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Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1

July 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 A few months ago, we asked if you would be interested in seeing semi-regular, seasonal meal plans here and heard a resounding yes. We love coming up with whimsical and creative, plant-based recipes to share here, but we also want this site to be a friendly space for busy people looking to eat more plants. You know, for those of you who might not have the time or brain space for making, say, an experimental aquafaba meringue, like we do. Meal planning is a great practice for saving money on groceries (and impulse takeout orders!), eating homemade meals (which inevitably equal healthier meals), and minimizing those situations of staring blankly into your refrigerator, wondering what to eat for dinner. Do I plan my meals? Sometimes. Ironically, I think that if cooking wasn’t my job, I would plan our family meals much more. But because I’m in the business of dreaming up recipes for this blog and for other publications, I often end up with random, non-coordinated dishes in my fridge, which then become our breakfast, lunch and dinner. For now, we are thinking of publishing one meal plan a season, while maintaining regular, single-recipe post programming the rest of the time. Not changing anything about the blog! Just adding to what’s already here. This is our meal plan for the Summer of 2017. I tried hard to make it comprehensive, practical, and budget-friendly, but also not boring and really delicious. It all starts out with cooking a big pot of chickpeas and making a batch of almond milk, and most of the recipes stem from there. We are splitting this plan into two parts. This first part will focus on the shopping list, prep, breakfast and lunch recipes. The second part is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert. Here we go! Menu (for dinner and dessert recipes, see Part 2) Breakfast Almond Pulp Lime Ginger Granola Overnight Berry Chia Oats Lunch Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad Basil Zucchini Chowder Dinner Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas Zucchini Kimchi Tacos Dessert Peach and Blackberry Crisp *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, it’s got all the ingredients you’ll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 cauliflower head - 1 small broccoli head - 5-7 small to medium zucchini - 3 corn ears or 1 corn ear and 2 1/­­2 cups frozen corn - 1 of each green and red (or yellow, or orange) bell peppers - 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - 2 portobello mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 1 large and 1 small red onion - 2 yellow onions - 1-2 garlic heads (6-7 cloves) - 1-inch piece ginger - 2 avocados - 3-4 radishes (optional) Fruits - 3-4 limes - 3-4 lemons - berries: 1 pint fresh blueberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint fresh raspberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint strawberries – fresh (optional) - 1 cup blackberries – fresh or frozen - 3 ripe peaches or nectarines Herbs - 1 bunch (about 2 cups) basil - 1 bunch dill - 1 bunch cilantro - parsley (optional) Bulk - 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas - 2 1/­­2 cups raw almonds or 2 cups almonds and 1/­­2 cup walnuts/­­other nuts of choice - 3/­­4 cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds - 3/­­4 cup chia seeds - 3 cups gluten-free old fashioned rolled oats - 1/­­4 – 1/­­2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut Other - 1 13.5 oz can light unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 can green or black olives - about 1 cup kimchi - tortillas of choice (corn for gf) - sun-dried tomatoes packed in olive oil (optional) - vanilla ice cream to serve with the fruit crisp (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - white miso paste - sunflower butter /­­ tahini /­­ almond butter - Dijon mustard - Sriracha or chili sauce of choice - neutral coconut oil - maple syrup - coconut sugar - arrowroot powder (optional) - vanilla extract (optional) - kombu (optional) - capers (optional) Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - red pepper flakes - smoked paprika - chili powder - garlic powder - cayenne pepper - black peppercorns - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking nuts and beans helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the nuts and beans more nutritious. - Soak 1 cup of almonds overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. You may need to repeat it later in a week to make more almond milk if needed more for granola. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners during the week. - Make almond milk for the overnight oats and granola, reserve the leftover almond pulp for the granola and fruit crumble. - Make the Almond Pulp Ginger Lime Granola - Cook the chickpeas to be used in the soup, fajitas, tacos and salad, reserve the cooking liquid for the soup. - Make the Overnight Berry Chia Oats - Make the Creamy Salad Dressing and the Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad - Make the Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder - Mix the Fajita Spice - Prep the veggies for the Fajitas Monday Night: Make the fajitas to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you already prepped the vegetables and spice blend during prep day. Bake the crumble for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the fajitas and the crumble are in Part 2. - Make the Fajitas - Bake the Crumble (+ second batch of almond milk if you didn’t make it on prep day) Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the fajitas, prepare the Kimchi Zucchini Tacos for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. They are a very quick, weeknight friendly dish. These tacos would also work well as a lunch, if you need a break from the soup and salad. The recipe for the tacos is in Part 2. - Make the Tacos Recipes 1. Once you try making almond milk at home, it will be hard to go back to the store-bought kind, since it’s infinitely more delicious and affordable. In this meal plan, we also show you how to utilize the almond pulp that is left over from making almond milk in an addictive granola recipe. You will likely need to make two batches of almond milk throughout the week. You can make the first batch (to use for the granola and overnight oats) during the prep day, and the second batch on the day that you make the crisp, which will give you more milk to serve with the granola. You can also make both batches during the prep day. Almond Milk   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 cup almond - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 4 cups purified water Instructions Combine the almonds with the water in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Strain the milk through a nut milk bag into a jar or bottle. Squeeze the pulp dry as much as possible and reserve the almond pulp to use for the granola and crumble. Store the milk in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226 2. This Ginger-Lime Granola is made with the pulp, leftover from making almond milk. Besides being zero waste, this recipe is also incredibly delicious, with bright flavors from ginger and lime, rich notes from shredded coconut, and crunch from pumpkin and chia seeds. It tastes great served with almond milk and fresh berries. Almond Pulp Ginger-Lime Granola   Print Ingredients reserved almond pulp from making almond milk ¼ - ½ cup unsweetened shredded coconut ½ cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds ¼ cup chia seeds 2 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ¼ cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon grated ginger zest of 1 lime juice ½ lime pinch of sea salt Instructions Preheat oven to 325° F (160° C). Combine the almond pulp, shredded coconut, pumpkin/­­sunflower seeds, chia seeds, coconut oil, maple syrup, ginger, lime zest and juice, and a pinch of sea salt in a large bowl. Mix thoroughly. Spread the granola mixture on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet in a somewhat even layer and toast for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir, breaking apart any large clumps. Place the sheet back in the oven and turn off the heat. Leave to dry in the oven for 1 hour. If granola is not completely dry by that time, turn the oven back on the lowest temperature and let dry for another 30 minutes or until completely dry and crispy. If you have convection oven, that setting is really useful here. Keep the granola in an airtight glass container at room temperature. Serve with almond milk and berries. 3.5.3226 3. Cooking a big pot of beans on a Sunday is always a good idea, since you will then have a solid base for all kinds of meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, the chickpeas are utilized in every savory recipe, making the dishes more nourishing and satisfying. Pot of Chickpeas   Print Ingredients 1½ cups dried chickpeas - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 3-4 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife half a yellow onion 1-2 bay leaves (optional) 2-inch piece kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions While the granola is baking, combine the chickpeas with plenty of purified water in a soup pot. Add the garlic, onion, bay leaves and kombu, if using. The water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Bring the chickpeas to a boil over high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Check for doneness. If the chickpeas are soft, salt the water generously and cook for another 10 minutes, until the chickpeas are tender but still intact. Simmer longer, before adding salt, if chickpeas are not yet soft. Drain the chickpeas, reserving the cooking liquid. Youll need 1 cup of it for this meal plan, for the chowder. Optionally, freeze the rest of the liquid for future use in place of vegetable broth in any dish. 3.5.3226 4. These overnight oats are a breeze to put together and make for a satisfying, summery breakfast. We like our overnight oats to be chia-heavy, so this is something between a chia pudding and overnight oats, layered with juicy summer berries. Overnight Berry Chia Oats   Print Ingredients 2 cups rolled oats ½ cup chia seeds 2¾ cups homemade almond milk - from above ⅓ cup maple syrup splash of vanilla extract (optional) about 2 cups mix of fresh or frozen blueberries and raspberries, or any other berries of choice Instructions While the granola is baking and the chickpeas are simmering, combine the rolled oats and chia seeds in a large bowl. Add the almond milk, maple syrup and vanilla extract, if using, and stir to combine thoroughly. Spoon the oats between 2-3 clean jars in layers, alternating them with fresh or frozen blueberries, raspberries or any other berries of choice. Cover the jars with their lids and place in the refrigerator overnight. Enjoy for breakfast. 3.5.3226 5. I make this simple, creamy dressing all the time. It’s perfect in salads, as well as a sauce or dip for so many veggie dishes. Universal Creamy Salad Dressing   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons sunflower butter, tahini or almond butter 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon sriracha or other chili sauce of choice juice of 2 large lemons, plus more if needed Instructions Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of the lemon juice, in a glass jar or a bowl. Mix until smooth. Add the lemon juice and stir until well combined. Store refrigerated in an airtight glass container. 3.5.3226 6. This rainbow salad is loaded with nourishing summer vegetables, chickpeas, olives, herbs and seeds. At the base of the salad is garlicky, sautéed broccoli, which keeps much better than greens and makes for a really sturdy bed for the veggies. When slathered in the creamy dressing (above), this salad is completely irresistible. Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower head - chopped 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above ¼ cup toasted sunflower or pumpkin seeds 1 small to medium carrot - shaved into ribbons with a vegetable peeler kernels from 1 corn ear ½ cup olives - halved or quartered ⅛ red onion - chopped ¼ cup chopped dill ¼ cup chopped parsley (optional) handful basil leaves - torn (optional) 3-4 radishes - sliced (optional) about 2 tablespoons chopped sun dried tomatoes (optional) 1 tablespoon capers (optional) 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 head broccoli - cut into florets sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced freshly ground black pepper about 6 tablespoons Universal Creamy Salad Dressing, plus more for serving - from above Instructions Place the cauliflower into a food processor and pulse a few times into rice-sized pieces. Combine the cauliflower rice, chickpeas, sunflower or pumpkin seeds, carrots, corn, olives, onion, dill, parsley and basil, as well as the radishes, sun-dried tomatoes and capers, if using, in a large bowl. Warm the coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the broccoli and salt and sauté until bright green, for about 5-7 minutes. Add the garlic and stir it around for 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the garlicky broccoli to the bowl with the salad. Season the salad with freshly ground black pepper and add about 6 tablespoons of the Creamy Salad Dressing. Toss to combine well. Store the salad refrigerated in an airtight container. Serve with more dressing. 3.5.3226 7. One of our favorite, easy summer soups, with delicate flavors of zucchini and basil, sweetness from corn, and creaminess from coconut milk. It makes for the perfect, light warm weather lunch. Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon ground coriander (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 yellow onion - chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2½ cups fresh or frozen corn kernels 3-4 small zucchini - cubed 3 garlic cloves - sliced juice of ½ lemon 1 can unsweetened light Thai coconut milk 1 cup reserved chickpea broth - from above 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above 1 packed cup basil leaves, plus more for serving Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the spices, onion, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and sauté for 5 minutes, until onion is translucent. Add the corn and another pinch of salt and sauté for another 5 minutes. Add the zucchini and garlic, and stir around for 1-2 minutes, until the garlic is fragrant. Add the lemon juice and let it absorb for about 1 minute. Add the coconut milk, chickpea broth and chickpeas and bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Measure 1½ cups of the soup into an upright blender, add the basil, and blend into a chunky puree. Return the pureed soup back to the pot and mix it in. Serve the soup garnished with more basil. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. 3.5.3226 8. Use this spice mix for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas, as well as in any other dishes, where a piquant savoriness would be welcome. Fajita Spice   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons chili powder ½ tablespoon sea salt ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ tablespoon ground cumin, preferably freshly ground ½ tablespoon coconut sugar ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon garlic powder (optional) a few grinds of black pepper Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a small jar with a tight fitting lid. Close the jar and shake until well-combined. 3.5.3226 9. Prep the vegetables for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas ahead of time, in order to simplify your weeknight dinner. Fajita Vegetable Prep   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower - cut into florets 2 portobello mushrooms - sliced 1 large red onion - chopped 1 red, yellow or orange bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 green bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - seeded and sliced Instructions Prep all the vegetables as specified in the ingredients list. Store the chopped cauliflower and mushrooms in separate containers. Store the chopped onion and all sliced peppers in one container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Nasi Lemak

March 15 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Nasi Lemak In the five weeks that I spent exploring Malaysia, Singapore, and Borneo there were a few dishes that I just had to try whenever I had the chance. Nasi Lemak is a national favorite - and one of my favorites, too! The name technically means “fatty rice” but “creamy rice” sounds a least a little bit better. Traditionally, as with this recipe, Nasi Lemak is rice cooked in creamy, coconut milk - often along with fresh herbs and spices such as pandan (which you can replace with bay leaves if that’s what you’ve got.) The bright yellow hue comes from turmeric. Though it’s a breakfast dish, it can be eaten at any time of the day, and many variations cross firmly into Savory Culinary Territory. I eat this all times of the day: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snack, whatever! I tried Nasi Lemak in lots of places: Kuala Lampur, Penang, Malacca, and Singapore. Inspired by those dishes and their accompaniments - and my own imagination, I’ve created a complete meal set: Coconut Pandan Rice served with stir-fried Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, crunchy, charred Spicy Nuts, and a delicious sweet-chili sauce known as Sambal Belacan. These are actually four different recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA which I’ve put together in this one post. You can of course substitute or simplify the dishes for a less involved meal set designed how you like it. Nasi Lemak is equally awesome even when it’s just served with the fresh cucumber, lime slices, and nuts. I love going all out and doing the Lemongrass Tofu cubes, too. Also, I find the hot, spicy Samabal Belecan completes the dish fantastically. How to eat it? Mix it up and eat it with your hands! Serve this meal set up on a banana leaf, wash your hands, mix everything together, and dive in… wild and forkless. (By the way, frozen banana leaves are often available at your local Asian import grocery shop. Just thaw them, rinse them, and eat off of them.) If you prefer a more modern approach: Make it all, arrange it perfectly on plates, eat it with a fork and spoon. It’s up to you! Nasi Lemak Malaysian Coconut Pandan Rice with Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, Spicy Nuts & Sambal Belacan recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 3 to 4 /­­ time 60 min Coconut Pandan Rice: - 2 cups (375 g) broken jasmine rice or basmati rice - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) water - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) coconut milk - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric ground - 2 pandan leaves or bay leaves - fried onions for garnish - 1/­­2 small cucumber sliced - lime slices for garnish - Rinse and drain rice thoroughly. - Bring water and coconut milk to low boil in a medium pot with good lid. Stir in rice, salt, turmeric, and pandan (or bay leaves). Return to simmer. Cover and steam until most liquid is absorbed, 12-15 min. Remove from heat. Stir a few times. Cover and let sit 10 min. Remove and discard leaves before serving. - Garnish with fried onions, cucumber, and lime slices. Lemongrass Ginger Tofu: - 14 oz (400 g) firm tofu cut in cubes or strips - 1 1/­­2 cups (200 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs oil - 2 shallots finely chopped - 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 2 stalks lemongrass finely chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice - 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - fresh coriander or parsley leaves chopped, for garnish - Cut tofu in slabs and wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with a heavy cutting board and press out extra moisture, 15-20 min. Unwrap and cut in cubes or strips. - Heat oil in a large frying pan or wok on medium high heat. Add chopped shallots, garlic, lemongrass, ginger, and ground coriander. Fry, stirring constantly, until shallots being to soften and brown, 2-3 min. - Add tofu cubes. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu cubes are golden brown and crispy on the edges, 5-8 min. - Add chopped pineapple, lime (or lemon) juice, soy sauce, and salt. Fry, stirring regularly, another 5-10 min. Remove from heat. Spicy Nuts: - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) peanuts - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) cashews - 1/­­2 tsp chili powder or paprika ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - Heat a medium frying pan on medium heat. Dry roast peanuts and cashews, stirring regularly, until light golden brown and dark spots begin to appear, 4-7 min. Do not burn. - Add chili powder (or paprika), sugar and salt. Mix well. Continue to cook another 2-3 min, stirring constantly, until sugar has melted and nuts are well coated. Remove from heat. Allow to cool. Sambal Belacan: - 2-3 Tbs vegetable oil - 5 large (90 g) red chilies chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1 Tbs rice vinegar - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice - 1 Tbs coconut sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - Blend all ingredients in a small food processor or blender until smooth, adding more oil (or some water) as needed. - Heat a small frying pan on medium heat. Add blended spice paste to pan and fry, stirring regularly, until sauce darkens, thickens, and oil separates, 8-12 min. vegan recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook in English & German) The post Nasi Lemak appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Penang Laksa

March 13 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Penang Laksa Incredibly, I’d been in Malaysia for almost two weeks before I got to try Laksa, the legendary noodle soup. Even before the trip, I’d read about the intensely loved, powerful and fiery, somewhat-sour soup in food blogs and food guides to Malaysia. I’d checked out plenty of recipes and seen lots of super tasty photos. Once I got to Malaysia, whenever I asked locals what dishes I had to try, I heard again and again: Laksa! Okay, great, but where? And the answer was: Penang! Penang was hands-down my favorite place to eat on the Malaysia trip. (Singapore was a fairly close second. Penang was just more artsy, soulful, and real). I collected maps with locations of the best street food in Georgetown (Penang) and scoured the web and my travel guides for addresses of must-try vegetarian restaurants. On my second day in town, I had lunch at the vegan restaurant Sushi Kitchen, and met the chef/­­owner, who made a list for me of Must-See places and dishes. That night I went to Luk Yea Yan, a vegetarian Chinese restaurant known for fantastic flavors and inexpensive eats. I ordered up the Laksa soup. Three minutes later my oversized bowl of hot, steaming, bright red soup arrived - with countless ingredients and toppings piled up to the rim. There were at least three kinds of noodles, tofu cubes, soya and seitan chunks, numerous vegetables, about four kinds of fresh herbs - and balanced on top: a soup spoon with a thick, red curry paste on it. I’d read about this… Traditionally Laksa is usually served with a generous spoonful of rempeh - spicy red curry paste for you to stir in to the hot red broth yourself. I knew what to do. I did it. A half dozen flavors immediately exploded in my mouth: tamarind, chili, lime, pineapple, cilantro, mint. This was followed by a second wave of flavors: an army of vegetables, tofu, and seitan slices. I slurped down the noodles and paddled pieces of everything with my chopsticks into my hungry jaws. I had to take a break a few times to catch my breath and cool the spice alarm with generous draws on my lemon iced tea. When I was done, my forehead was light with perspiration and my lips and tongue were tingling and alive. There was never a doubt whatsoever that I would include a vegan recipe for Penang Laksa in my new Malaysia cookbook. Several weeks later (after having tried vegan Laksa soup at least three other times in Malaysia) I was back in my kitchen in Germany and set to work. It took a few attempts to master the recipe, each try better than the last. And then I had it: my own epic Laksa recipe! Since then, I’ve made it probably ten more times, including for several dinner parties large and small, and plenty of times for lunch. It’s best on cold, cloudy days to fire up your mood and open you up! But I’ve also made it lots of other times, even in the summer, well… just because it’s so awesome and is always a dish guests talk about long after the meal. Penang Laksa classic Malaysian noodle soup recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 45 min - 5 oz (150 g) seitan sliced - 3.5 oz (100 g) smoked tofu sliced - 1/­­3 cup (45 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs vegetable oil  - 1 Tbs soy sauce or Vegan Fish Sauce - 7 oz (200 g) udon noodles (cooked) - 2 1/­­2 cups (600 ml) water  - 2/­­3 cup (150 ml) coconut milk  - 1 kefir lime leaf or 1 tsp lime zest  - fresh mint leaves chopped - fresh coriander leaves chopped - fresh thai basil leaves chopped - bean sprouts for garnish laksa spice paste: - 4 candlenuts or 2 Tbs cashews soaked 20 min in hot water, drained - 1 stalk lemongrass chopped - 1/­­2-1 large red chili chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 shallot chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh galangal or ginger chopped - 1/­­2 tsp paprika ground (more as desired, for red color) - 1/­­2 tsp fennel seed ground - 1/­­2 tsp coriander ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar or agave syrup  - 3/­­4 tsp sea salt  - 1 tsp tamarind paste (seedless) - 2 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice  - 2 Tbs vegetable oil  - If using dried Udon: Cook, rinse, and drain 3.5 oz (100 g) noodles according to package instructions. - Blend spice paste ingredients in a small food processor until smooth. - Heat 1 Tbs oil a large pot or wok on medium high heat. Add sliced seitan and smoked tofu. Fry, turning regularly until edges are browned and crispy, 3-5 min. - Stir in chopped pineapple. Continue to stir-fry, 2-3 min. Add soy sauce (or Vegan Fish Sauce). Fry 2-3 min. Transfer to a plate or bowl. - Return pot or wok to medium high heat. Fry blended spice paste until it darkens and oil starts to separate, stirring constantly, 3-5 min. - Gradually stir in water, coconut milk and kefir lime leaf (or lime zest). Bring to simmer. Add cooked udon noodles. Return to simmer. Cook until noodles have slightly softened, 3-5 min. - Stir in fried seitan, tofu, and pineapple. Turn off heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Portion soup and noodles into bowls. Garnish with chopped herbs and bean sprouts. Serve. Panang Laksa vegan recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook - in English & German) The post Penang Laksa appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

No-Recipe Healing Soup

January 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No-Recipe Healing Soup A few years ago, I developed this soup recipe for Food & Wine, and since then, it has become a staple in our household during the winter months. The soup is all about the broth, which is based on a combination of immunity-boosting, anti-inflammatory ingredients like turmeric, ginger, garlic, lemon and miso. Any time I feel a cold coming on or if I’m simply in need of something warming and comforting, I make a batch of this gingery, spicy, sinus-clearing soup, and it’s proven to be a lifesaver many times. I never follow the original recipe exactly, in fact I’ve developed a sort ‘no-recipe’ approach, which considers my mood and the ingredients I have on hand. Sometimes, when in a hurry, I make the broth on its own and sip on it like I would on hot tea. When looking for a more substantial soup, I add other wholesome ingredients like veggies, greens and mushrooms. Each time is a little different, but the golden broth framework ensures that the soup will be tasty and nourishing to the core every time. The original recipe I did for Food & Wine involved pre-roasting the vegetables, but I’ve simplified it a great deal since then. Everything basically gets thrown into a pot and simmers into a magical mixture. I even cook soba right in the broth whenever I feel like having soba in my soup. I’m sure many people would call that an incorrect approach to the delicate thing that is soba, but the convenience of the method wins me over here, and it still tastes really good, so why not? I’m giving you my no-recipe recipe here. It’s a little different than usual, but it is the way I cook most of the time, and I suspect many of you do as well – with a great deal of improvisation, modification and at times simplification, whether following a particular recipe or not. No day is the same, so why should any one recipe stay rigid? Nothing wrong with going with the flow :) No-Recipe Healing Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients The ingredients in this recipe are divided into two sections - broth constants and optional add-ins. The constants are ingredients that are mandatory for making a flavorful broth. The optional add-ins are just that - optional. You can make just the broth and sip it on its own when feeling under the weather or in need of some comfort, or add one or more of the add-ins that you are craving/­­have on hand for a more substantial soup. This recipe is highly customizable, so feel free to get creative, following the basic broth framework. If you feel like including all the optional add-ins in the soup, all of them work well together except for the soba and spaghetti squash noodles - I recommend using one or the other as the noodle element. broth constants 2 teaspoons ground turmeric or 2 piece fresh turmeric - peeled, grated/­­minced 1 piece ginger - peeled, grated/­­minced 5 whole garlic cloves 1 jalape?o or small chili pepper - minced (leave seeds in if you prefer a spicier soup) 10-12 cups filtered water freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1-2 tablespoons tamari or to taste juice of 2 lemons 2 heaping tablespoons white/­­sweet/­­mild miso or to taste optional add-ins 1 large sweet potato or 3-4 medium carrots, or any other root vegetable of choice - cubed 8 oz shiitake or crimini mushrooms - sliced 2 lemongrass stalks - bruised with the back of a chefs knife, sliced into 3 pieces per each stalk handful kaffir lime leaves 1 piece kombu about 4 oz soba 1-2 clusters baby bok choy - separated into leaves or 1 small bunch any other greens - torn spaghetti squash noodles (from 1 roasted spaghetti squash) 1-1½ cups cooked beans or lentils handful cilantro leaves - for garnish Instructions Add all the broth ingredients, except black pepper, tamari, lemon juice, and miso to the pot. Also add any of the following optional add-ins that you are using: sweet potato/­­carrots, mushrooms, lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves and kombu. Lower the heat and simmer for 15 minutes, covered. If using sweet potato/­­carrots, check them for doneness by pricking a few pieces with a knife or fork, which should go in easily if the vegetables are cooked through. If not done, simmer for another 5 minutes and check again. Turn off the heat and add pepper to taste. If you have time, its great to let the broth sit and infuse for anywhere from 30 minutes to overnight (refrigerate if overnight), but this step is completely optional. Discard lemongrass stalks, kaffir lime leaves and kombu, if using. If making broth only, or if youve already added all the add-ins you have, you can stop here and add tamari, lemon juice and miso according to directions in step #5. If continuing with other add-ins, bring the soup back to a boil over medium high heat. If using soba, add it to the boiling broth and cook, uncovered, about 2-3 minutes less than the required time on the package until al dente (the soba will continue sitting in the hot broth and might get a little too soft if you cook it for the whole required time). Turn off the heat and add any of the following optional add-ins that you are using: baby bok choy/­­greens, spaghetti squash noodles, beans/­­lentils. Cover the pot and let the soup sit for about 2-5 minutes, until the greens are wilted and spaghetti squash noodles, beans/­­lentils are warmed through. Mix in lemon juice and tamari. Combine about 1 ladleful of the hot broth with the miso in a small bowl and mix until the miso is incorporated. Mix the miso broth into the soup. Taste for salt and adjust by adding more tamari if needed. Distribute between bowls, garnish with cilantro, if using, and serve. Notes 1. I call for 10-12 cups water here. Begin by adding 10 cups, if the pot seems too crowded, add 2 more cups. If you are making the broth only, you can add less water if you prefer, about 8 cups. 2. If you can get your hands on organic ginger and/­­or turmeric, dont peel them, as the skin holds lots of nutrients. Non-organic ginger and turmeric should be peeled. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules & a Giveaway Pink Soup with Roasted Onions and Broccoli Black Sesame and Ginger Ice Cream Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts and How to Make Ghee at Home .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No-Recipe Healing Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Three New SoCal Restaurants to Get Your Meatless Monday Fill

December 12 2016 Meatless Monday 

Three New SoCal Restaurants to Get Your Meatless Monday FillReality TV has certainly helped put Orange County, CA on the map. But if you prefer to dish with superbly prepared meatless meals, these three restaurants are our recommended Specials of the Day.   True Seasons Organic Kitchen 5675 East La Palma Ave., Anaheim, CA 92807   The True Seasons menu offers organic hot pot cuisine (Shabu-shabu) alongside their irresistible all-organic wraps, salads, bowls and desserts. Each menu selection originates from local famers and quality vendors with fresh, seasonal ingredients that are completely organic and GMO-free. In fact, Chef Saifon can often be found at the local produce markets, selecting unique and exotic vegetables for her renowned recipes. Perhaps thats why True Seasons was recently named one of Orange Countys Top 10 Best New Restaurants by Orange Coast Magazine.   True Seasons represents dining as a GMO free, truly organic food experience. We know many of our customers are vegan and vegetarian, so were excited to support the Meatless Monday movement and showcase some of our meat-free items. – Chef Saifon, True Seasons Organic Kitchen Vegan Lemongrass Soup by True Seasons Organic Kitchen Try the True Seasons recipe for Vegan Lemongrass Soup!   o o o   Green2Go - Burgers, Salads & Bowls 2435 East Imperial Highway, Brea, CA 92821   Green2Go is redefining the way Americas favorite meals are made. Imagine a deliciously healthy take on tacos, rice bowls and more. In addition to their tasty variety of meat-free specialties, they feature a healthy kids menu, not to mention an on-the-go food truck. Every step on their farm-to-fork path is designed with sustainability in mind.   The team here at G2G loves what Meatless Monday stands for and is honored to support this important movement. Many of our food items are meat-free and were delighted to share these with our health-minded customers. – Anita & Joulia, G2G co-founders   House Roasted Brussels Sprouts & Farro Salad by Green2Go   o o o   Jimmys Famous American Tavern 3325 East Imperial Highway, Brea, CA 92823   Jimmys Famous American Tavern serves up modern American regional cuisine with an artisanal point of view. This means the food is freshly prepared, hand crafted in small batched, made with high quality ingredients and cooked with traditional methods. Theyre self-described as comfort food for the foodie. Respecting customers who dont eat meat, they provide a flavorful selection of meat-free dishes and will gladly remove meat products from any menu item upon request.   The post Three New SoCal Restaurants to Get Your Meatless Monday Fill appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tofu and Pumpkin Lemongrass Curry…

October 27 2016 Vegie Head 

I’ve had the house to myself this week – with Paul’s work schedule taking him all over the country, and my travels taking me far and wide, we don’t often spend a lot of time together. When he’s away, I love to go all out in the kitchen.  I do when he’s at home as ... The post Tofu and Pumpkin Lemongrass Curry… appeared first on Vegie Head.

MALAYSIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 19 2016 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

MALAYSIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter On August 16th, 2016 I launched the Kickstarter Crowdfunding project for The Lotus and the Artichoke MALAYSIA vegan cookbook! This is my 4th Kickstarter project, and like the first three, it’s off to a terrific start. Cruise on over and check out the campaign. It’s a great way to support my creative endeavors and culinary adventures, and it’s a great way to pre-order the new cookbook which will be coming out in October. The Kickstarter will end on Sept 15th... make sure to get in before the fun is over. For the next few weeks, I’ll be posting cool updates and Behind the Scenes stories and photos of the design and production of the new cookbook. The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA After 3 successful Kickstarter projects and 3 internationally celebrated cookbooks, The Lotus and the Artichoke is back with a new cookbook... and back on Kickstarter! Earlier this year, I returned home to Berlin, Germany after 5 intense weeks exploring Malaysia, Singapore & Borneo: checking out the cities, cruising the coasts and countryside, island life during the wild Chinese New Year celebrations, staying in a rainforest treehouse, eating and cooking with the locals everywhere, and riding buses, trains, taxis, and boats all over the place. Since then, I’ve been recreating the insanely delicious eats, writing up new recipes inspired from the trip, spending hours at my art desk and computer with the illustrations and design, and photographing all the dishes for my next cookbook: The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA: A Culinary Adventure with over 70 Vegan Recipes. My 4th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide: - 160 pages - with over 60 full page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 5 weeks of travel in Malaysia, Singapore & Borneo - Explore amazing Malay, Chinese, and Indian cuisine from the fantastic foodie metropolises Kuala Lumpur & Singapore, culinary heritage highlights of Penang, rising star Ipoh, Sarawak’s quaint Kuching, the tribal highlands of Borneo and beyond - Everyday classics, mind-blowing mains, fabulous feasts, street food superstars, awesome salads & fresh treats, great snacks, and crazy delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and easy, awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Pre-Order my MALAYSIA cookbook on Kickstarter Some of the recipes: - Kelabit Mango Salad - Shredded Beet & Coconut Salad - Cucumber Zucchini Salad - Acar - pickled vegetables - Urap - traditional veg side - Penang Laksa Soup - Curry Mee - Nonya Noodle Soup - Spicy Mushroom Noodle Soup - Wonton Soup - Popiah Rolls - Otak-Otak - steamed quiche pockets - Satay Skewers w/­­ peanut sauce - Serunding Kelapa - roasted coconut & spices - Sauce Kachang - satay sauce - Sambal Belachan - red chili sauce - Pineapple Pepper Chutney - homemade red curry rempah paste - vegan faux-fish sauce - super 5-spice powder - Nasi Lemak - coconut creamy rice & ginger lemongrass tofu - Nasi Kandar - Malay street food feast - Nasi Kerabu - herbs, spices & olive mushroom rice - Nasi Goreng - fried rice classic - Mee Goreng - fried noodles with vegetables & crumbled tofu - KLFC - Kuala Lumpur Fried “Chicken” - Mushroom Murtabak - stuffed, grilled Indian flatbread - Sayur Campur - mixed vegetables w/­­ dark soy sauce - Sayur Lodeh - mixed vegetables w/­­ coconut gravy - Kang-Kong Goreng - stir-fried spinach - Bao - steamed buns w/­­ spicy seitan - Assam Tofu Faux-Fish - Asian casserole - Crispy Curry Tempeh Cubes - Soya Rendang - Black Pepper Seitan - Eggplant & Okra Tomato Curry - Szechuan (Kung Pow) Seitan - Char Kuey Teow - stir-fried rice noodles - Hong Shao Rou - roasted jackfruit - Mushroom Manchurian - Roti Canai - red curry & flatbread w/­­ chutney - Banana Leaf - Indian curry meal - Gobi 65 - Indochinese batter-fried cauliflower - Punjabi Sizzler - Apam Balik - crunchy peanut pancakes - Cendol - shaved ice, green noodles & syrup - Kueh Dadar - green pandan crepes - Kueh Lapis - multi-color cake - Ondeh-Ondeh - sweet, chewy dumplings - Kuih Kodok - fried banana fritters - Chocolate Mint Cake - Lychee Banana Sorbet - Coconut Ice Cream - Iced Ginger Lime Soda - Purple Dream - ... and more! Pre-Order my MALAYSIA cookbook on Kickstarter The post MALAYSIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday

May 22 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday I think I first got the desire to make rhubarb frozen yogurt when I saw a photo of Nigel Slater’s Rhubarb Eton Mess. Slater always does the most amazing things with rhubarb, making me dream about the days when the blushing pink bunches will appear at the market. Since those days are fully upon us, I went ahead and made this treat for the weekend, in celebration of rhubarb season and its elusiveness. I couldn’t resist appointing rose as a component of this frozen yogurt for two reasons – for one, rhubarb and rose has always sounded like the most magical combination that I’ve been thinking about for years, and secondly, I’ve had some beautiful dried roses sitting in my pantry without getting any use for too long. Yogurt is a complete weakness for me and all members of my family – we always have some in the fridge to use for breakfast and snacks. I like to make my own, whether with real milk or coconut, but I also love trying new brands. There seem to be many great yogurt companies out there today, which make it very easy to be a happy consumer – if you’re curious, I like Maple Hill, Wallaby, Seven Stars and Anita’s Coconut Yogurt is a delicious vegan variety. Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker (I’ve had an older model of this ice cream maker for years and it’s one of my favorite kitchen appliances). All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. With this possibility in mind, you are always less than an hour away from a dessert that many consider to be a treat to only acquire outside of the home. This batch matched my very high expectations. The first spoonful I had made me stop in my tracks and close my eyes for a second or two. I’ve always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Since I make so much ice cream/­­popsicles/­­frozen yogurt, we’ve decided that Sunday posts will be reserved for frozen treats of all kinds. We hope that will make you smile. Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt   Print Serves: 6-10 Ingredients 1½ lb rhubarb - sliced ½ cup dried rose petals (optional) ½ cup maple syrup - divided 32 oz Greek yogurt (I used Wallaby for this batch) 2 tablespoons rose water Instructions In a medium saucepan, combine rhubarb with rose petals, if using, and ¼ cup maple syrup. Bring to a boil over medium heat, reduce to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes, until rhubarb is soft. Let cool to room temperature and chill in the refrigerator for about an hour. Combine well-chilled yogurt with half of the rose-rhubarb mixture, remaining ¼ cup of the maple syrup and rose water. Process in an ice cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon into a container, alternating between layers of frozen yogurt and the remaining rose-rhubarb mixture. Eat right away as soft serve or place in the freezer and make sure to remove from the freezer 10-15 minutes before serving. Notes If you dont have an ice cream maker, you can make popsicles. Just pour the final rhubarb-yogurt mixture into popsicle molds and freeze. Rose petals are optional, rose water gives plenty of flavor. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Lavender Ice Cream with Apricots Poached in Blueberry Sauce Homemade Yogurt and Frozen Yogurt Lemongrass Raspberry Pops Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Saturday Six | Roasted Jalape?os, Blueberry Corn Panzanella & Rainier Cherry Ice Cream

June 27 2015 Oh My Veggies 

Were rounding up some of our favorite recipes from this weeks Potluck submissions, including Roasted Jalape?os, Rainier Cherry Ice Cream, Blueberry Corn Panzanella, Coconut Curry Soup, Vegan Summer Pizza with Sweet Corn, and Tofu Banh Mi Sandwiches with Lemongrass.

Greens and Adzuki Bean Stew

April 23 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | Heat coconut oil in large pot over medium heat. Add shallots, and sauté 5 minutes, or until beginning to brown. Add garlic, ginger, and salt; cook 3 minutes, then stir in turmeric. Add chiles, lime leaves (if using), lemongrass, coconut milk, and 21/­­2 cups water; bring to a boil over high heat. Cover pot, reduce heat to low, and simmer 30 minutes. 2 | Remove and discard chiles, lime leaves, and lemongrass. Add beans to pot, and return to a simmer. Stir in leek, and simmer 2 minutes more, or until tender. Add bok choy, watercress, ginger juice (if using), tamari, and coconut sugar; stir well, and cook 1 minute more. Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

Thai Spiced Butternut Squash Soup

March 16 2015 Vegan Dad 

Thai Spiced Butternut Squash Soup This soup has Thai inspired undertones that let the roasted squash still be the star of the dish. You can make it as hot as you want with the Sriracha, and you can always add more lemongrass and ginger if you want those flavours to come through more. INGREDIENT - 2.5 lbs butternut squash - 3 dried New Mexico chiles, seeded and cut into pieces - 1 cup boiling water - 1 tsp coriander seeds - 3 tbsp coconut oil - 1 large onion, diced - 2 shallots, diced - 6 garlic cloves, chopped - 1 stalk lemongrass, minced - 1/­­4 cup chopped fresh ginger - 4 cups vegetable stock - 1 tbsp brown sugar - 1 can light coconut milk - Sriracha to taste - salt to taste METHOD 1. Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Slice (each) squash lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Brush flesh with oil and place flesh-side down on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for about 30 mins, or until soft. Set aside to cool. Scoop squash out of the skins. 2. Pour boiling water over the chiles and let sit for at least 20 mins. 3. If you have one, use a mortar and pestle to pound the lemongrass and ginger into a pulp. 4. Heat a soup pot over medium heat. Dry roast coriander seeds until fragrant. 5. Add oil, onion, shallots, garlic, lemongrass, and ginger to the pot. Saute for 5-7 mins, until softened but not browned. 6. Add chiles and soaking water to the pot and cook for 5 mins, stirring regularly. 7. Add squash, stock, and sugar to the pot. Mix well. 8. Transfer to a blender in batches and blend until very smooth. 9. Transfer back to the pot on med-lo heat. Add coconut milk. Season to taste, and add Sriracha to taste. Heat to steaming and serve.

Lemongrass Mung Beans over Spaghetti Squash

December 15 2014 Golubka Kitchen 

Lemongrass Mung Beans over Spaghetti Squash Before we share our holiday dessert for the year, here is a dish that I’ve been hooked on lately. It will make for a light and nourishing lunch or dinner between those big celebratory meals. Spaghetti squash has been in high demand in my kitchen this fall, I love it for its versatility and convenience. It never ceases to amaze me how a little yellow squash produces delicious natural ‘noodles’ after some time in the oven. Something magical happens when coconut milk mixes with the spice of ginger and chili, citrus, lemongrass and tamari into a creamy sauce. Mung beans, and later spaghetti squash absorb the flavors of the sauce, while broccoli and carrots provide a freshness and crunch. The garnish of toasted sesame seeds and herbs adds a bold finishing touch. I recently rediscovered mung beans and have been experimenting with them in the kitchen (I even managed to make this fettuccine, stay tuned). For this recipe, you can either cook or sprout the mung beans, I’m a fan of the latter. Sprouting them is very simple: cover with filtered water overnight, then drain and keep in the same bowl, covered with a damp kitchen towel for about two days, until satisfied with the size of your sprouts. Rinse every 8 hours. For this dish, one day of sprouting is plenty. And if you are looking for a light seasonal dessert for your holiday table, grab the recipe for Earl Grey Poached Pears and Hazelnut Panna Cotta from our cookbook over at Chalkboard Magazine. Lemongrass Mung Beans over Spaghetti Squash for the spaghetti squash 1 medium spaghetti squash coconut oil sea salt and freshly ground black pepper for the lemongrass mung beans (inspiration credit) 1 tablespoon coconut oil 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil 2 stalks lemongrass – bruised with the back of a chef’s knife and chopped finely 1 tablespoon grated ginger root 2 cups sprouted or cooked mung beans 2 teaspoons sriracha 1 tablespoon lime juice 2 teaspoons brown rice vinegar sea salt 2 cups broccoli florets 2 large carrots – julienned 3/­­4 cup coconut milk 2 tablespoons tamari toasted sesame seeds 1/­­4 cup chopped green onions basil or cilantro leaves to cook spaghetti squash Preheat oven to 400 F. Cut squash in half lengthwise and remove the seeds. Rub the flesh with coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place onto a rimmed baking sheet, cut side down. Bake for 30 minutes or longer, until soft throughout. Let cool. to make lemongrass mung beans Warm up coconut oil and 1 tablespoon of sesame oil in a large saute pan over medium high heat. Add lemongrass, ginger, mung beans, sriracha, lime juice, rice vinegar and a pinch of salt. Saute for 4-5 minutes. Add broccoli, carrots, coconut milk, remaining 1 tablespoon of sesame oil and soy sauce. Stir over the heat for another 3 minutes. Remove from heat. to assemble Scoop out the spaghetti squash and distribute between bowls. Spoon lemongrass beans and veggies over the squash. Sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds, green onion and basil/­­cilantro leaves.

No Noodle Pad Thai

September 21 2014 Golubka Kitchen 

No Noodle Pad Thai I’m so excited to talk about the new creation of our long-time (virtual) friends, David and Luise, the team behind Green Kitchen Stories. I’ve been anticipating their second cookbook, Green Kitchen Travels, with much enthusiasm after admiring their work for many years. Once it arrived at my doorstep, I didn’t put it down until I saw the whole thing, studying every stunning image many times over. The book is filled with vibrant vegetarian and vegan dishes, many of which I was tempted to make right away. What makes it special is that every recipe is inspired by the authors’ travels around the world, often based on authentic dishes with a fresh, veggie-based twist. The creative and easy-going GKS style is evident on every page. It was very tough for me to decide on a dish for this post. I was quite torn between the Crispy Aubergine Bites, Lentil and Strawberry Tacos, Sicilian Caponata, Vietnamese Pho, Vegan Moussaka, Indian Cardamom Laddu, Portuguese Sopa de Legumes and Lemongrass Brussels Sprout Curry. Finally, my never-ending love for Pad Thai took over, and this No Noodle Pad Thai recipe did not disappoint. The flavors here are warming, yet very fresh and crisp, with julienned daikon and carrots replacing noodles. Now I’m off to shop for ingredients for the Caponata, before it’s too late in the season for tomatoes and eggplants. The good news is that Green Kitchen Travels is available for pre-order right here! Thank you David and Luise for another beautiful cookbook. No Noodle Pad Thai 1 daikon radish or zucchini 4 medium carrots – peeled 4 cups mung bean sprouts 4 spring onions (scallions) – finely chopped (I used chives here) 1 package firm tofu – cut in cubes 1 handfull cilantro leaves (I used basil because I had beautiful basil on hand) 2 tablespoons black or tan sesame seeds – toasted, plus extra for garnish 4 slices of lime – to serve Sauce 1/­­2 cup (4 oz/­­125 g) peanut butter (I used almond butter) 4 tablespoons lime juice 2 tablespoons honey 2 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger 1 pinch ground cayenne pepper 1. Create the noodles from the daikon and carrots using a julienne peeler, mandoline, spiralizer or potato peeler. Place the ‘noodles’  into a bowl, then add in the mung bean sprouts, onions, tofu, herbs and sesame seeds. Mix well. 2. Stir together all the sauce ingredients in a separate bowl, add more water if needed. Adjust the seasoning. 3. Pour the sauce over the vegetables and toss to combine thoroughly, using your hands. Garnish with more herbs, sesame seeds and a slice of lime. Note: If making ahead, store the salad and sauce refrigerated in two separate containers.

Blueberry-Lemongrass Spritzer

June 23 2014 Vegetarian Times 

1. Trim lemongrass ends, and peel away any tough outer leaves. Starting from the base end, cut stem into 5 1-inch-long pieces. Smash each lemongrass piece once or twice with dull side of knife to bruise and break open. 2. Combine lemongrass, blueberries, and sugar in medium saucepan. Stir with wooden spoon, smashing some berries as you go. Add 1/­­2 cup water, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 10 minutes, or until thickened and slightly syrupy. 3. Meanwhile, line strainer with two layers of cheesecloth, and set strainer over medium bowl. Pour blueberry mixture into center of cheesecloth, and let drain completely, about 8 minutes. Pull together ends of cloth, closing them up around remaining fruit, and carefully squeeze out any remaining juice. Discard solids, and stir in lime juice. Chill syrup until cooled. 4. Pour 3 to 4 Tbs. syrup into glass with ice. Top with 6 oz. seltzer water. Taste, and add more syrup, if desired. Repeat with remaining syrup and seltzer. Serve garnished with lime wedges.

Lemongrass Soup

December 12 2016 Meatless Monday 

This unique recipe seasons classic winter vegetables with the exotic flavors of Southeast Asia. Look for lemongrass, Kaffir lime leaves, turmeric, galangal  and dry  guajillo chili pepper in specialty shops or find them online. This recipe comes to us from Chef Saifon of True Seasons Organic Kitchen in Anaheim, CA. Serves 2 For the Vegetables: - 1/­­2 cup kabocha squash, cut into 3/­­4 inch thick slices - 1/­­2 cup butternut squash, cut into 3/­­4 inch thick slices - 1 cup kale, chopped - 1 cup red chard, chopped - 1/­­2 cup carrot, diced - 2 t green onion, chopped - 1/­­2 cup zucchini, sliced - 1 purple onion, cut in to 3/­­4 inch thick slices - 1/­­4 cup cilantro, finely chopped for garnish For the Spicy Lemongrass Soup Base: - 1/­­4 cup lemongrass - chopped - 3 t garlic - 1 t coriander seed (dry) - 2 t sea salt - 5 kaffir lime leaves - 1 turmeric (small root) - 1 galangal, cut in 3 small pieces - Fresh lime juice - 1/­­2 cup guajillo dry chili pepper (5 large peppers) - 1/­­2 cup water Mix all of the ingredients for the soup base in a high speed blender for about 2 minutes. Boil 3 cups of water, add soup base mixture and all vegetables. Season to taste with more lime or lemon juice for more sour taste, and more fresh chili or chili powder for extra spice. Cook until vegetables are tender. The post Lemongrass Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower

November 2 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower This post was created in partnership with San-J. Happy November! It’s so hard to believe that the year is almost over. November in the U.S. means Thanksgiving, and for the rest of the world, those December and January holidays are not so far off as well. We are here to give you some ideas to consider for those festive family dinners, friendsgivings and potlucks, with an emphasis on vegetables, fruit and whole food ingredients. The holidays can be a little tough if you are trying to stay on track with eating well or even simply keeping away from meat/­­dairy/­­gluten. If you aren’t participating in one or more of those categories, chances are, you might feel excluded at a holiday table. And even if you are totally fine with eating those veg-centered sides only, others might find it offensive or feel as though they are not being good hosts, etc. The point is, there is usually a main event to a holiday table, and although to me it’s always been the pie, to most it’s the bird, or another grand platter of some sort of meat. There is a ceremony to getting that platter on the table – it takes time and care to pick out and prepare, which creates anticipation and excitement. Here, I applied that kind of thinking to cauliflower, a whole cauliflower, prepared in a way that feels ritualistic, celebratory and fun, and delicious enough to be a holiday table centerpiece. This cauliflower is slowly stewed whole in a rich, tomato-based sauce with greens, carrots, onions, mushrooms, spices and autumn herbs. Tamari, balsamic and prunes help create body, depth and complexity in flavor. In the end, the cauliflower comes out incredibly tender and cuts like butter – ‘carving’ it is quite a pleasure. It’s incredibly good served over anything starchy, which should be easy since many holiday tables will likely include some sort of potato/­­root mash in their setting. The cauliflower is pictured here served with a delicious celeriac and parsnip mash with crispy sage, which makes for a perfect accompaniment. We will be posting the recipe for the mash this coming weekend, so make sure to stop by for that, it’s a real winner. Tamari, the gluten free soy sauce, is such a staple ingredient in my kitchen, that I feel at a loss whenever I run out. It’s a basic requirement in many Japanese and Asian-inspired dishes, but I use it in all kinds of meals, way beyond Japanese. It’s an essential flavor builder in this cauliflower, for example. I find tamari to be especially great for vegan and vegetarian cooking – it helps immensely with developing flavor depth and complexity when added to vegetables, and of course, it’s an amazing addition to sauces. When it comes to tamari brands, San-J is a classic that’s been around for eight generations, and the brand you will likely see when you search for gluten-free soy sauce in your store. The difference between San-J tamari and regular soy sauce is that tamari contains no wheat, just organic fermented soybeans, while soy sauce usually has 40%-60% wheat. The higher concentration of soybeans in tamari also contributes to its richer flavor and smoother texture. San-J tamari contains no artificial preservatives or additives, the soybeans are non-GMO, and are brewed for up to six months according to traditional Japanese techniques. It really is the best, and I’m so happy to have partnered with San-J on this festive recipe. Enjoy :) Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower   Print Serves: 1 cauliflower head Ingredients 5 prunes - roughly chopped 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - sliced 2 medium carrots - diced about 6 cups roughly chopped collard greens about 3 tablespoons tamari - divided 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered 5 garlic cloves - sliced 1 chili pepper - seeded and chopped 3-4 sprigs thyme - chopped about 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary handful sage leaves - chopped freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste two 28 oz boxes/­­cans of crushed tomatoes 1 large cauliflower head - outer leaves trimmed Instructions Drizzle prunes with balsamic vinegar in a small bowl and set aside. Warm coconut oil in a large pot over medium high heat. Add onion, carrots, collard greens and a splash of tamari and sauté for 10 minutes, until onion is translucent and collard greens are wilted. Add mushrooms and sauté for about 8 minutes, until all their liquid is evaporated. Add garlic, chili, thyme, rosemary, sage and black pepper and saute for 2-3 minutes. Add prunes together with balsamic vinegar, followed by 2 tablespoons tamari and tomato paste and stir around until the liquid evaporates, about 1 minute. Add crushed tomatoes, stir to combine and bring to a near boil. Carefully drop cauliflower into the sauce and spoon plenty of sauce on top of the cauliflower to coat it completely. Stir some of the vegetables out from under the cauliflower to ensure that its covered with the sauce as much as possible. The top of the cauliflower may peek out a little and thats ok. Bring the sauce back to a boil, adjust the heat to a slow simmer, cover and cook for 40-50 minutes, until the cauliflower is completely cooked and soft throughout. Scoop the simmering sauce over the cauliflower every now and then while its cooking. Remove the cauliflower from the pot, slice and serve it warm with plenty of sauce, over vegetable mash or any grains of choice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Banana Toffee Tart Butternut Squash Spaghetti with Creamy Almond Butter Sauce Lemongrass Mango Curry with Toasted Pumpkin Seeds .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Creamy Thai Carrot Sweet Potato Soup

September 6 2016 VegKitchen 

Creamy Thai Carrot Sweet Potato Soup This soup shows off the flavor of red curry paste, an authentic Thai ingredient. Its warm and spicy, but not overpowering, and its usually enhanced with notes of lemongrass, garlic, ginger, and chiles. It works wonders in this soup, creating rich and full-blown flavor in an instant!

Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet -- Ice Cream Sunday

May 29 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet -- Ice Cream Sunday Florida is on its own schedule when it comes to growing seasons, and we usually have our local strawberries in March. This year’s strawberry crop was especially abundant, a field of ruby-red like I’ve never seen it before. We went strawberry picking at the nearby organic farm and ended up gathering way more of the sun-ripened beauties than we initially planned. We took home enough to enjoy fresh for a week and froze the rest. Soon after, Roost Books sent me Emma’s beautiful cookbook, My Darling Lemon Thyme – Recipes from My Real Food Kitchen, and all stars aligned for me to make her Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet. I waited a bit to share this until strawberry season kicked off in northern climates, and when I saw strawberries being sold at the Union Square Greenmarket while visiting NYC last weekend, I knew it was finally time. Aside from eating them just as they are, nothing showcases seasonal fresh berries more than homemade sorbet. One of the things I adore about Emma’s cooking style is her love of fresh herbs. Just like her, I often include herbs in sweet dishes, it’s a little trick to turn many ordinary desserts into a completely unique and memorable treat. The inclusion of Thai basil in this recipe is genius and makes this creamy sorbet even more refreshing, aromatic and summery. It’s also hard to believe that this intense crimson colour comes just from strawberries – a real show stopper. As the heat approaches, My Darling Lemon Thyme offers a nice collection of easy frozen desserts, like Watermelon, Rose and Mint Icepops, No Churn Banana Berry Ice Cream and dreamy Chocolate Cream Pops. The breakfast chapter includes such gems as Tahini, Orange and Coconut Toasted Muesli, creamy porridges, crepes and pancakes. When I turned the page to the Raspberry, Dark Chocolate and Pistachio Brownies, I knew I had to make them right away and have several times since then – they came out perfect every time. The savory dishes in the book are just as exciting, ranging from flavorful salads and soups to big dinner plates, all influenced by various cuisines and utilizing the most beautiful array of vegetables, grains, legumes, spices and herbs. The whole book is gluten-free and I was especially excited to receive it and study the thorough and detailed instructions for the Gluten-Free Sourdough Starter that is used in the Brown Rice, Millet and Chia Sourdough Bread. The recipe for the Gluten-Free Pizza Crust is also at the top of my list of things to try. My Darling Lemon Thyme is Emma’s debut cookbook, and although the U.S. edition came out a few months ago, Emma already released her second cookbook, A Year in My Whole Food Kitchen, in Australia and New Zealand. It looks nothing short of amazing and I can’t wait for it to be published in our side of the world. Below, some links for the long weekend. Michael Pollan interviewed on the Here’s the Thing Podcast Rene Redzepi is the chef/­­co owner of Noma and his Instagram is full culinary wonders – veggies preserved in beeswax for 5 months, pickling wild roses, crazy peas, or how about stale pumpkin flowers that didn’t come out tasting so good :) Nettle, Raspberry Leaf and Goji Beauty Tonic – I’ve been making this for a few months now and I swear I’ve noticed my nails get stronger in the process. Transcendental/­­Vedic Meditation has been on my mind a lot lately and I enjoyed this interview on the subject between Bob Roth and Jerry Seinfeld. Who would have ever guessed Seinfeld has been meditating since the 70s? States of Undress – a very typically Vice show about global fashion intertwined with cultural and political issues, hosted by girl crush Hailey Benton Gates. GKS Smoothies Cookbook – so excited for this! Blog Love – Shelly’s Chive Blossom Vinegar, Laura’s White Lentil Spring Onion Sauce, Sophie’s Pistachio Ice Cream, Jodi’s Rhubarb Panna Cotta, and this Mango Tahini Sauce! Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet   Print Serves: 8 Ingredients 2 lb/­­1 kg strawberries - hulled and sliced ¾ cup/­­200 g unrefined raw sugar (1 cup in original recipe) 1 cup loosely packed Thai basil leaves - roughly torn ½ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice Instructions Combine strawberries and sugar in a large bowl and set aside for 1-2 hours, stirring occasionally until syrupy. Drain syrup from the berries into a small saucepan, add basil and bring to a boil. Boil for 1 minute, remove from heat and let infuse while cooling down to a room temperature. Puree strawberries in a blender until smooth and strain through a fine sieve. Discard the seeds. Strain basil syrup over the strawberry puree, squeezing basil leaves with your hands to get the most flavor out of them. Add lemon juice, stir to combine and chill in the fridge for at least 2 hours - I prefer overnight. Churn in an ice-cream maker for 20-25 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Transfer to a container and freeze for another 2 hours. Notes If you dont have an ice cream machine, pour the mixture into a shallow, freezer-proof container, freeze for 1 hour until the edges are starting to freeze, and then beat with a whisk to break down ice crystals, until smooth. Return to the freezer and repeat this 2-3 times before leaving to freeze for 2 hours. Or make popsicles - pour the final mixture into a popsicle mold and freeze. 3.5.3208   You might also like... Spiced Apple and Blackberry Kuchen Ice Cream Valentines Day Dessert - Rose Ice Cream, Pomegranate Sorb... Homemade Yogurt and Frozen Yogurt Lemongrass Raspberry Pops Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots and Beluga Lentils

November 4 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots and Beluga Lentils I recently came back from a short stay in NYC with Masha (older daughter and Golubka photographer), where I was happy to get a glimpse of autumn with its turning trees and crisp air. Fall is something I miss a lot after being a resident of almost seasonless Florida for so many years. All the falling leaves and a minor sniffle got me thinking about comforting soups, which are the best answer to being under the weather or any general cravings for warming, healing food. This soup is simple in preparation, but full of powerful flavors and anti-inflammatory properties. I started with a play on chicken noodle soup, the classic ‘get well’ food, by using roasted spaghetti squash in place of noodles and making a nutritious broth. The broth is infused with the best of the best – turmeric, ginger, garlic, lemongrass and plenty of lemon. The sweetness of roasted carrots balances out the tartness and spiciness of the broth. Puy lentils complete the soup with body and substance. If you can get your hands on kaffir lime leaves, which can be found frozen at Asian markets, do not hesitate to include them, you’ll be in for a real treat. I created this recipe as part of a healthy recipe package for Food & Wine online, see the detailed recipe here.

Lemongrass Noodle Bowl with Mock Duck

June 19 2015 VegKitchen 

Lemongrass Noodle Bowl with Mock DuckThis dish is bursting with crave-worthy Vietnamese flavors: lemongrass, lime, mint, ginger. I like to use homemade broth and infuse it with aromatics, but you can use bouillon, if you like. Just try not to make the base too strong; you want all the flavors to shine through. Mock duck is really just seitan, but if youre familiar with those little cans of mock duck at the Asian grocery, feel free to use those! Recipe and photo from Vegan With a Vengeance: 10th Anniversary Edition* by Isa Chandra Moskowitz, (C)2015. Published by Perseus Books, reprinted with permission. Save Print Lemongrass Noodle Bowl with Mock Duck Author: Isa Chandra Moskowitz Recipe type: Asian Noodles Cuisine: Vegan /­­ Healthy Prep time:  1 hour Cook time:  1 hour Total time:  2 hours Serves: 4   Ingredients Marinated seitan 1/­­4 cup chopped shallot 1 clove garlic 1 teaspoon agave nectar A few grindings of freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon peanut or other vegetable oil 2 tablespoons sliced lemongrass Juice of 1 lime 2 cups thinly sliced seitan Broth 2 tablespoons coriander seeds 1 tablespoon peanut or other vegetable oil 2-inch piece fresh ginger, thinly sliced (no need to peel) 6 cloves garlic, smashed 1 large white onion, roughly chopped 3 tablespoons sliced lemongrass 1 teaspoon salt 4 cups vegan vegetable broth (or equivalent bouillon) Juice of 1 lime To serve 8 ounces vermicelli rice noodles Sriracha Thinly sliced red onion Thinly sliced red pepper Lots of fresh mint Lots of fresh cilantro Lime wedges Instructions First, marinate the seitan: Toss all the marinade ingredients, except the seitan, into a small food processor and puree until (relatively) smooth. Place the seitan in the marinade. Let marinate for about an hour, turning a couple of times to keep everything evenly coated. Meanwhile, prepare the broth: Heat a stockpot over medium heat. Dry toast the coriander seeds for about 3 minutes, until theyre fragrant and a few shades darker. Add the peanut oil, onion, garlic, and ginger and sauté for about 15 minutes. Add the lemongrass, salt, broth, and 6 cups of water. Cover and bring to a boil. Once boiling, lower to a simmer and cook for about 30 more minutes, or until everything else is ready. While the broth is simmering, prepare your noodles according to the package directions. Once they are ready, drain and rinse under cold water and set aside. Its okay if theyre at room temp. Then prepare the mock duck: Heat a large pan (preferably cast iron) over medium heat. Drizzle a little peanut oil in the pan. Sauté the mock duck for about 10 minutes, until nicely browned. Oh, and if you like things spicy, add a big pinch of red pepper flakes while sautéing. Back to the broth. After it has simmered for 30 minutes or after all other components are ready, strain the broth through a fine-mesh strainer (remember to have a large bowl underneath, obviously), then return to the pot to keep warm. Add the lime juice. To assemble the bowls, place one quarter of the noodles in each of four large bowls. Pour in the broth. Add sriracha to taste. Tuck the veggies and fresh herbs all over. Top with the mock duck and garnish with lime wedges. Serve with a fork or chopsticks and a large spoon. 3.3.3077 Here are more recipes for Asian Noodles. Enjoy more Seitan Recipes. *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!

Thai Tempeh Balls with Green Beans

March 16 2015 Meatless Monday 

Tempeh is transformed into delectable balls spiced with leek, garlic, cilantro, chili, ginger and lime juice. These Thai spiced tempeh balls are balanced by a miso apple lemongrass glaze and finished with green beans and a sprinkling of sesame seeds. This recipe comes to us from Danica of Soundly Vegan. Serves 4 - 1 stalk lemongrass* - 2 cups apple juice - 1/­­3 cup onion, thinly sliced - or - 1/­­3 cup leek, thinly sliced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1/­­4 cup cilantro - 1 Thai chili*, seeded and thinly sliced - 1 inch fresh ginger, peeled and finely diced - 1 tablespoon ground flax seed** - 8 ounces tempeh - 1/­­4 cup low sodium tamari or soy sauce* - juice from 1/­­2 lime - a little canola oil, for baking the tempeh - 1 pound green beans, trimmed - 1 tablespoon light miso* - sesame seeds, for garnish *Found in Asian markets or the Asian section of most grocery stores. **Optional. Found in health food stores or the grains section of most grocery stores. Prepare a baking sheet with parchment paper. Preheat an oven to 350 degrees. Peel the outer layer from the lemongrass and set aside. Thinly slice the inner stalk and set aside in a separate bowl. Place the apple juice in a large saucepan over medium high heat. Add the outer layer of lemongrass and bring to a gentle boil. Cook for about 10-15 minutes, or until the apple juice has been reduced by half. While the juice is reducing, place the sliced inner layer of lemongrass, onion or leek, garlic, cilantro, chili, ginger and flax seed into a food processor and pulse until well combined. Add the tempeh, soy sauce or tamari and lime juice to the food processor. Pulse to combine, taking care to intermittently scrape down the processors walls with a spatula to ensure all ingredients are evenly distributed. If using flax seed, let the tempeh mixture rest for 10 minutes before baking. Roll the tempeh mixture into balls the size of large marbles and place them on the baking sheet. Spray with a light layer of canola oil. Place the baking sheet in the oven and bake for 30 minutes, or until the tempeh is well browned. Preheat a steamer filled with water. When the steamer is heated, steam the green beans for 5-7 minutes, or until cooked through, but still crisp. Remove the lemon grass stalk from the reduced apple juice. Add the miso powder to the lemongrass apple glaze, stirring until fully incorporated. Add the steamed green beans and spiced tempeh balls to the saucepan. Toss taking care to ensure the green beans and tempeh are coated in lemongrass apple glaze. Divide into 4 servings, garnish with a sprinkle of sesame seeds and enjoy! The post Thai Tempeh Balls with Green Beans appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Thai Composed Rice Salad (Kao Yum Pahk Dai)

December 23 2014 VegKitchen 

Thai Composed Rice Salad (Kao Yum Pahk Dai)Though you wont find this on domestic restaurant menus as often as you would traditional green papaya salad, the basic ingredients for this southern Thai composed salad are more readily available to the home cook. Central to this gorgeous composition is a mound of rice, which is surrounded by a variety of veggies plus one fruit -- usually pineapple or green apple. A feast of flavors, textures and colors, what really pulls it together is the toasted coconut. Once youve got the rice cooked and cooled, this dish comes together quickly. Though this version makes use of common ingredients, we present options for using more authentic ones if theyre available to you -- Thai basil in place of ordinary basil, and galangal in place of ginger. Serves: 4 Dressing - 1/­­4 cup natural reduced-sodium soy sauce or tamari - 1/­­4 cup lime juice - 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger or galangal - 2 tablespoons natural granulated sugar (coconut sugar is good) - 2 shallot cloves, minced, or 2 tablespoons minced scallion (white part) - 1/­­4 cup minced fresh cilantro - 8 to 10 leaves fresh basil or Thai basil, thinly sliced Salad - 2 cups cooked whole-grain rice (any variety of brown rice, or an exotic rice blend), cooled to room temperature - 1 cup fresh mung bean sprouts, or green sprouts such as sweet pea shoots - 1 cup coarsely shredded carrots - 1 cup shredded green or red cabbage, or a combination - 1 cup diced pineapple or papaya, or 1 medium diced green apple - 1 cup thinly sliced cucumber, cut into half-circles Garnishes: - Lime wedges - 2 thinly sliced scallions, green parts only - 1/­­4 cup thinly sliced lemongrass, optional - 1/­­2 cup shredded coconut, toasted on a dry skillet Combine the ingredients for the dressing in a small serving bowl and set aside to allow the sugar to dissolve. Lightly oil a round soup bowl. Pack the rice into it, then invert onto the middle of a platter to release, forming a nice mound. Surround the rice with the sprouts, carrots, cabbage, pineapple or apple, and cucumber in separate small mounds. Garnish the platter lime wedges, sliced scallion, and optional lemongrass. Just before serving, place the toasted coconut in its own small serving bowl, and whisk the dressing together. To serve, have everyone take about 1/­­2 cup of rice, and arrange a little of the other components over or next to it. Pass around the dressing and coconut for embellishing individual portions. Originally published in the Sept. 2014 issue of Vegetarian Times. - Here are more Main-Dish Salads.

Savoury Tomato & Parmesan Crumble

October 22 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savoury Tomato & Parmesan Crumble Just needed to write this before we share today’s recipe: Damn! (or Holy F**k!, as TK probably would put it). We asked for some travel tips but never expected that you would be so incredibly helpful. We will compile all your recommendations into a document and it is going to be the perfect travel guide for us. Huge, huge thank you! After having read your comments we are now leaning towards dividing our time between Sydney and Melbourne. And do a month in NZ in between. We will keep you updated regarding our workshops as soon as we have more info. If you’ve been cooking with us this summer, you probably know that we love crumbles. They are imprecise and easy improvised - try quinoa flakes instead of oats, coconut oil instead of butter, a little less of this or a little more of that. Instead of doing yet another sweet crumble, this a savoury version. It’s a nice little autumn dinner that we recommend making with some heirloom tomatoes or flavourful cherry tomatoes. The sweet tanginess from the tomatoes goes perfectly with the rich and crunchy parmesan and oat topping. If you can’t find any good tomatoes, I imagine that diced eggplant/­­aubergine and zucchini would be great as well. Serve with a simple bean salad for some extra protein. Savoury Tomato Crumble Serves 4 You can read our thoughts on the use of rennet in cheese at the bottom of this post. 1,5 pounds /­­ 700 g ripe tomatoes 1 tsp coarse sea salt 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar 1,5 cups /­­ 140 g rolled oats (cert. gluten free if you prefer) 6 tbsp almond meal/­­flour 1/­­2 cup /­­ 25 g grated parmesan cheese (choose rennet-free cheese if you prefer) 4 sprigs oregano, leaves picked and chopped 1 pinch sea salt 100 g butter (or try coconut oil) Preheat the oven to 175°C /­­ 350°F. Grease a 22 cm /­­ 9 inch baking dish or pie tin with butter (or coconut oil). Rinse the tomatoes and cut in halves. Place in a baking dish and toss with sea salt and apple cider vinegar. Prepare the crumble in a separate bowl. Start by thoroughly mixing oats, almond meal/­­flour, grated parmesan, oregano and sea salt. Cut the butter into smaller pieces and add to the oat mixture. Use your hands to mix until large crumbs are formed. Pour the crumble filling evenly over the tomatoes. Bake in the oven for 40 minutes until the tomato juices are bubbling around the edges and the crumble is firm and browned. We served it with lettuce, pear and chickpeas on the side. Keeps for about a 5 days in the fridge. Freezes and reheats well. PS. Through these last weeks, some of our favourite food bloggers have cooked their own versions of recipes from Green Kitchen Travels. Their interpretations are honestly so beautiful so make sure to check them out: Vegetarian Pho by Kelsey from Happyolks. Crispy Eggplant Polenta Bites with Honey + Lime by Laura from The First Mess. No Noodle Pad Thai by Anya from Golubka. Lemongrass & Coconut Summer Rolls by Sara from Sprouted Kitchen. Halloumi Veggie Burgers by Brian from A Thought for Food. Ribollita (Tuscan Vegetable Stew) by A Couple Cooks. No Noodle Pad Thai by Kathryne from Cookie+Kate. Here are a few other press clips about the book: Red Online, British Vogue, Marie Claire & Epicurious. If you already have our book we’d be super grateful if you wanted to write a short review of it on Amazon. Thank you, Thank you! Next week I think it’s time to share the recipe for these.

Chickpea Succotash with Lemongrass

August 11 2014 Vegetarian Times 

1. Tim and discard tough base and skinny top leaves of lemongrass stalks, then peel away tough outer layers. Crush inner white stems with mallet or rolling pin, then finely chop. (You should have 1 Tbs.) Transfer to small bowl, and cover with 1/­­4 cup boiling water. Set aside. 2. Halve tomato through middle, and scoop seeds into strainer set over bowl. Press juice from seeds, then discard seeds. Set juice aside, and dice tomato flesh. (You should have 2 cups.) 3. Heat oil in large, deep skillet or Dutch oven over medium-low heat. Add squash, ginger, and garlic, and sauté 3 minutes without browning. Stir in chickpeas, corn, diced tomato, lemongrass with liquid, and tomato juice, and season with salt and pepper (if desired). Cover, increase heat to medium, and simmer 5 minutes, or until tomatoes just begin to soften. Stir in basil.

Veg Celeb: Q&A with Izabella Miko

April 25 2014 Vegetarian Times 

Veg Celeb: Q&A with Izabella Miko   As if her plate isn’t already full with an acting career and her nonprofit foundation EkoMiko, Izabella Miko is also seriously into cooking. On the last day of shooting Starving in Suburbia, the new Lifetime movie she co-stars in, she treated cast and crew to her “vegan energy balls”--made with coconut, ground nuts, flaxseed, hemp seed, and spirulina, then dipped in melted vegan chocolate chips. Which goes to show she couldnt be more different than the character she plays in the movie, a pro-anorexia guru on a “thinspiration” Web site. The movie premieres April 26.   Were aware of how anorexia wrecks health, so what explains the continuing appeal of thinspiration Web sites? I think we do everything through the Internet now, and you feel like youre anonymous when youre browsing. So the popularity of the sites will continue. When I read the script [for Starving in Suburbia], I remember thinking, thats completely exaggerated--and then I did a quick search and all these Web sites came up. I thought: I cant believe it, its so easy. If youre a young girl or boy looking to lose weight and you want an easy way to do it, you start getting obsessed. People look through Instagram and Facebook, and they obsess about other peoples lives and what they have, and then they start comparing. Its a really wrong path to go down. With eating disorders, unfortunately, it can lead to death. Unless parents are closely monitoring their kids activity on the Internet, theres no way to protect kids from these sites. Until people speak up, its not going to stop.   As people committed to a plant-based diet, were attentive to what we eat. How do we avoid that attentiveness turning into an obsession? I dont eat food; I nourish my body. Thats how I look at it. Eating is an enjoyable thing, but when I think of mealtime, I dont think how I can satisfy a craving, I think how I can nourish my body. I believe in the mind-body connection, so if you put stuff in your body thats good for you, your mind will work better and youll have a better spiritual connection. So, do some people get obsessed with, Oh, this touched an egg, Im not going to eat it? Yes, but thats because theyre looking for something they can obsess about. Thats a whole other issue. Its a control issue. Theres anger involved, and thats not spiritual and veganish.   Whats distinctive about EkoMikos approach to educating about the environment? Everything thats on my Web site is super-positive. I dont talk about negative things. I dont talk about oil spills; I dont talk about Monsanto. That doesnt mean I wont talk about things that will cause change on a bigger scale, I just dont believe in spreading negative messages and angering people, because I think thats creating more of a problem. I try to convey the message in a fun, interactive way. All EkoMiko episodes and the stuff we do teaches that eco can be really sexy and fun, it doesnt have to be hempy and weird, because unfortunately the green life still has that stigma. I want people to come to the Web site and smile and laugh. Im trying to get people interested who would never even think about green, sustainable living. I did a movie in Poland, where I saw all this waste, like people using plastic bags, and they didnt even know it was wrong, that was what was so scary.  A lot of them had no clue about recycling and using less water, so I wanted to create a foundation and a Web site to educate people. Thats how it all started. A big part of it is making people aware so they can be conscious about their choices, so they know to look at how something is packaged, where it came from, and where its going to end up, and that will be a factor in their purchases.     Are there ingredients youre experimenting with lately in your cooking? I love lemongrass. I started growing lemongrass, which is kind of difficult, but its so great. I make lemongrass sorbets. And when Im traveling, I love getting unique spices and then using them in my cooking back home. I just got a bunch of interesting vanillas that Im adding to dishes. I experiment with adding sweet spices to things that are savory and vice versa, like adding rosemary to pies. I think part of the problem with vegan cooking is things tend to taste the same unless you really make an effort.   Any cooking tips? Ill put roasted coconut chips on top of things for a little crunch. A food dehydrator is amazing for making chips, including kale chips, which are so good with nutritional yeast, one of my favorite ingredients. It gives a cheesy flavor, and I use it to make [vegan] Alfredo sauce. Also, Ill cook a batch of something--like quinoa with grilled vegetables--and Ill make a sauce with tahini, agave, almond milk, cayenne, and curry, and keep the sauce separate from the quinoa and veggies, and then Ill freeze individual portions and have a meal ready to go.    


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