local - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Balsamic Basil Watermelon Antipasto

Pi?a Colada Breakfast Shake

Baked Sriracha Potato Chips

Corn cheese balls recipe | how to make sweet corn & veg cheese balls










local vegetarian recipes

Zucchini and Herb Hummus

June 17 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Zucchini and Herb Hummus There is a stand at the local St. Petersburg farmer’s market that sells the most delicious hummus. I got to talking with the owner one day, and she pointed out that the hummus is made without chickpeas, which I myself didn’t notice when trying a sample. She makes it this way is because of a legume intolerance and uses zucchini in place of chickpeas. The zucchini gives the dip that creamy texture and fairly neutral flavor that usually comes from the chickpeas. With the addition of tahini and lemon juice, the ingredient swap is almost unnoticeable. I thought it would be fun to try making a version of that hummus at home, and to share the recipe here. This dip is so fresh. It’s packed with herbs, and the zucchini makes it light and fluffy. Hope you’ll give it a try this summer. Also, if you’re looking for an easy recipe for crackers to go with this hummus, this one is great. P.S. Thank you so much for your support on our new weeknight recipe ebook! In case you missed it, you can check it out/­­purchase here. Zucchini and Herb Hummus   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 3 medium-large zucchini - halved lengthwise 2 teaspoons olive oil, plus more for drizzling the zucchini sea salt freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup tahini zest and juice from 1 large lemon 3 cloves garlic - roughly chopped a few large handfuls fresh herbs (dill, parsley, basil, etc.) Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Put the zucchini on a parchment-covered baking sheet, cut side up. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast the zucchini for 30-35 minutes, until knife-tender. Let cool for at least 15 minutes. In a food processor, combine the roasted zucchini, olive oil, tahini, lemon zest and juice, garlic, herbs, sea salt, and black pepper to taste. Process until smooth. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Transfer the hummus to a sealable container and let cool in the refrigerator for at least an hour before enjoying. 3.5.3226 New Ebook! This ebook is a collection of straightforward, plant-based recipes for busy people who love to cook. Each recipe was developed to be weeknight-friendly, with shorter cooking times and easier prep. Whole, plant foods are featured prominently throughout the ebook and make up the bulk of these vibrant, weeknight meals. Click Here to Buy   The post Zucchini and Herb Hummus appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

banana ice cream recipe | frozen homemade banana ice cream – no sugar, no cream

June 4 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

banana ice cream recipe | frozen homemade banana ice cream – no sugar, no creambanana ice cream recipe | frozen homemade banana ice cream - no sugar, no cream with step by step photo and video recipe. ice cream recipes have always been a popular choice among many indians and are made with many locally available tropical fruits. most of them involve a cumbersome process in it with not so healthy ingredients in it. however, there are some healthy one and frozen homemade banana ice cream is one such made without sugar and cream. The post banana ice cream recipe | frozen homemade banana ice cream – no sugar, no cream appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

5 Simple Ways to Support Local Restaurants

May 11 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

As a restaurant guide and worldwide resource serving millions online, HappyCow considers businesses to be more than just listings on a map. They are the entire foundation of our community – the spirit of HappyCow and of what brings our members together worldwide. Amidst the restrictions and temporary shutdowns brought about by COVID-19, we’re on the forefront of the struggle for businesses  to survive through this time. We know how hard it’s been for many restaurants to make ends meet, and we’re here to try and offer support. Today we’re bringing you 5 ways to be an active advocate for restaurants you love in your community, including ways to help out without dishing out any cash. Do you have more ways to support local restaurants right now? We’d love to hear from you in the comments below or on social media.  1. Order Take-Out or Delivery This is the most obvious and easy win-win option; whether ordering directly from a particular restaurant, or through DoorDash, Deliveroo, or UberEats. Ordering take-out, delivery, or curb-side pick-up is a great way to safely buy a meal from your favourite business. Many restaurants on HappyCow are now marked with “Take-Out” and “Delivery” icons, making […] The post 5 Simple Ways to Support Local Restaurants appeared first on HappyCow.

“Stress Bake” Your Worries Away Using These Plant-based Egg Alternatives

May 11 2020 Meatless Monday 

“Stress Bake” Your Worries Away Using These Plant-based Egg AlternativesAs most bakers will tell you, baking makes you feel good. It can even be a meditative activity that helps to reduce stress and brings us positive feelings of doing something for others; in this case, creating delicious baked goods for the ones we love. When whipping up plant-based desserts and baked goods, using the right substitute for eggs is critical as it is a key ingredient that gives structure to cakes, color to cookies, and thickness to sauces and custards. Dont panic. Some clever cooks have come up with easy to use animal-free alternatives; flax and chia seeds, apple sauce, and aquafaba can all be used in some capacity to replace eggs. But remember that not every egg alternative is equal: aquafaba is used for egg whites, chia seeds are better for browning and color, and silken tofu adds texture and protein. Below is a list of our favorite egg alternatives complete with drool-worthy recipes from a few of our favorite plant-based bloggers. So start experimenting and find out what works for you -- and then share the love and post it on social with #MeatlessMonday! Aquafaba Aquafaba is a fancy term for chickpea juice. Drain a can of chickpeas into a bowl and whip up the liquid as you would egg whites. Replace one egg with a quarter-cup of aquafaba to make plant-based meringues and mousses. Check out this guide to aquafaba from Minimalist Baker , and try making her recipe for easy macaroons . Bananas The substitution for this one is easy: Use 1/­­4 cup ripe banana in place of one whole egg. This swap works best in denser baked goods like muffins and pound cake, but be prepared for a subtle banana flavor. You can use apple sauce for a milder flavor. If youre a fan of banana, try these heavenly peanut butter banana brownies from Bucket List Tummy . Please note that the recipe also calls for a flax egg (see recipe for flax egg below). Chia Seeds Chia eggs are made by combing 1-tablespoon chia seed (or ground chia) and 3-tablespoons water (equals one egg), and letting the mixture sit for 5-10 minutes. Chia seeds will darken baked goods, making them ideal for brownies, muffins, and cookies, but they can also add a nice texture to this sweet chia cornbread from The Simple Veganista . Flaxseed Minimal effort is required to make a flaxseed egg. Simply use the same ratio as chia seeds -- 1-tablespoon flaxseed to 3-tablespoons water to make one flax egg-- and let sit for around 5-10 minutes. A flaxseed eggs can be used to replace traditional eggs in pancakes, quick breads, brownies, and muffins. Try using them to make these vegan coffee cake streusel muffins by Choosing Chia . Silken Tofu Want moister baked goods with a bit of extra protein? Swap out an egg for a quarter-cup of silken tofu when making muffins, cakes, and quick breads. Silken tofu is best for baking with recipes that already have a leavening agent, like baking powder or baking soda, but its also wonderfully decadent in this vegan strawberry cheesecake by Exceedingly Vegan . Vegan Egg Replacements Many supermarkets and online stores now offer a variety plant-based products developed specifically to function as vegan egg replacers. Some popular brands are Follow Your Heart , Bobs Red Mill , and JUST (theyve got a great recipe for crispy waffles). Check out your local grocery store, online store, or natural foods market to see what options they offer that meet your baking needs. Share your plant-based egg baking successes and let us know your tips. Tag @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday. Need some more #inspo? Check out this Blackberry Bran Muffin recipe from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery .   The post “Stress Bake” Your Worries Away Using These Plant-based Egg Alternatives appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Recipe | Pesto-Roasted Veggie Sandwiches

May 1 2020 Oh My Veggies 

I never need an excuse to go to our local French bakery. I might go there to get something for a meal, but I won’t leave without a tarte tatin or eclair. The bakery is owned and operated by a French family, so the food and the accents really make you feel like you’re in Paris and not Wisconsin. (Oh, how I wish I was in Paris and not Wisconsin.) Anyway! In seeking new and different ways to use pesto, I wanted to do something sandwichy. Yes, it’s a word! Sandwichy! I bought a crusty loaf of sourdough bread from aforementioned bakery, and then yellow squash, zucchini, and portabella mushrooms from the grocery store. I had pesto, Parmesan cheese, and an onion on hand. Because roasting is pretty much my default way of preparing vegetables, I thought I’d marinate the veggies in a pesto and olive oil mixture and then throw them in the oven until they got all caramelized and delicious. If you prefer grilling your vegetables, that would work too, of course--I mean, basically the idea is to cook the vegetables before putting them on the sandwich, you know? These sandwiches are bound to become a weekend staple […]

Recipe | Kale & Sweet Potato Quesadillas

March 27 2020 Oh My Veggies 

There are two things you should know about this recipe: 1. The name is a lie. There’s no queso in these quesadillas. But calling them “dillas” makes them sound like something cutesy off of a children’s menu, doesn’t it? 2. Yes, if it sounds familiar, it’s because I made these with leftovers from my Sweet Potato & Kale Wraps. I decided to save the recipe for a rainy day and its day has finally come! So yeah, about #2. We had tortillas and fillings leftover after making those wraps. But, as you saw, I am no burrito wrapper, so the second night around, I made these Kale & Sweet Potato Quesadillas for dinner. Instead of binding everything together with cheese like in a traditional quesadillas, I used mashed sweet potatoes. Is this weird? Okay, fine, maybe it sounds weird, but sweet potatoes and kale go really well together (this is one of my most popular posts, after all!) and so do sweet potatoes and black beans. Oh, and one note about the chorizo: if you can purchase Field Roast locally, use their Mexican Chipotle sausage. Their sausage is made with real vegetables, grains, and spices and it’s minimally processed. (Yes, […]

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this)

March 12 2020 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this) I threw these blondies together as I prepped a big batch of black bean burgers to freeze for later. (Yes, I am food prepping.) Probably made over a dozen batches of these cookies over the past few months. As usual, I took a break from sugary carb-craving in February. Things are much different now. Even though the grass is beginning to green up and my daffodils are blooming, the urge to bake and soothe my soul with comfort foods normally reserved for dark, winter months has returned with a vengeance.  (As a news-obsessed individual, I'm sure you can guess why.) My cookbooks lining the kitchen walls are more precious to me than ever right now. I've collected hundreds over the decades. I drop into flea markets looking for Pyrex and instead find myself with a two-dollar cookbook I'd wanted years ago. One more for the collection. Call me crazy, but in my Marie Kondo cleaning frenzy last spring--very few cookbooks left this house. Very. Few. One of my old stand-by cookbooks, an Alice Medrich classic, stands the test of time.   Published in 2010, my dog-eared, taped-page and post-it noted guides indicate the cookbook's utility.  Here's my vegan version blondie--and don't bake these in an 8" square pan. Use instead a rectangle if you can. Mine is 10 x 6" pan I purchased for eight bucks at the grocery store. Once you add the batter to the pan, you may look at it and think: this cannot be right--there's barely enough batter to cover the bottom of the pan. Trust the recipe, they bake up beautifully. And after a night in the fridge, even better.  Vegan Blondies (adapted) 3/­­4 cup unbleached AP flour 1/­­4 cup whole wheat flour 1/­­2 t. baking powder 1/­­4 t. fine sea salt 1 stick vegan butter 3/­­4 cup light brown sugar 1 t. vanilla extract 2 T. ground flax, plus 3 T. water, 1 t. olive oil (vegan egg) 2/­­3 cup walnuts or pecans 1/­­2 cup chocolate chunks Preheat oven to 350. Line pan with parchment paper, lightly spray. Mix dry ingredients together, set aside. Place small saucepan over low heat, add butter and sugar and stir until butter melts and sugar is mostly dissolved. Remove from heat. Add vanilla extract and flax egg. Mix well. Add dry ingredients to butter mixture. Mix just until flour is mostly incorporated. Add half nuts and half chocolate. Spread batter in pan, then sprinkle remaining nuts and chocolate over. Bake for about 20 minutes or just until the sides begin to turn golden. Let cool completely, then cut into squares and store in fridge. With all the bleak AF stuff out in the world lately, my own version of self-care includes a nice vitamin rich juice first thing in the morning. I've had my juicer for a dozen or so years now. It's come in very handy lately (even though it sat literally unused for about eight of these). If you think, "Hey, nice blondie recipe, but then juicing...how's that work?" Um, resistance is futile. I will always have chocolate in my life in one form or another. This is my favorite juicing recipe: 1 beet 1 carrot 1 celery stick 1 knob ginger 1 granny smith apple juice of half a lemon When I can, I make enough for two small pints (one before I eat oatmeal for breakfast, another to drink later in the day--you know, around three in the afternoon when I'd rather scarf down a whole package of M&Ms). I've been a believer in juicing for ages...has it helped? I have no damned idea. It makes me feel good. So yes. It "helps". Also been intermittent fasting. So basically the day goes like this: Eat between nine and five. Stop.  Went to my local WM on Tuesday, just as a precaution, trying to get my hands on bleach cleaner. Wow. I happened to turn the corner and spotted an out of place single bottle left. I was like: "Thank you retail-eagle-eye for helping me spot the thing that wasn't like the other things."

lauki ki sabji recipe | lauki sabzi | ghiya ki sabji | bottle gourd curry

February 26 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

lauki ki sabji recipe | lauki sabzi | ghiya ki sabji | bottle gourd currylauki ki sabji recipe | lauki sabzi | ghiya ki sabji | bottle gourd curry with step by step photo and video recipe. north indian cuisine has myriad gravy or curries to offer which can be served for day to day lunch and dinner. generally it is made locally available vegetables, paneer and also with wide range of meat based options. one such hugely popular yet not considered as a premium curry is lauki ki sabji recipe or also known as bottle gourd curry. The post lauki ki sabji recipe | lauki sabzi | ghiya ki sabji | bottle gourd curry appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

pulihora recipe | chintapandu pulihora | how to make andhra style tamarind rice

February 19 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

pulihora recipe | chintapandu pulihora | how to make andhra style tamarind ricepulihora recipe | chintapandu pulihora | how to make andhra style tamarind rice with step by step photo and video recipe. tamarind rice is a known south indian staple food which is hugely popular across indian states. each state in south india has its own variation of preparing it, with different set of spices used in it and a different local name. one such easy and simple variation is pulihora recipe from the famous andhra cuisine. The post pulihora recipe | chintapandu pulihora | how to make andhra style tamarind rice appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Meatless Monday Celebrates Chinese New Year at The Good Food Festival in Beijing

February 10 2020 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Celebrates Chinese New Year at The Good Food Festival in BeijingEarlier this month, to celebrate Chinese New year, The Good Food Fund in China -- in collaboration with Meatless Monday and Slow Food International -- hosted a series of events, known collectively as The Good Food Festival. Local community leaders in Xinzhuang Village, Beijing took a stance to advocate for more sustainable food choices. Through a collection of workshops, seminars, and cooking contests, The Good Food Festival sought to expand the community’s capacity and knowledge for dietary change by teaching attendees the many benefits of a diet rooted in plant-based foods. By introducing the changes in diets throughout history, Jianyi (founder of the Good Food Fund) discussed the issues surrounding the increasing consumption of animal protein, and the increasingly high environmental costs we all face. He encouraged everyone to make a change starting from the most important meal of the year-New Year’s Eve! While these decisions can sometimes be culturally and logistically challenging, events such as The Good Food Festival demonstrate how people can come together to advocate for progressive change, while still staying true traditions. Wishing everyone the best in the new year. ????! The post Meatless Monday Celebrates Chinese New Year at The Good Food Festival in Beijing appeared first on Meatless Monday.

10 Vegan Chocolate Desserts You Must Try

February 8 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Whether it’s Valentine’s Day or any day of the year, here are 10 must-try vegan chocolate treats. From nougat to tart, all around the world, you mustn’t miss out on these! Laduree – Los Angeles, California Get the Plaisir Sucré: which literally translates to Sweet Pleasure. Made with hazelnut biscuit, chocolate hazelnut ganache, and chocolate chantilly (a sweetened whipped cream), you’re sure to get your chocolate fix here. Ara Chocolat – Paris, France An award-winning bean-to-bar chocolate maker in Paris? Sign us up! Besides artisinal chocolates, find chocolate cake, chocolate mousse and hot chocolate. VeganWaf – Brussels, Belgium Have you been missing out on waffles since going vegan? Not anymore. Try this vegan and gluten-free waffle smothered in chocolate. La Gelateria del Barri – Santiago, Chile Vegan gelato, yes… you’ll find some chocolate gelato here - but did you know you’ll also find decadent vegan brownies? This shop is 100% vegan and, bonus, they don’t use gluten, soy, or added sugar. Vegan Heaven – Taipei, Taiwan Aiming to use organic and local ingredients, this charmingly colorful bakery will have something for everyone. For you chocolate lovers: there’s a dark chocolate tart that’s not to be missed. Fukafe – […] The post 10 Vegan Chocolate Desserts You Must Try appeared first on HappyCow.

Tips To Get You Through Veganuary 2020

January 8 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

If you’re new to veganism - or have always been curious, but never made the jump – the international campaign known as Veganuary may be the perfect transition period to attempt it. According to their blog, Veganuary set out to create a movement that would appeal to non-vegans throughout the world. With more people starting the new year with new trends, new objectives, and newfound motivation, you surely won’t be alone diving into a plant-based prerogative. With so many questions surrounding newly-vegan navigation, we’d like to share with you some tips and resources for how you can best prepare for the month (or year) ahead of you. Register on Veganuary.com By doing so, you can take advantage of the free resources provided to help you understand how to tackle this process from the get-go. Don’t be scared of the kitchen There are plenty of resources on the web to get you comfortable whipping up easy meals for you and your family. Try typing in “Vegan Recipes” in Google or in YouTube, or hashtagging it on Instagram. A great website to start with? The feedfeed vegan. Look around your city for participating local restaurants A handful of U.S. Cities are focused […] The post Tips To Get You Through Veganuary 2020 appeared first on HappyCow.

kobbari laddu recipe | coconut jaggery ladoo | kobbari undalu | kobbari louz

January 1 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

kobbari laddu recipe | coconut jaggery ladoo | kobbari undalu | kobbari louzkobbari laddu recipe | coconut jaggery ladoo | kobbari undalu | kobbari louz with step by step photo and video recipe. ladoo recipe are very common across india and are generally made for various occasions. each demography and region has its own variations which is made with different locally available ingredients. one such typical karnataka cuisine based sweet recipe is the kobbari laddu or coconut jaggery ladoo recipe. The post kobbari laddu recipe | coconut jaggery ladoo | kobbari undalu | kobbari louz appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Restaurant Highlight: Fourchette ? Bicyclette – Brussels

December 18 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM Tucked away in a calm little street, ideally located next to Place Saint Boniface, Fourchette ? Bicyclette is a unique place. This very tiny restaurant is owned by Alexandra Roshardt, a French expat who invites us into her kitchen to discover how healthy cuisine can be both exciting and nourishing. Alexandra has a real passion for culinary art. Her restaurant is where she gives free rein to her imagination, to create original dishes that make gourmet mouths water. Her cuisine is familial but sophisticated, she transforms simple ingredients or day to day recipes into elegant and almost gastronomic preparations. Her cuisine isnt exclusively for vegans, it is suited for anyone that enjoys eating healthy without compromising on flavour or quality. Quality is one of her strong values; she works with organic products sourced locally for the most part, and prepares everything herself in her open kitchen. She has dedicated her work to creating great lunch and brunch, and never opens at night. I guess she believes in the adage that says that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but Alexandra extends it to lunch and brunch! My advice for you is to go there for […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Fourchette ? Bicyclette – Brussels appeared first on HappyCow.

Pesto-Roasted Veggie Sandwiches

May 1 2020 Oh My Veggies 

I never need an excuse to go to  bakery. I might go there to get something for a meal, but I won’t leave without a tarte tatin or eclair. In seeking new and different ways to use pesto, I wanted to do something sandwichy. Yes, it’s a word! Sandwichy! For this recipe, I bought a crusty loaf of sourdough bread from our local French bakery, and then yellow squash, zucchini, and portabella mushrooms from the grocery store. I had pesto, Parmesan cheese, and an onion on hand. Because roasting is pretty much my default way of preparing vegetables, I thought I’d marinate the veggies in a pesto and olive oil mixture and then throw them in the oven until they got all caramelized and delicious. If you prefer grilling your vegetables, that would work too, of course--I mean, basically the idea is to cook the vegetables before putting them on the sandwich, you know? These sandwiches are bound to become a weekend staple in our household. Most Saturdays, we swing by the farmers market to pick up fresh veggies and the bakery is on the way home. And on Saturdays, we’re usually so busy, the last thing we want to […]

Spaghetti LoMein

April 15 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Spaghetti LoMein In our small town, the most vegan-friendly food available has been the local Chinese take-out restaurant.  Sadly, they closed down during this pandemic. To satisfy our cravings, I’ve included a few stir-fries in my menu rotation.  One of our favorites is Spaghetti Lo Mein.  (I make it with spaghetti because most traditional lo mein noodles contain egg and are therefore not vegan.) This recipe is quite versatile.  Use fresh veggies if you’ve got them, but frozen veggies work quite well too. The last time I made them I used frozen bell pepper strips and substituted sliced zucchini for the mushrooms.  Use what you’ve got! Here’s the recipe from my quarantine-friendly cookbook, Cook the Pantry: Spaghetti Lo-Mein If you are using leftover cooked pasta, steam the broccoli for 3 to 5 minutes. If you dont have fresh vegetables on hand for this recipe, substitute frozen stir-fry vegetables, cooked according to package directions. This recipe is from Cook the Pantry by Robin Robertson (C) 2015, published by Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Annie Oliverio. -  8 ounces spaghetti noodles - 2 cups broccoli florets - 2 tablespoons tamari or other soy sauce - 3 tablespoons cup hoisin sauce - 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil - 1 teaspoon sriracha (optional) - 1/­­4 cup water - 2 tablespoons dry sherry (optional) - 1 tablespoon neutral-tasting oil such as grapeseed oil - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 1 red bell pepper, cut into strips - 2 cups sliced mushrooms - 1 carrot, shredded - 1/­­3 cup sliced scallions - 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger - 1 cup reconstituted Soy Curls  or diced extra-firm tofu or seitan (optional) Cook the spaghetti in a large pot of boiling salted water until just tender.  About 3 to 5 minutes before the pasta is done cooking, add the broccoli. Drain the pasta and broccoli and set aside. While the pasta is cooking, combine the tamari, hoisin, sesame oil, and sriracha, if using.  Add the water and sherry, if using. Mix well and set aside. Heat the oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the garlic, bell pepper, mushrooms, carrot, scallions, and ginger. Cook, stirring frequently, until tender, about 3 minutes.  Add the Soy Curls, if using and stir to combine.  Stir in the reserved noodles and the sauce mixture, and gently toss to combine until heated through.  Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot. Makes 4 servings The post Spaghetti LoMein appeared first on Robin Robertson.

dates halwa recipe | khajoor ka halwa | khajur ka halwa

March 25 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

dates halwa recipe | khajoor ka halwa | khajur ka halwadates halwa recipe | khajoor ka halwa | khajur ka halwa with step by step photo and video recipe. halwa recipes are native to both north india and south indian cuisine and can be made with locally made ingredients. however these days, the same halwa recipes are made with myriad ingredients and has extended to the dry fruits and served for different purpose. one such simple and healthy halwa recipe made without any sugar is the dates halwa recipe. The post dates halwa recipe | khajoor ka halwa | khajur ka halwa appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for Baking

March 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for BakingEggs play a crucial role in many of our favorite baked goods, giving structure to cakes, color to cookies, and thickness to sauces and custards. But like other forms of intensive livestock farming, egg production also takes a toll on the health of the environment, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions, ozone depletion, and contamination of soil and water. Plant-based egg replacers are designed to give us all that we love about eggs without the environmental baggage. But, please remember that every plant-based egg alternative wont work in every application, so look for plant-based baking recipes or do some experimenting and find out what works for you -- and then share the love and post it on social with #MeatlessMonday! Aquafaba Aquafaba is a fancy term for chickpea juice. Drain a can of chickpeas into a bowl and whip up the liquid as you would egg whites. Replace one egg with a quarter-cup of aquafaba to make plant-based meringues and mousses. Check out this guide to aquafaba from Minimalist Baker . Bananas The substitution for this one is easy: Use 1/­­4 cup ripe banana in place of one whole egg. This swap works best in denser baked goods like muffins and pound cake, but be prepared for a subtle banana flavor. You can use apple sauce for a milder flavor. Chia Seeds Chia eggs are made by combing 1-tablespoon chia seed (or ground chia) and 3-tablespoons water (equals one egg), and letting the mixture sit for 5 minutes. Chia seeds will darken baked goods, making them ideal for brownies, muffins, and cookies. Flaxseed Minimal effort is required to make a flaxseed egg. Simply use the same ratio as chia seeds -- 1-tablespoon flaxseed to 3-tablespoons water to make one flax egg-- and let sit for around 5 minutes. A flaxseed eggs can be used to replace traditional eggs in pancakes, quick breads, brownies, and muffins. Silken Tofu Want moister baked goods with a bit of extra protein? Swap out an egg for a quarter-cup of silken tofu when making muffins, cakes, and quick breads. Best for baking with recipes that already have a leavening agent, like baking powder or baking soda. Vegan Egg Replacements Many supermarkets and online stores now offer a variety plant-based products developed specifically to function as vegan egg replacers. Some popular brands are Follow Your Heart , Bobs Red Mill , and JUST . Check out your local grocery store, online store, or natural foods market to see what options they offer that meet your baking needs.   Share your plant-based egg baking successes and let us know your tips. Tag @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday. Need some #inspo? Check out this Blackberry Bran Muffin recipe from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery . The post The Best Plant-Based Egg Replacers for Baking appeared first on Meatless Monday.

gajar mooli ka achar recipe | carrot radish pickle | mooli gajar ka mix achar

February 25 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

gajar mooli ka achar recipe | carrot radish pickle | mooli gajar ka mix achargajar mooli ka achar recipe | carrot radish pickle | mooli gajar ka mix achar with step by step photo and video recipe. pickle or achar recipe is very common across india and are made with different types vegetables. the most common veggies used are mangoes and limes which has abundant source of sourness and flavour in it. yet it can be made with other locally available vegetables and gajar mooli ka achar is one such combination from the north indian cuisine. The post gajar mooli ka achar recipe | carrot radish pickle | mooli gajar ka mix achar appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

cabbage soup recipe | vegetable soup with cabbage | cabbage soup diet

February 17 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

cabbage soup recipe | vegetable soup with cabbage | cabbage soup dietcabbage soup recipe | vegetable soup with cabbage | cabbage soup diet with step by step photo and video recipe. soup recipes are not a native indian cuisine dish, but has widely accepted for its taste and appetizing feature. consequently, there have been myriad variations to the soup recipes across india with the locally grown ingredients and herbs. one such locally produced and experimented soup recipe is cabbage soup recipe, known for its health benefits. The post cabbage soup recipe | vegetable soup with cabbage | cabbage soup diet appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

10 Chocolate Desserts You Must Try from Vegan Shops Worldwide

February 8 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Whether it’s Valentine’s Day or any day of the year, here are 10 must-try vegan chocolate treats. From nougat to tart, all around the world, you mustn’t miss out on these! Laduree – Los Angeles, California Get the Plaisir Sucré: which literally translates to Sweet Pleasure. Made with hazelnut biscuit, chocolate hazelnut ganache, and chocolate chantilly (a sweetened whipped cream), you’re sure to get your chocolate fix here. Ara Chocolat – Paris, France An award-winning bean-to-bar chocolate maker in Paris? Sign us up! Besides artisinal chocolates, find chocolate cake, chocolate mousse and hot chocolate. VeganWaf – Brussels, Belgium Have you been missing out on waffles since going vegan? Not anymore. Try this vegan and gluten-free waffle smothered in chocolate. La Gelateria del Barri – Santiago, Chile Vegan gelato, yes… you’ll find some chocolate gelato here - but did you know you’ll also find decadent vegan brownies? This shop is 100% vegan and, bonus, they don’t use gluten, soy, or added sugar. Vegan Heaven – Taipei, Taiwan Aiming to use organic and local ingredients, this charmingly colorful bakery will have something for everyone. For you chocolate lovers: there’s a dark chocolate tart that’s not to be missed. Fukafe – […] The post 10 Chocolate Desserts You Must Try from Vegan Shops Worldwide appeared first on HappyCow.

Top Tips To Get You Through Veganuary 2020

January 8 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

If you’re new to veganism - or have always been curious, but never made the jump – the international campaign known as Veganuary may be the perfect transition period to attempt it. According to their blog, Veganuary set out to create a movement that would appeal to non-vegans throughout the world. With more people starting the new year with new trends, new objectives, and newfound motivation, you surely won’t be alone diving into a plant-based prerogative. With so many questions surrounding newly-vegan navigation, we’d like to share with you some tips and resources for how you can best prepare for the month (or year) ahead of you. Register on Veganuary.com By doing so, you can take advantage of the free resources provided to help you understand how to tackle this process from the get-go. Don’t be scared of the kitchen There are plenty of resources on the web to get you comfortable whipping up easy meals for you and your family. Try typing in “Vegan Recipes” in Google or in YouTube, or hashtagging it on Instagram. A great website to start with? The feedfeed vegan. Look around your city for participating local restaurants A handful of U.S. Cities are focused […] The post Top Tips To Get You Through Veganuary 2020 appeared first on HappyCow.

Freezer-Friendly Greens & Tofu Scramble Wraps

January 6 2020 Oh My Veggies 

It’s always my goal to create recipes that aren’t just tasty, but that are doable. For me, part of “doable” is ingredients that are readily available. This isn’t just about you, it’s also about me--I live in a smallish town and I don’t want to be schlepping all over the place for ingredients either. But I was working on a tofu scramble for a while and it just wasn’t coming together and I finally had to acknowledge the fact that I needed to go to Raleigh to get some nutritional yeast. Nutritional yeast is a flaky little deactivated yeast that tastes like cheese. So it’s great for vegan cooking. It’s a good source of vitamins (some brands, like Bob’s Red Mill, are fortified with Vitamin B12) and even contains some protein. If, like me, you can’t find it at your local grocery store, you can buy nutritional yeast on Amazon. But since I needed the nutritional yeast right away, I didn’t order it online and went to Earth Fare, 40 minutes away, to get it. I got home and since I was going to use it the next day, I decided to leave it on the countertop, as I sometimes […]

Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19.

December 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19.Youve probably heard of Meatless Monday. Maybe youve even considered giving it a try. Well, weve got your motivation right here -- the 19 reasons to go meatless on Monday in 2020. With the human population set to reach 10 billion by as early as 2050, the current approach to food production is no longer sustainable. Studies show that a reliance on animal products like dairy, beef, pork, and poultry is doing irreversible damage to the environment and is having a negative impact on personal health. Pretty heavy issues, but Meatless Monday can be part of a delicious solution to tackle these global problems. For 2020, we are encouraging everyone to ditch meat one day a week to help preserve the planet and live a healthier life. Improve Your Health Eating animal products has shown to increase instances of a myriad of metabolic and chronic health problems. Cut out meat one day a week to improve your wellbeing:   1. Reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. 2. Lessen the probability of developing type 2 diabetes. 3. Lower chances of having a stroke. 4. Preserve your kidneys. 5. Maintain a healthy weight. Save the Environment  Theres an inextricable link between livestock production and environmental degradation. For a number of reasons (many of which are listed below), a reduction in the consumption of animal products can help stall the destruction of our oceans, forests, and atmosphere. Enjoying plant-based meals instead of meat on Mondays can be help address climate issues including: 6. Forests are cleared for livestock production. 7. Animal feed production requires intensive use of water, fertilizer, pesticides, and fossil fuels. 8. Animal waste is a leading factor in the pollution of land and water resources. 9. Beef, pork, and poultry emit large amounts of carbon dioxide, methane, and other harmful greenhouse gases. 10. Livestock production uses 75% of the earths agricultural land. 11. Industrial livestock production displaces small, rural producers. 12. A quarter-pound of beef requires 425 gallons of water to produce (enough to fill 6,800 glasses of fresh drinking water). 13. Livestock manure can contain a variety of pathogens such as coli, growth hormones, and antibiotics. 14. Livestock waste streams contaminate drinking water and groundwater. Plant-based Goodness   Feel good about the food youre eating while saving money and exploring new ingredients. Thanks to the boom of flexitarian and plant-based eating, its never been easier, more convenient or delicious to go Meatless Monday. 15. Abundance of delicious plant-based meats to satisfy any of your cravings. There are so many high-protein meatless products now available at grocery stores, restaurants and fast food chains - making it easier than ever to enjoy your favorite foods - entirely plant-based. 16. Make Meatless Monday a reason to get the team together. Round up your friends and family to enjoy plant-based meals with on Mondays. 17. Almost all of your favorite restaurants offer a hearty plant-based option. So you can still frequent your favorite local, just explore new parts of the menu on Mondays. 18. Provides an opportunity to explore new ingredients. There are so many fruits, vegetables and grains to choose from, every Meatless Monday meal can be a new culinary adventure. 19. Youll likely save money on your grocery bill!   Interested in learning more about why you should give Meatless Monday a try? Weve got all the information (and plant-based recipes) that youll need to get started. The post Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19. appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Anja Schwartz Rothe

December 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Anja Schwartz Rothe Anja Schwartz Rothe is an herbalist, gardener, medicine maker, and writer, based in New Yorks Hudson Valley. Anja is the alchemist behind Fat of the Land, a small batch herbal apothecary with a focus on cultivating connection to self, environment, and the cycles by which we live. We interviewed Anja about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, her work and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? A nice balance of both! I need to exist inside a structured, but flexible container. A little bit of routine allows me to make the most of my time, while feeling free and inspired. -- Do your routines change with the seasons? Definitely, it is one of the biggest factors that informs the way I live – acknowledging the seasonal shifts within and without and using that information to alter how I show up to take care of myself. -- What do your mornings look like? I dont like alarms, so I usually wake up naturally, somewhere between 6:30 and 8, depending on the time of year. Then I drink a bunch of water, sometimes with lemon and sometimes not. I try to get out in nature almost immediately. I live right next to a bird sanctuary on the Hudson River, so I bring a hot bevvie and do a long walk there. I always leave my phone at the house so I have a chance to really check in with myself, do some breathing, and connect before the day starts. After that, its breakfast and usually emails. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I usually wash my face and do some facial gua sha. Its so relaxing and helps me unwind. Then, I have little ritual of turning down the house, where I close the curtains, turn off the lights, and say goodnight to everything. It sounds like a small detail, but its a gesture I really like, acknowledging the animacy of the home energies, thanking them, and setting it all to rest for the day. In my bedroom, I try to keep good sleep hygiene, which for me means low technology and minimal artificial lighting. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice? Honestly, I think my whole life is a mindfulness practice. Isnt that what mindfulness is all about, practicing showing up in the mundane of the day-to-day in the fullest capacity? Sustenance -- Describe your typical or favorite meal for each of these: Breakfast – Usually some combination of eggs and ferments. In the summer, hard-boiled with smoked salmon and sauerkraut. Right now, Im on a scallion and ginger congee kick – a simple Chinese rice porridge served with a soft boiled egg and miso. Its so good. Lunch – Sometimes an open-face sandwich or leftovers from the night before. Lately, Ive been working through lunch and having an early dinner. Snack – Fruit and chocolate. Its apples, pears, and citrus right now. Dinner – Currently: soup and sourdough bread with lots of ghee. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I make myself a matcha latte with oat milk and a couple droppers of our brain tincture almost every day. On weekends, I might have a cup of coffee and I sometimes do a mushroom tea/­­dandy blend/­­cacao mixture as an afternoon pick me up. I really try not to have too much caffeine though, it makes me a bit of a mess and dehydrates me way too much, always trying to find that balance. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your basket? Its pretty broken up between farmers markets, the local food shop, and the co-op in the next city over. In the summer, primarily farmers markets for that good good fruit and veg. Right now, my staples are eggs, potatoes, citrus, oatly, broccoli, and cauliflower. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? Definitely. I like to keep my kitchen stocked with what I call hippie treats and lots of fruit. I dont buy a lot of packaged food, which means if I want to have sweets in the house I have to prepare them myself. I love baking, and will usually make a treat at least once a week – recently, its been sticky apple ginger date cake and berry crisps from a stocked freezer of gleaned summer berries. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do, but with much variability. In the past, I’ve been really into running, yoga, and rock climbing — and these things come back in waves. In the summer, I’m cycling a lot, and right now I’m getting back into my ephemeral winter gym flow. Sometimes, my exercise is just doing squats in the kitchen while waiting for the kettle to boil. Thats actually my favorite kind. Beauty -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I definitely subscribe to the less is more skincare model. I wash with just warm water, am very liberal with hydrosols, and then use a serum and/­­or balm. I make all my own hydrosols in my garden during the summer and offer some of them in the apothecary. Im currently really loving Dragon Balm by Apis Apotheca, a farm and skincare line run by my friend Aviva, who really knows her shit. Most days I also do a quick little gua sha facial massage afterwards – I always see instant results and it feels too good. -- Do you have any beauty tricks that you’ve found to be especially useful? Drinking lots of water and herbal infusions. My present go-to is nettle, raspberry leaf, goji berry, and fresh ginger root. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress? Big Calm tincture in every pocket, purse, and drawer. I lean heavily on nervines and deep breathing. Getting outside is also really important — and socializing! -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? To be honest, I havent gotten so much as a cold in more than ten years! I owe this mostly to a naturally strong constitution, but also a pretty large emphasis on tonic, preventative medicine and lifestyle. Cooking with medicines, like infused vinegars, dank broths, and elderberry syrup, are big, but getting enough rest is the biggest. Im constantly doing micro check-ins throughout the day to see how I can best give myself what I need to prevent burnout, fatigue, and illness. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Theyre so fluid in my life. I enjoy the hell out of the work I do, and I’d probably be doing most of it even if it wasnt my job, but Im also pretty good at allowing myself to turn off when I’m tired and not place undue expectations on myself all the time. I find allowing myself to take frequent mini vacations is the most helpful — getting out of my environment is the only thing that really turns off my work brain, plus it brings in a fresh influx of new inspiration and perspective. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist? My first job in high school was at the local health food store. There were a couple older women who worked there and would walk me through the vitamin and bulk aisles, teaching me all about the different herbs and supplements. This was a sort of epiphany for me, viewing plants in this way. I then studied anthropology in university, focusing mostly on traditional sustenance and healing practices. After finishing school, I knew I needed to immerse myself in plant medicine, so I enrolled in an herbal medicine program in Appalachia. -- How do you approach foraging the ingredients for your apothecary and seasonal wellness boxes? Do you have a plan in mind for each season or is it more about going with the flow? I definitely have a plan in mind, but I usually have to surrender it while remaining open to new inspiration. It can be a challenge to have expectations for a season, nature doesnt really work that way, and thats been both a constant source of inspiration for me, as well as a lesson in boundaries and respect. I could be inspired to make one thing, but if its not a particularly fecund year for a certain plant, I have to cede to that. Making things from intuition and by listening to the seasons and cycles is probably not the best business model, but its the only way I want to work with plant medicine. -- What are some offerings youre working on currently? Im getting ready to re-release a little book I wrote last year, Always Coming Home: a guide to seasonal wellness, with some edits and new content. Im also refining the 2020 Seasonal Wellness Box subscription that will soon be available. -- How were you able to grow a business with your interests and loves in mind? Its been a very slow chipping away for me to remain really clear on the things that matter and the things that dont in growing my business. It turns out, remaining true to creating medicine that is intimate, small batch, and well cared for is much more important than being able to mass produce things or being on every shelf in the country. I want my values to be foremost and my business to be second. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Going full hibernation this January. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Put my legs up the wall, get a massage, go hiking with a friend, sweat, travel, in the summer I go swimming multiple times of day in various bodies of running water, thats my favorite. -- We love the Catskills so much. What are some of your favorite places to visit in the area? Montgomery Place farm stand for all your fruit and veg needs, there are so many great trails in the mountains, Colgate Lake for a swim, Talbott and Arding picnic at the Saugerties lighthouse for lunch and Lil Debs Oasis for dinner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Im reading The Overstory by Richard Powers right now, and it is SO GOOD. A vignette of short stories written about trees and so much more. Song/­­Album – Hildegard von Bingen forever. Movie – Fantastic Fungi! Just saw and highly recommend, mushrooms will save the world. Piece of Art – All things Andrew Wyeth. Photos by Jenn Morse, Gabrielle Greenberg and Anja herself. The post Anja Schwartz Rothe appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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