monday: Breakfast Lentils, Lazy Lentil Soup, Lentil Balls with Riata Hemp Seeds Nutrition: 3 tablespoons = roughly 10g protein Far from a simple garnish, hemp seeds add protein to any meal and contain heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Whether sprinkled on salads, stirred into smoothies or blended in soups, hemp seeds at a mild sweet or nutty flavor to meals. Hemp Seed Recipes for Meatless Monday: Mushroom Hemp Tartlets, Blueberry Brainiac Smoothie Chia Seeds Nutrition: 2 tablespoons = 4g protein Chia seeds are a sprinkle-able, stir-able, drinkable source of protein with simple instructions: just add water! Soaking your chia seeds allows them to absorb water and produce their iconic soluble-fiber- rich gel. These seeds and the gel they produce also make an excellent thickening agent in cooking. Chia Seed Recipes for Meatless Monday: Chocolate Banana Smoothie, Blueberry Apple Porridge Quinoa Nutrition: 1/­­2 cup = 7-9g protein A perfect protein-rich replacement for rice, quinoa has recently become a popular meatless main course ingredient and stand-alone side dish. Quinoa is packed with full of fiber, iron, magnesium, and manganese, and makes a very nutritious addition to your menu. Quinoa Recipes for Meatless Monday: Black Quinoa, Farro & Rice Salad with Radishes, Quinoa Stuffed Bell Peppers, Supreme Crispy Quinoa Vegetable Burgers Quinoa Nuts and Nut Butters Nutrition: 1/­­4 cup = about 7-9g protein Peanuts, almonds, cashews, and more – nut butters are perhaps the easiest way to add a dollop of protein and healthy fats to your diet. Nut butters go way beyond the traditional PB&J; spread it on whole grain toast, add a spoonful to soups or sauces, or just enjoy a spoonful on its own! Nut Recipes for Meatless Monday: Spicy Peanut Chutney, Thai Fresh Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce Beans (Like Black Beans, Kidney Beans, and Cannellini Beans) Nutrition: 1 cup = about 15g protein One of the best-known plant-based protein sources, beans are versatile and can be very easy to prepare. In addition to the protein they bring to your plate, beans also offer a heaping helping of fiber and flavor. Bean Recipes for Meatless Monday: Italian White Beans with Kale, Mashed Plantain with Red Beans Seitan Nutrition: 1 cup = 40g protein Nicknamed “wheat meat,” seitan is made of wheat gluten and has a chewy, meaty texture when cooked. It’s know for its ability to soak up the flavors of the other foods, seasonings, and sauces it is cooked with. Seitan Recipes for Meatless Monday: Seitan-Cashew Blanquette, Seitan with Mushroom Gravy, Smoked Spicy Seitan Chili Tempeh Nutrition: 1 cup = 22g protein This meatless protein source is made of fermented soy beans, and has a nutty, sweet flavor on its own. Like tofu and seitan it absorbs flavors well, but tempeh has a firmer consistency that makes grilling and searing ideal cooking options. Tempeh Recipes for Meatless Monday: Sesame Tempeh with Green Beans, Tempeh Fried Brown Rice, Thai Tempeh Tacos Tofu Nutrition: 1 cup = 14g protein Spongy, versatile tofu is one of the most popular meatless protein-rich foods. Made from soybean curds, tofu can be silky soft or extra firm, and can be grilled, fried, baked, steamed, sautéed, or even eaten raw. Tofu Recipes for Meatless Monday: Curried Tofu Egg Salad With Almonds, Korean BBQ Tofu Tacos, Asian Noodles with Tofu and Almonds The post Stock Your Pantry with Plant-Based Protein appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The New Vegetarian’s Guide to a Happy Thanksgiving

November 23 2015 Vegetarian Times 

The New Vegetarian’s Guide to a Happy Thanksgiving How to keep the peace between the omnivores and vegetarians at your holiday table Heading home for Thanksgiving as a newbie vegetarian? No need to fear the meat-eaters. Here, seasoned vegetarians offer dos and donts, answers for the silly (and serious) questions you may get from family and friends, tips for veg makeovers of traditional family dishes, and suggestions for main dishes even omnivores will love. Gene Baur Farm Sanctuary president and co-founder Gene Baur, a vegan, marks 1986 as his most memorable Thanksgiving, because that was the year he started celebrating the holiday by saving turkeys from slaughter. It was a way to turn a violent tradition into a more compassionate one, says Baur. One of the highlights that first year was an iconic picture taken as Clyde, our rescued turkey, poked his head into the oven as we were pulling out the main course, a stuffed squash. Q: What are your favorite Thanksgiving dishes? A: I love many of the plant-based side dishes commonly served at Thanksgiving, including potatoes, cornbread, stuffing, beets, veggies, corn, beans, and squash. My new book, Living the Farm Sanctuary Life, includes some Thanksgiving table-worthy recipes, like roasted-root salad and roasted asparagus with preserved lemon and crispy capers. Q: Do you have traditional dishes that you have remade veg? A: Yes, I have actually created a new dish by combining scrambled tofu with stuffing. The spices and veggies of each dish are complementary, and the heavier tofu and lighter stuffing balance each other out nicely. Q: What question are you most often asked about your diet and how do you respond? A: Where do you get your protein? It might seem silly to long-time veggies who have found getting protein to be very easy, but to people who have been bombarded by marketing campaigns touting animal protein, its often a serious concern, and I address it as such. I explain that the average American actually gets too much protein, and that protein is present in most plant foods. Vegan foods especially high in protein include beans, greens, tofu, tempeh, quinoa, nuts, and seeds. ESSENTIAL DO: Be friendly and supportive of others who may be curious about exploring a more compassionate holiday. ESSENTIAL DONT: Dont allow the holiday carnage to get the best of you. Focus on the positive. Julieanna Hever Julieanna Hever, RD, The Plant-Based Dietitian, cooking show host, and author of The Vegiterranean Diet, says that Thanksgiving is her favorite holiday: The focus is on gratitude, a priority that is often overlooked with the bustle of daily living. Q: What are your favorite Thanksgiving dishes? A: I love all the colorful squashes, fruits, and root vegetables, and I find myself cooking more frequently during this time of year. My favorite dishes include anything with pumpkin or butternut squash, and roasted Brussels sprouts. I have a stuffed acorn squash and herbed tempeh recipe that are my go-to Thanksgiving entrées. Q: Do you have traditional family dishes that you have remade veg? A: Yes, Ive revamped a chocolate-chip pumpkin bread that has become a family favorite; I swap in vegetable broth in any soups we traditionally made; and I use either prepared tempeh, tofu, or faux meats instead of turkey. Q: Do you have other non-food-related Thanksgiving traditions? A: We all go around the table and say what we are most grateful for and what we hope for in the upcoming year. ESSENTIAL DO: Enjoy an indulgence. When you focus on eating healthfully throughout the year, it is a good thing to enjoy a treat on holidays. ESSENTIAL DONT: Dont be defensive when someone tries to pressure you into just one bite of something not in alignment with your beliefs. One of the easiest responses is, Thank you for offering, but Im enjoying whats on my plate. Lisa Bloom NBC legal analyst, trial lawyer, and owner of The Bloom Firm, Lisa Bloom, a vegan, hosted her most unforgettable Thanksgiving in 2013, the first year that her omnivore guests embraced a full-fledged veg feast. How did she win them over? It helped that the [faux turkey], mushroom gravy, stuffing, sweet potatoes, almond string beans, and the boatload of pies were insanely tasty. The final verdict: Afterward everyone realized how nice it was not to be catatonic after the meal; full, but no one went into cardiac arrest. And no animals were harmed in our celebration of gratitude, which is what Thanksgiving is all about for me. Q: What question are you most often asked about your diet and how do you respond? A: My philosophy is that I dont actively proselytize, but if asked a direct question, I will give an honest answer. So, I often have this conversation: New Friend: Oh, youre vegan. Why? Me: Because I love animals, so I dont want to financially support their cruelty and deaths. NF: How does it affect your health? Me: Well, Im 53. I run marathons, climb mountains, take long cycling trips. I almost never get sick. I take no medication. My cardiologist says I have the heart of a 20-year-old. For all that I thank my whole-food vegan diet and daily exercise regimen. Q: What are your favorite Thanksgiving dishes? A: One Veg Worlds [faux] turkey with a crispy skin, my Moroccan-spiced carrot dip, and my chocolate pecan pie. ESSENTIAL DO: Offer to bring a few dishes. This is key to family happiness. Make sure they are amazing and delicious. ESSENTIAL DONT: Dont apologize for being a compassionate soul, caring about your health, wanting to reverse climate change, or whatever your reason for going veg is.

Curried Lentil Soup with Coconut Milk

January 20 2015 VegKitchen 

Curried Lentil Soup with Coconut MilkFor centuries, spices have been used to create delicious and nourishing meals. Aromatic herbs and spices, also known as carminatives, improve digestion and make zesty, globally inspired dishes.  The key to making beans easier to digest is to cook them from scratch, adding sea vegetables like dulse along with carminative herbs and spices. Adapting this main course soup to the seasons is easy: You can use fresh tomatoes, summer squash, spinach, and eggplant in the summer; canned tomatoes, carrots, yams, or butternut squash in the fall and winter.  Recipe excerpted with permission from Going Wild in the Kitchen ,* by Leslie Cerier, (C) 2005, Square One Publishers, Inc. Photos by Tracey Eller. Serves 6 to 8. - 1 cup red lentils, rinsed - 2 cups water - 1 cinnamon stick - 2 tablespoons grated ginger - 1 tablespoon seeded and coarsely chopped cayenne pepper - 2 garlic cloves, finely minced or pressed - 3-inch piece dulse or 1 tablespoon dulse flakes (optional) - 1 cup coarsely chopped onions - 10 cups bite-sized cauliflower florets - 3 1/­­2 cups coarsely chopped plum tomatoes - 14-ounce can coconut milk - 1 teaspoon sea salt, or to taste - 1 cup coarsely chopped cilantro (optional) Place the lentils, water, cinnamon stick, ginger, cayenne pepper, garlic, and dulse (if using) in a 6-quart stockpot. Bring the ingredients to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low. Simmer, covered, for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the lentils melt and become yellow. Add the onion, cauliflower, tomatoes, and coconut milk, and continue to simmer for 20 to 30 minutes, or until cauliflower is soft. Add the salt, and adjust the seasonings if needed. Ladle the hot soup into bowls. Garnish with cilantro, if desired. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing! - Here are more Soulful Soups. - Here are more recipes for  Lentils and Peas.

Bibimbap Recipe & Vegan Without Borders Book Review + GIVEAWAY!

December 18 2014 Vegan Richa 

Bibimbap Recipe & Vegan Without Borders Book Review + GIVEAWAY! If you want to try your hand at cuisines from around the world, and add some adventure to daily meals, This is the book for your. Robin Robertson, takes you on a journey all over the world with simplified recipes that are easy to make and easy to like! The recipes are categorized by region, Europe (Italy, France, Spain and Portugal , Greece, Eastern, British Isles), Americas (US, Mexico, Caribbean, South), Africa, Middle East, India, Asia (China, Thailand, Japan, Korea, Vietnam). Each region includes appetizers, main courses, side dishes and desserts. There is a global pantry in the beginning with helpful tips. There are gorgeous pictures sprinkled throughout the book.  There are dietary options with every recipe. Gluten free, soy free, low or no oil. The back of the book also has the recipes categorized according to the dietary restrictions.  Get Robin Robertson’s Vegan Without Borders today or enter the Giveaway at the end of the post.  The book is a gem in the cookbook collection. Where else would you find so many countries and their cuisines being covered in one place! Continue reading: Bibimbap Recipe & Vegan Without Borders Book Review + GIVEAWAY!The post Bibimbap Recipe & Vegan Without Borders Book Review + GIVEAWAY! appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Mushroom, wild rice and ale wellington

October 2 2014 The Everyday Vegetarian UK 

Mushroom, wild rice and ale wellingtonThis main course dish is delicious. It is really worth getting your hands on a good variety of mushrooms if you can. If you cant get any interesting fresh varieties, just use more chestnut mushrooms in their place. Ingredients (8 portions) 300g wild (black) rice 30g butter 1 white onion 2 cloves of garlic 250g chestnut mushrooms 500g other fresh mushrooms (I used shitake and oyster) 60g dried porcini mushrooms 400ml dark ale 2 eggs + 1 egg yolk 75g breadcrumbs 2tsp sugar Salt and pepper 1 pack of readymade pre-rolled puff pastry Method Start by boiling a full kettle. Pour plenty of boiling water over the porcini mushrooms in a bowl and set aside. Put the rice on by filling a high sided pan with the remaining water, add some salt and the rice and slowly simmer. While the rice is cooking, melt the butter in a large frying pan or casserole dish. Thinly dice the onion and fry in the butter until translucent. Add the thinly slice garlic. Chop half of the chestnut mushrooms as small as you can (or blitz in a blender). Chop the remaining mushrooms in large-ish chunks and keep some mushrooms whole. Add all to the onion and garlic mixture and fry on a medium heat. Make sure it doesnt get too dry - add some more butter if it does. Cook for about 10 minutes so the mushrooms start to reduce in size. Add the ale, sugar, salt and pepper to the mushrooms. Also spoon in the rehydrated porcini mushrooms. Dont throw away the lovely mushroom water they have been rehydrating in - use this as a gravy base but be careful to not include the grit that might have sunk to the bottom of the bowl. Drain the black rice and also add this to the mushroom and ale pan. Leave to simmer on a low heat for at least 30 minutes. You want to get to a stage where the ale as completely reduced and the rice is a good thick texture. If you push the mixture aside and liquid drains on to the bottom of the pan then you need to cook it for longer. The less liquid there is remaining, the better it will cook in the pastry. Once you think you have got to this stage, turn of the heat and leave the mixture to cool completely. Once it has cooled, turn on the oven to 180 degrees. Whisk two eggs and add it to the mixture along with the breadcrumbs - make sure it is all mixed in well. Grease an oven proof tray and lay out the puff pastry. Spoon in the mushroom and rice filling along the length of the pastry rectangle. Pull up the sides of the pastry and pinch along the top ensuring the mixture is securely sealed in. With a pastry brush, wash the pastry with the yolk. Pop into the oven for 25 - 30 minutes or until the pastry is golden brown.

Mushroom Tikka Masala

September 1 2014 Meatless Monday 

Tikka masala is a dish made with a spicy yogurt sauce and most often served with chunks of chicken and vegetables, but this version is all veg, all the time. Grilling the vegetables gives the dish a char traditionally achieved in a tandoor oven. This recipe comes to us from Sonal of SimplyVegetarian777 and appears in The Mushroom Channel‘s new free meatless e-cookbook. Serves 4 - 20 small or 10 large, halved button mushrooms, washed and cleaned of any dirt with a wet towel - 20 pieces of onion, same size as mushrooms - 20 pieces of green bell pepper, same size as mushrooms - 20 pieces of tomato without pulp, same size as mushrooms - 1 cup of plain yogurt (Greek or thick) - 1 tbsp of ginger, freshly grated - 1 tbsp of garlic, freshly grated - 1 tbsp, of fresh lemon juice - 1 1/­­2 tbsp of chickpea flour/­­Besan - 1 tbsp or to taste of Garam Masala - 3/­­4 tsp of salt - 1 tsp of paprika (non-spicy) or Kashmiri red pepper powder for color - 1 tbsp of oil to brush the skewers while grilling - For side: lemon slices, julienned onions and tomatoes slices - Bamboo skewers Soak bamboo skewers in water for 2 hours. Take a bowl, add yogurt and chickpea flour, mix well with a fork or whisk. Add garlic, ginger, lemon juice, salt, garam masala, red pepper powder. Mix well with the fork. Your basic marinade is ready. Add washed and cleaned mushrooms, bell peppers, onions and tomato pieces to marinade. Mix with a light hand so every piece is coated well. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2 hours. Take marinade out and rest at room temperature for 10 minutes. Start skewering the bamboo with vegetable pieces. Gently start with mushrooms as they are tender and then bell pepper, onion and tomato. Repeat to fill the skewer with all the vegetables. Heat the grill or pan to high. Brush the grill with oil and place the skewers on the grill. Once the skewers are placed, cover with foil to steam cook first for 8 minutes, so the yogurt and chickpea flour gets cooked initially. Remove the foil. Cook for 3-4 minutes each side, flipping them as needed. Serve. Serving suggestions: -You may enjoy them as is. -Stuff your pita bread, flat bread, big sandwich bread/­­roll, thin naan, chapati/­­roti, with mushroom tikka masala and add some shredded cabbage, onions, cucumber and tomato slices, a dash of lemon and tzatziki. -Serve them over a bed of any kind of pilaf or rice. -You may serve these as main course or grill them in smaller cocktail skewers and serve as appetizers. The post Mushroom Tikka Masala appeared first on Meatless Monday.

A Walk Throughthe Greenmarket with Diana Rice, RD

July 21 2014 Meatless Monday 

A Walk Throughthe Greenmarket with Diana Rice, RDIts summer and farmers’ markets everywhere are flooded with locally grown fresh produce, herbs, flowers and breads. Diana Rice, our resident Meatless Monday Registered Dietitian, took me a guided tour through the Greenmarket in Union Square, NYC. And being an opportunist, I resolve to leverage her expert opinion to plan a dinner. To impose a little order, I decide to limit myself to $20. It’s the peak of summer, and without such restrictions, I could end up sore-backed and-with all the choices-sore of wallet. She alleviates my financial woes immediately; I wouldnt be spending $20 on this meal. The Greenmarket in Union Square is a year-round farmers’ market with over 230 family farms and fishermen participants. At the first stand, we find the center of the plate” vegetable--the hearty eggplant. People are often stuck in the rut of eggplant parmesan, but really the eggplant is quite versatile, according to Diana. The smaller, narrower varieties (such as Chinese eggplant) are typically great for stir-fries, while the bigger ones are great for baking or grilling. At this point Im not certain what my meal will turn into so I go with a bigger Sicilian eggplant--and as Im not a purist in the kitchen, Im not worried that this decision will determine the direction of my meal. Next we add a yellow tomato to the basket. Diana mentions that a big difference between the tomatoes from the grocery store versus the tomatoes at a farmers’ market is that the grocery store tomatoes are bred for appearance; color and roundness matter. At local markets, the old adage, the uglier, the more flavorful may be a better approach. Then we add both a green and a yellow zucchini. She tells me the carotenoids and antioxidants  are largely responsible for the orange-yellow color of the yellow zucchini (or yellow squash, if you prefer). But this doesnt mean that the green squash is lacking in carotenoids and antioxidants , just that the green pigment overwhelms the yellow-orange color. We check the onions. This time of year, you never know what youll find from one stand to the next. Diana says, I always like to do a quick sweep of the offerings before I make final decision. This is a smart way to combat the dilemma of too many delicious fresh produce options. The meal is starting to come together, at least loosely. Its looking like there will be a pasta or grain with fried eggplant and veggies and that there will also be a salad to put the tomato to good use. At the next stand there are many varieties of lettuce. We decide to go with arugula--its more peppery, more bitter than a lot of the other varieties. And what better way to complement that flavor with a little sweet. We head to another vendor to select two peaches. And as almost an afterthought, we also pick up some fresh basil. Later this basil will become the flavor-thread that ties the salad and the main course together. The total bill ended up being under $12 and with what I picked up at the market and the few spices and pasta I had at home, I fed 4. Diana’s farmer market tips o Try things you might not find in grocery stores: heirloom tomatoes, patty pan squash; these options often dont hold up well over long periods of transport since theyre bred for taste, not durability o You can always ask the booth attendant for tips on what to cook with unique offerings o If possible, do a full sweep of the market to see what most appeals to you before you start making purchases o If one item is priced higher at one booth than the next, there might be a good reason: organic growing methods, a more flavorful, yet harder to cultivate varietal...you can always ask! The post A Walk Through the Greenmarket with Diana Rice, RD appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Medu Vada

September 13 2013 Manjula's kitchen 

Medu VadaClick here to view the embedded video. Medu Vadas are a traditional South Indian dish which can be served as a main course, side dish, or snack. This crispy deliciousness is made with spiced urad dal batter and fried in donut shape dumplings. They are crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. They are served with Sambar and Coconut Chutney. Recipe will make about 10 to 12 Vadas. Ingredients: - 1 cup split washed urad dal (available in Indian stores) - 1/­­8 teaspoon asafetida (hing) - 2 teaspoon whole coriander seeds (sabut dhania) - 1 tablespoon green chili chopped - 2 tablespoons cilantro chopped (hara dhania) - 1 teaspoon salt - Oil to fry Method - Wash and soak dal in about 3 cups of water for about 4-6 hours. - Drain the water and grind dal to smooth paste using very little water just enough to grind, food processor works good for this. Blend for another 2 minutes to whip dal to make fluffy. Take dal batter out in a wide bowl. - Add all the ingredients to the dal batter, cilantro, green chili, coriander, asafetida and salt, beat the batter for 2-3 minutes this will make the batter light and fluffy. To make sure batter is ready put one drop of batter in a bowl of water, batter should float. - Keeping the right consistency of batter is very important; add water as needed batter should not be soft but not runny. When you put the batter on your palm batter should hold its shape. Make the Vadas batter when you are ready to fry them, as the batter sit will get soft if you are not ready to fry keep batter refrigerated. - Heat the oil in a frying pan over medium high heat. - The frying pan should have about 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put one drop of batter in oil. The batter should sizzle and come up but not change color right away. If oil is very hot Vadas will not cook through and will not be crispy. - Wet the palms and take golf size batter and place over your palm, flatten to round shape and make hole in the center looking like donut now with other hand wet fingers slowly slide Vada into the hot oil. - Fry the Vadas from both sides to golden brown. Take them out over paper towel to drain access oil. - Traditionally Medu Vada served with Coconut Chutney, and samber (aromatic lentil soup with vegetables). Notes - If Medu Vada Batter is too thick: The Vada will shape nicely but they will be hard inside after frying. - If batter is too soft: it will not be able to hold the shape and will absorb too much oil. - Its the consistency of the batter that determines how soft and shapely the Vadas turn out. Related RecipesSambar (Spicy Lentil Soup)Vegetable PakorasPotato in Coconut GravyAloo (Potato) Masala for DosaCoconut ChutneyMoong Dal Vada (Bhajia-Pakoras-Fritters)Cabbage KoftaMoong Dal DosaSabudana Vada (Fried Dumplings of Potatoes and Tapioca)Kalmi Vada (Fried Lentil Patties)

Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn

August 3 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn A bit on the state of things around here - The kitchen renovations have been put off until October, and all I can say is that I’m very relieved. I knew that gutting the kitchen right after submitting the cookbook manuscript would be chaotic, but when it actually came down to it, I felt even more unprepared and exhausted than I ever expected. Not to mention, I still have a list of recipes to perfect for the book, which requires a fully working kitchen. Thankfully, our contractor – the only good one we could find after months of meetings and unreturned calls (because sometimes people in Florida are too chill) – is booked up two months in advance. A blessing in disguise, if I ever saw one. Among other things, I’m finding it painfully difficult to choose tile for the kitchen floor (Moroccan? Spanish? Mosaic? Forget the tile and do hard-wood?) and I’m really welcoming this extra time for making a decision. I am still working on the staircase leading up to the kitchen, and if you follow us on snapchat (golubkakitchen), you’ve likely seen some snaps of that whole process. The stairs were covered in bad carpet by previous owners, and finally stripping off that dust magnet of a surface felt great. Re-finishing the wooden stairs underneath, however was a huge pain, and re-awakened my carpal tunnel, which started when I was working in the dental field. But at least the stairs are looking great. Paloma goes back to school mid-August and turns eight around the same time too. We’re looking for a Beatles-related present (girl has serious Beatlemania), and the birthday cake will be an ice cream cake, which I will hopefully share here one of the coming Sundays. I recently promised to do more salad posts, and since we are getting into the hottest part of the summer, salads are the key item at any given meal around these parts. And this Caesar, you guys! I’ve already made it several times since coming up with the entirely vegan Caesar dressing. The dressing is everything you want your salad leaves drenched in (and you will want to drench with this one, not just drizzle) – it’s garlicky, creamy and incredibly savory. I aimed for a salad that can be eaten as a main course, and besides the addition of protein-rich beans in the dressing, there are crispy, golden tempeh ‘croutons’ that will fill you up nicely. Grilled peaches and corn contribute perfect little pockets of juice and sweetness here, and Laura’s pine nut parm is optional but very addictive. This Caesar is also easily adaptable to other seasons – instead of the peaches and corn, include roasted squash in the fall/­­winter, asparagus/­­peas in the spring, etc., etc. It’s August! Take it easy and enjoy this last stretch of summer, perhaps even with some hearty Caesar in tow ;) Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients for the Caesar dressing 1 cup cooked white beans, plus cooking liquid/­­liquid from can to achieve desired dressing consistency 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard ½ tablespoon vegan Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon capers ½ teaspoon maple syrup ¼ teaspoon sriracha 1 garlic clove sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2 tablespoons olive oil for the salad 4-6 corn ears 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - divided freshly ground black pepper - to taste 3-6 ripe, sweet peaches - cut in half 1 package tempeh - cubed 1 medium bunch kale - stems removed, leaves cut into bite-sized pieces ½ tablespoon olive oil sea salt - to taste 1 small head Romaine lettuce - torn into bite-size pieces pine nut Parmesan - optional Instructions to make the dressing Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of the cooking liquid and olive oil in an upright blender. Blend until smooth, adding in cooking liquid as needed to achieve the desired creamy salad dressing consistency. Add olive oil with the motor still running. to make the salad Rub corn ears with 1 tablespon coconut oil, salt and black pepper and grill on an outdoor grill or under the broiler, watching and rotating the corn, until charred in places. Let cool slightly and cut kernels off the ears, set aside. Grill peaches on an outdoor grill or under the broiler until charred. Let cool and slice into wedges. Set aside. Warm the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium pan. Add tempeh cubes, sprinkle with salt and fry until golden and crispy. Set aside. Place kale in a large mixing bowl, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt, and massage until wilted. Add in torn Romaine lettuce. Pour the dressing over the greens and toss to coat. Distribute between bowls or plates, top with corn kernels, peach slices, tempeh croutons and sprinkle with pine nut Parmesan, if using. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle Roasted Pepper Lasagna Baby Spinach and Strawberry Salad with Pink Dressing No Noodle Pad Thai .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

8 Holiday Meals that Skip the Meat

December 21 2015 Meatless Monday 

During the holiday season families around the world gather around the table to share a meal and get into the spirit of the season. While many traditional holiday feasts have meat on the table, this year could be the year you try out a meatless holiday! These savory, hearty meals are fit for any family banquet. Gatherers Pie, In My Bowl Youve heard of shepherds pie (usually made with lamb or mutton) and cottage pie ( a similar dish made with beef). Both are traditional foods of the winter months in many parts of the world, having a layer of protein and vegetables baked under a top layer of mashed potatoes. Turn this recipe into a meatless dish that has all the heartiness and flavor, with tons of nutritional value!   Mushroom Hemp Tartlets, Manitoba Harvest These tasty, crusty tartlets make an excellent starter or horderves for your festive meals. Made with hemp hearts (which add an extra boost of protein and savory umami flavor), mushrooms, and goat cheese, these morsels pair rich flavors with flaky pastry.   Vegducken, Epicurious Now famous on the internet for several seasons, the Turducken (a dish that consists of turkey stuffed with a duck stuffed with a chicken) now has a new twist: a meatless version! The Vegducken is a butternut squash stuffed with an eggplant stuffed with a zucchini. This recipe also includes gravy and stuffing recipes (all meatless, of course) that pair with your freshly-roasted Vegducken.   Wild Rice, Lentil & Cranberry Stuffed Delicata Squash, Oh My Veggies Your meatless main course becomes the main event of the evening with stuffed delicate squash! Go overboard this season with squash boats stuffed with wild rice, lentils and cranberries. Youll get all those holiday flavors and a heaping helping of vitamins and fiber.   Vegan Lentil Shepherds Pie, Ezra Pound Cake Another take on the classic shepherds pie or cottage pie, this lentil pie is 100% vegan and is sure to please even the most ravenous carnivores at your table. This recipe also uses a trendy twist on mashed potatoes for the top layer: cauliflower! Lots of chefs and cooks are experimenting with cauliflower in recipes that have ordinarily called for a variety of other ingredients. Use a mix of mashed potatoes and cauliflower for your version, or experiment with an all cauliflower mash for your table! Heres a note from the recipes creator, a two-cup portion is 400 calories, with 5.5 grams of fat, 16 grams of fiber, 19 grams of protein and more than 100 percent of your daily requirements for vitamins A and C.   Seitan Stuffed with Walnuts, Dried Cranberries, and Mushrooms, Fat Free Vegan Have you discovered seitan? Seitan is made from heat, and has a wonderful texture that soaks up flavor as it cooks. This moist, stuffed seitan has all the flavors of its filling - walnuts, cranberries, mushrooms, and seasonings. Follow the recipes advice for reheating, using the microwave will help keep it moist, the oven will dry it out a bit.   Mushroom Wellington with Spinach, Ramsons & Bramble Youve heard of beef Wellington, a classic culinary feat for students learning to be professional chefs. This mushroom Wellington has all of the flavor and all of the artistry of a classic beef Wellington - just none of the beef! This version of the dish calls for walnuts and oats instead of plain bread crumbs, which adds whole grain vitamins and minerals to an already healthy dish.   Autumn Vegetables w/­­ Balsamic Glaze, Veggie Chick These hearty glazed vegetables make an excellent side dish for your holiday table, late night snack, omelet the next morning, and lunch the following day! Roasted fall/­­winter vegetables are a treat to eat at any meal when they are fresh and in season.   Anytime family gathers around the table its a time for celebration. Enjoy some of thee meatless recipes together, and have a happy holiday! The post 8 Holiday Meals that Skip the Meat appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plan a Summer-Turned-Fall Vegan Dinner Party

September 16 2015 VegKitchen 

Plan a Summer-Turned-Fall Vegan Dinner PartyThe dinner party is a staple of the season. September and October are just starting to blend into fall. Youre enjoying the last of grilling season, chilly evenings and changing leaves. Whether youre throwing a party to welcome autumns arrival or to celebrate a birthday or milestone, heres a handful of fresh, vegan ideas for your soiree. Decor Galore Invitations Go green with email invitations. Paperless Post has beautiful fall favorites. And Greenvelope lets you customize with RSVP options and even embedded Google Maps. Tablescape Use a burlap table runner or placemats as your base. For a summer-gone-fall look, try a festive flower arrangement from FTD as the centerpiece and place soy candles on the runner, or opt for tall candlesticks to fill out the look. For a deeper-into-fall feel, arrange pumpkins, squashes and other gourds with colorful leaves along the burlap runner. Or arrange edible bouquets — include veggies and herbs like lettuce, kale and chives. Dinnerware As an alternative to your dinnerware, you might opt for a night of no dishes. Check out this line of single-use dinnerware from VerTerra . Its made entirely of fallen palm leaves and is 100 percent biodegradable, so it is very sustainable.  Foodie Frenzy Sometimes creating a dinner party menu that can satisfy everyone’s taste buds, vegan or not, can be challenging. And you want to make sure there is enough variety for those with other dietary restrictions or preferences. Whip up a combination of food so everyone will have an option but dont overdo it. A few options will suffice. Starters Start with a salad. This zucchini and mushroom pilaf is fall in a bowl. Sweet and savory all in a serving. Image: oh she glows We also love the roasted winter salad bowl from Oh She Glows. Mix hearty potatoes and quinoa with green beans, kale, green onions, pepitas and avocado. Its festive, uses seasonal veggies and is filling for those who are both vegan and gluten free. Add a squash for a slightly different fall flavor. Not quite ready to give up summer? Make up a black bean corn salsa , like this one. Serve it with crudites or corn chips. Main Course Image: The Healthy Family & Home For the main course, consider a veggie burger as a last hurrah for the grilling season. Veg Kitchen presents five vegan burger recipes to chose from. Offer lettuce-wrap style burgers as an alternative to buns for those looking to limit carbs or avoid gluten. If your grill is already cleaned up and stored for the season or you just prefer to keep it indoors, bake up something like this spaghetti squash casserole . Full of anti-inflammatory ingredients, its paleo-friendly, vegan, gluten-free and delicious. This dish will suit almost everyone. Dessert And now, for what everyone looks forward to most: dessert. Its time to use those seasonal fruits for warm fall sweets. Consider this grain-free apple crisp . Its a crunchy combo of coconut sugar and nuts, with the dashing flavor of lemon and cinnamon on apples. If youd rather something chilled, try basil-cinnamon peaches for a delightful bridge between seasons. Want to go decadent? Whip together a vegan classic cheesecake . The Food Network has a dairy-free, egg-free recipe thats made with tofu. Its just as creamy and delicious as the original recipe, so guests, vegan or not, will be sure to enjoy it. Wine Wine goes through a fining process which often entails the use of animal products. For this reason, not all wine is vegan. To find vegan selections, check out the wine recommendations from The Kitchn . If youre making veggie burgers, pair them with a dry white wine like the 2009 Bonny Doon Ca’ del Solo Albari?o ($16). The spaghetti squash dish calls for a subtle red -- a pinot noir or cab -- we suggest Kawarau Estate Pinot Noir 2008 ($29). And for dessert, crack open a bottle of Sandeman Fine Ruby Port ($14). Beyond all the planning and details, tablescape and delicious vegan food, be sure you sit back and enjoy the company. Its truly the life of the party. Lauren Topor is a multimedia journalist, freelance writer and editor. She earned her journalism degree from Arizona State University and has been writing professionally for more than five years. Lauren covers food news and the fun stuff happening around Phoenix, AZ for Thrillist. She also writes about fitness and health as a contributor to MoveItMonday.

Potato & Pea Samosa Cakes with Tamarind Sauce

January 20 2015 VegKitchen 

Potato & Pea Samosa Cakes with Tamarind SauceSamosas are a traditional savory Indian pastry, usually stuffed with spiced potatoes and other vegetables. These cakes are basically samosa filling without the pastry. The tart and sassy tamarind sauce makes the perfect accompaniment. The patties would be well received as finger food or as a side, but you could also pile four or five (or nine) on your plate for an unforgettable main course. Recipe from  But I Could Never Go Vegan!: 125 Recipes That Prove You Can Live Without Cheese, Its Not All Rabbit Food, and Your Friends Will Still Come Over Dinner,* copyright (C) Kristy Turner, 2014. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment. Makes 15 Cakes     Tamarind sauce 3 tablespoons tamarind paste (from a jar, not a block) 1/­­3 cup water 1/­­4 cup agave syrup 1 tablespoon tamari (or soy sauce or liquid aminos) 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger Salt to taste Samosa cakes 1/­­2 cup vegetable broth, plus additional if needed 2 teaspoons curry powder 1 teaspoon cumin 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cardamom 1/­­4 to 1/­­2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon mustard seeds 1/­­2 medium red onion, chopped small 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 pound small golden potatoes, chopped small 1/­­2 red bell pepper, chopped small 1 carrot, chopped small Salt and black pepper to taste 1/­­2 cup chickpea flour 1/­­2 cup green peas (fresh or defrosted if frozen) Olive oil spray   Combine the tamarind sauce ingredients in a small bowl and whisk together. Chill until ready to use. Mix the broth, curry powder, cumin, ginger, paprika, cardamom, and cayenne in a small bowl. Set aside. Combine the oil and mustard seeds in a large shallow saucepan and heat over medium heat until the seeds begin to pop. Add the onion and garlic and sauté until the onion is almost translucent. Add the potatoes, bell pepper, carrot, and broth mixture; sauté until the potatoes and carrots are soft. If the liquid absorbs too quickly or the potatoes begin to stick, add a bit more broth to deglaze the pan and lower the heat. When the vegetables are fork-tender, remove from the heat. Use a potato masher to very lightly mash the potatoes and vegetables (leaving big chunks). Add salt and pepper. Let cool for 5 to 10 minutes. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone baking mat. When the vegetables have cooled enough to touch, mix in the chickpea flour and fold in the peas. Spray a 2 1/­­2 -inch round biscuit cutter with olive oil and place on the prepared baking sheet. Scoop 2 heaping tablespoons of the mixture into the biscuit cutter and use your fingers to press it into a flat patty. Carefully lift the biscuit cutter, leaving the cake on the sheet. Repeat with the rest of the samosa mixture. Bake for 20 minutes, or until the cakes are firm and golden brown. Remove from the oven and cool for about 5 minutes on the sheet. Serve with the tamarind sauce. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

The Vegetable-Sideof Thanksgiving

November 24 2014 Meatless Monday 

The Vegetable-Sideof ThanksgivingLets lay our stuffing on the table--on Thanksgiving Day in most households, the turkey is king. And thats perfectly fine. But dont forget   those unsung heroes--the yams, the string beans and carrots, the salads and casseroles. What do vegetables bring to the party? Well a number of things: Color--eating a variety of different colors helps to ensure you are getting the right nutrients.Also if you decide to stack your plate only with turkey, stuffing, rolls and gravy, your meal will be a light taupe. While light taupe is a fine color and very respectable in a pressed khaki pant, on the plate (by itself) it is a little boring. And your Thanksgiving does not have to be boring. Flavor--according to a 2012 study, diners found the main course tasted better when served with vegetables. So youll actually be making the turkey taste better by including several sides of vegetables.  And when it comes to flavor, what could be more exquisite than biting into a well-seasoned brussel sprout? Texture--having a diversity of textures on your plate adds a new dimension to the meal. Think of the crispy breadcrumbs on the green bean casserole. Respect--according to the aforementioned study, serving vegetables with a meal, increases the chances that diners will find the cook more thoughtful and attentive. This Thanksgiving Day, serve your guests vegetables and youll not only be promoting their health and enhancing the meal, you also be encouraging them to think, What a kind human being, you are! Here are a few recipes to help you do it. Cauliflower Mash Roasted Rainbow Carrots w/­­ Maple-Mustard Glaze Orange Maple Cranberry Sauce Brussels Sprouts with Dates & Dill Stuffing Scoops Carrot Soup w/­­ Parsnip Chips The post The Vegetable-Side of Thanksgiving appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Kohlrabi Hash with Corn and Chevre

September 22 2014 Meatless Monday 

Hash may be everyone’s favorite brunch side, but this version using kohlrabi in place of potatoes is produce packed, making it an excellent main course any time of day. Look for kohlrabi, a bulbous cabbage cousin, in your local farmers market. This recipe comes to us from Olga of Mango & Tomato. Serves 2-4 - 2 teaspoons olive oil - 2 medium kohlrabi bulbs, peeled, diced 1/­­4″ - 1/­­2 white onion, diced - 1/­­2 green pepper, diced - kernels from 1 ear of corn - salt to taste - 2 teaspoons smoked paprika - 1 roasted red pepper, diced (jarred or home roasted) - 1 tablespoon chopped parsley - 1/­­4-1/­­3 cups chevre Heat a cast iron skillet. Add oil and allow the oil to get hot. Add kohlrabi, onions, green pepper and corn. Season with salt and smoked paprika and sauté for 15-20 minutes. You want the kohlrabi to be cooked through and slightly caramelized. Add roasted red pepper and allow to heat through. Serve topped with parsley and chevre. The post Kohlrabi Hash with Corn and Chevre appeared first on Meatless Monday.

US News and Report Gives a Nod to Meatless Monday

August 11 2014 Meatless Monday 

US News and Report Gives a Nod to Meatless MondayMany flock to popular social media outlet, Pinterest, for the latest and greatest from fashion to food.  And according to US News and World Report, the platform can also be useful in budgeting, saving, organizing, and generating DIY or meal ideas. When its used to curate and search Meatless Monday recipes, well then its satisfying a few of the benefits that U.S. News and World Report highlighted. Their recent article featured the Meatless Monday Pinterest Board as a means of organizing and meal planning--to help protect against unused leftovers or an improvised meal of fast food. But wed be remiss not to add that eating more vegetable proteins instead of meat is usually a money saver as well. And the Meatless Monday Pinterest page is an excellent source of deliciousness, featuring meatless recipes for breakfast, lunch, and dinners--and many variations on chili, tacos, pizza, mushrooms and more. There is a lot there. So we enlisted our Associate Director of Marketing to help pick out a few highlights. Here is what she suggested:     The MM Blogger Board--this board features over 80 Meatless Monday bloggers cooking, creating, and contributing recipes. So its eclectic, plentiful, and great place to browse. Here youll find a range of meatless recipes from main courses and sides to dips and desserts.     The MM Meat Makeovers--this board is a great place for everyone who has grown accustomed to having meat in the center of the plate. Here youll find crab-less crab cakes, vegan po boys, and meatless meatloaf or meatless meatballs.     The MM Mushroom Lovers Board--this board features the versatile and umami-rich mushroom. The board is the love child of Meatless Monday and our partners at the Mushroom Council. Did you know that September is National Mushroom Month? Dont forget to mark your calendar.     The MM Summer Cookout Board--this board demonstrates that there is more to a summer cookout than hot dogs, hamburgers, and steaks. Here youll find alternatives to the usual (meat) suspects of cookouts, and youll also see some terrific vegetable centered sides.     The MM E-Cookbooks--the Meatless Monday E-Cook Books are an absolute favorite. Here youll find a wide range of recipes. And youll get to rub shoulders with some excellent chefs. Contributors include: Mario Batali, Matteo Bergamini, Mary Sue Milliken, Susan Feniger, and John Fraser--just to name a few. The post US News and Report Gives a Nod to Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

A Walk Through the Greenmarket with Diana Rice, RD

July 21 2014 Meatless Monday 

A Walk Through the Greenmarket  with Diana Rice, RDIts summer and the farmers market is flooded with locally grown fresh produce, herbs, flowers, and breads. Our resident Meatless Monday registered dietitian Diana Rice has offered me a guided tour through the Greenmarket in Union Square, NYC. And being an opportunist, I resolve to leverage her expert opinion to plan a dinner. To impose a little order, I decide to limit myself to $20. It’s the peak of summer, and without certain restrictions, I could end up sore-backed and beet-stained. She alleviates my financial woes immediately; I wouldnt be spending $20 on this meal. The Greenmarket in Union Square is a year-round farmers market with over 230 family farms and fishermen participants. At the first stand, we find the center of the plate vegetable--the hearty eggplant.  People are often stuck in the rut of eggplant parmesan, but really the eggplant is quite versatile, according to Diana. The smaller, narrower varieties (such as Chinese eggplant) are typically great for stir-fries, while the bigger ones are great for baking or grilling. At this point Im not certain what my meal will turn into so I go with a bigger Sicilian eggplant--and as Im not a purist in the kitchen, Im not worried that this decision will determine the direction of my meal. Next we add a yellow tomato to the basket.  Diana mentions that a big difference between the tomatoes from the grocery store versus the tomatoes at the farmers market is that the grocery store tomatoes are bred for appearance--color, roundness. And really going by the adage, the uglier, the more flavorful may be a better approach. Then we add both a green and a yellow zucchini. She tells me the carotenoids and antioxidants  are largely responsible for the orange-yellow color of the yellow zucchini (or yellow squash, if you prefer). But this doesnt mean that the green squash is lacking in carotenoids and antioxidants , just that the green pigment overwhelms the yellow-orange color. We check the onions. This time of year, you never know what youll find from one stand to the next. Diana says, I always like to do a quick sweep of the offerings before I make final decision. This is a smart way to combat the dilemma of too many delicious fresh produce options. The meal is starting to come together, at least loosely. Its looking like there will be a pasta or grain with fried eggplant and veggies and that there will also be a salad to put the tomato to good use. At the next stand there are many varieties of lettuce. We decide to go with arugula--its more peppery, more bitter than a lot of the other varieties. And what better way to complement that flavor with a little sweet. We head to another vendor to select two peaches. And as almost an afterthought, we also pick up some fresh basil. Later this basil will become the flavor-thread that ties the salad and the main course together. The total bill ended up being under $12 and with what I picked up at the farmers market and the few spices and pasta I had at home, I fed 4. Diana’s farmer market tips o Try things you might not find in grocery stores: heirloom tomatoes, patty pan squash--these options often dont hold up well over long periods of transport since theyre bred for taste, not durability. o You can always ask the booth attendant for tips on what to cook with unique offerings. o If possible, do a full sweep of the market to see what most appeals to you before you start making purchases. o If one item is priced higher at one booth than the next, there might be a good reason: organic growing methods, a more flavorful, yet harder to cultivate varietal...you can always ask!   The post A Walk Through the Greenmarket with Diana Rice, RD appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Diwali Menu

November 6 2012 Manjula's kitchen 

Diwali MenuDeciding on the perfect menu for the upcoming holiday of Diwali can be challenging! I have been trying to decide the menu for a Diwali party I am hosting for the last couple of days. It’s the time of year to indulge in delicious and tasty food, without a regard for calories! This year I am leaning towards a very traditional menu. I would love to hear your thoughts and suggestions about this menu. To start out the evening, I would like to serve: - Crispy Spinach Pakoras - Dhokla with Hari Cilantro chutneys - Dahi Vadas     My main courses will include: - Urad Dal Puri, with Spicy Squash - Potato Curry with Yogurt Gravy - Bhindi Masala - Raita - Methi Chutney       Finally, for dessert, I would like to serve: -  Ras Malai - Moong Dal Halwa   I know this is a very big menu so I need to start making some preparations now! Let me know what you think? Does this traditional menu sound good to you, or do you think I should incorporate some non-traditional items as well?  


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!