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magnesium vegetarian recipes

Bali Butter

March 12 2019 My New Roots 

Bali Butter I miss Bali. Or maybe I just miss the warmth, the sun, the vibrancy, the life bursting forth from every nook and cranny. I miss living outside, I miss my eyes being assaulted by colours, and layers upon layers of wild sounds, but hey, its March in Ontario and this is a familiar feeling. Are you feeling it too? A couple weeks ago when I was in the depths of yet another snowstorm, feeling like spring may never come, I came up with this recipe to remedy my winter woes. Its called Bali Butter - and its the most delicious thing to cross my lips since I could see grass outside my window. A rich combination of cashews, coconut, and cacao, blended together with coconut sugar and salt, its like the nut butter of DREAMS in all of its salty-sweet-crunchy-chocolatey glory. And I am really excited to share this one with you, wherever you and no matter what season youre experiencing. What does one do with Bali Butter, you ask? Let me tell you, it goes on all. the. things. Pancakes, waffles, smoothie bowls, toast, rice cakes, ice cream, fruit salad, porridge, yogurt, and fingers! You can stuff dates with Bali Butter, stick them in the fridge and have something delicious on hand to satisfy those salty-sweet-fat cravings too. Slice a banana lengthwise, slather Bali Butter in the middle and sandwich it together again. I even like it with carrot sticks. No joke. I chose to use coconut sugar in my Bali Butter because its one of the main sweeteners used on the island and you can easily find it everywhere. Some of you may be curious about using liquid sweetener as an alternative, but the problem with using something like maple syrup or honey, is that it causes the nut butter to seize up. Fat is hydrophobic (translation: its afraid of water) and will stiffen when it comes into contact with anything that contains it. Using a solid sweetener, like coconut sugar, avoids this problem and keeps the finished product relaxed and runny. If you dont want to use coconut sugar and you dont mind a less-spreadable version of Bali Butter, sweeten it with whatever you have on hand. I think Ive talked about all of these ingredients respectively, but for the heck of it, lets recap why theyre awesome! Coconut - Once a maligned food for its saturated fat content, coconut has taken center stage in the wellness world, as scientific research has confirmed that the type of fat in coconut integrates differently in the body, compared to other saturated fats. MCTs (medium-chain-triglycerides) are a type of fat that can be broken down quickly and used as fuel, instead of being stored, so its prefect for people who enjoy an active lifestyle. Coconut also contains a surprising amount of protein, about 14% by weight, and impressive amounts of manganese.   Cashews - Contrary to popular belief, cashews have a lower fat content than most nuts. And 66% of their fats are heart-healthy, monounsaturated fats, like those found in olive oil. Cashews are an excellent source of copper, and a good source of magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc. They also contain good amounts of fiber, so that they keep you feeling full for longer.  Cacao - One of the best sources of magnesium found in nature, in addition to containing high amounts calcium, zinc, iron, copper, sulfur, and potassium, cacao is a nutritional powerhouse. It also contains many chemical compounds that enhance physical and mental well-being, including alkaloids, proteins, magnesium, beta-carotene, leucine, linoleic acid, lipase, lysine, and some neurotransmitters such as dopamine and anandamide - which explains why eating chocolate makes you feel so darn good! Coconut sugar - Sometimes called coconut palm sugar, this incredibly delicious sweetener is high in minerals, such as potassium, magnesium, zinc and iron. It is happily low glycemic, ranking 35 on the GI scale, compared to agave at 42, honey at 55, cane sugar at 68. This is due to coconut sugars composition of long-chain saccharides, which are absorbed by the body at a slower rate than something like refined white sugar. Coconut sugar also contains amino acids, which are thought to slow down the rate at which the sugar is absorbed into the bloodstream, acting as a buffer of sorts.  Some notes on the recipe. Its very important that you make coconut butter to start, as it creates the liquid base to help the get the cashews going in the food processor. Once youve made the coconut-cashew butter, feel free to stop there (it tastes incredible on its own), or go all the way as I have and add the cacao, coconut sugar and salt. I like to leave my Bali Butter out of the fridge, since it remains liquid and spreadable at room temperature. If you refrigerate it, Bali Butter with harden completely. You can roll it into balls and make yourself some pretty delicious little energy bites when its in this state, but its impossible to drizzle when chilled.   If youre into smooth nut butters, simply leave the cacao nibs out of the equation. They arent necessary for any other purpose than crunch, which I personally feel is essential, but I wont judge anyone for skipping them. Even though youre obviously crazy     Print recipe     Bali Butter  Makes 3 cups /­­ 750ml Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 375g raw cashews 3 cups /­­ 240g unsweetened desiccated coconut   3/­­4 tsp. large flake sea salt (I used Maldon) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 23g raw cacao powder 3 Tbsp. coconut sugar 3 Tbsp. cacao nibs seeds from 1 vanilla bean Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F /­­ 160°C. Spread cashews out evenly on a rimmed baking sheet and place in the preheated oven. Toast for about 10 minutes, keeping an eye on them so that they dont burn! Remove from oven and let cool. 2. While the cashews are in the oven, toast the coconut in a dry skillet over medium heat, stirring often, until slightly golden. Remove from heat and set aside. Depending on the size of your skillet, you may want to work in batches. 3. Place the coconut in a food processor. Blend on high, scraping down the sides every so often, until the coconut is creamy and smooth (this make take up to 10 minutes, depending on the strength of your food processor - be patient!). 4. Add the cashews to the food processor and blend on high until creamy and smooth. Add the remaining ingredients and blend on high. Taste and adjust saltiness /­­ sweetness /­­ chocolate levels to suit your taste. 5. Store Bali Butter in an airtight glass container at room temperature (out of the fridge) for one month. The post Bali Butter appeared first on My New Roots.

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera

January 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera Cortney Herrera is the artisan distiller and founder of the holistic skincare company Wildcare, located in the Pacific Northwest. We’ve been crushing hard on Cortney’s creations, like her expertly distilled hydrosols and face masks full of the most unique, glow-promoting ingredients, and we’re so excited to share this wisdom-packed interview. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Structure of certain things like eating & sleeping times has always made me feel the most supported. I am a triple virgo so by nature I crave a solid routine around the everyday basics. With that said, its freeing to just rehash it all and recreate a functional flow if I feel like Im too caught up in our pattern. Now that I have a baby (hes 1!) as much as I want things to be regimented for us all to thrive,  its necessary to play with flexibility for the unexpected too, so Ive shifted a bit more towards that direction. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. We sleep with our curtains open so that each morning we wake up to natural light. We just moved back to Oregon from sunny CA, so this is especially crucial for me here in the Pacific Northwest to feel more stable during the darker winter months. Our baby almost always wakes us up around 7am and usually starts babbling, so well take him out of his crib and have a little cuddle time. If hes not out on a job, my husband Alex will get him ready for the day and then Ill make us a morning beverage (usually tea with mushroom powder and coconut manna, and honey) and either one of us will cook a simple breakfast for the family (tortilla with an egg, handful of parsley or cilantro and a fermented veggie). We both work from home so we each hop on our computers shortly after while switching off with who is playing with baby Oso. One thing I am firm on is giving myself a facial massage for 5-10 minutes after I wash up. My skin loves it, but more importantly its a nice form of meditation to have that little moment of space to zen out a bit. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I opt for a magnesium bath, face mask (I like our creamy Soft Focus Mask at night), sometimes a chocolate and always a cup of tea – lately its a blend of lemon balm, chamomile, oatstraw and raspberry leaf. If time gets the best of me, Ill have a mug of hot water with magnesium powder to relax before bed. Im also really big on lists (virgo) so I usually write a new one before bed every night for all different things like shopping lists, distillation lists, who I need to email back more urgently, recipes I want to make.... everything thats been floating around in my mind that day so Im more freed up before bed. I watch a little Netflix and laugh, and then get in bed around 11. I like the Headspace app as a guided 5-10 minute meditation to center my breathing when I lay down. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Outdoor explorations! We aim to weave one day trip into each week, usually within an hour of home, and drive to a mountain, forest, or river to breathe clean air & explore without much of a plan or direction in mind. Having this free-flowing space contrary to our routines during the week creates lots of room for spontaneity…and sometimes we hit a dead-end, but thats all part of the fun of experimenting and not having a plan! Balance is key. If we dont have time to physically drive to a big open landscape that weekend because of work, well take walks in the neighborhood or a smaller visit to a nearby park (there are parks everywhere in Portland!). I like to be present and check in with myself as I move…how does the sun or mist feel on my skin, what scents are in the air, what does this leaf feel like in my hand.... All of these little check-ins help me feel more grounded and connected. Sustenance -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I stopped drinking coffee and caffeinated tea about 8 or so years ago to curb my anxiety – its helped tremendously! My favorite go-to drinks for energy & focus are roasted dandelion tea, fresh juice we make at home (the greener, the better), or chocolate milk with walnut milk and raw cacao! For the most part good quality chocolate has always mellowed me out actually – I think its the magnesium. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I like to opt for something that will satisfy a sweet tooth without the crash or sugar spike like incorporating dates, honey or maple with healthy fats that sustain my energy. Lately Ive been making these very simple almond butter cookies. The recipe is: 1 cup almond butter (any nut butter will do!), 1 egg, 1/­­2 Tbs of virgin coconut oil, a couple spoons of coconut sugar, a pinch of himalayan salt and any spices that appeal (cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla bean etc). Roll into balls, smoosh with a fork and bake for 10 minutes! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? My sister Ash (Black Sage Botanicals) makes delicious oxymels – vinegar based tinctures with infused organic and foraged herbs and honey. Im in love with her Tulsi Oxymel made with rose and pomegranate vinegar. It feels heart-opening and nurturing! Im pretty regimented on taking Vitamin D, a DHA fish oil, and iron with nettles along with various flower essences dependent on what my emotional state is calling for. Water is the main tool for me I need to remember, all day every day!!!!! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I aim to get out at least a couple times a week on an adventure and walk, usually finding a new forest to explore here in the northwest. Its been the single best thing for me in releasing any anxiety or stress from the week. I also am just getting back into yoga, focusing on the balance between movement + stillness. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I see beauty in nourishing and embracing every facet of our unique selves so much that the joy and loving energy we hold for our own bodies and spirit inherently radiates to those around us. I think when we allow ourselves to really connect with others, be vulnerable, be authentic, be blissful, be curious, beauty is an energy thats more magnetic than visually stimulating. I find a lot of rocks beautiful because I take time to notice their expressive nature. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My approach is all about balance supported by nature and ancient rituals. Cold-pressed oils, raw honey, herb infusions, powdered herbs....focusing on the balance between humans and the natural world – how we care for botanicals and how they may care for us. I like to look at skincare the same way I look at the food I eat; when I feel happy about the ingredients I apply on my skin, my skin feels happy too. Its all about respecting and caring for ingredients so we create more harmony as we utilize them. My favorite tools are oil + water, in the form of our face oil and hydrosols. It may sound counterintuitive for those two to go hand in hand yet its what our skin is essentially made of and vital for nourished skin + optimal function. After cleansing, Ill mist a hydrosol (during winter I choose Empress Cypress or Rosemary Bay) and follow with SunRoot Solar Serum. Ill take about 5-10 minutes for a facial massage and then follow with another generous mist of Hydrosol. My skin glows!! -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water mainly. Eating lots of healthy fats like coconut oil/­­manna, ghee, avocado. The fish oil and vitamin d every day along with eating a lot of fermented foods and drinking the roasted dandelion tea I mentioned earlier (hormone balancing = skin balancing). The more we can do to support the gut and liver especially, the happier our skin is! I love incorporating raw honey and bee pollen in my rituals. Our Bee Rosy Mask actually has ground bee pollen in it and makes my skin feel like a spring flower. As for my hair, I like to use our skin soother Rosemary Bay Hydrosol to keep my scalp healthy. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? As a mama & business owner, there is always stress – good stress and real earth-shaking stress. The beauty/­­wellness business is pretty idealized – its HARD work and creating boundaries to minimize stress and prioritize your own personal wellness can be easily misplaced. Some things that usually help me release are talking it out with my sisters, breathing deep with a tall glass of water, embracing quietness, saying no when I need to, saying yes when I want to, putting my hands in dirt to work in the garden, and going on a walk. The past year I also started writing more regularly. Oddly enough a lot of it started flowing on my instagram which has led me to a beautiful community of friends that Ill message with on and off. On some more wild days, my husband and I will just run to the living room, turn up the music and just go crazy dancing for 10 minutes and then go back to work. This often helps the most with little stressors, especially seeing baby Oso laughing at us. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I make elderberry syrup every winter and take a spoon everyday when Im run down. Magnesium baths, herbal steams, foot soaks, rest, water, raw honey, and garlic. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Something that always helps me is doing something for myself first thing in the morning, so I dont end up too busy and putting it off later. That usually takes shape as a face massage. At the end of the day when Im laying in bed, I almost always do a self-check in and think of one nice thing I did for myself that day. If I forgot to physically do something, Ill say a few affirmations to myself. Im also quite excited to be starting therapy again and EMDR this month. I honestly am really eager to get back into it and work through some heavy triggers and blockages. I think thats one of the nicest things I could do for myself right now. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Allowing myself space to slow down & connect. Wildcare has been buzzing since conception. We were featured in Vogue the first month we opened, and from there it just became an everyday hustle to stay caught up – a challenge Im incredibly grateful for. Last year I had my first baby, and he arrived to our surprise 2 months early via an emergency cesarean. He remained in the NICU for a month while my husband and I went home as baby and I each had to separately heal. I felt broken, and at first, I jumped right back into work as soon as I had more movement to distract from much of the emotional pain I had experienced. A few months later when he was home, business was great but there was this moment I knew I needed to stop everything, reflect and be present with what I was feeling and with our baby. I closed the shop for a few weeks, and decided to stop taking on new retail partners for pretty much the remainder of 2018. Being transparent and open with those around me – even our customers about what I was going through, has been the biggest change Ive made. Slowing down, bridging that connection of my voice + products, being present and prioritizing the same amount of care for myself that I give others has allowed me to feel more honest with myself. Still a huge work in progress yet this practice continues to reveal a community of supporters that wouldnt have been there unless I was vulnerable. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I feel like inspiration finds me within the energy of the landscapes I’m immersed in. Right now its walking on the soft mossy forest floor in Oregon, hypnotized by rushing rivers and gazing up at towering Fir trees and dancing leaves. I really trust in the natural relationship of quiet down time vs the times Im energized with new ideas, and think its important to allow things to reveal themselves naturally as a connection is made. These visuals, scent memories, and feelings from nature always wind their way into my dreams even years later and lead me to formulas and product names so its best for me to just to go with the flow. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a distiller and starting Wildcare? My sisters and I grew up strongly influenced with our moms skin care rituals who worked as a makeup artist for film & tv, amongst other things. As kids, we would concoct foot soaks using pine needles and flowers we would collect on afternoon walks, and hair masks with eggs and mayonnaise! These DIY projects have always stayed with me. My formal schooling was both in Culinary and Herbal disciplines – a foundation that propelled my special focus on care – internal & external. There was an afternoon in particular where I had focused all my energy on exploring a better remedy to comfort my eczema flare-ups. When I noticed all the Rosemary that was growing in our yard near a little Bay tree I intuitively crafted my first Wildcare product, The Skin Soother Rosemary + Bay Hydrosol using a makeshift distillation system out of kitchen pots & pans. I remember I actually cried at the moment I saw the first hydrosol emerge…I really felt lucky to be in the presence of such an ancient form of alchemy. After obsessively spraying this camphorous green-smelling mist for a few weeks & seeing my skins improved health, this artful practice of distilling was something I fully got behind. I spent a year doing playful and careful experimentations, making hydrosols for family and friends. There was one night I even dreamt about filling a table full of tiny amber bottles with aromatic liquid and then a month or so later, I sprung up from a dream and shouted Wildcare! to my husband. Wildcare was born shortly after that in the end of 2015. -- At Wildcare, you make your own hydrosols and advocate their healing properties. Can you tell us a little bit about what they are and why they are so effective? Hydrosols are the subtly aromatic waters from distilled plant material. A copper still is placed over fire, holding spring water (we hand-collect from a local Oregon spring!) & fresh plant material. Inside the still, steam rises & passes through the plant in the form of vapor, carrying vital nutrients, plant acids & suspended particles of the plants essential oils. As the vapor cools, it condenses back into a liquid state and emerges in the form of aromatic water (now a Hydrosol) along with its essential oil counterpart. Our distillations have about an 8 hour duration depending on the plant utilized, a very slow & thoughtful process that requires a focused presence from the distiller. The majority of the essential oil will rise to the top, leaving the Hydrosol with about 0.1% micro-particles of essential oil, making it a very gentle mist without the same safety concerns that essential oils carry. When you purchase a pure Hydrosol, note that it will read as 100% distillate or floral water – without the addition of other ingredients or essential oils. More on the distillation process here. -- What are some of your best-sellers? 100% SunRoot Solar Serum, but more on that below! Our best selling Hydrosols of the season have been the skin soother Rosemary Bay, awakening Palo Santo, and Empress Cypress (a personal favorite!). From our face and body line, Soft Focus Mask has been flying off the shelves. Its a gentle and creamy clay based mask with brightening pearl powder, soothing organic coconut milk, and pineapple extract to even out lackluster skin. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? SunRoot Solar Serum is a product Ive worked on for 2+ years and was just released! After working so long on this formula, its been the most rewarding experience to see so many glowing reviews pour in. Im overwhelmed in the best possible way. It features a 4-week infusion of organic artichoke leaf in this incredibly beautiful Jojoba oil that Im sourcing directly from a farmer here in the US. He is self-taught and does all his cold-pressing by hand! Artichoke leaf is a powerhouse in healing sun damage, scarring and repairing tissue. Its combined with warming turmeric root, and juicy fruit oils like Sea buckthorn, Rose hip and Raspberry Seed. To extend even more beauty and peace of mind, its a 90+% certified organic formula! I am also in the middle of a complete rebrand, designed by artist Morgan Ritter (my younger sister!), with SunRoot as the first look of Wildcares new visual identity. The bottles are entirely covered with my actual tiny handwriting thats been screen-printed, echoing my commitment to being a maker – literally being a conduit, like water. Its a bold gesture to avoid a standardized typeface and is unlike what is commonly seen in the market, as we intend for this design to be a personal, embodied approach to commerce. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Its been a challenge as a nurturer however Ive been practicing treating myself more, creating stronger boundaries around my own personal time so that I can give more too. My affirmations since going through what I did last year have been The nurturer deserves to be nourished. I am deserving of nourishment. I am deserving of my own care. Simple pleasures like tinkering around in the kitchen and baking something experimental, even a chiropractic care visit from my favorite Luna Wellness practitioner, Megan makes me feel extra supported. Every so often Ive been treating myself to a facial from any one of a few dear friends here in Portland too. Allowing myself this space has been crucial to be able to lovingly care for child and have peace of mind. -- Standout book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art: Book - Aromatic Medicine by Patrice de Bonneval & Cathy Skipper Song/­­Album -Papa Celestin ragtime music, bought it at Mississippi Records :-) Movie - Stargate (I just saw Hackers for the 1st time and that was cool, ha ha ha) Piece of Art - STOOL WITH WHEELS (ALL THE WORLD’S PAIN, YET THERE ARE MOVEMENTS) by Morgan Ritter from her show The Cat House Settlements -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Dena Nakhle Birch – She is my friend/­­angel/­­naturopathic doctor based out of Santa Barbara, CA. A brilliant healer with one of the biggest hearts I know. Erica Chidi Cohen – her friendship and book Nurture was incredibly supportive to me after my birthing experience. Neva Osterloh – the sweetest woman offering loving forms of care through her Portland skincare studio. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Gabrielle Russomagno Self-Care Interview Series: Rocio Graves Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Cortney Herrera appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder

December 30 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder Erin Lovell Verinder is a herbalist, nutritionist and energetic healer living in the wilds of the Byron Bay hinterland in Australia, working with clients locally in her Sydney clinic and worldwide via Skype. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly love both. I keep certain parts of my day very structured especially around work days and where I can, I claim open space. I follow structure to bring in the foundations of support that are essential for me to thrive and maintain my balance. Like slow mornings, connecting to nature, enjoying a whole nourishing breakfast. But then I open up my days where possible to flow & allow spontaneity. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I keep my mornings slow and sacred, it’s been a very intentional movement towards this over the years. I wake with the sunlight pouring into our bedroom, we live in an old church and the light in here is just next level serene. I always keep the blinds open to allow my body rhythms to harmonize with the sun and moon cycle. This regulates your cortisol and melatonin in such a fundamental way. I allow myself to wake slowly, no rush, no jump out of bed, no alarms, no startle response! I will then take time to do some stretching sequences with conscious breath, and then sit for a 20 minute meditation. Followed by a morning dog walk around our very green country town. Other mornings it’s a swim in the ocean with my husband and a lazy lay on the sand. After this, it’s breakfast time. I brew a tea, or make a tonic and take that out into the garden. I really feel it’s so important to have a whole breakfast, and we really honour that in our household, we sit and chat and connect over a meal before the day unfolds. I do my absolute best to only engage in anything work related after 8am and completely screen free before then is the daily goal. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes! I am super ritualistic about the evening wind down. I ensure I am off all screens at least two hours before sleep. I feel this is so greatly important to allow our bodies to align and flow into the yin cycle of the night. I switch off all overhead lights and only use very warm low light lamps as the sun sets. This is another trick to converse with your body to wind down, let go of any tasks and prep for rest. I read, write, listen to music and savour evenings for creative flow and conversation with my husband. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Many. I practice conscious breath and meditation as my main allies. But I also spend A LOT of time with plants, growing, making, conversing and in nature scapes. This is for me the ultimate mindfulness practice of oneness, presence and connection. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Scrambled eggs with turmeric, garlic and greens, avocado and some home fermented veggies on the side.  Lunch – Wild caught Mahi Mahi with tarragon, parsley, lemon and garlic cooked in ghee, on top of a bed of greens with some roasted sweet potato on the side. (Literally one of my favourite dishes ever) Snack – I love smoothies. Often a smoothie, my current fav is Strawberries, cashew nut butter, cashew nut mylk, collagen, hemp seeds, tocos, cinnamon, vanilla powder & ashwaganda powder. Dinner - San choy bow, with a rainbow of veggies & lots of bold ginger flavour in vibrant cos lettuce cups. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I actually do not, I am completely stimulant free. I have not always been, but just find myself so very sensitive to any stimulants these days. I used to love love love a great spicy black chai tea but since going caffeine free I have replaced it with a dandelion chai blend I make myself that is just so warming and grounding I adore it. Plus no crazy energy spikes and lows, so thats a plus! -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? At the same time when I let go of stimulants, I completely let go of sweets- even natural sweeteners. In the past I have been an avid lover of raw chocolate and quite the connoisseur (ha) but these days I make my own carob chocolate that has no sweetener in it at all. I love carob as it’s very sweet naturally so you can get away with no added sweeteners. I pair it with vanilla powder and they work synergistically to give a natural sweetness that I find so comforting. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I do utilize supplement support as needed, this shifts as my body shifts. I love Vitamin C on so many levels but particularly for its adrenally restorative healing elements, so it is absolutely in my daily supplement routine, alongside Magnesium citrate on the daily. With herbs, I will vary what I am taking depending on my needs. I add herbal powders and medicinal mushrooms to my tonics and smoothies. Currently my favourites are Withania (Ashwaganda) and Reishi. I also am a huge lover of infusions (long loose leaf herbal brews) and always have a big jar of an overnight infusion with me to sip throughout my day. My most utilized blend would be Nettle leaf, Oat straw and Hibiscus. Earthy, calming, tangy and nourishing. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Years go I had a heinous back injury, I herniated multiple discs from overexercising. My approach and relationship to body movement completely shifted after this, from rigorous to gentleness. It is still an area of my life I have to encourage myself back to and approach more as an act of self love. Taking care of my temple. I walk my pups daily, I love pilates and swimming, I have begun the be.come project and absolutely LOVE the approach to body movement with body positivity, inclusivity, no need for any equipment and in the comfort of my own home. This all feels really supportive and a mix of gentle yet effective support for me and my body. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I am not a natural athlete by any measure! I have recently connected to how emotional it can be to return to body movement when you have been through a big physical injury/­­body change/­­life change. So for me the way I psyche myself up to do a session is to come from self love, to know this is a loving act of care for my body. That really helps me so much. Also knowing there are no rules to how you must move your body, allow exercise to meet your vibration- yin, yang and all between. Shifting the type of body movement I do with my menstrual cycle/­­hormones is so key. Be your own compass. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Authenticity, when someone is just purely themselves and at ease with it. I find it absolutely stunning. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Oils, oils and more oil. I swear by the dewy hydration of oils. I am pretty low maintenance with skin care, and have noticed I need a lot less intervention since moving to the sea and swimming in the ocean most days. The salt magic is so nourishing for the skin. I also find the sun very healing, contrary to the fear of UV rays we have been indoctrinated with! I use a homemade herbal balm for a lot of applications, hair mask, makeup remover, and moisturizer. It is a power packed plant based mix, and such a heavenly blend. I also use Ritual oil, a moringa and blue lotus oil as a body moisturizer.  I am in my mid 30s and really notice my skin responds so well to the dewy goodness of oils. I practice dry body brushing also, which I feel is so wonderful to aid stagnation and lymphatic flow. I use a jade roller which I keep in the fridge for extra lymphatic cooling, and use on my face every few days with oil. I always end my showers with cold water, to add in a hydrotherapy element. I wear very little makeup, but when I do it is always natural, as clean as can be. I love RMS and Ere Perez. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? The importance of a vibrant whole foods diet and hydration is EVERYTHING! So many compounds in our foods, fruit + veggies are anti aging and collagen boosting anti oxidant heros. I drink 3+ litres of filtered water daily and do my very best to eat a rainbow of seasonal organic fruit/­­veggies daily and honestly I rely on this to support my health, skin and hair primarily. I do add in a marine based collagen daily to either smoothies or tonics. Also I am in a stage of encouraging my hair to grow, and am using nettle, rosemary and horsetail infusions as a hair rinse. I also massage in olive oil and rosemary oil into my scalp, truly it is so simple and aids hair growth. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? A low tox life is key. Keep your stress in check, move your body, eat as clean as possible – mostly plants, organics or pesticide free produce, clean water and clean air. The most incredibly glowy humans I know follow this ethos. This has been my guideline and I am often told I really do not look my age. I am so at ease with ageing but it is always nice to hear you are maintaining a youthful glow! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I really do. I work for myself and direct all of my offerings at this point. This can be demanding and means work can have a never-ending feel. There are always so many thoughts, needs and energy streams flowing into my work life. I also feel when you work as a space holder and in the healing realms, your energy output can be hefty. Burn out is high in this line of work, as you truly want to assist so deeply to aid others, we can often throw our needs to the side. I have learnt this many times in my years as a clinician/­­healer. I implement a lot of consistency with a structured clinic week~ limiting the amount of clients I see weekly to where I feel my energy is at and how many clients I can truly be present for. I balance myself with time off, away from screens, in nature and welcome in receiving energy to counteract my giving energy. My self care practice is the core of how I seek balance. I am actually freakily good at giving back to myself, which I believe enables me to do what I do! -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? For me, it is much healthier to come at it head on.. (typical Aries answer!) I do my finest to address the stressors, and clear the way. Whether this means a mountain of admin,  which is often a stressor for me as I not a natural lover of admin. I bunker down, switch off all other distractions, play some flute music or chants, burn some incense and get in the zone. When I exit that zone I feel so accomplished and reward myself with an ocean swim, or a nature walk to balance out the mental space I have been in. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? First and foremost I rest. Immunity can be a very strong conversation our bodies communicate to us with the message of needed REST. My go to supplement and herbal approach is to take a high dose of Vitamin C consistently in divided doses throughout my day, I also add in zinc supplements. I always have an immune focused liquid herbal tonic in my first aid support cabinet, so I begin this at a high frequent dose to meet the acute presentation of a cold/­­virus~ generally dosing up to 4 x daily. Usually it will have Echinacea, andrographis, elderberry, manuka, thyme in it. I love medicinal mushrooms to support immunity so I will take a blend of Reishi and Chaga in higher doses. I avoid raw foods and focus on lots of cooked warming nourishing food to feed the cold, congees, broths, soups, stew. I also make fresh oregano, thyme with sliced lemon &  ginger tea. If I really honour the rest that is needed, the cold/­­rundown feelings will shift very swiftly. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? The best thing I ever did was to get a separate work phone. I have a dedicated phone that my clients can contact me on, so in my free time it is left at home or on silent. This has helped me enormously create healthy boundaries. I also do not have my work emails on my phone, so I do not check them at all unless I am sitting down at my computer to work. It is so important to be available to your own process and own life, especially when you are in the field of assisting others. These simple interventions help fortify those boundaries greatly for me. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I return to softness with myself if I lose my way a little. I do my best to not judge or engage in negative self talk. I soften and return to my centre. We all have patterns we are cycling. Although I feel I am quite a master of my own self care practice I definitely can get caught up in my workload a fair bit. One thing I do consciously do is to book a treatment in weekly in some form, usually a bodywork-massage session. I find this tactile healing so restorative. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I recently moved from the mountains to the sea, although they are both completely beautiful nature rich locations I was very much in need a big environment change for my own health and wellbeing.  Having lived in a very cold environment mountain side for 10 + years I was craving the warmth, the salt and the sun. Being by the ocean and soaking up the sun rays has been so fundamentally healing for me at this point. Total game changer! The power of changing your environment is so potent when you feel the call to do so. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I acknowledge that this too shall pass, it is transient. I do my best to trust my own creative genius. I am quite a forward motion person, so when I am feeling uninspired it absolutely can get me down. I am naturally a procrastinator in many ways, which can be so frustrating but saying that I also have the ability to then smash out the tasks in an uncanny way! I often find when I am not in such a wonderful place with myself I feel that sense of stagnation, so I do my very best to get to the roots of that stagnation. Often it takes me getting into nature to be re inspired, crafting out some quiet space to re energize and tackle the task head on. I try to ask myself what is the block, and unpack the block to free up the energy flow. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. As cheesy at it sounds I LOVED Practical Magic, the witchy plant potions and the apothecary Sandra Bullocks character opened was a total inspiration for me as teenager.. & still is now (lol). Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a herbalist, nutritionist, and energetic healer? How do all of those practices interweave for you? I was always drawn to the esoteric realms and the mystery of nature. As a little girl I loved being outside, I loved the flowers, the trees, the plants, the grasses, the oceans, the mountains. I loved being an observer and always felt so held when I was in nature. As soon as I began to understand that plants could have a positive effect on our health, it just fascinated me. Learning about folklore of plant medicine, applications and remedies drew me into a language I wanted to be fluent in. I believe that much of our call to the plant path is remembering, these plants  have been with us through our ancestral lines for eons. My career began really at the age of 16 with energetic healing, I met a group of wild women up north in Australia and was welcomed into circles, introduced to the concepts of healing, and recognized as a student of these realms. I learnt reiki which led to crystal healing, then to sound healing, colour therapy, kinesiology.. I went to a college for 2 years to learn energetic healing in depth and graduated by the age of 19 holding full in depth sessions on auric healing and clearing energetic blockages. For me it felt too much too soon. So I went and travelled, met my husband in the USA and studied a whole lot more. When I returned to Australia I wanted to anchor my knowledge of healing with more grounded modalities so I began studying Naturopathic medicine. I forked off into a Bachelor of Western Herbal Medicine and Nutritional Medicine. I loved learning about plants and food as medicine, I loved the union of science and grass roots knowledge. Over years of being in practice, I have found that there is no way or no need to seperate these modalities. I weave them all in together to ultimately support the client in a very holistic way. I approach my practice with this lens of perception. I lead with intuition, and merge functional testing, pathology testing, traditional folk medicine, evidence based plant medicine, nutritional medicine, and energetics all to support. I believe there are always energetics involved in a health presentation, along with the demand for nutritional healing as powerful ally, and herbal medicine to assist, shift and support. Aligning these healing modalities is a potent combination. Essentially the basis of Naturopathic Medicine is individualised care, no one case is the same. This ethos rings true to me, there is not one client I have worked with that is the same as any other. How can we approach health in one way, or believe there is one remedy for one presentation? It goes against the nature of our uniqueness! My practice is about honouring the individuals path, story and health goals. -- You put a lot of emphasis on gut health in your practice and believe it to be the root to all balanced health. Can you talk a little bit about why you see this as such an important aspect of wellbeing?  All diseases begin in the gut – Hippocrates had it right! So many issues stem from the gut, it is the root of our health. With the emergence of continued evolving science we are seeing so much more information come to light around the microbiome/­­microbiota, which is truly wonderful. Much of our immunity is linked with gut health, it impacts mental health greatly with our second brain residing in the gut producing neurotransmitters, it is involved in the auto immune expression, it defines our ability to absorb and produce nutrients/­­vitamins/­­minerals, it impacts our metabolism, it is directly connected to our stress response and digestion responds accordingly.. And so much more... I work very closely with digestive healing with each and every one of my clients as I believe this is a key element to balanced health and shifting imbalanced symptoms. Many of my clients present with poor digestion and we dig like detectives to get to the roots, often it is a leaky gut like picture – with parasites, yeast overgrowths or SIBO which we generally detect via functional testing. Once we have a good sense of what is actually happening in the gut, we go in with a supportive treatment plan – lifestyle, supplemental, nutritional and herbal interventions. It always astounds me how health can transform so greatly, from imbalanced to balanced with the right support, intention and dedication. Our bodies are so wise, and so willing to transform. -- What is your favorite way of incorporating herbal medicine into your (or your clients) everyday life? I personally incorporate it in so many ways. I make my own products and use them on my skin and in my home on the daily, I drink herbal teas and infusions daily and use tonic herbs to support my body/­­being. I have a herbal garden that is buzzing right now, so connecting with the plants via gardening is medicine to me. There is something so potent about growing and caring for a plant and utilising her healing, knowing the story of the plants beginnings enhances the healing power I believe. For clients~ it really depends but I do always advise infusions to become a part of their everyday lives. They are so very simple and accessible, basically a long brewed overnight tea! If you are working with me in a session we will touch on many ways to incorporate plant medicine into your life, from the herbs that are suitable for your current process, to cleaning up your skin care with more plant love, to working with herbal tablets/­­liquid tonics for marked support. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? This next year feels so full of creativity, as I expand and launch multiple new offerings. Right now I am in a potent brewing stage, so I look forward to it all coming to fruition! -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Days off at the beach, going into the bush, gardening in my medicinal plant patch, reading a great book, screen free days, massages, hugs with my husband & dogs. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Braiding Sweetgrass – Robin Wall Kimmerer Song –  Stay – Cat Power/­­ Ba Movie –  Call me by your name Piece of Art –  A oil pastel pencil drawing gifted to me by my husband and family by my dear friend and incredible creator Chanel Tobler called Curves like jam -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily Lami from Bodha, she is a scent magician. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Self-Care Interview Series: Lucy Vincent Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Parmesan

October 20 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegan Parmesan Here is a recipe that will replace Parmesan cheese. Fast and very easy to make, this vegan parmesan does not contain any products of animal origin. The taste is, of course, different from the traditional Parmesan, but once you get used to it there is no way you will put cow’s milk cheese on your pasta. This vegetable Parmesan is really delicious and you can use it on all your preparations. I added in some sesame seeds (rich in calcium) and yeast powder (naturally rich in vitamins B1, B2, B5, B6, B9, PP, magnesium, zinc, phosphorus, protein and fiber, source of iron and vitamin B12).   Save Print Vegan Parmesan Prep time:  10 mins Total time:  10 mins   Servings: 1 cup Ingredients 1 cup of cashews 4 tablespoons yeast 1 pinch of pink Himalayan salt, otherwise your usual salt 1 pinch of white pepper Instructions Add all the ingredients to a blender or a food processor Pulse and mix at regular intervals for a few seconds and not continuously. You must get a powder. Keep your Parmesan in a glass jar that you can close. Leave it in the fridge. To use on all dishes, instead of Parmesan! 3.3.3077 […] The post Vegan Parmesan appeared first on VegKitchen.

Adaptogenic Date Shake

May 3 2018 My New Roots 

Adaptogenic Date Shake Each year, my now friend Sasha Swerdloff of Tending the Table genius organizes a trip for women in the food world (bloggers, cookbook authors, chefs, nutritionists, photographers etc.) to get together, hang out, share delicious food, and get to know each other beyond a screen (...see? Genius!) This year I actually got to attend - ok truth: I shamelessly invited myself because I wanted to meet this talented troupe of ladies IRL. The group decided to gather in Palm Springs, much to my delight as I needed to escape two kinds of hell: overdue home renovations and Ontario in February. The days were magically sunny, delicious, and life-affirming. We cooked a lot, then let our food get cold taking too many photos of it. We swam, we hiked, we yoga-ed, we laughed, and conspired together. Besides all of the heart-warming togetherness, one of the highlights for me, was visiting a date farm just outside the city limits, to understand where our favourite whole food sweetener comes from (and to gorge ourselves, naturally). I had never seen dates on a tree before, and was moved to learn from the passionate farmer himself just how these sweet miracles grow. Dates grow on palm trees, and they fastidiously follow the calendar – you can practically set your watch to a date palms seasonal cycle. The first day of spring the tree is in full bloom and the hard work begins, as the farmer pollinates each one by hand. The ratio of male to female trees is about 1 to 30, since the male trees are only necessary to produce the pollen, and the female trees are the ones that produce the fruit. Between the first day of spring and the first day of summer, the tree sets up its entire crop for the year. All the work (trimming, feeding, etc.) must take place during this season, since its during this period is when the fruit ripens, turning from green, to yellow, to brown. The dates are ready to eat from the first day of autumn, and then the harvest begins. During this season, the fruit is either left on the tree and protected with cloth bags to prevent rain, birds and insects from spoiling the fruit, or picked when ripe. The farmer told us that the best place for the dates is to remain on the tree for freshness, but if the load is too heavy, it will not bloom as well the following year, thus effecting the trees output. After decades of date farming, he was as wide-eyed and passionate about his fruit as an eager young man, which really made us all swoon. It is truly one of my favourite things in this world, to see how and where food is grown, and to meet and connect with the people who lovingly produce it. We all left with full bellies and hearts, and of course, our bags bulging with dates.    Along the dusty, desert road home we saw so many signs for date shakes, since this is the land where this indulgent treat was invented back in the 1930s. None of us caved and bought one, but my mouth was definitely watering, and I was excited to get back and make one for myself. The original recipe is simple, and calls for dates, vanilla ice cream, milk, and sometimes a dash of cinnamon and nutmeg. I knew this was the perfect makeover opportunity, and high-vibed my date shake with coconut milk instead of dairy, hemp seeds, and adaptogens. So why the adaptogens? Well, I felt like the already-pretty-healthy date shake could use a boost, and what better way to make something more supportive than with a dose of stress-reducing, adrenal-loving, hormone-balancing, potions to get you back into balance? Yahs! I had these four choices on hand, but there are a lot of options once you start to dig around the health food store a little. Here is a little about each one and why I chose them. Ashwaganda: helps the body adapt to stress and bring us back into balance. It encourages deeper sleep, supports the immune system, and energy levels. He Shou Wu: builds the blood, harmonizes adrenal gland function, nourishes hair, skin and nervous system, increases antioxidant activity. Maca: increases stamina, elevates mood, helps to balance hormones in both men and women, supports fertility and healthy libido. Licorice: balances hormones, helps the body adapt to stress, supports the immune response, and aids learning and memory. *Some adaptogens during pregnancy, breastfeeding, and while on medication are not recommended, so check with your natural health care provider before trying any of them. The farm we visited grew seven types of dates, and we loved trying them all. The unanimous favourite was the growers very own variety that he created himself, called Black Gold. He also mentioned that this was the best type of date for a date shake, but considering the fact that you maaaaay not get a chance to visit Palm Springs anytime soon, Ill go ahead and recommend using Medjool dates for the shakes, since they are widely available, and their thin skin blends very easily into a smooth consistency. If you cannot find Medjool, try Deglet Noor instead, or soak your dates in warm water for half an hour before blending. Dates are a great source of energy, and provide a generous amount of filling dietary fibre with very little fat. Dates are mineral rich, delivering potassium, manganese, magnesium and copper, as well as an assortment of B-vitamins. Seek out dates that are plump and juicy-looking (if youre buying from a market, ask to try them first), that their skin is intact, and that they are neither glossy or dusty. I store my dates in an airtight glass jar in the fridge to extend their shelf life, and protect their flavour and nutrients. Kept this way, dates will last up to six months. Outside of the fridge at room temperature, dates will last about a month and a half, or you can freeze them for up to a year. The banana in this blend up is totally optional, and I actually really liked the version without, even though it was less thick and milkshakey. If you want to add more dates for sweetness and flavour, live it up. I found that this amount, about 3 Medjool dates, was just perfect for me, even without the banana. The spices are also optional, but help to disguise any strong flavours from the adaptogens, which admittedly can sometimes taste like the inside of a barn, or everyones favourite: feet? Mmmmm. Right. Lets cover that up. All in all, this is a delicious and filling way to start your morning, or the perfect afternoon pick-me-up. Its creamy, smooth, sweet and totally balanced. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do!        Print recipe     Adaptogenic Date Shake Serves 1 (makes 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ ml) Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 50g pitted Medjool or Deglet Noor Dates 1/­­2 – 1 frozen banana (optional) 1 cup /­­ 250ml full-fat coconut milk 2 Tbsp. hulled hemp seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. licorice root 1/­­2 tsp. ashwaganda 1/­­2 tsp. maca 1/­­4 tsp. ho shu wu pinch vanilla powder (or 1/­­2 tsp. pure vanilla extract) pinch ground cinnamon pinch ground nutmeg 3-4 ice cubes Directions: 1. Brew the licorice tea by combining 1 cup /­­ 250ml boiling water with 1/­­2 tablespoon of chopped licorice root. Let steep covered for 15-30 minutes. 2. Place all ingredients in the blender. Measure out 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml of licorice tea, add it to the blender, and blend on high until smooth. Taste and adjust sweetness and spice to your liking. Enjoy immediately. I just want to give a huge shout out to Sasha and all the women who attended the retreat – it was truly a beautiful experience. And if anyone out there is looking for some inspiration and general awesomeness, follow these wonderful people, below: Sasha Swerdloff – Tending the Table Renne Byrd – Will Frolic for Food Lily Diamond – Kale and Caramel Kimberly Hasselbrink – Kimberly Hasselbrink Shelley Westerhausen – Vegetarian Ventures Lindsay Kluge – Ginger Botanicals Trisha Hughes – Go Eat Your Beets Carly Diaz – Carly Diaz Eva Kosmes Flores – Adventures in Cooking Sophie MacKenzie – Wholehearted Eats Hope you’re all enjoying the first breaths of Springtime. Sending love, gratitude, and sunshine, Sarah B. Show me your shakes on Instagram: #mnrdateshake *   *   *   *   *   * Hey ya’ll! One more thing before I go: new Wild Heart High Spirit retreats are being planned! I’ll share more news about the retreats soon, but if you want to be the first to know when tickets are available, go to www.goldencircleretreats.com and join the email list. I’m so excited to welcome another group of women to this magical experience! The post Adaptogenic Date Shake appeared first on My New Roots.

Pumpkin Spice Chia Pudding

October 6 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Here’s a quick and healthy recipe from Plant-Based Cooking that is just in time for fall! Why? Because it contains everyone’s favorite fall flavor — pumpkin spice. Chia pudding is great for a grab-and-go breakfast, or a light snack. It’s made with chia seeds, which are packed with fiber, omegas, potassium, zinc and magnesium. A superfood that is great for boosting energy and so much more! You can get super creative with what ingredients you put in your chia pudding, which is one of the reasons we love it so much. So for anyone looking for a pumpkin spice version of chia pudding, this recipe will do the trick! Here’s how to make it: Read the full recipe here. The post Pumpkin Spice Chia Pudding appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Peanut Butter and Jelly Smoothie

August 2 2016 VegKitchen 

Peanut Butter and Jelly Smoothie Based on the famous PB&J sandwich and full of nutrition, this berry smoothie is antioxidant rich. And peanut butter gives you protein and fiber as well as well as vitamin E, B6 and magnesium. Recipe and photo from How to Be a Smoothie Criminal by James McLoughlin, published by Green Press.

Banza Co-Founders on Creating a Chickpea-Powered Pasta

May 16 2016 Meatless Monday 

Banza Co-Founders on Creating a Chickpea-Powered PastaWe here at Meatless Monday love chickpeas. And whats not to love?  A great source of protein and high in fiber, magnesium and folate, these naturally gluten-free legumes are loved across the globe for their nut-like taste and buttery texture. In its newest rendition, the versatile chickpea is used to make pasta, and we sat down with the founders of Banza to see how they came up with “pasta that loves you back”. MM: What was your initial inspiration to eat more nutritiously? Health, sustainability? Did you grow up with healthy cooking/­­eating as a family or did you become interested in it later on? Brian: Growing up, I was a picky eater – I didnt venture far away from chicken nuggets and bagels. After college I started paying closer attention to the way I ate, and noticed a real difference in how I felt. I began to focus my attention on food and nutrition. Now Im the guy who stays up late reading food science books and thinking about our next innovation. MM: How did you get the idea to use chickpeas as your starter food? Why pasta? Brian: Im a huge fan of chickpeas. Theyre delicious and a staple of the mediterranean diet. Meanwhile, I love pasta. If I could, I would eat it every day. But durum wheat doesn’t have a ton of nutritional value. So I bought a hand crank and started making chickpea pasta in my own kitchen! I figured I wasnt alone – other people also must be craving a better pasta. So I recruited my big brother Scott, who was working in private equity at the time, to co-found the business with me. And weve been chickpea dreamin ever since! MM: Tell us about some of your creative failures creating the pasta and your final ah-hah moment? Scott: Early on, we realized why chickpea pasta didnt already exist. Its really hard to make! We worked with pasta experts, and still werent satisfied. We finally found the right plant, invested hundreds of thousands of dollars into production, and landed our first big order. But our initial attempt fell short of our expectations. We lost a fair amount of time and money, but the challenge motivated us to spend every waking hour researching, testing and perfecting. Well never stop obsessing over making our product better. MM: Whats the feedback you hear from people about your product? Scott: When were sampling our pasta in stores or at events, we get to meet our customers, which is incredibly rewarding. We love watching people take a bite, and be shocked to discover Banza is made from chickpeas. Since day one, weve made a commitment to building a brand thats personal – one that people can meet and get to know. MM: Whats your favorite chickpea pasta recipe of all the time and can you share the recipe with us? Thats like making a parent choose a favorite child! Mac & cheese is a team favorite. We also love this avocado cream with herbs! Get the recipe for Banza’s Spring Pea Pesto Penne! MM: Do you have plans for other products with chickpeas or other ingredients? Brian: Right now were focusing on pasta – well be launching a high protein mac & cheese soon! But yes, our mission is to take the foods that people love and make them better, by using more nutritious ingredients. Im continually experimenting in my kitchen – making better versions of the foods we dont want to give up - from cereal to tortillas. Stay tuned. MM: What advice can you give our readers about how to live a healthier and more sustainable life - besides eating Banza chickpea pastas?! Everyones different, but everything in moderation. You dont need to give up all the foods you love to eat well. There are a lot of options out there that are healthy, simple substitutions for everyday foods, and healthy is much more sustainable over time if its done without sacrifice.   The post Banza Co-Founders on Creating a Chickpea-Powered Pasta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard

April 28 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard Mung beans have been my legume of choice as of late. I love them for their versatility, good nutrition record (protein of course, manganese, potassium, magnesium, zinc, etc.), brief cooking time, and a very fair price tag. They work well for falafel, with very similar properties to chickpeas, albeit lighter in every way. Soaking the mung beans overnight and baking the falafel instead of frying makes them easy on the stomach – I say this because even though I love to get traditional fried falafel when out, it always makes me feel unwell. These mung bean falafels are made with my favorite spice mix that goes well with their bright, lemony flavor. When I go to the farmer’s market, I often have the eyes bigger than the stomach problem, especially with greens. Last week, there was lots of beautiful rainbow chard at the stand, and I carried away more bunches than we could ever eat. Pickling was the next best choice and I was pleasantly surprised by the result. The marinade I came up with is very mild and simple, and the pickling only takes a day. It seems that in our little health food community, bowl format has become the default lunch format, and we are right there with everyone, happy to enjoy a veggie loaded and colorful lunch bowl, any time of day really. As usual in spring, I can’t get enough of quickly sautéed, crispy and tender asparagus, which complements any grains or legumes. A base of quinoa, which can be substituted with any grain, tangy tahini sauce, crunchy nuts, herbs, and pickles complete this meal. All these components are, of course, suggestions, and dishes like these are highly customizable. I do very much recommend trying all the parts – the falafel, the pickles and tahini sauce – if not together, then independently, added to sandwiches, salads, and the like – you won’t regret it. Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard serves 4-6 for the mung bean falafel bowl 1 cup rainbow quinoa or other grain of choice – cooked sea salt – to taste 1/­­2 tablespoon neutral coconut oil about 20 asparagus – tough ends removed freshly ground black pepper – to taste mung bean falafel – recipe below pickled rainbow chard – recipe below large hadful baby spiach/­­other salad greens handful cilantro leaves/­­pea shoots/­­other microgreens tahini sauce – recipe below sesame seeds – for garnish (optional) chopped pistachios/­­other nuts – for garnish (optional) to assemble the falafel bowls Distribute quinoa between bowls. Warm coconut oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add asparagus to the pan, sprinkle with a pinch of salt and black pepper and cook, undisturbed, for 3 minutes. Flip and cook for another 3-4 minutes, until soft and bright green. Divide asparagus between bowls on top of quinoa. Arrange falafels on top, followed by chard pickles, if using. Add spinach or other salad greens, herbs/­­microgreens. Drizzle with tahini sauce, sprinkle with sesame seeds and nuts. Mung Bean Falafel makes about 18 falafels 1 cup mung beans – soaked overnight 1/­­2 cup pumpkin seeds juice of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons sesame tahini 2 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil or olive oil 1/­­2 tablespoon cumin seeds – freshly ground 1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes sea salt – to taste freshly ground black pepper – to taste 1. Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). 2. Drain and rinse mung beans and cook them in plenty of salted water for about 7 minutes, or until soft but not mushy. Drain over a colander and set aside. 3. Coarsely grind pumpkin seeds in a food processor. Add mung beans and the rest of ingredients. Pulse to combine. 4. Shape about 18 small falafels and arrange them on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes on each side. Keep covered and warm, if using right away. Otherwise, keep refrigerated in an airtight container and reheat in the 350° F (180° C) oven for about 10-15 minutes. Pickled Rainbow Chard 1 large bunch rainbow chard – leaves and stems separated 4 garlic cloves – sliced pinch red pepper flakes roughly chopped dill and cilantro – to taste (optional) Thinly slice chard stems and leaves into bite sized pieces. Place into a large water-proof bowl, and pour purified water over them to just cover. Drain water, reserving it, and measure it, as you will need to prepare the marinade according to these proportions: 5 cups water 1/­­2 cup apple cider vinegar 2 1/­­2 tablespoons sea salt 1 teaspoon coconut sugar 2 bay leaves 3 whole cloves 1/­­2 teaspoon coriander seeds 1/­­4 teaspoon black peppercorns to pickle Combine measured water with other marinade ingredients in a medium saucepan. If you have more or less water than the recipe calls for, adjust the amount of vinegar, salt and spices accordingly – it doesn’t have to be exact. Bring the marinade to a boil over medium high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 3 minutes. Meanwhile, add garlic, red pepper flakes and herbs to the chard, mixing to distribute evenly. Pour hot marinade over the chard and place a plate over it to keep all the chard emerged in the marinade. You can use a heavy object to weigh the plate down, such as a jar filled with water. Pickles will be ready the next day. Keep refrigerated. Best within 1 week. Tahini Sauce 1/­­4 cup sesame tahini 1/­­4 cup purified water juice of 1 lemon 1 garlic clove – chopped sea salt – to taste tiny pinch red pepper flakes (optional) Combine all the ingredients in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated for up to 1 week.

Do Food Cravings Mean Your Nutrient Deficient?

February 19 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Do Food Cravings Mean Your Nutrient Deficient? Myth: You crave a certain food because youre deficient in one of its nutrients. If youve ever found yourself desperately pushing through a crowd to get at the double-chocolate cupcakes in a display window, youre well aware of the power of food cravings. Some people suggest that such cravings are an effort by your body to correct a deficiency in a certain nutrient. In the case of chocolate, that might be magnesium--cocoa is considered a good source of this vital mineral. The urge to dig into a tub of salted caramel ice cream, some would say, is an indication you are coming up short in bone-building calcium. And if youre desperately searching for that strawberry shortcake in your fridge, are you deficient in vitamin C? Probably not. Your hankering for certain foods is more likely caused by a mixture of social, psychosocial, cultural, and environmental cues rather than nutritional ones. Case in point, we most often yearn for foods laden with fat, sugar, and salt rather than nutrient-dense choices such as leafy greens and lentils. See also 8 Foods Every Vegetarian Should Eat A study in The Journal of Clinical Investigation found that volunteers who received an infusion of fatty acids (similar to what you would get from comfort foods) while being exposed to depressing stimuli, such as dreary music, reported feeling less sad. And a British study looking at the state of mind of participants right before a craving struck found that they were prone to being anxious or bored and to experiencing a depressed mood. These findings indicate that areas of the brain involved in emotions and moods are strongly affected by dietary elements that can impact cravings and the urge to eat. So when youre feeling down in the dumps, a warm muffin may positively impact parts of your brain--and result in a learned craving for that item. Outsmart a Craving Heres how to outsmart cravings for foods laden with sugar, salt, or fat, which can lead to unbalanced eating and weight gain. STEP OUT The next time you sense a craving for a brownie coming on, lace up your shoes instead. Research shows that a brisk walk can be enough to dampen the urge for sugary snack foods. GET SLEEP Research suggests that people who get more hours of shut-eye tend to be slimmer. KEEP NOTES A detailed food log can help you pinpoint craving trends. You can then take measures to fight back, such as using yoga to deal with stress that induces cravings. UPGRADE Look for healthier substitutes for the foods you crave. For example, try salty tasting nori snacks instead of potato chips or sweet frozen grapes instead of candy. See also Cut the Sugar in 3 Easy Steps The Reality of Food Cravings Cravings are more about wanting than needing. While your body can coax you into drinking more water when youre parched, its not likely to urge you to eat more pumpkin seeds when you need magnesium. Psychological and external factors, though, are the main motivators that drive people to indulge in food cravings. Canada-based Investigative Nutritionist Matthew Kadey, RD, sets us straight on misleading nutrition claims.

One Ingredient, Three Ways: Spelt Flour

February 2 2016 Vegetarian Times 

One Ingredient, Three Ways: Spelt FlourWe asked our friends at the Natural Gourmet Institute to weigh in on popular, healthy ingredients and cooking methods. Vegetarian Times has partnered with the renowned New York-based culinary school to create a  comprehensive new online course, Foundations of Plant-Based Nutrition. Whether youre a new vegetarian, an avid cook wanting to expand your skills, or contemplating a career in the food industry, you will find this course helpful. Sign up to receive discounts and information about this awesome course. While spelt may be an ancient grain, its finding its way into lots of modern recipes. And no wonder: its a perfect choice for health-conscious cooks who want to add more variety to their current stable of grains, and it’s a fitting alternative to whole wheat products. Some people claim spelt is better than whole wheat, touting its nutty flavor. While taste may be a valid distinguishing quality, spelt is nutritionally on par with whole wheat --it boasts fewer calories, but it has less fiber and other nutrients than its counterpart. Another big difference? Spelt is technically not wheat. Though it does contain gluten,  spelt’s gluten is more soluble than that of wheat gluten, and therefore acts differently during the cooking process. Health Benefits of Spelt Spelt provides lots of nutritional benefits, and boasts an impressive mineral and vitamin content. It is high in fiber, and a good source of essential vitamins and minerals such as iron, magnesium, and B vitamins. Here are a few favorite recipes utilizing spelt: Spelt pizza dough--Spelt flour is a sub-in for flour in any pizza dough recipe. Many people swear by the texture and flavor that it provides versus other heartier flours.  Spelt salad--Toast about 1 cup of spelt kernels in a dry skillet until browned, rinse well with cold water. Bring 6 cups of water to a boil and simmer spelt until tender, about an hour. Use this as a base for a salad serving eight to ten people. What else to include? Try a protein such as tofu or beans, veggies like bell peppers and onion, and a spicy peanut butter sauce to top it off. Spelt waffles - Spelt flour can act as a 1:1 replacement for whole wheat flour. So try it out in waffles to create a light, airy final product with a nutty flavor. These waffles can also include spices such as cinnamon and nutmeg. Shredded apple can be a great addition too. Kayleen St. John is the resident nutritionist at NYCs Natural Gourmet Institute. Kayleen has a Masters degree in clinical nutrition from NYU and is a registered dietitian. Her research examines the relationship between diet and inflammatory conditions. Kayleen is an avid runner and believes smart nutrition contributes to optimal athletic performance. Our new course, Foundations of Plant Based Nutrition, led by Kayleen, covers essential plant-centric professional cooking techniques, health-focused topics including allergens and inflammation, and how to separate nutrition fact and fiction in a vegan and veg diet. 

Is Low-Fat Always Better Than Full-Fat?

May 21 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Is Low-Fat Always Better Than Full-Fat?Illustration: Stephanie Birdsong Nope! It’s a myth. It wasnt so long ago that we began blaming fat for all the things that ail us, leading to widespread fat phobia and the proliferation of lower-fat foods on store shelves. Yet opting for only low-fat or fat-free items might be hurting, not helping, our health and weight-loss efforts. Researchers at Cornell University discovered that labeling snacks as low-fat ups their consumption at a single sitting by as much as 50 percent. Why? ?A low-fat label can increase what people perceive to be an appropriate serving size, and temper the guilt associated with, say, polishing off a bag of reduced-fat chips; similarly, a study in the journal Appetite found that people tend to underestimate the calories in candy presented as low-fat, and also perceive the candy to be more healthful than full-fat versions. Such miscalculations can lead to excessive calorie intake and potential weight gain. Worse still, reduced-fat versions of grocery products arent necessarily ?a nutritional upgrade. When fat is removed from such items as peanut butter, frozen yogurt, and salad dressings, manufacturers tend to make up for the ?loss of flavor and texture by pumping in more sugar and salt, which raise ?heart disease risk. Not to be overlooked are nutritional assists from fats. A type of unsaturated fat called oleic acid, packed into foods including olive oil, converts to a hunger-curbing compound in the body, thus helping curtail between-meal trips to the cookie jar. Fat also improves absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, such as the vitamin D added to milk. And, according to research from Purdue University, even just a bit of the monounsaturated fat in canola oil- or olive oil-based dressings promotes absorption of health-protective carotenoid antioxidants supplied by salad veggies. Fat Chance Adults should get 20 to 35 percent of their calories from fat, according to the USDA and the Department of Health and Human Services. Start with these naturally fat-rich plant foods that provide plenty of nutritional perks. Almond butter supplies magnesium, a mineral that aids in lessening heart disease risk. ?Spread on crackers, apple slices, and celery sticks. Here’s how to make your own almond butter. Avocado boosts dietary fiber intake to help kick-start weight loss. ?Blend into smoothies, chocolate desserts, and dips. Hemp seeds are a good source of plant-based protein, delivering about ?10 grams per 3-tablespoon serving. ?Add to yogurt, salads, and soups. Bottom Line: Dont always fear the fat. In most cases, youre better off selecting the full-fat versions of grocery goods, and simply paying attention to portions to keep calories in check.

5 Types of Seaweed to add to your diet

April 18 2015 Vegie Head 

5 types of seaweed to add to your diet Wakame – called the woman’s seaweed because it is loaded with osteoporosis-preventing calcium and magnesium and acts as a diuretic (which helps reduce bloating). Wakame’s dark pigment, fucoxanthin, is known to improve insulin resistance, and...

6 Top Health Benefits of Almonds

February 24 2015 VegKitchen 

6 Top Health Benefits of AlmondsAlmonds are one of the worlds most nutritious and versatile nuts, perfect for snacking as well as in tasty recipes, renowned for their many health benefits and culinary uses. Here are just a few: Reduce Blood Sugar Levels: Eating almonds may be a great option for diabetics looking to maintain healthy blood glucose levels. Findings from a 2007 study published in the journal Metabolism found that consuming almonds alongside white bread regulates spikes in blood sugar and significantly lowers the glycemic index of the meal. Heart-Loving Antioxidant Powers: Almonds are one of the richest food sources of alpha-tocopherol, the form of vitamin E that is most easily absorbed by the body. Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant that protects cells against the damaging effects of free radicals, boosts the immune system, supports cardiovascular health, and helps your body create new red blood cells. A 2005 study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that almond consumption helped meet the Recommended Dietary Allowance of 15 mg/­­day alpha-tocopherol and improved red blood cell concentration. Another study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that almonds can reduce C-reactive protein, an indication of inflammation that affects the arteries. Weight Control: As part of a calorie-conscious eating regime, almonds, which are high in monounsaturated fats, can help obese adults lose weight easier than a diet high in complex carbohydrates, according to a study in the International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders. Contrary to many worries of healthy eaters, consuming almonds actually lowers the risk of weight gain. A 28-month long study showed that individuals who ate almonds at least twice per week were 31% less likely to gain weight than nut-avoiding participants. So go ahead and go nuts! Lower Cholesterol: Almonds are the leading source of monounsaturated fat among commonly eaten nuts: over 60% of the total fat in almonds is monounsaturated. Numerous studies have demonstrated the cholesterol-lowering effects of consuming foods rich in monounsaturated fat. A 2005 study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that consuming almonds as part of a heart-healthy diet can be just as effective at lowering LDL bad cholesterol levels as first generation statin drugs. A good source of calcium and other nutrients: Weve already heard that almonds are a good source of Vitamin E, but they offer a modest but significant and absorbable form of calcium, which is good for the bones. Likewise, theyre a good source of phosphorous for strong bones and teeth. Almonds are a good source of magnesium and folic acid, as well. Excellent source of plant-based protein: Just one ounce of almonds contains about 12 percent of average daily protein needs. Enough said! Adapted from Nuts.com, with permission. Discover your favorite almond products at nuts.com from premium supreme-sized raw almonds to finely blanched almond flour and all natural almond butters for your snacking and recipe needs.

Beets and Mint Tartar

September 19 2018 VegKitchen 

Beets and Mint Tartar Today, the recipe that I propose is a tartar of beetroot with mint. Its an entree that is both pretty and very light. But beware not to use canned, but fresh beet! In fact, this beetroot tartar and mint is more of a salad. What we are going to do is cut the cooked beetroot into small pieces, then season with mint vinaigrette. Beetroots are rich in B vitamins, iron, manganese, copper, magnesium, and potassium. A diet rich in these things is believed to result in improved blood pressure, improved cognition, and reduce accumulation in your liver. Prep Time: 45 minutes Cook Time: 20 to 40 minutes Servings: 8 Ingredients 2 lb yellow and red beets (6 or 8) 2 small cloves garlic minced 2 tsp dried mint 1/­­4  tsp salt and pepper 1 tbsp balsamic vinegar 1/­­3 cup extra virgin olive oil Preparation Dip the unpeeled beets in a large pot of salted boiling water and cook until tender--20 to 40 minutes. While still warm, remove them with a cloth or paper towel, remove the stem, and remove the skin by simply sliding. Slice the hot beets into rings and arrange them on a serving platter. Before they cool, sprinkle […] The post Beets and Mint Tartar appeared first on VegKitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh

October 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Ally Walsh is a model and co-founder of Los Angeles-based organic coffee company, Canyon Coffee. Though we’ve never met, we love Ally’s easy-going approach to wellness, her beautiful instagram, and what her and her partner are doing over at Canyon. It’s an all-around girl crush :) In this interview, Ally tells us about her transition from a vegetarian diet to a feel-good, intuitive diet, the tonic she always takes before bed, the books she’s found to be instrumental to her well-being, exercise, beauty, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I love routine, but that probably has a lot do to with the fact that my schedule is constantly changing! I really enjoy my morning routine, waking up early and making coffee at home. But its always nice to switch things up and come back to that. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning.  I definitely try to ease into my morning. I used to grab my phone first thing when I woke up--now I keep it out of the bedroom. Instead, the first thing I do when I wake up (on a good day!) is sit upright and do a 20 minute meditation. To me, theres no better way to start off the day. Meditation is always followed by some Canyon Coffee. At home, I typically make a pour-over, which is another little opportunity to be mindful as I start my day. On a day off its so nice to sit outside on the porch with some friends and read and have coffee together. We get the New York Times delivered to our house on Sunday mornings and I could spend the whole day reading and relaxing outside in the sun. Its honestly one of my favorites things to do. If I’m shooting though, or out of town for a job, most days start early and end late. The schedule for modeling is often last minute--I sometimes dont know my schedule until the day or night before. In contrast, its nice to have Canyon, where I make my own schedule. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I make a glass of calm/­­magnesium before bed every night! I take that with me wherever I go--security always pull me aside at the airport to ask about what this white powder is ha :) Aside from magnesium, Ill sometimes make a warm tonic with some ashwaganda. And reading always helps me to fall asleep. I guess I wouldn’t call it a ritual, but I do love watching a show or movie before sleep, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast: I have a cup of black coffee and almond butter or avocado toast with gluten-free bread every morning. Im a creature of habit... I have my favorite go-tos, and Im happy eating them every day. If I have to work super early sometimes i like to make overnight chia seed oatmeal. Ill mix in some oats, chia seeds, almond milk, maca and flax seeds, and then in the morning top it off with some fruit and almond butter. Lunch:  Usually a salad with quinoa, avocado, kimchi, roasted seasonal vegetables, seeds, lemon and different oils like grapeseed, olive, and white wine vinegar. I would also be very happy with just roasted kabocha squash and pesto :) Snack: Cashews, pumpkin seeds, Dates and almond butter, green juice, avocado toast, and currently addicted to Honey Mamas Chocolate! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Well, it kind of comes with starting a coffee company ;) Some people are surprised to learn, though, that I only drink one cup of black coffee in the morning! Thats pretty much it. I cant do too much caffeine. Only on rare occasions, like when Im on vacation, will I have an afternoon espresso or cortado. I was in Copenhagen and Stockholm recently, and fell in love with oatmilk cortados! Definitely pushed my caffeine limit there! -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I honestly don’t! I love raw chocolate, but Im really sensitive to sugar! So Im kind of weird in that I really dont love sweets. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? In addition to magnesium at night (for sleep), Ill take ashwaganda at any time of the day for my adrenals, and probiotics daily. I feel such a difference when I take b12, too. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Yes. Yoga has been such an important practice to me, for years. I usually go to a class a couple times a week. I intersperse that with hiking in the Santa Monica mountains and walks on the beach. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I actually look forward to exercise. I dont really partake in any forms of exercise that arent enjoyable. For example, Ive never really gotten into spinning or boot camp-style workouts. I love getting out in nature for hikes, and I find an hour-and-a-half in the yoga studio to be very meditative. After a long work day, I really look forward to being able to do something nice for my body. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really think the most beautiful people are those that feel confident in their skin and are who they want to be--not what society expects them to be. Someone thats naturally comfortable in any setting. As a model, so much emphasis is put on the external, and thats important for a photograph or video. But in person, beauty really does come from within. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I think the most important thing for healthy skin is to eat and drink clean. Especially drinking lots of water. As for products, I use the most natural that I can find. I love Earth tu Face, True Botanicals, Osea and Linne! I use oils for moisturizing and just use water to wash my face in the morning. I love using Bodha and CAP Beauty rose water spray, too. Ill try to do a face mask once a week from Wildcare while taking a bath! Its very relaxing :) -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water! I also think getting a good night of sleep is just as important! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Stay hydrated. My mom is 59 & has the most beautiful skin – not one wrinklel! And she swears by drinking lots of water! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Im trying to get better at this, but acupuncture has been a life saver! Its a place to relax and reset. I see Maria at Elysia Life Care and she is life-changing! I think getting into a regular routine of acupuncture and meditation can help so much with stress. After having a consistent routine with both, you start to notice things that used to stress you or make you upset no longer have the same power or effect on you. You can laugh it off, or just observe it and not be affected by it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going on a walk always helps. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Lycopene vitamin C packets, lots of ginger and tea tree oil (usually just put it in my water!) -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This has been a learning process for me, how to balance everything. Modeling, Canyon Coffee, relationship with my partner, my friends, and time for myself. Especially with starting a company with your partner, that start-up grind can be all-consuming because theres always more work you can do! So weve had to learn how to turn off- and make sure to make time for a date night! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? My goal is to maintain a state of love (as opposed to state of stress, or lack, or anger, etc.). I was lucky to learn from a qi gong master named George Falcon for a couple years before he passed, and I feel like his teachings provided me with tools to help stay in this mindset throughout the stressors and obstacles of daily life. One of the big ones is to take responsibility for our actions and state of being. Its easy for us to blame, to say he, she, or it made me feel this way. But really its our decision. Of course, we sometimes fall out of that consciousness of love. When Im not feeling well, my first step is to take a break. To meditate, listen to a recorded guided meditation of George, go on a walk or a hike. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Ive made different changes throughout my life that have been substantial in terms of my wellness. I stopped eating meat when I was 19, then introduced fish (mainly salmon!) back in years later. Acupuncture has perhaps been the most substantial in helping me maintain balance and wellness. All of these changes or decisions are really informed by just listening to my body. You can get caught up in the mindset and identity of, say, Im vegan. But its important to check in with yourself and ask, Am I feeling good? Is this helping live a balanced and vibrant life? If not, then its important to make a change! -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So many books! If I had to pick two, Id say Anatomy of the Spirit by Caroline Myss and Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert. Anatomy really opened me to the power of our bodies to heal and self-nourishment. It helped me connect my mental and spiritual state to my health and well-being. Its a book you can go back to, re-read and continue to learn from over time. Big Magic was instrumental in motivating me to start Canyon Coffee. It made me feel like I had more to give, creatively, and pushed me to start something with a greater purpose. It brought clarity to the creative process for me, breaking it down in a way that makes it approachable and applicable to my own life. Its one of those books that really inspires you to follow your dreams, and what could be more important for self-nourishment? Knowlegde -- You run Canyon Coffee together with your boyfriend, Casey. What was your path to starting your own coffee company? Personally, I was feeling uninspired. I felt like I wasnt making the most of my creativity and talents. Ive always been grateful for my modeling career, but I had also always wanted to start something of my own, and I was feeling that itch. Casey and I had both fallen in love with coffee over the years... through making it at home together and visiting coffee shops in our travels and around LA. Casey actually started working in the coffee industry, and we became friends with a roaster, James. Eventually, our passion for it grew to the point that we had the thought: why not start our own company? It really was a natural culmination. The moment we decided we wanted to do it, we just never looked back. -- What is your process when choosing beans for Canyon Coffee? Are there certain growing practices, flavor profiles, or geographical locations that are important to you? The universal practice of tasting different beans is called cupping. It involves preparing small roasted samples of different beans exactly the same way and trying them at the same time. For Canyon, our parameters narrow down our options. We usually decide on a country first, and then see what organic, seasonal beans grown at high altitudes are available through the network of importers near us in California. Then we order samples, cup, and choose the bean that smells and tastes best to us. High altitude is important because the elevation makes the coffee plant grow slower and put more energy into producing cherries. The slow growth results in cherries (and coffee beans) that are much more flavorful and vibrant. To start Canyon, we focused on Latin American coffees and wanted to find amazing-tasting beans in the chocolatey /­­ caramel flavor profile. We went with beans from Guatemala and Colombia first, because theyre known for these flavor profiles and they have great infrastructure for small coffee producers to process and export their beans. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love going to the movies :) And a nice dinner out before or after. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit .. anything from Krishnamurti & Ram Dass Song/­­Album – Paul Simon – Graceland, Feist – Let it Die, Lord Huron – Lonesome Dreams Movie – Beginners Piece of Art – Robert Lango Men In the Cities, Alfred Stieglitz’ Portraits of Georgia OKeeffe -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Gjusta/­­ Gjelina, Honey Hi, Amara Kitchen, Pace, Botanica, Necco, Destroyer, Erewhon -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Im actually in the process of moving out of my house right now! Were taking advantage of the end of our lease to do some traveling and try out living in some new neighborhoods. As a result, Im having to put a lot of my stuff in storage. Its been really nice to get rid of a lot of things and simplify to the essentials. But as far as traveling goes, I always have with me.. – new book and magazines – headphones – Jesse Kamm pants – Nikes – journal – Bodha rose water spray – probiotics – magnesium and ashwaganda  – sparkling water – ursa major rings – eye mask – almond butter packets -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily LAmi of Bodha, and Lacy Phillips at Free & Native! Both these women are a constant inspiration! You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tahini Hot Chocolate

December 4 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tahini Hot Chocolate Most of us know that feeling that usually rolls around at around 3 pm on a workday, when it seems as if you’ve hit a wall and need to somehow recharge before going back to work. I have to say that since I’ve been taking a break from caffeine, it has been less a of a crash and more a need to get up, stretch and whip up some kind of fun potion in the blender, just as a mental breather. Since it’s been cold out, I’ve been really into making hot, frothy, restorative drinks as my 3 pm activity, and this super quick tahini hot chocolate has come out on top many times. This drink gets its decadent chocolate flavor from raw cacao powder, which, contrary to popular (and my own until very recently!) belief, contains insignificant amounts of caffeine. The energizing properties of cacao come from theobromine, a mild cardiovascular stimulant (while caffeine is a nervous system stimulant) that increases heart function and blood flow and is much milder in effect than caffeine. Cacao is also high in magnesium, a mineral known for its relaxing properties, anandamide – the ‘bliss chemical,’ and PEA – the ‘love chemical.’ So this drink will calmly wake you up and give you a lift in mood – nothing crazy and no jitters. It gets its creaminess from tahini and nut butter, and its sweetness from prunes (you can also use dates, but I like the richer flavor the prunes yield here) and honey. It’s very easy to make and comes together in no time. I drink this hot chocolate as an afternoon pick-me-up, but it’s good enough to serve on a special occasion, and could act as an elegant, sweet finish to a festive meal. There are some links after the jump, have a nice Sunday :) Immunity Herbal Infusion – I’ve been very much into making herbal infusions and drinking them instead of water throughout the day (nettle, raspberry leaf and goji is still my favorite), and this immunity-supporting one sounds amazing. Actually, Let’s Not Be in the Moment – an article questioning the recent trends of mindfulness, full of many valid points and this response, very valid in its own way. Willka Yachay Instagram – amazing photographs of the Q’eros Nation of Peru by an organization helping their community thrive in the modern world. Well + Good’s Health and Wellness Trends of 2017 – I’m especially into the #s 5, 11, 13 and 14 Amanda Chantal Bacon on the One Part Podcast How Ayurvedic Beauty Can Change Your Health – all good reminders Tahini Hot Chocolate   Print Serves: 1 mug full (about 1½ cups) Ingredients 1½ cups hot water 2 prunes or dates 1 heaping teaspoon tahini 1 heaping teaspoon almond butter 1 tablespoon raw cacao powder 1 tablespoon raw honey, or more to taste pinch cinnamon (optional) Instructions Combine all ingredients in a blender until smooth and frothy. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes Black Sesame Cappuccino Beet Tahini Snack Bars Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tahini Hot Chocolate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tropical Soba

June 1 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tropical Soba The hotter the weather gets, the more I find myself substituting meals with just a ton of watermelon, mango or papaya, or even some kind of iced and very hydrating smoothie or drink. The heat brings out those strong cravings for all things hydrating, juicy, and cooling, and I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this. For something more substantial and nourishing, but still in line with all the aforementioned requirements for a hot summer day meal, there is this Tropical Soba. Papaya is one of my favorite tropical fruit. Of course, we didn’t have anything like it when I was growing up in Russia, so when I moved to Florida and tried papaya for the first time, I was blown away by its buttery consistency and complex, unfamiliar flavor. I was also pleasantly surprised by all its sunny health benefits – papaya is anti-inflammatory due to a wealth of vitamin C and beta-carotene, and some special enzymes, and contains other good stuff like potassium, magnesium, copper, fiber and folate, etc. (the list is quite long). I had a very similar story with mangoes, being completely overjoyed the first time I tried one. So when both of these fruit come into season, they sneak into all kinds of meals around here. Soba noodles are on high rotation in our house as well. Paloma, being in her very picky eater stage, will accept some kind of soba bowl any time of day, which I’m ok with, as the protein-rich buckwheat in soba makes the noodles filling and nutritious. For her, I tend to buy the 100% buckwheat soba, just to pack in as many extra goodies as I can into her meal, but I also like wheat/­­buckwheat blend soba, which tends to be more affordable. This recipe basically combines everything we want to eat at the moment. Nourishing, chilled soba noodles are the base, accompanied by sweet and luscious pieces of papaya and mango, jicama for a nice crunch, a sprinkle of desiccated coconut for some bite, basil, cilantro and mint for that herbal freshness, all dressed with a creamy coconut milk and lime sauce. A tropical dream in a bowl really. I hope you get around to making it sometime this summer :) Tropical Soba   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 large, ripe mango - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces ½ medium papaya - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces 1 small or ½ large jicama - peeled and cut into small cubes basil, mint, cilantro - to taste juice of 2 large limes - divided 1 8 oz package of soba noodles (I used these) sea salt Thai chili paste/­­sriracha - to taste (optional) 1 can light coconut milk unsweetened desiccated coconut - for garnish Instructions Combine mango, papaya, jicama and herbs in a large bowl. Squeeze juice of 1 lime over the mixture, toss to coat. Cook soba noodles in well salted water, according to instructions on the package, take care not to overcook. Drain over a colander, rinse briefly with cold water and shake off any excess water. Add soba to the bowl with the fruit, toss gently and squeeze juice from the second lime over the dish. Add a little squeeze of chili paste, if using, followed by coconut milk. Toss to coat well. You can add more coconut milk to make the dish soupier, if desired. Distribute between bowls or serving plates, garnish with desiccated coconut and more herbs. 3.5.3208   You might also like... Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza No Noodle Pad Thai Raw Caramelized Vegetables in Crispy Coconut Cups Raw Thanksgiving .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tropical Soba appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

4 Great Tips for Using Dates

May 10 2016 VegKitchen 

4 Great Tips for Using Dates Are you ready for your hot date tonight? Dont worry, I havent hacked into your social calendar--I am referring to the naturally sweet and energy-dense fruit. Dates are packed with fiber, potassium, copper, manganese, magnesium, and vitamins A, B, C, and K.

How Do I Cook with Seaweed

April 12 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Sea vegetables deserve way more attention than they get from sushi bars and maki rolls.  Mineral dense and a great source of iron, magnesium and potassium, seaweed is the unique source of plant-based EPA; an omega-3 fatty acid otherwise only found in animal products.  And theres an entire world of sea vegetables out there.  Here are a few of the most common varieties. Nori: The sushi staple also makes great wraps for veggie rolls.  Dulse: After a quick soak in cold water, the brownish/­­ dark purple seaweed makes a wonderful addition to salads.  Kombu: The fat, dried strips of sea kelp are most often used as flavoring agents. They can be added to vegetable broths as they cook, then thinly sliced to add texture, umami flavor, and richness to soups.

Do Food Cravings Mean You’re Nutrient Deficient?

February 19 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Do Food Cravings Mean You’re Nutrient Deficient? Myth: You crave a certain food because youre deficient in one of its nutrients. If youve ever found yourself desperately pushing through a crowd to get at the double-chocolate cupcakes in a display window, youre well aware of the power of food cravings. Some people suggest that such cravings are an effort by your body to correct a deficiency in a certain nutrient. In the case of chocolate, that might be magnesium--cocoa is considered a good source of this vital mineral. The urge to dig into a tub of salted caramel ice cream, some would say, is an indication you are coming up short in bone-building calcium. And if youre desperately searching for that strawberry shortcake in your fridge, are you deficient in vitamin C? Probably not. Your hankering for certain foods is more likely caused by a mixture of social, psychosocial, cultural, and environmental cues rather than nutritional ones. Case in point, we most often yearn for foods laden with fat, sugar, and salt rather than nutrient-dense choices such as leafy greens and lentils. See also 8 Foods Every Vegetarian Should Eat A study in The Journal of Clinical Investigation found that volunteers who received an infusion of fatty acids (similar to what you would get from comfort foods) while being exposed to depressing stimuli, such as dreary music, reported feeling less sad. And a British study looking at the state of mind of participants right before a craving struck found that they were prone to being anxious or bored and to experiencing a depressed mood. These findings indicate that areas of the brain involved in emotions and moods are strongly affected by dietary elements that can impact cravings and the urge to eat. So when youre feeling down in the dumps, a warm muffin may positively impact parts of your brain--and result in a learned craving for that item. Outsmart a Craving Heres how to outsmart cravings for foods laden with sugar, salt, or fat, which can lead to unbalanced eating and weight gain. STEP OUT The next time you sense a craving for a brownie coming on, lace up your shoes instead. Research shows that a brisk walk can be enough to dampen the urge for sugary snack foods. GET SLEEP Research suggests that people who get more hours of shut-eye tend to be slimmer. KEEP NOTES A detailed food log can help you pinpoint craving trends. You can then take measures to fight back, such as using yoga to deal with stress that induces cravings. UPGRADE Look for healthier substitutes for the foods you crave. For example, try salty tasting nori snacks instead of potato chips or sweet frozen grapes instead of candy. See also Cut the Sugar in 3 Easy Steps The Reality of Food Cravings Cravings are more about wanting than needing. While your body can coax you into drinking more water when youre parched, its not likely to urge you to eat more pumpkin seeds when you need magnesium. Psychological and external factors, though, are the main motivators that drive people to indulge in food cravings. Canada-based Investigative Nutritionist Matthew Kadey, RD, sets us straight on misleading nutrition claims.

Stock Your Pantry with Plant-Based Protein

January 25 2016 Meatless Monday 

Stock Your Pantry with Plant-Based ProteinGearing up to go meatless on Mondays? Keep your kitchen and pantry stocked with plant-based foods that are rich in protein and flavor! When folks start eating meatless once a week, many wonder where they can get enough protein to stay healthy. The truth is, plants (especially pulses) are full of protein, and with just a little planning you can get all the nutrients you need from plant-based foods! Here are some of the most popular plant-based sources of proteins that Meatless Monday diners love. Lentils Nutrition: 1 cup = 18g protein Lentils are a protein powerhouse: 9 grams of protein in just half a cup! But protein is only part of the picture for lentils; these pulses add a significant serving of fiber, folate, iron, and potassium to your meal. Dried, canned, or pre-cooked, lentils are an essential in any pantry. Lentil Recipes for Meatless Monday: Breakfast Lentils, Lazy Lentil Soup, Lentil Balls with Riata Hemp Seeds Nutrition: 3 tablespoons = roughly 10g protein Far from a simple garnish, hemp seeds add protein to any meal and contain heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Whether sprinkled on salads, stirred into smoothies or blended in soups, hemp seeds at a mild sweet or nutty flavor to meals. Hemp Seed Recipes for Meatless Monday: Mushroom Hemp Tartlets, Blueberry Brainiac Smoothie Chia Seeds Nutrition: 2 tablespoons = 4g protein Chia seeds are a sprinkle-able, stir-able, drinkable source of protein with simple instructions: just add water! Soaking your chia seeds allows them to absorb water and produce their iconic soluble-fiber- rich gel. These seeds and the gel they produce also make an excellent thickening agent in cooking. Chia Seed Recipes for Meatless Monday: Chocolate Banana Smoothie, Blueberry Apple Porridge Quinoa Nutrition: 1/­­2 cup = 7-9g protein A perfect protein-rich replacement for rice, quinoa has recently become a popular meatless main course ingredient and stand-alone side dish. Quinoa is packed with full of fiber, iron, magnesium, and manganese, and makes a very nutritious addition to your menu. Quinoa Recipes for Meatless Monday: Black Quinoa, Farro & Rice Salad with Radishes, Quinoa Stuffed Bell Peppers, Supreme Crispy Quinoa Vegetable Burgers Quinoa Nuts and Nut Butters Nutrition: 1/­­4 cup = about 7-9g protein Peanuts, almonds, cashews, and more – nut butters are perhaps the easiest way to add a dollop of protein and healthy fats to your diet. Nut butters go way beyond the traditional PB&J; spread it on whole grain toast, add a spoonful to soups or sauces, or just enjoy a spoonful on its own! Nut Recipes for Meatless Monday: Spicy Peanut Chutney, Thai Fresh Spring Rolls with Peanut Dipping Sauce Beans (Like Black Beans, Kidney Beans, and Cannellini Beans) Nutrition: 1 cup = about 15g protein One of the best-known plant-based protein sources, beans are versatile and can be very easy to prepare. In addition to the protein they bring to your plate, beans also offer a heaping helping of fiber and flavor. Bean Recipes for Meatless Monday: Italian White Beans with Kale, Mashed Plantain with Red Beans Seitan Nutrition: 1 cup = 40g protein Nicknamed “wheat meat,” seitan is made of wheat gluten and has a chewy, meaty texture when cooked. It’s know for its ability to soak up the flavors of the other foods, seasonings, and sauces it is cooked with. Seitan Recipes for Meatless Monday: Seitan-Cashew Blanquette, Seitan with Mushroom Gravy, Smoked Spicy Seitan Chili Tempeh Nutrition: 1 cup = 22g protein This meatless protein source is made of fermented soy beans, and has a nutty, sweet flavor on its own. Like tofu and seitan it absorbs flavors well, but tempeh has a firmer consistency that makes grilling and searing ideal cooking options. Tempeh Recipes for Meatless Monday: Sesame Tempeh with Green Beans, Tempeh Fried Brown Rice, Thai Tempeh Tacos Tofu Nutrition: 1 cup = 14g protein Spongy, versatile tofu is one of the most popular meatless protein-rich foods. Made from soybean curds, tofu can be silky soft or extra firm, and can be grilled, fried, baked, steamed, sautéed, or even eaten raw. Tofu Recipes for Meatless Monday: Curried Tofu Egg Salad With Almonds, Korean BBQ Tofu Tacos, Asian Noodles with Tofu and Almonds The post Stock Your Pantry with Plant-Based Protein appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The Best Vegan Milk (Non-Dairy) Alternatives

April 22 2015 VegKitchen 

The Best Vegan Milk (Non-Dairy) AlternativesAre you looking for some healthy vegan milk alternatives that can please your taste buds at the same time? Well, the market is flooded with dozens of non-dairy milk beverages and quite a few of them are worth trying. Sounds interesting? Read on below to learn more: Why Vegan Milk is a Good Choice for You? No matter whether you are a vegetarian or a non-vegetarian, picking non-dairy milk alternatives over the regular ones is always beneficial for you. Let us dig a bit deeper and find out why one should go for vegan milk choices: - Being free of lactose, it is non-allergenic. So, if you are allergic to cow milk, going vegan will help you a lot. - If you have lactose intolerance, the chances are big that you experience acid reflux, abdominal gas, bloating, etc. frequently. Dairy-free milk substitutes can eliminate these symptoms fast and easily. - Acne and regular milk always go hand in hand. The risk becomes even greater in case of skimmed milk. But when you replace your dairy consumption with the vegan alternatives, you get rid of it. - When the milk is produced from a cow non-organically, it gets contaminated by the antibiotics and hormones injected into the animals body. The unnatural production process of milk also causes mastitis to cows, which results into the presence of pus in milk. All these lead to hormonal imbalances and various other ailments in human beings. However, when you opt for non-dairy milk, you can always stay away from these worries. - Most of the vegan milk alternatives can be made easily, quickly and economically at home and you can even add lots of flavor to it. 8 Best Vegan Milk Alternatives You Should Try -  Soy Milk It is prepared by pounding and processing dried soybeans with water. You can find a variety of flavors including light, sweet, full-cream, vanilla, chocolate, etc. in the market. The density and creaminess of the milk may also vary greatly and it tastes even better than regular milk. Qualities: - The protein content is almost similar to cow milk (around 8 grams a cup). - High in dietary fiber, calcium, potassium, magnesium, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin D, plant-based omega-3 fatty acid, antioxidants, phytoestrogen, manganese, selenium, phosphorus, choline, folate, etc. - Very low in saturated fats and sugar - Lactose and cholesterol-free - Prevents prostate cancer, osteoporosis, cholesterol transportation, etc. - Strengthens blood vessels - Eases menopausal symptoms - Oat Milk This nutritious milk is made by pre-soaking the grains of oatmeal in water and straining the concotion carefully. It is sweet in taste and thick in consistency. A variety of flavor is available in the market and you are free to pick your favorite one. Qualities: - Fulfills almost 35% of our daily requirements of calcium - Works as a protein powerhouse - Fat and sugar content is very low. - Contains no cholesterol or saturated fats - Rich in soluble fibers, iron, vitamin A, vitamin D, folate, phytochemicals, etc. - Prevents a number of cancers - Improves cardiovascular health - Promotes digestion and prevents constipation - Increases good cholesterol level and reduces bad cholesterol level - Makes the immune system stronger - Keeps skin clean and acne-free -  Rice Milk This thin and naturally sweetened milk substitute is prepared from brown rice grains and is considered as extremely healthy. You can also avail its vanilla-flavored version from your local supermarket. Qualities: - Has perfect proportions of protein and carbohydrate - Great source of antioxidants, B-vitamins, vitamin D, calcium, etc. - Gluten-free milk - No saturated fat and cholesterol - Very inexpensive -  Almond Milk This wonderfully tasty vegan milk is made by pulverizing soaked almonds thoroughly. The sweet and nutty flavor and high nutrition make it highly popular among the lovers of dairy-free milk substitutes. Qualities: - Fulfills 30% of our daily requirements of calcium - Contains 25% of our daily requirements of vitamin D - Very low in calories (one servings offers only 30 calories) - Enriched with proteins, omega-6 fatty acids, antioxidants, dietary fibers, vitamin E, iron, zinc, magnesium, etc. - No saturated fats, cholesterol and lactose - Gives immunity a boost - Makes teeth and bones stronger - Helps in healthy digestion - Perks up the skin texture by offering anti-aging benefits - Encourages weight loss -  Coconut Milk It is another creamy, flavorful and nourishing alternative to regular milk, which is basically prepared by grating the meaty flesh of ripe coconuts as well as extracting the concoction. You can get both thick and thin coconut milk for using as cooking ingredients and both of them are super tasty. Qualities: - High in dietary fibers, vitamin B-12, vitamin D, iron, calcium, manganese, copper, phosphorus, selenium, etc. - Contains very less amount of sugar - No fructose - Helps in controlling blood sugar - Strengthens both bones and blood vessels - Prevents arthritis and osteoporosis - Gives a feeling of fullness, thereby helping in weight loss -  Cashew Milk Cashew milk has a natural vanilla flavor and it is made of a smooth, rich blend of water and cashew nuts. It is an amazingly tasty, absolutely creamy and highly satisfying milk beverage. Qualities: - Amazing source of proteins, B-vitamins, calcium, magnesium, copper, etc. - Very low fat content - Free of cholesterol - Increases the production of RBCs (Red Blood Corpuscles) - Promotes healthy metabolism - Helps in tissue and bone formations - Keeps cholesterol levels under control - Enhances cardiovascular health -  Hazelnut Milk Being derived from tasty and savory hazelnut, this milk tastes heavenly. It also has a nutty flavor, which is very much liked by people. Like all other vegan mil substitutes, it also has high nutrition value. Qualities: - High in healthy carbohydrates, vitamin B-12, vitamin D and calcium - No saturated fats, lactose and cholesterol - Takes care of bones and teeth - Keeps filled for a long time -  Hemp Milk It is prepared from the seeds of hemp tree and is regarded as one of the healthiest choices for dairy-free milk. It is widely known for its earthy taste and nutty flavor. Qualities: - Contains as much as 10 essential amino acids - Has a perfect omega-6 fatty acids to omega-3 fatty acids ratio - Loaded with soluble fibers, proteins, vitamin B1, vitamin B5, calcium, potassium, - Aids in muscle building - Provides immense energy 3 Simple and Easy Homemade Vegan Milk Recipes What if you need a good vegan milk alternative for cooking or drinking but do not wish to purchase commercial one? Just DIY! We are giving you 3 easy, simple and fast vegan milk recipes to try at home: (1) DIY: Homemade Almond Milk Recipe Ingredients: - Best-quality raw almonds - 1 cup (organic is even better) - Sea salt - 1 teaspoon - Distilled water - 2 to 4 cups (as per your preference) Method: - Take the almonds in a glass bowl and pour distilled water into it to soak them completely. Add sea salt to the water and cover the bowl with a lid. Keep it aside for nearly 12 hours. - Rinse the swelled up almonds well under running water to get rid of all sorts of enzyme inhibitors. - Now, put the almonds in a blender and pour rest of the distilled water into it. Blend thoroughly to mash all the nuts. - Strain it or not, your creamy almond milk is absolutely ready! (2) DIY: Homemade Oat Milk Recipe Ingredients: - Oats - 1 cup - Organic raw honey - 1 to 2 tablespoons (as required for sweetness) - Sea salt - (1/­­4) teaspoon - Distilled water - 3 cups Method: - Rinse the oats well and drain them perfectly before placing them in a bowl. - Add water to it and cover with a lid. Let the oats soak for 8 to 10 hours so that they get softer as well as easier to process. - Once again, rinse the oats well and remove the oat slime completely. - Shift them to a blender and pour distilled water into it. Blend for some time and sieve it. - Press the semi-pulverized oats with the backside of a spoon in order to take the maximum milk out of it. - Add honey and sea salt to the concoction and your homemade oat ilk is here! (3) DIY: Homemade Brown Rice Milk Recipe Ingredients: - Brown rice - (1/­­2) cup - Sea salt - 1 teaspoon - Distilled water - 2 cups Method: - Clean and wash brown rice properly and soak it in water for a couple of hours. - Cook it as usual. - Now, place the cooked brown rice inside a blender jar. Also, add sea salt and distilled water to it. - Blend until a smooth, thick milk is formed. - Voila! So, are you ready to switch to vegan milk alternatives? References http:/­­/­­vegetarian.about.com/­­od/­­vegetarianvegan101/­­f/­­MilkSubstitutes.htm http:/­­/­­www.peta2.com/­­lifestyle/­­vegan-milk-101/­­ http:/­­/­­www.beautyglimpse.com/­­almond-milk-vs-regular-milk-which-is-healthier/­­ Authors Bio Soni likes to share her knowledge with the world helping others to live a healthier life. She also loves to share her express her views and explore anything and everything that can feed her pen.

Winter Rainbow Panzanella

March 16 2015 My New Roots 

Winter Rainbow Panzanella Dear colour. I miss you. Please come back soon. Your pal, Sarah B Ive joked before about the oh-so dark, single-toned, and super grey city Copenhagen becomes in the winter. After months upon months of this, I feel as if my eyes have turned into little slits, and only capable of seeing in black and white. Needing some kind of sign that I wasnt turning into a subterranean mammal, I cycled down to the central market of Copenhagen last week to find some inspiration in the form of light and colour. I was pretty shocked when I arrived to see a plethora of vibrant veggies, all lined up and waiting for me take them home. I guess Id gotten into such a routine with my shopping that I had failed to remember that winter does in fact offer a lot of brightly hued food, and that I am, undoubtedly, a human. Excited and hungry, I hurried home with a whack-load of produce and a plan brewing in my brain. Oh the colours! Oh the possibilities! Oh what a nerd I am! With some stale sourdough rye sitting on the counter and a knob of ginger in the fridge, a hearty, satisfying salad began to take shape in my mind, a rainbow swathe of vegetables stretched out before me like a beacon in an stubborn steel grey sky. Super Cool Kohlrabi Kohlrabi is a mysterious and intimidating vegetable, dont you agree? Ive gotten a lot of questions about this prehistoric looking creature, as many of you out there seem to be quite scared of even taking it home! Well fear not. Kohlrabi is not going to take off a finger or worse if you approach it with a knife. It is a rather gentle and yielding brassica, a cross between a cabbage and a turnip that can be enjoyed cooked or raw. Its pleasantly crisp texture is perfect julienned in salads, but its also a tender treat roasted in the oven in slices or batons. The flavour is somewhere near to broccoli but a tad milder and sweeter. I really like it in soups as well, blended up with white beans or chickpeas. The leaves are also edible and very delicious in salad or stir-fried with garlic like collards or Swiss chard. Key nutrients in kohlrabi include vitamin C, for fighting infection, vitamin E for preventing arterial plaque build-up, and a range of B-vitamins for combating stress. The potassium in kohlrabi helps the body maintain proper fluid balance, while the calcium manages the acid/­­alkaline balance of our blood. Other minerals in kohlrabi include iron, magnesium and zinc. When buying kohlrabi, look for bulbs that are firm, smooth and free of holes or cracks. Typically this part of the vegetable is pale green, but you can also find purple varieties like the one pictured above. The younger ones can be eaten with the skin on, but as their season (late fall to early spring) stretches, youll find peeling the more mature bulbs is a tastier choice. The leaves should be taut and unblemished. To prolong the kohlrabis shelf life, remove the leaves and wrap them in a damp towel, place them in a plastic bag in the fridge for up four days. The root bulb can be stored separately in the crisper as well, and will keep well for couple weeks. To the panzanella! Traditionally, this is a salad made with stale white bread and tomatoes, a popular dish in Tuscany. My version is a far, Nordic cry from the classic, but its a meal in itself and a very satisfying one at that, since there is just so. much. going. on. The key to building this dish, or any dish for that matter is layers and balance; flavours, textures and of course, colours. Taking into consideration that the base of this dish would be hearty winter greens I knew that I needed something creamy and yielding, like roast veggies, and something dense and crusty, like the Garlic Sourdough Rye Bread Croutons to contrast and compliment. From a flavour perspective, especially in salads, balancing tastes is very important for success. Because the roast vegetables are so sweet, its important to have an acidic hit to add brightness. I made some very tasty Ginger-Pickled Carrots in advance, but capers would also be a nice touch if you are pressed for time. The point is to step back and look at your dish as a whole, then adjust all the levels of salt, sugar, and acid as needed tipping the scales until everything is just right. And just a special note about these croutons, because they are so darn delish. I first came up with these in the good ol days when I was cooking at a very small café here in Copenhagen, inventing new dishes every day and being creative with what I had available. The odd time we had any leftover rye bread, I would make these garlic croutons, few of which actually made it onto any finished dishes because I would typically eat them all up before service with my kitchen mates. They are addictive. The kind of thing you wouldnt necessarily think of as a terrific little snack, but wow, are they ever hard to stop eating! There is a high amount of garlic-to-bread ratio, but because Danish rye is so rich and flavourful, youll need that amount of garlic to be heard. If youre using a lighter bread, a spelt loaf for instance, you can scale back just a touch unless you really love your garlic and/­­or not planning on making out with anyone for a couple days. This dish may seem component-heavy, but most of these elements can be made in advance so the whole thing comes together when youre ready. The only thing you need to do before serving in fact, is massaging the kale and kohlrabi leaves. Now excuse me as I dive face first into this bowl of rainbow ecstasy! Okay, good-byyyyyyeeee!     Print recipe     Winter Rainbow Panzanella Serves 4 Ingredients: 4 cups /­­ 100g shredded kale and kohlrabi leaves (or any hearty winter green) 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice a couple pinches sea salt A variety of winter vegetables suitable for roasting. I chose: – sweet potato – golden & red beets – kohlrabi – parsnip – Brussels sprouts Other suggestions: – celeriac – butternut squash – purple potatoes – Jerusalem artichoke – cauliflower – broccoli – leeks Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. Scrub veggies well, chop into similar sized pieces (no need to peel!) and place on a baking sheet with a few knobs of coconut oil or ghee. Place in the oven and when the oil has melted, remove pan from oven, toss to coat veggies and return to the middle rack. Bake for 25-35 minutes, depending on the size of your veggies. Remove from oven, season with salt and pepper, and a drizzle of olive oil. 3. While the veggies are roasting, prepare the kale and /­­or other greens. Wash and dry then well and chop into small pieces. Place in a large bowl and dress with olive oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Vigorously massage the oil and juice into the greens for two whole minutes until they are tender and dark green. Season to taste. 4. To assemble salad, Top the greens with the roasted veggies, add as many pickled carrots as you like, drizzle the dressing over and toss. Top with garlic croutons and serve. Overnight Ginger-Pickled Carrots Ingredients: 300g carrots 1 cup /­­ 250ml apple cider vinegar 1 cup /­­ 250ml water (or more if needed) 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1/­­2 Tbsp. fine grain sea salt small knob of ginger (about 10g), peeled and sliced Directions: 1. Scrub carrots well. Using a vegetable peeler, slice the carrots lengthwise into long, thing ribbons. Place into a 1-quart /­­ 1 liter glass container. 2. In a measuring cup combine the vinegar, water, maple syrup, salt and ginger, and stir to dissolve the salt. Pour over the carrots and top up with more water as needed to cover them completely. Place in the fridge for 24 hours and enjoy the next day. Grainy Mustard Dressing Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. whole grain mustard 1 tsp. maple syrup generous pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Whisk all ingredients together. Season to taste. Garlic Sourdough Rye Bread Croutons Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 200g stale dark sourdough, cut into generous cubes (any bread here would work, but make a healthy choice) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee (ghee is definitely the tastiest) 2 fat cloves garlic, finely minced or grated on a microplane a couple pinches flaky sea salt Directions: 1. Melt oil in a small saucepan over low heat. When it is melted, grate in the garlic and stir to combine. Cook just until the garlic starts to simmer, immediately remove from heat and let cool slightly. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. Cut bread into generous cubes and place in a medium sized bowl. Pour the garlic oil over the top and toss to coat, using your hands to squish the oil into the bread. Spread out bread cubes on a cookie sheet, sprinkle with salt and place in the oven. Toast for 10-15 minutes, tossing a couple times during cooking. Croutons are ready when they are crisp and golden around the edges. Once cool, store leftovers in an airtight container for up to three days. *   *   *   *   *   * Hey guys! I have some very exciting news...Im going on tour with my cookbook! Although we are still working out some of the hard details, I wanted to let you know when and where Ill be so you can make a note of it. It would be so rad to meet you, and I hope that you can come out and celebrate! I will update this page and post the events on my Events page and Facebook as they are finalized. Looking forward to it, more than you know! TORONTO April 9-14 VANCOUVER April 15-17 LOS ANGELES April 18 + 19 NEW YORK April 22 + 23 I hope that everyone who has pre-ordered the book is enjoying the Bonus Pack of recipes! Thanks for all of your very positive feedback so far. There is still time to get yours if you’re interested…click here!

5 Top Health Benefits of Almonds

February 24 2015 VegKitchen 

5 Top Health Benefits of AlmondsAlmonds are one of the worlds most nutritious and versatile nuts, perfect for snacking as well as in tasty recipes, renowned for their many health benefits and culinary uses. Here are just a few: Reduce Blood Sugar Levels: Eating almonds may be a great option for diabetics looking to maintain healthy blood glucose levels. Findings from a 2007 study published in the journal Metabolism found that consuming almonds alongside white bread regulates spikes in blood sugar and significantly lowers the glycemic index of the meal. Heart-Loving Antioxidant Powers: Almonds are one of the richest food sources of alpha-tocopherol, the form of vitamin E that is most easily absorbed by the body. Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant that protects cells against the damaging effects of free radicals, boosts the immune system, supports cardiovascular health, and helps your body create new red blood cells. A 2005 study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that almond consumption helped meet the Recommended Dietary Allowance of 15 mg/­­day alpha-tocopherol and improved red blood cell concentration. Another study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that almonds can reduce C-reactive protein, an indication of inflammation that affects the arteries. Weight Control: As part of a calorie-conscious eating regime, almonds, which are high in monounsaturated fats, can help obese adults lose weight easier than a diet high in complex carbohydrates, according to a study in the International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders. Contrary to many worries of healthy eaters, consuming almonds actually lowers the risk of weight gain. A 28-month long study showed that individuals who ate almonds at least twice per week were 31% less likely to gain weight than nut-avoiding participants. So go ahead and go nuts! Lower Cholesterol: Almonds are the leading source of monounsaturated fat among commonly eaten nuts: over 60% of the total fat in almonds is monounsaturated. Numerous studies have demonstrated the cholesterol-lowering effects of consuming foods rich in monounsaturated fat. A 2005 study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that consuming almonds as part of a heart-healthy diet can be just as effective at lowering LDL bad cholesterol levels as first generation statin drugs. A good source of calcium and other nutrients: Weve already heard that almonds are a good source of Vitamin E, but they offer a modest but significant and absorbable form of calcium, which is good for the bones. Likewise, theyre a good source of phosphorous for strong bones and teeth. Almonds are a good source of magnesium and folic acid, as well. Excellent source of plant-based protein: Just one ounce of almonds contains about 12 percent of average daily protein needs. Enough said! Adapted from Nuts.com, with permission. Discover your favorite almond products at nuts.com from premium supreme-sized raw almonds to finely blanched almond flour and all natural almond butters for your snacking and recipe needs.


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