leek - vegetarian recipes

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leek vegetarian recipes

Ginger Roasted Leeks and Asparagus

June 10 2019 Meatless Monday 

Leeks are sliced paper thin and marinated with lemon juice, soy sauce and freshly grated ginger. Roasted asparagus makes the perfect canvas for the salty sour leeks in a side dish which celebrates springs bounty. This recipe comes to us from JL Goes Vegan. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1 bunch asparagus - 1 leek - juice of 1/­­2 a lemon - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon coconut aminos* - or - 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce - 1 teaspoon ginger, grated *Coconut aminos is a soy sauce substitute with 65% less sodium. Found in health food stores. Low sodium soy sauce can be substituted if coconut aminos are unavailable. Snap the bottom ends off of each asparagus spear. Slice the leek in slices as thin as possible with a madoline or a knife. Rinse the leek slices thoroughly. Toss the asparagus and thinly sliced leeks in a shallow dish with the lemon juice, olive oil, grated ginger and the coconut aminos or soy sauce. Let marinate for 20 minutes. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Roast the asparagus and leeks in their marinade for 8-10 minutes, or until the asparagus is cooked to preference. Divide into 4 portions and enjoy on the side. The post Ginger Roasted Leeks and Asparagus appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie

May 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie Spring has been super rainy for us (it’s been raining for almost a full week now!), with only a sprinkling of a few nice days, so cozy food cravings are still in full swing around here. I seriously can’t wait until freezing cold smoothies, raw salads, and huge watermelon mono-meals regain their appeal, but I definitely don’t mind living on this pot pie til then :) It’s got almost all the comforting features of a traditional pot pie, but is made with bright spring produce and a blanket of thinly sliced vegetables instead of the more traditional pastry-based crust. Leeks, asparagus, peas, and spinach all made it into this pot pie in celebration of spring. There’s also quinoa for more substance and a stew-like texture, as well as carrots and zucchini. The crust is made up of thinly sliced potatoes (use new potatoes for the ultimate seasonal points) and zucchini. You could totally sub in your favorite pot pie pastry crust here if you’re looking for something even more substantial, store-bought biscuits would work too. Don’t be afraid to improvise and include other spring goodies that you might find around this time of year. Green garlic, spring onions, and ramps could replace some of the leeks. Quickly blanched fava beans could stand in for part of the peas. Chives can be used for garnish instead of scallions, and chive blossoms will always offer the most beautiful finish. Hope you enjoy this one :) Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie   Print technique adapted from The First Mess cookbook Serves: 6 Ingredients avocado oil or olive oil 2 leeks - white and pale parts only, thinly sliced 2 medium carrots - sliced into half-moons salt - to taste 3 medium zucchini - divided 5 garlic cloves - minced about ½ teaspoon each of dried herbs - such as thyme, rosemary, marjoram (you can use fresh herbs as well, about 1 tablespoon minced total) 1 tablespoon tomato paste ¼ cup uncooked quinoa freshly ground black pepper - to taste ½ cup dry white wine scant ¼ cup ground rolled oats or oat flour (gluten-free if needed) 2½ cups vegetable stock 1 small bunch asparagus - tough ends trimmed, cut into 1-inch pieces 4 cups baby spinach or other tender spring greens 8-10 oz fresh or frozen green peas 2 medium new potatoes or Yukon gold potatoes - thinly sliced into rounds on a mandoline fresh herbs - for garnishing Instructions Preheat the oven to 375° F (190° C). Warm a generous drizzle of oil in a soup pot or very deep pan over medium heat. Add the leeks, carrots, and a pinch of salt, and sauté for about 7 minutes, until the leeks are soft. Meanwhile, dice 2 of the zucchini into medium cubes and mandoline the remaining 1 zucchini into thin rounds, setting it aside together with the mandolined potatoes. Add the garlic, herbs, and tomato paste and stir to incorporate for about 30 seconds, until garlic is fragrant. Add the diced zucchini, quinoa, more salt, and pepper, and stir to incorporate. Pour in the wine and turn up the heat to a medium high. Let the wine cook off and absorb for 1-2 minutes. Add the ground oats/­­oat flour and the vegetable stock to the pot. Bring everything up to a simmer and cook for 3-5 minutes, stirring periodically, until the mixture is slightly thickened. Turn off the heat and let the pot sit off the heat for a few minutes, then stir in the asparagus, spinach, and peas, mixing to lightly wilt the spinach. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Spoon the stew into an oiled 9 x 9 baking dish (or a dish of a similar size), evening it out with a spoon. Arrange the mandolined potato and zucchini on top of the stew, overlapping them and alternating them in a pattern. Brush the vegetables with more oil and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 35-40 minutes, until the potato slices are fully cooked. Turn on your broiler on low and place the pot pie under the broiler for about 5 minutes, or until your crust is crispy, golden and blistered in places. Be careful not to burn the crust. Let the pot pie cool slightly and serve, garnished with fresh herbs. Notes You could divide the pot pie mixture and crust vegetables into small, single serve dishes or ramekins for individual pot pies. Just place the ramekins on a baking sheet and slide into the oven. 3.5.3226 The post Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Green Shakshuka

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Spring Green Shakshuka is a versatile one-pot breakfast (or dinner) meal packed with nutrients and vitamins. Ready in less than 30 minutes. This recipe comes to us from Happy Kitchen.Rocks . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 2  tablespoons  olive oil 1  medium-sized yellow onion  chopped 2  cloves  garlic  minced 1/­­2 -1  jalapeno  with seeds for extra spiciness (otherwise, removed), chopped 1/­­2  teaspoon  ground cumin 1/­­2  teaspoon  smoked paprika 1/­­2  leek  chopped 4  spears asparagus  chopped 100  grams  or 1 cup mung bean sprouts 2  green onions  chopped 100  grams  or 1 cup baby beet greens 100  grams  or 1 cup stinging nettles  chopped, leaves only 100  grams  or 1 cup baby spinach 50  grams  or 1/­­2 cup wild garlic  chopped 2  sprigs oregano  chopped 4  eggs 2  tablespoons  chopped parsley  to garnish salt and freshly ground black pepper hot sauce  to serve (optional) crusty bread  to serve (optional)   1. Heat olive oil in a large skillet or cast iron pan over medium heat. Sautéing chopped onion, garlic and jalapeno until soft, for about 3 minutes. Add ground cumin and smoked paprika and cook for 1 more minute, stirring frequently. 2. Add chopped leek, asparagus, mung bean sprouts, green onions, baby beet greens, stinging nettles, baby spinach, wild garlic and oregano. Sauté until the liquid evaporates, stirring occasionally, for about 8 minutes. 3. Make wells in the green mass and poach eggs into them. Cook until the eggs are done. You can cover the skillet with a lid for a quicker result. 4. Garnish with chopped parsley and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Serve with hot sauce of your choice and fresh crusty bread (optional). The post Green Shakshuka appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Scallion Pancakes

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

These 3-ingredient Vegan Scallion Pancakes are incredibly delicious and very easy to make. Theyre also known as green onion pancakes and can be made with chives or leeks too. This recipe comes to us from Bianca Zapatka . See the step-by-step photos on her blog . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Makes 4 pancakes 2  cups  all-purpose flour (250g) 3/­­4  tsp  salt 3/­­4  cup  warm water (180ml) 1 1/­­3  cup  finely sliced scallions  green part only 4  tbsp  cooking oil  plus more for brushing   1. In a large bowl, mix the flour and salt. Then pour in the water and stir with chopsticks or a fork until all the water has been absorbed. 2. Using your hands, knead all the bits of dough together. (If your dough is still very dry after a bit of kneading, add 1-2 tbsp more water*). Then transfer dough to a working surface and continue kneading until the dough is smooth and soft, about 5 minutes. 3. Shape the dough into a round ball. Cover with foil (or a damp towel) and let rest for 20-30 minutes. After resting time, divide the dough into 4 equal sized pieces and shape them into balls. (Work with one piece at a time and cover the remaining pieces so they wont get dry). 4. On a lightly floured working surface, roll out one piece into a very thin circle. 5. Brush the circle with a bit of oil, and sprinkle about 1/­­3 cup chopped scallions all over the dough. 6. Roll up the dough into a log. Take one end of the log and curl it into a snail. 7. Use your hands to flatten the dough a bit, then use your rolling pin to roll it out again to another circle, about 8-/­­9-inch (20/­­22cm) in diameter. (Dont worry if some scallions poke out through the dough). 8. Repeat with the remaining dough pieces and stack them as you go, separating with parchment paper. 9. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a pan over medium heat and pan-fry each side of one pancake for about 2-3 minutes until golden-brown and crispy. Repeat with remaining pancakes, adding about 1 tbsp oil per pancake. 10. Cut Scallion Pancakes into quarters and serve hot with dipping sauce. Notes The pancakes are best eaten when hot. Theyll be still good when cooled, but will no longer be crispy. If you still have any fried pancakes left, you can reheat them in the oven. Sprinkle some grated non-dairy cheese on top and bake for a few minutes until crispy again. If they got a bit hard overnight, you could also put them in the microwave for a few seconds. * The ideal flour water ratio may vary slightly depending on the kind of flour you use and how you measure it.   The post Scallion Pancakes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celebrate Spring with Delicious Plant-Based Recipes Using Seasonal Veggies

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Spring with Delicious Plant-Based Recipes Using Seasonal VeggiesSpring has officially sprung, so its time to explore the local farmers markets and forage the grocery aisles for fresh seasonal vegetables. Trying new meatless recipes is a great way to utilize all of the ripe fruits and vegetables coming into season. Weve gathered delicious plant-based recipes from our Meatless Monday bloggers  and influencers featuring spring produce such as asparagus, spinach, sweet peas and broccoli. Enjoy the tastes of spring! Scallion Pancakes from Bianca Patka Lemony Spring Risotto from Healthy Voyager Spring Green Shakshuka from Happy Kitchen Asparagus Avocado Tomato Salad from Blondelish   Sweet Potato Pizza from It’s a Healthy Lifestyle Asian Noodles with Gingery Prune Sauce from Jackie Newgent Spring Leek and Asparagus Soup from The Domestic Dietitian Penne Pasta with Arugula Pesto, Red Potatoes and Spring Vegetables from She’s Cookin Flageolets and Dandelion from Soulful Vegan Ravioli in Creamy Garlic and Spinach White Sauce from The Kitchen Docs   Invite your friends and family to join you in a celebration of spring with these plant-based recipes. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Celebrate Spring with Delicious Plant-Based Recipes Using Seasonal Veggies appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Leek Pie

February 13 2019 Oh My Veggies 

The eggs and cream in this leek pie give it a smooth, thick texture. This succulent salty pie combines leeks--a delicious vegetable--with eggs to make this tasty quiche. Share this tasty dinner with family and friends!  

Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy

February 6 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy Hi friends! Checking in really quickly with a favorite dinner as of late. I think tempeh is one of those things that people either love or hate, but there’s a few ways of cooking it that I’m pretty sure would make anyone like it. ‘Glazing’ it is one of those. It’s a decadent method that leaves you with irresistibly golden tempeh ‘steaks’ with crispy edges. Today we’ve got a cozy rosemary, mushroom and white bean gravy to top it with. I thought I’d also share something that’s been helping me stay on track with eating the foods that make me feel good after an indulgent December and January. I noticed myself falling into some not-so-great eating patterns ever since the holidays. Things like treats after dinner almost every night, or buying salty processed snacks more often than I like (have you tried Hippeas?!). None of them are a big deal, but it’s things that don’t contribute to me feeling 100%. So I’ve been aiming to gently steer my focus towards the food that gives me the most energy: whole plant foods. I like the idea of Dr. Michael Greger’s daily dozen checklist, which is his proposed list of the most nourishing plant foods to try to fit into your daily routine. It goes as follows: beans, berries, other fruit, cruciferous vegetables, greens, other vegetables, flax seeds, nuts and seeds, herbs and spices, whole grains, beverages (water), along with the suggested number of servings. So, I’ve been aiming to check off most of the items with my meals every day. At first it becomes a fun game, and then turns more and more into a habit. Of course, it’s not realistic to expect yourself to eat that way every single day, and some days I don’t even eat half of the things listed, but it’s also easier than you might think to get these things in. These tempeh steaks, for example, check off 4 of the items! I make sure to use this tool as a gentle reminder, definitely not as a way to control my eating or stress myself out in any way. There’s a daily dozen app that lets you check off the items, which I used at first, but now I just think about the checklist when buying groceries for the day/­­week, and it helps so much with building out nourishing meals. Just wanted to share this, in case anyone else finds it helpful. Have a great rest of your week! Glazed Tempeh Steaks with Rosemary Mushroom Gravy   Print Serves: 4 medium portions or 2 large Ingredients for the tempeh steaks 8 oz tempeh (we used 3-grain tempeh) 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1½ tablespoons tamari or coconut aminos 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar or mirin 1 teaspoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil for oiling the pan for the rosemary mushroom gravy avocado or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced 2 cloves of garlic - minced 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 2 cups or 1 can of cooked white beans (any variety) 1 tablespoon white miso 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard splash of Sriracha/­­chili sauce or a pinch of red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup white bean broth (if cooking white beans from scratch), veggie broth or water parsley, cilantro, or other herbs - for serving Instructions to make the tempeh steaks Slice the tempeh in half crosswise and then slice each half in half lengthwise, so that you end up with 4 thin, square or slightly rectangular pieces. In a shallow dish, whisk together the sesame oil, tamari/­­coconut aminos, vinegar, maple syrup, and oil. Place the tempeh pieces into the shallow dish with the marinade and let it marinate while you make the gravy. To cook the steaks, heat oil in a large pan over medium heat. Remove the tempeh from the shallow dish, leaving the marinade in the dish. Place the tempeh in the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes on each side, until golden. Pour the remaining marinade over the tempeh, letting it bubble up and create a glaze over the tempeh. Serve right away with the mushroom rosemary gravy. to make the rosemary mushroom gravy Heat some oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and cook for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms, stir once, and then let them sit without stirring for a minute or two. Cook for another 7 minutes, or until all the liquid, released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic and stir for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the balsamic and cook for another few minutes, until the vinegary flavor of the balsamic cooks off. Add about a ¼ of the amount of the mushrooms to an upright blender. Add half of the white beans, miso, mustard, chili sauce/­­red pepper flakes, rosemary, black pepper, more sea salt, and broth/­­water. Blend until smooth, adding more broth if needed. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Add the blended gravy back to the pan with the mushrooms, along with the remaining white beans. Heat everything through, adding more broth if necessary to achieve a gravy-like consistency. Serve the gravy over the tempeh steaks, garnished with herbs. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Our Most Popular Recipes of 2018

December 27 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Our Most Popular Recipes of 2018 It’s always fun to do a little year in review, go through our website analytics, and see which recipes resonated with you the most. This helps us plan for the year to come and get inspired to cook in 2019. This year, easy weeknight dinners, meal plans, and decadent but healthyish, plant-based desserts seemed to take the lead. All our favorite things that we can’t wait to make more of next year. We would love to hear which dishes you’ve been most excited about and what type of things you’d like to see from us next year. Seeing our recipes make their way to your kitchens is the most amazing part of our job :) Vegan Lentil Moussaka (v, gf) This was by far the most popular recipe of 2018! And for good reason. The layers of silky eggplant, tomatoey lentils, and fluffy mashed potatoes in this moussaka make it impossible to resist. It takes some work to put together initially, but makes a nicely sized portion that will sustain you way beyond one dinner. Plant-Based Winter Meal Plan (v, gf) This meal plan and all meal plans have been very popular this year. We have a ton of fun making them, and we’re so happy to see them bringing some ease into your everyday cooking. We have big plans to continue the meal plan series in 2019, so stay tuned :) Miso ‘Butter’ Ramen (v, gfo) Inspired by a transcendent meal we had at V Street in Philadelphia, this umami bomb of a dish is incredibly savory and satisfying. The recipe also teaches you how to make quick-pickled radishes, which is a delicious component to pretty much everything. Our Favorite Weeknight Curry (v, gf) This curry is truly weeknight-friendly, packed with veggies, and highly customizable. We make it at least once a month. Vegan Herb Frittata /­­ Kuku Sabzi (v, gf) This vegan ‘frittata’ is inspired by Persian leek and herb fritatta or Kuku Sabzi. It’s great for frittata lovers, but would also please any socca lover, since it’s like a thicker, more substantial, herb-packed socca. Tofu Saag Paneer, Spring Style (v, gf) Saag Paneer is our favorite Indian takeout, and we were so happy with this version, made with tofu paneer and a ton of spring vegetables. This isn’t strictly a spring dish, though – you can omit the asparagus and use frozen peas, etc. The Simplest Lentil Soup from Abruzzo (v, gf) This year, we hosted our first ever retreat in Abruzzo, Italy and had the most amazing time. You can read all about it and sign up for our upcoming retreats in the spring of 2019 here. In preparation for the retreat, we familiarized ourselves with a bunch of staple Abruzzo meals, including this lentil soup. It’s incredibly simple and 100% perfect that way. Cold Almond Butter Noodles, Our Weeknight Go To (v, gfo) This weeknight staple is surprisingly flavorful, thanks to a universal, slightly spicy almond butter sauce that the cold noodles get slathered in. This dish is super kid-friendly and, really, everyone-friendly. Chunky Monkey Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are what we imagine a love child of chocolate chip cookies, oatmeal cookies, and banana bread would look and taste like. Enough said :) Coconut Beet Overnight Oats (v, gf) This breakfast is not only popular because of its looks, we promise. It’s as much overnight oats as it is chia pudding, and made with the most decadent, homemade walnut-coconut-beet milk. Super Decadent Vegan Chocolate Walnut Spread (v, gf) This is chocolate-nut spread taken to the next level of decadence, thanks to a secret and very special ingredient. We heard from so many people that made it, and everyone agreed that it’s the most addictive spread ever. You might also like... Favorite New Year Reset Recipes Couscous Collard Rolls in Coconut Curry Sauce + Simply Vibrant News Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes Favorite Spring Cleaning Recipes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Our Most Popular Recipes of 2018 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi)

September 5 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi) I have a subscription to Bon Appétit, and I haven’t been able to get this Persian frittata recipe out of my head ever since I saw it in one of their issues this past year (there’s also a video of Andy Baraghani expertly making it here). The frittata is called kuku sabzi and is often served during Persian New Year that is celebrated on spring equinox, welcoming spring with the abundance of herbs in the dish. I’m obsessed with any food that requires a ton of herbs, and this frittata is loaded with parsley, dill, and cilantro. I also like making vegan ‘frittatas’ with chickpea flour, since I’m completely in love with socca, and chickpea frittatas are like socca x 100. Since this vegan version of kuku sabzi is taken out of context and tradition, I thought we could add our own spin on the meaning here. Instead of a welcome-spring dish, it can be a farewell-summer one. Herbs are still abundant at the farmer’s market where I live, and I see them as such a gift of summer. At the same time, I’m noticing all these subtle signs of fall creeping in. The days seem a tiny bit shorter, there’s often a chill in the air in the evenings, and some trees are already beginning to yellow. This time of year is so abundant, but also very fleeting, which makes it even more beautiful and worth savoring. So let’s load up on local, sun-fed herbs while we can. Since fresh herbs are so readily available to many of us, we might take them for granted as a commonplace food. In truth, herbs are our everyday superfoods. Just think of the intense flavor that they provide – that intensity also signals their concentrated, nutritional power. I live in a city with windows that never get sun, but one of my biggest intentions is to soon live somewhere where I can have an herb garden (and beyond). Sprinkling fresh herbs on everything is a always a great idea, but this recipe really packs them in at 4 1/­­2 cups! Just a reminder that if you have a high-speed blender or grain mill, you don’t have to buy chickpea flour. You can just grind up dried chickpeas, which will also save you a few bucks. All in all, this recipe is pretty easy. The biggest effort you’ll have to make is chopping up all of the herbs and veggies. The rest is basically just mix and bake. I served this frittata with market cucumbers and sun gold tomatoes, topped with the tzatziki sauce from Simply Vibrant. You can also eat it on its own, or topped with coconut yogurt or cashew cream. Hope you enjoy this one :) Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi)   Print Serves: 1 9-10 frittata Ingredients 2 cups chickpea flour 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon sea salt 1 teaspoon turmeric powder pinch of red pepper flakes a few grinds of black pepper 3 tablespoons avocado, olive, or neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pans 2½ cups purified water 1 onion - finely chopped 1 large leek - thinly sliced into half-moons 2 garlic cloves - minced 1½ cups chopped cilantro 1½ cups chopped parsley 1½ cups chopped dill Instructions Preheat oven to 500° F (260° C). Prepare a 9-10 pie or tart dish by oiling it well. In a large bowl, mix together the chickpea flour, nutritional yeast, sea salt, turmeric, red pepper flakes and black pepper with a fork. Gradually pour in the oil and water, whisking them in as you pour. Mix until smooth and let sit while preparing the vegetables. Heat a glug of oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onion and leeks along with a pinch of salt, and cook, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes, or until soft and cooked through. Add the garlic and cook for another minute, until fragrant. Add the sautéed vegetables to the bowl with the batter, along with the cilantro, parsley, and dill. Fold everything in, making sure that the ingredients are dispersed well throughout the thick batter. Transfer the batter to the oiled pie/­­tart dish, patting it down with a spoon to form an even layer. Bake for 2o minutes. Open the oven door slightly to let any steam escape and proceed to bake for another 10 minutes, or until the top of the frittata is solid to the touch and nicely browned. Let cool, slice, and serve with yogurt or your favorite creamy sauce. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Eatin Good in Granada

November 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Although I dont think it formally deserves this title, so far Spain feels like the meat capital of the world. However, Granada (in the south of Spain) has a booming vegan scene thats growing every year!  I didnt get to spend much time in Granada, but I did have the opportunity to work with an incredible little vegetarian restaurant that offered a heap of superb vegan dishes by the name of AlLaurel. This cozy veggie bistro is centrally located by the famous Catedral de Granada and welcomes you in with chic styling, a delicious menu del día, and local artisanal wines and cervezas. While there I got to sample a few of their famous dishes including a leek and ginger soup, seitan skewers (drooling), and traditional tomato and avocado salad. The cuisine was fantastically fresh, obviously organic, and perfectly plated by Ále (short for Alejandro), the restaurants lead chef. I left AlLaurel with a happy tummy and a newfound respect for seitan. The next day, while in search for some lunch in town, I stumbled upon a little vegan tapas bar called El Ojú. You heard me right, a vegan TAPAS bar. You know, where you buy a drink and you […] The post Eatin Good in Granada appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Le Botaniste – New York City

July 3 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

A beauty-salon for you insides. We are a plant-based organic food & natural wine bar. – Le Botaniste The beautiful logo & website caught my attention... So this place was high on my list of places to visit in New York. And the reality was even so much better than I thought. image via Le Botaniste Le Botaniste is a botanical-based, apothecary-inspired restaurant. It is created by Le Pain Quotidiens Founder & Chief Creative Officer, Alain Coumont, and he knows a thing or two about good food and good restaurants. The restaurant looks like a classic apothecary including glass tincture bottles and white lab coats. image via Le Botaniste The menu is 100% organic and entirely botanical, which means there are no animal products used on-site. The seasonally changing menu features chef-designed prescriptions such as the Tibetan Mama: a savory combination of brown rice, peanut curry sauce, steamed greens and spicy kimchi, and the Dirty Noodle Soup: with velvety tofu, steamed leeks, garlic and spicy ginger. Hearty specialty soups and fresh juices rotate daily. image via Le Botaniste The menu also encourages DIY meal-building, allowing guests to design their own hot or cold entree from the many bases, spreads and toppings available. […] The post Le Botaniste – New York City appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Potato Pesto Pizza with Vegan Basil Spinach Pesto

May 30 2017 Vegan Richa 

Potato Pesto Pizza with Vegan Basil Spinach PestoEasy Potato Pesto Pizza with 20 min Thin Crust. Basil Spinach Pesto makes for a refreshing Pizza Sauce Topped with thin potato slices, onion and garlic. Bake or make on the grill. Vegan Pesto Pizza Soyfree Recipe.  Its not really pizza season with the crazy heat, but this is one delicious Pizza you want to make come sun or rain. Thin crust, loads of fresh pesto, potatoes, onions or leek, thinly sliced garlic, loads of pepper. Delicious! Bake or grill it up if you’d rather not start up the oven. This flatbread Pizza works well with sliced potato or sweet potato and onions.  I use my 20 Minute Pizza Crust with Spelt flour for this flatbread pizza. The dough is rolled out into thin rustic crusts to make 2 medium size pizzas. I use a quick basil spinach cashew pesto as the base. Spread the pesto, sliced potato, onion and garlic. Add other toppings such as veggie crumbles or vegan sausage or artichokes. a Drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and bake to make a crisp refreshing Summery Pizza. Continue reading: Potato Pesto Pizza with Vegan Basil Spinach PestoThe post Potato Pesto Pizza with Vegan Basil Spinach Pesto appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway

May 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway My first experience with South Indian fare was in Toronto, in a buzzing, cafeteria-style restaurant that looked like a food court in any American mall, but instead of fast food, the offering consisted of the most mind-blowing, bold-flavored South Indian dishes that weren’t like anything I’d ever tasted before. That ended up being one of the most memorable meals of my life. Since then, I’ve continued to seek out restaurants that specialized in South Indian cuisine, but rarely considered trying my hand at any of the dishes at home. Chitra Agrawal’s debut cookbook Vibrant India changed all of that for me. Chitra has spent years documenting her family’s traditionally vegetarian South Indian recipes on her blog, as well as adapting them to use the local, seasonal produce that she comes across in Brooklyn, where she lives. Her cookbook is a stunning collection of modern recipes, which honor her mother’s South Indian heritage, rooted in the ayurvedic tradition. The cookbook truly opens up a whole new world of cooking to those of us used to a more Western approach to food (and we are giving away a copy, see below :D ). In a her intro, Chitra explains the difference between North and South Indian cooking, and chances are, the Indian food you’ve tried likely originated in the North – think naan, samosas and curries. Cuisine from the South is generally characterized by the use of lentils, rice and specific spice mixtures in dishes like dosa and sambar – delicious stuff that doesn’t get nearly as much attention in the West. The book is filled with Chitra’s super comprehensive explanations of Indian cooking techniques like tempering spices, etc., which takes the intimidation factor out of the recipes. Turns out, making flavorful and authentically rooted South Indian dishes at home is totally doable. I’ve already made the Dosa, Lemony Lentil Soup, Banana, Coconut and Cardamom Ice Cream, as well as a few of the rices, and each one came out explosive in flavor, as well nourishing to the core. One of my favorite chapters turned out to be the Rice and Bread chapter, which offers a ton of ideas on preparing rice to be enjoyed as a main dish. Who would have thought that basmati rice could be so flavorful and substantial?! There are recipes for Lemon Peanut Rice, Fragrant Eggplant and Green Pepper Rice, Coconut Rice with Cashews, and Yogurt Rice with Pomegranate and Mint, but my favorite one of all turned out to be the Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios, which I’m sharing here. Chitra talks about often getting a hefty bunch of dill from her farm share and not knowing what to do with the volume, which sparked the idea for this recipe that uses up plenty of dill. The result is rice so fragrant that it’s nothing short of heavenly. Chitra explains that she aims to achieve a balance of sweet, sour, bitter, spicy, and savory flavors in her recipes, which is what I mean when I describe her dishes as explosive, and that very much applies to this rice recipe as well. Other chapters within the book include Breakfast and Light Meals, Salads and Yogurts, Stir-Fries and Curries, Soups, Stews and Lentils, Festive Bites and Snacks,  Sweets and Drinks, Chutneys and Pickles – basically a ton of deliciousness packed into a beautiful cookbook. Well done, Chitra! In case you are wondering, the book does call for specialty Indian ingredients that you might not be able to find at your mainstream supermarket. However, if you enjoy cooking and learning about new ingredients, it’s SO worth seeking out a local Indian market in your area. I rely on our nearby Indian market for stocking up on ghee, fresh spices, rice and a variety of lentils, all at an affordable price. All the ingredients are also available online. Giveaway: To enter to win a copy of Vibrant India, leave a comment here letting us know if you would be interested in seeing weekly plant-based meal plans, complete with recipes and shopping lists as a new series on this site. We are thinking of starting up a conversation about meal prep, and would love to gauge your interest! The winner will be selected at random on Wednesday, May 24th. Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the turmeric rice 1 cup basmati rice (makes about 4 cups cooked) ⅛ teaspoon turmeric powder for the lime and dill rice with pistachios 4 cups cooked turmeric rice 2 tablespoons mild-flavored oil such as canola (I used coconut) ½ teaspoon black mustard seeds pinch of asafetida (hing) powder 1 teaspoon chana dal 1 teaspoon urad dal 5 fresh curry leaves 1 dried red chile, broken in half 1 large shallot or ½ medium yellow onion - finely chopped small bunch of dill - tough stalks removed, chopped ½ to ¾ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon sambar powder (optional) ¼ cup shelled pistachios - lightly toasted and coarsely chopped juice of half a lime (about 1½ tablespoons), plus more as needed serving options raita or plain yogurt hot pickle or Brooklyn Delhi (Chitras company!) achaar Instructions to make the turmeric rice Wash the rice in several changes of water until the water runs clear. Soak the rice in water, generously covered, for at least 30 minutes. Drain thoroughly, using a fine-mesh sieve. Place rice and 1¾ cups water in a medium saucepan. Mix in the turmeric powder. Place the saucepan over high heat and bring to a boil. Once the water is boiling, cover the saucepan and turn the heat to the lowest setting on your stove. Cook until the rice in tender and there is no water left in the pan, about 15 minutes. Turn off the heat. Remove the saucepan from the stove and leave it covered for 10 minutes, to allow the grains to separate. Fluff with a fork. to make the lime and dill rice with pistachios Coat the bottom of a wok (I used a large sauté pan w/­­ a lid) with the oil and place over medium heat. When the oil is hot and shimmering, add one black mustard seed. When the seed sizzles and pops, add the rest of the mustard seeds and asafetida. Keep a lid handy to cover the pan while the mustard seeds are popping. When the popping starts to subside (a few seconds), immediately add the chana dal and urad dal. Stir to coat with oil, and turn the heat to medium-low. Continue to stir the dals so they evenly roast, until they turn a reddish golden brown and smell nutty, less than a minute. Rub the curry leaves between you fingers a little to release their natural oils, and drop them and the dried red chile into the oil. Cover immediately, as moisture from the curry leaves will cause the oil to spatter. Then stir to evenly coat everything with oil, a few seconds. Add the shallot to the wok and fry over medium heat until softened, less than a minute. Add the dill, ¼ teaspoon of the salt, and a couple tablespoons of water. Turn the heat to medium-low, cover, and cook for 10 to 15 minutes. Stir from time to time. When cooked, the dill should be darker in color and not have as strong a flavor as raw dill. Add the sambar powder. Fry for another minute. Stir in the cooked rice and season with ¼ to ½ teaspoon salt. Stir-fry for 1 to 2 minutes. Mix in the pistachios, reserving a few for garnish. Turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice and garnish with the reserved pistachios. Taste for salt and adjust as needed. Serve hot with yogurt and hot pickle. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways Summer Vegetable Saute Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Babamesco Dip

May 7 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Babamesco Dip Baba ganoush + romesco = babamesco! One fine day, I had some but not all of the ingredients to make romesco, as well as a few baba-ganoush appropriate items, and I was craving some kind of powerful dip/­­spread/­­sauce. I combined the two and ended up with something really special. I’m pretty sure that everyone who sampled it loved it, and that goofy name that I threw out in the moment really stuck. I’ve had friends call me and seriously ask me when I’ll be making another batch of babamesco. Now I can’t imagine calling it by any other name. A few ways it can be used: as a dip for pita chips, sandwich spread, pizza sauce, veggie bowl component, sauce for vegetables (try it with grilled ramps or roasted cauliflower). There’s a step-by-step video above and some weekend links below. Happy Sunday :) Dimes Spiced Porridge on Munchies – can’t wait to make this someday soon! Tortus Copenhagen – this ceramicist’s instagram is addicting. The potter’s wheel videos are so meditative and satisfying. Unsweetened Miso Chocolate Bar – Valentina used our almost savory raw chocolate recipe as a starting point for her own unsweetened chocolate bar, and it looks amazing. Margaret Atwood on What ‘The Handmaids Tale’ Means Today – have you been watching the show?! I find it to be so eerily believable. Loved this article from the author about how the novel relates to the world today, and this bit: ‘One of my rules was that I would not put any events into the book that had not already happened in what James Joyce called the nightmare of history, nor any technology not already available. No imaginary gizmos, no imaginary laws, no imaginary atrocities.’ Jessica Koslow of Sqirl – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman Simplicity City – our favorite fashion instagram that draws from the past Babamesco   Print Serves: around 4 cups Ingredients 2 red bell peppers 1 small eggplant or 3 small Japanese eggplants - sliced in half 1 head of garlic neutral coconut oil or olive oil, plus more for garnish sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons tahini juice of 1 lemon handful of parsley, plus more for garnish zaatar - to garnish (optional) microgreens - to garnish (optional) Instructions Place the bell peppers on a baking sheet and turn your broiler to high. Broil the peppers for 2-4 minutes, flipping every minute or so, until the skin is blistered and the peppers are soft. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C) and prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the eggplant on the sheet. Break the head of garlic into cloves and place them next to the eggplant, with the skins intact. Drizzle the eggplant and garlic cloves with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix with your hands to coat. Place in the oven. The garlic should be done after about 15 minutes, while the eggplant may need another 5-10 minutes until its ready, a total of 20-25 minutes. Once the bell peppers are cool enough to handle, peel off their skin and remove the core and seeds. Slip the skin off the roasted garlic cloves. Scoop the eggplant flesh out of the skin and discard the skin. In a food processor, combine the roasted pepper, eggplant, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, salt and pepper until just smooth. Add in the parsley and pulse to incorporate. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the babamesco with a drizzle of olive oil, a sprinkling of zaatar and microgreens, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Raw Apricot Lavender Tart and a Giveaway Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Babamesco Dip appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lemony Spring Risotto

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

This vegan lemony spring risotto recipe is the perfect dish to bridge the gap between the warm comfort foods of winter and the light, fresh flavors of spring. This recipe comes to us from The Healthy Voyager . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 12  ounces  asparagus 1  cup  peas 1  quart  vegetable stock or vegan chicken bouillon stock - 2 cups water 1  tablespoon  olive oil 1  medium leek,  thinly sliced 2  cloves  garlic,  finely minced Salt and pepper 1 1/­­2  cups  Arborio rice 1  cup  dry white wine 1  tablespoon  fresh lemon juice 2  teaspoons  lemon zest 2  tablespoons  fresh, chopped parsley 1/­­3 cup vegan parmesan cheese  (about 1/­­3 cup)   1. Trim the ends from the asparagus. Cut the remaining stalks into 1-inch pieces. 2. Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil and add the asparagus. Cook until crisp tender, 3-4 minutes. If using fresh peas, add the peas along with the asparagus. If using frozen peas, add them during the last minute. 3. Transfer the vegetables to a bowl of ice water. Drain the vegetables and set aside. 4. Heat the stock along with water in a large saucepan. Add the trimmings from the asparagus and leek and the parsley stems to add flavor to the stock. Bring to a simmer and then keep warm on low heat while you make the risotto. 5. Heat the oil in a large, wide sauté pan over medium heat. Add the leeks and garlic and season them with salt and pepper. Cook until leeks are partially softened, 4-5 minutes. 6. Add the rice and stir to coat all of the grains with the oil. Cook 1-2 minutes to lightly toast the rice and then add the wine. Cook a few minutes until the wine is reduced, stirring occasionally. 7. Add the warm stock, a few ladles at a time, stirring the rice frequently. Each time the liquid is almost completely absorbed, add some more stock. Continue adding the liquid in this manner, stirring often, to develop the starch in the rice. It should take about 20 minutes for the rice to cook once you start adding the liquid. 8. When the rice is done, it will be plump and al dente- tender but still firm to the bite. At this point, lower the heat and stir in the lemon juice and zest, asparagus, peas, parsley, parmesan cheese, 1 teaspoon salt and 1/­­4 teaspoon pepper. 9. Stir to combine all ingredients well. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper as needed. Garnish with parsley and lemon zest. Serve hot. The post Lemony Spring Risotto appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!)

March 3 2019 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!) Dear Soup, Thank you for always reminding me there are better days ahead. Soups are mainstays around here, especially with snow on the ground and temps hovering in low twenties to single digits tonight, plus more cold on the horizon this week. And poison ivy. (Yup.) I've probably made six batches of this already this winter. It involves a food processor and a soup pot. That's it. Comes together in approximately five minutes and is satisfying, warm and delicious. Here's my take on this soup, which was originally inspired by this. Here's how I made my Vegan Pasta e Fagioli: 4 carrots 1 leek 6 cloves garlic 1 celery stalk 1/­­2 onion sliced thin 2 bay leaves 1/­­2 head of cabbage 1 can of cannellini beans (drained, rinsed) 1 can diced tomatoes 1/­­3 cup ditalini pasta (cooked in separate pot, then added to soup just before serving) 2 T. nutritional yeast 1 qt. veggie stock olive oil thyme oregano red pepper flakes salt & pepper to taste Add chopped veggies--carrots, leeks, garlic to food processor, pulse about ten times. Prep the soup pot with the olive oil over medium heat, add chopped veg. Cook till just tender. Add remaining ingredients and broth and seasonings, salt and pepper. Cover and let simmer two hours over low heat. Serve with a side of your best homemade bread. (Mine is Jim Lahey's --I made the ciabatta version). After a visit with the folks at Urgent Care yesterday for a infernal outbreak of poison ivy, I am now awaiting an agonizing three weeks for this painful mess to clear up. Or longer. Why does Mother Earth require such an evil, toxic plant? What purpose does it serve? I've been struck by this havoc on only a handful of times in my life because I am so gawdawful afraid. Sounds impossible. But trust me when I tell you: only to me, the Master Gardener, and in winter no less. And above is the culprit.  Our home is undergoing a transformation of sorts in a few weeks which will finally rid us of these old railroad timbers and be replaced with a more substantial wall of stone. (That will hopefully outlive us and beyond.)  So I found myself outside on a warm-ish day earlier last week in a bit of a snit over the demise of some cherished plants I couldn't bear to loose. I've spent fifteen years tending and planting, so obviously there are plants I want to keep. Out with the shovel and buckets and pots. Everything's dormant, ground was soft, sun was out: perfect. Until later that night when I woke with what I imagined to be some sort of bug bite. Then to the next afternoon when my arm reached up to scratch my wrist (pulling the long sleeve back and discovering to my horror what really had happened). OMG. WTH? Could this be? . . . is this? Noooooo!  And then began the seven stages of grief: shock, denial, guilt, anger and bargaining, depression and loneliness to reconstruction (the UC visit) and finally acceptance. Yes, I accept that I have the rash of the spring and summertime, of gardeners, campers, hikers and landscapers, the poisonous fury of: Leaves of Three Let it Be! Ah, but what about the roots?  I had come in contact with said dormant plant--through the roots. I had oh-so carefully lifted plants and divided, setting each clump aside. Gloves and long sleeves. I have replayed this moment back through my mind a hundred times: as I reached under one of my plants, I must have accidentally, on an exposed part of my wrist, come in contact with the worst plant root on the planet, unbeknownst to me.  I am more allergic than most and so, this lovely little visitor and its prescribed remedy dosed out (the horrid steroid treatment) is, well. It's hell. The rash has traveled from my left wrist, up my right arm, to my abdomen, and leg. There's a perfect dot-to-dot landscape you can follow if you wanted. I can see the entry at every point. It's like an incredibly cruel irony and one I will face with tears, determination, agitation and regret. As for the remainder of the plants. They'll be destined for demolition. 

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool

February 9 2019 My New Roots 

Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool   When we committed to going to the ocean, I immediately felt the thrilling sensation that washes over me when I stand at the intersection of land meeting water. I smelled brine and dampness. I saw certain patterns and colours; light sand against dark water, wet stones, seaweed, driftwood, and feathers. This was the second recipe I created for the dreamy on-location photoshoot with Christiann Koepke back in October (you can see the first one here). The inspiration for this dish came first in fact, fast and furiously. Just thinking about the seaside brought this recipe to me in a wave of total inspiration. I wanted the ingredients to reflect the elements in this environment, and for the final result to be a visual meeting of land and sea. Now Im not super into “fake meat”, but there is something undeniably satisfying about tricking someone into thinking a vegetable is flesh. Tee hee. Plus, Rene Redzepi does it all the time, so maybe it puts me in the cool cooking club too? Yes? Anyway, I knew something on the plate had to look like seafood, and I had my sights set on scallops. In my first cookbook, I made “scallops” out of leeks, and wanted to try something different, so going through the rolodex of tube-shaped white veggies in my mind, I fell upon king oyster mushroom stems. Naturally. Browned in ghee and well-seasoned, I knew that these morsels would look exactly like mollusks, and taste deceptively meaty. A pool of herbaceous, vibrant green pesto, would be the land, and the perfect resting place for my mushroom medallions. I combined flat-leaf parsley and spinach to create a bright yet balanced sauce that complimented - rather than overwhelmed - the rest of the dish. But with all this creaminess, I knew that I also needed to include something for textural contrast, so toasted hazelnuts became the beach stones, along with fried capers, which added a bite of seaside brine. This dish is surprisingly easy to make, and it is the prefect main to serve for family and friends that you want to spoil a little. It looks impressive, but its a cinch to get on the table without gluing you to the stove. The pesto can be made a week in advance (although the fresher, the better), so that the only thing you need to do before serving is cook the mushroom and capers, and warm the pesto a little. I love cooking the capers and mushrooms in ghee (recipe here) because its just so darn delicious, but the pesto is vegan and if you want the entire meal to be so, simply swap out the ghee for expeller-pressed coconut oil, which is refined for high heat cooking and has no tropical aroma. Beta-glucan Goodness Edible mushrooms are both medical and nutritional dynamos. Collectively, they not only provide us with plant-based protein, vitamin D, and a whole host of minerals, but most excitingly a group of polysaccharides called beta-glucans. These complex, hemicellulose sugar molecules enhance the functioning of the immune system by activating immune cell response and stimulating the production of white blood cells. These compounds also effectively mobilize immune stem cells in your bone marrow, and exhibit anti-tumor properties, so theyre often used supplementally in cancer treatment protocols. Beta-glucans help to lower cholesterol, as this type of fiber forms a viscous gel during digestion, which grabs a hold of excess dietary cholesterol, prevents absorption by moving it through your digestive tract, and eliminates it. Through your poop! This same gel also slows down your digestion, which in turn stabilizes blood sugar, and minimizes the release of insulin. King oyster mushrooms are of course a good source of beta-glucans, but you can get them in other places too: barley, oats, sorghum, mushrooms like shiitake, reishi and maitake, as well as seaweed, algae, and dates.   I wouldn’t put king oyster mushrooms in the “specialty” category of fungi, but I also know that theyre not available at every grocery store, so if you cant find them, substitute with any other kind of mushroom you like and forgo the whole scallop charade. The dish will still turn out delicious, I promise. If you want to change up the herb in the pesto, try basil instead of flat-leaf parsley. Cilantro could also be delicious, but potentially overwhelming, so use more spinach in that case. And instead of hazelnuts in the pesto and garnish, try almonds, pecans or walnuts. Yummm. I like to serve this with a big hunk of crusty bread on the side to mop up any leftover pesto in the bowl. It also helps to have some good olive oil and flaky salt around for this situation, just sayin. If youd prefer the grain route, steamed brown rice, quinoa, or millet could be a decent accompaniment too. And if you want to go completely grain-free, roasted sweet potato, winter squash, or pumpkin would be totally lovely.     Print recipe     King Oyster Mushroom Scallops in a Warm Pesto Pool Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g king oyster mushrooms (choose ones with fat stems) a generous amount of ghee (or expeller-pressed coconut oil) fine + flaky salt 1 jar brined capers (about 1/­­3 cup /­­ 55g) a handful of toasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped, for garnish 1 batch Parsley-Spinach Pesto (recipe follows) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish a few leaves of parsley, for garnish Directions: 1. Remove any dirt or debris from the mushrooms with your hands, or small soft brush. (do not use water!). Slice the stems into enough rounds so that each person has 5 or 6. Keep the caps for another dish. 2. Drain the capers and pat them dry with a clean tea towel or paper towel. Heat about a tablespoon of ghee (or coconut oil) in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the capers and fry until split and crisp - about 2-3 minutes. Remove from pan and set aside. 3. Add more ghee (or coconut oil) to the same skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the sliced mushroom stems, a sprinkle of flaky salt, and cook on one side until golden, about 5-7 minutes. Then flip and cook on the other side until golden. Work in batches or use separate skillets - if you crowd the mushrooms they will steam each other and get soggy. That is not what were after! 4. While youre cooking the mushrooms, place the pesto in a small saucepan, add a touch of water to thin, if desired, and warm over low-medium heat. Do not boil! 5. To serve, place about 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of the warm pesto in the bottom of a dish, spreading it out to make an indent in the center. Place 5 or 6 mushroom stems in the pesto, then top with the fried capers and toasted hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and a few grinds of black pepper. Garnish with parsley and serve immediately. Parsley-Spinach Pesto Makes about 2 1/­­4 cups Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g hazelnuts 1 fat clove garlic 2 cups /­­ 35g flat-leaf parsley, lightly packed (tender stems only) 2 cups /­­ 65g baby spinach, lightly packed zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­3 cup/­­ 80ml freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 2 lemons) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 35g nutritional yeast 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water, more if needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place hazelnuts on baking sheet. Toast in oven for 12-15 minutes or until fragrant and lightly toasted. Remove and set aside. Once cool, remove skins by rubbing the hazelnuts together in your hands. Set aside. 2. Remove any tough stems from the parsley. Roughly chop the leaves and tender stems (this prevents the parsley from bruising in the food processor). 3. Place garlic in the food processor and pulse to mince. Add the hazelnuts, parsley, spinach, lemon zest and juice, olive oil, nutritional yeast, and salt. Pulse for 30 seconds, then add the water and pulse again until its thick, but spreadable. Remove lid and scrape. Repeat until reaches desired consistency (I like mine a little chunky, but its up to you!). Store leftovers in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to one week. We’re home from Bali now, settling back into life in the cold Canadian winter. It feels good to be here, especially after a satisfying few weeks in the sunshine, hosting two glorious retreats. Now it’s time to ground and focus on the year ahead. I’m very excited for 2019 – so many exciting things to share with you, just on the horizon. I hope you’re all well out there, and enjoying a vibrant start to the new year. Sending love and gratitude out to you all, always. xo, Sarah B The post Mushroom “Scallops” in a Warm Pesto Pool appeared first on My New Roots.

New Year Glow Meal Plan: Spaghetti Squash (Pho, Lasagna, Tacos, Pesto Noodles)

January 16 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

New Year Glow Meal Plan: Spaghetti Squash (Pho, Lasagna, Tacos, Pesto Noodles) The New Year Glow Meal Plan is here! All kinds of carb-on-carb, dessert-every-day type of holiday indulgence happened for us over the past month, and at this point we are so ready to fill our plates with 99% plants. That’s what this meal plan is all about. We are employing the amazing, shape-shifting powers of spaghetti squash to create four distinctly different, plant-fueled dishes that will still keep us cozy in this frigid weather (no bone-chilling, cold salads or fully raw dishes here!). We’ve got special pesto ‘noodles’, pho, tacos, and lasagna. As usual, there is a step-by-step weekend prep guide, as well as a shopping list for your convenience :) Hope you enjoy this one! Menu - Spaghetti Squash Noodles with Brussels Sprout Pesto - Kale Pho with Spaghetti Squash Noodles - Spaghetti Squash Kimchi Tacos - Portobello Spaghetti Squash Lasagna *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free if needed, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients youll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce 2 large or 3 medium spaghetti squash 1 lb Brussel sprouts 1 medium yellow onion 2 large leeks 1 head of garlic 1-inch piece ginger 1 bunch kale 1/­­2 lb shiitake 8-10 portobello caps 2-3 avocados 1 bunch cilantro 1 lemon 3 limes Spices 2 cinnamon sticks 2 star anise black peppercorns 5 whole cloves 3 whole cardamom pods 1 teaspoon coriander seeds Staples/­­Other sea salt olive oil neutral avocado oil or other oil of choice apple cider vinegar brown rice vinegar tamari sriracha/­­chili sauce 24 oz marinara sauce 1 cup vegan kimchi tortillas – gluten-free if needed sea salt Bulk 1 cup dried chickpeas 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds 1 cup raw almonds nutritional yeast Basic Prep Complete these steps on the weekend (or whenever you have the time), and these meals will be a breeze to put together during the week, thanks to all the prepared components. 1) Roast The Spaghetti Squash Spaghetti Squash, the beautiful yellow vegetable with flesh that turns into ‘noodles’ when roasted, will be the base for all our dishes in this meal plan. Here, we are roasting 2 large squashes, which we’ll be using for pesto noodles, pho, tacos, and lasagna throughout the week. Roasted Spaghetti Squash   Print Ingredients 2 large spaghetti squash - halved, seeds scooped out avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 baking sheets, lined with parchment paper. Place the halved spaghetti squash on the baking sheets, face up. Oil thoroughly and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Turn the squashes face down, place in the oven, and roast for 30-40 minutes,until the flesh is soft, cooked through, and noodle-like when scraped with a fork. Take care not to overcook, as the noodles can turn mushy. Let cool slightly. Scrape all of the noodles out of the squash skins using a fork, and store refrigerated in an airtight glass container, until ready to use. 3.5.3226   2) Cook Chickpeas and Make Broth Base for Pho In this step, we are cooking chickpeas for the pho and tacos, while also making the broth base for our pho. Making ingredients using the offshoots from other ingredients is one of the most gratifying and humbling things about cooking! Pot of Chickpeas   Print Ingredients 1 cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Place the chickpeas in a pot and cover with about 8 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes. Test the chickpeas for doneness. Cook longer if needed, until completely soft. Add salt to taste at the end. Drain, reserving the cooking liquid for the pho broth (below). 3.5.3226   3) Make the Pho Broth This pho broth gets its deep, comforting flavor from toasted spices, chickpeas (cooked in the same water, in the previous step), tamari, and any other vegetable scraps you have around. Pho Broth   Print Ingredients 2 star anise 2 cinnamon sticks 1 teaspoon whole coriander seeds 1 teaspoon black peppercorn 5 whole cloves 3 cardamom pods 1 medium yellow onion - sliced into 8 wedges 3 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 1-inch piece ginger, sliced and crushed with a knife 6 cups chickpea broth - from above any vegetable scraps like leek tops, onion skins, etc. (optional) ½ lb shiitake - hard stems separated, caps reserved 3½ tablespoons tamari 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar ¼ teaspoon sriracha/­­chili sauce Instructions Warm a soup pot over medium heat. Add the star anise, cinnamon, coriander, peppercorns, cloves, and cardamom. Toast, stirring, until fragrant, for about 2-3 minutes. Add the onion, garlic, and ginger and sauté for another couple of minutes, until fragrant, and until the onion begins to get some color. Carefully add the chickpea broth (it may splatter), vegetable scraps (if using), shiitake stems, tamari, brown rice vinegar, and sriracha. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes. Reserve the shiitake caps for when you make the pho (recipe below). Remove the pot from heat and let infuse further for at least 30 minutes, or as long as you have (overnight is best, refrigerate if letting infuse overnight). Strain the broth, discarding the solids. Keep the broth in the same soup pot, refrigerated, until ready to make the pho. 3.5.3226   4) Make the Brussels Sprout Pesto This pesto is made with blanched Brussels sprouts, for a dose of cruciferous goodness, and pumpkin seeds, for a lighter alternative to nuts. The result is surprisingly delicious pesto, which will be used for the Spaghetti Squash Noodle dish, as well as the lasagna. Brussels Sprout Pesto   Print Ingredients 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds 1 lb Brussels sprouts - ends trimmed off, sliced in half sea salt 1 clove garlic - chopped 1 bunch cilantro, stems and leaves (reserve a handful of leaves for the pho and tacos) - torn juice of ½ lemon 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper ½ cup olive oil Instructions Preheat the oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread the pumpkin seeds on a baking tray and toast in the oven for 5-7 minutes, until fragrant and slightly golden. Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a rapid boil. Add the Brussels sprouts and blanch for about 8 minutes, or longer, until soft throughout, but not mushy. Drain and set aside. Reserve a small handful of pumpkin seeds and set aside to use as a garnish for the pesto noodle dish. Place the rest of the pumpkin seeds into a food processor, followed by a large pinch of salt and garlic. Pulse to roughly break up the pumpkin seeds. Divide the blanched Brussels sprouts in half. Save one half of them whole, to use later in the pesto noodle dish, keeping them refrigerated in an airtight container. Add the other half of the blanched Brussels sprouts to the food processor, along with the cilantro, lemon juice, nutritional yeast, another pinch of salt and black pepper. Process until well combined. Slowly poor the olive oil through the feeding tube on the lid, with the motor still running. Taste for salt, adjust if needed. Use the pesto right away or store refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   5) Make the Almond Ricotta This easy almond ricotta is mainly meant for the lasagna, but you can use any of the leftovers in the tacos or in the Brussels sprout pesto noodles. Almond Ricotta   Print Ingredients 1 cup almonds - soaked overnight in purified water 1 small garlic clove pinch of sea salt 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast generous squeeze of lemon juice - to taste Instructions Drain and rinse the almonds. Optionally, squeeze each almond to slip off the skin for a whiter, smoother ricotta. Place the almonds into the bowl of a food processor, along with the garlic, salt, nutritional yeast, and lemon juice. Add 2 tablespoons water and pulse, until you achieve a ricotta consistency. Add another 1-2 tablespoons of water, if needed. Use right away or refrigerate for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes This is a meal that will take you minutes to prepare, thanks to all the weekend prep. Spaghetti squash ‘noodles’ go well with pesto of any kind, but they become something really special, when combined with the Brussels Sprout Pumpkinseed Pesto and silky, blanched Brussels sprouts. Spaghetti Squash Noodles with Brussels Sprout Pesto   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients ⅔ of the amount of the Brussels Sprout Pesto - from above about 3 cups roasted spaghetti squash - from above reserved ½ lb whole blanched Brussels sprouts - from the pesto recipe, above reserved handful whole toasted pumpkin seeds - from the pesto recipe, above Instructions Warm a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the pesto and let warm through, stirring, for about a minute. Add the spaghetti squash and toss to coat in the pesto. Add the whole Brussels sprouts and let everything heat through thoroughly, stirring. Serve right away, garnished with the whole pumpkin seeds and almond ricotta from above, if using. 3.5.3226   This Pho is incredibly cozy, but also very nourishing and light. The deep, dark broth holds the powers of various warming spices, shiitake, chickpeas, and veg. Spaghetti squash ‘noodles,’ chickpeas, and kale fill it out, and a scoop of avocado + a drizzle of chili sauce on top take it to that next level. Kale Pho with Spaghetti Squash Noodles   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients pho broth - from above 1½ cups cooked chickpeas - from above about 3 cups roasted spaghetti squash - from above shiitake caps from ½ lb shiitake - sliced, reserved while making pho broth 2-3 kale leaves - stems removed, roughly chopped juice from 1 lime, plus more for serving handful of cilantro leaves - for garnish ripe avocado - for garnish sriracha/­­chili sauce - for garnish (optional) Instructions Bring the pho broth back to a boil, add the cooked chickpeas, spaghetti squash, sliced shiitake caps, and kale. Adjust the heat to a simmer and cook for about 10 minutes, until the kale is cooked through. Remove from heat and mix in the lime juice. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve warm, with more lime slices, garnished with cilantro leaves, cubed ripe avocado, and more sriracha/­­chili sauce, if desired. 3.5.3226   This is the wintery version of our Kimchi Tacos from the Summer Meal Plan. It’s hard to do them justice with words or photos, but they are really good. Proof: my ten year old, who strongly dislikes squash and doesn’t eat kimchi because it’s too spicy, ate them for dinner two nights in a row without any comment (silence during a meal is always a good sign around here :). They are also so, so quick! Spaghetti Squash Kimchi Tacos   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 1 tablespoon avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice 2-3 kale leaves - stems removed, leaves torn sea salt 1½ cup cooked chickpeas - all of the remaining from above 2 cups roasted spaghetti squash - from above about 1 cup vegan kimchi tortillas of choice - gluten-free if needed 1-2 ripe avocado - cubed cilantro - for serving lime slices - for serving sriracha or hot sauce of choice - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil over medium heat in a large sauté pan. Add the kale and salt, and sauté for about 7-10 minutes, until soft. Add the chickpeas to the pan and stir around to lightly toast. Add the spaghetti squash and toss to combine. Add the kimchi and stir to combine and warm everything through. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the warm veg in tortillas, topped with avocado, cilantro, squeezes of lime juice, and hot sauce (if using). 3.5.3226   Does this dish of layered vegetables, mushrooms, and sauces actually taste like lasagna? It really does! The spaghetti squash ‘noodles’ replace the carb component of regular lasagna noodles, while the portobello mushrooms add substance, depth, and meatiness. The almond cheese and pesto from prep day, as well as good, store-bought marinara add just the right punch of flavor. It’s a higher vibe lasagna that will still leave you satisfied, with a bonus of not weighing you down. Portobello Spaghetti Squash Lasagna   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice - divided, plus more for oiling the dish 8-10 portobello caps 2 large leeks, white and pale green parts only - sliced sea salt 24 oz marinara sauce about 7 cups roasted spaghetti squash - from above almond ricotta - from above reserved ⅓ the amount of Brussels sprouts pesto - from above freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Warm 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add as many portobello caps as the pan can hold and fry them on one side for a couple of minutes, until golden. Flip and fry the other side. Remove and continue with the rest of the portobellos. Set them aside on a plate and drain off any water that they release. Add the remaining 1 tablespoon of the oil to the same pan. Add leeks and a pinch of salt and sauté for about 8-10 minutes, until soft. Oil a 10 x 1o-inch, deep baking dish or a baking dish of a similar size. Spread half of the marinara sauce over the bottom. Add half of the spaghetti squash, spreading it into an even layer. Spread half of the almond ricotta over top, in little clumps. Arrange all the portobello caps in the next layer, overlapping them as you go. Next, add a layer of the pesto and sautéed leeks. Continue with layers as follows: the rest of the almond ricotta, the rest of the marinara, and the rest of the spaghetti squash. Sprinkle the top layer with salt and pepper, and drizzle with avocado oil. Cover the dish, place in the oven, and bake for 30 minutes. Increase the temperature to 400° F (200° C), uncover and bake for another 15 minutes. Let the lasagna rest and cool slightly for 10-15 minutes before serving. Store refrigerated, reheat in the oven or in a pan, covered, until warmed through. The lasagna gets even more flavorful after a day or two in the fridge. 3.5.3226   You might also like... 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Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Mushrooms (Pasta Alfredo, Minestrone, Gravy)

December 12 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

I’ve noticed a pattern that I fall into every fall. At the very start of it, right as there’s the first serious chill in the air, I get in the mood for all the cozy fall foods. For me, those always involve tons of root vegetables and winter squashes, and I enjoy them very, very thoroughly for the next month or two. That must be why I’m generally already sick of roasted root vegetables and almost can’t look at another squash right around the holidays. Meanwhile, there’s still January, February, and March (maybe even some of April?) to endure. I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this :) Thankfully, there are mushrooms. They have all the elements needed for fall/­­winter cooking: they are earthy, versatile, satisfying, do well with wintery preparations, and pair well with cozy spices and herbs (and they are decidedly unlike root vegetables or squash). So today we are sharing a meal plan, consisting of 3 distinctly different, umami-bomb mains, centered around a batch of sautéed mushrooms: pasta alfredo, minestrone, and gravy with mash. And as usual, there’s a shopping list and step-by-step prep tips. Hope you guys enjoy this one! Menu - Mushroom Pasta Alfredo - Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone - Mushroom Gravy over Potato-Parsnip Mash *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free if needed, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce 2 large yellow onions 2 lbs mushrooms of choice (ex: crimini and shiitake) 1 large head of garlic 2 medium-large Russet or Yukon Gold potatoes 2 large parsnips 2 lemons 1 small bunch kale of choice 1 large bunch of parsley rosemary (2 sprigs) Bulk 1 cup chickpeas 1/­­2 cup cashews Staples/­­Other sea salt olive oil or other oil of choice miso balsamic vinegar kombu (optional) 10-12 oz penne pasta (gluten-free if needed) Basic Prep Complete these three steps on the weekend (or whenever you have the time), and these meals will be a breeze to put together during the week, thanks to all the prepared components. 1) Cook the Mushrooms Here, we are cooking our mushrooms with onions and garlic (don’t worry, 2 lbs of mushrooms cook down quite a bit) to use as a base for all three of our meals. Half of them will be left whole and the other half will be blended into the creamy Mushroom Alfredo sauce. Sautéed Mushrooms   Print Ingredients oil of choice 2 large yellow onions - chopped sea salt 2 lbs any mushrooms of choice (we used a mix of crimini and shiitake) - sliced 3 cloves of garlic - minced Instructions Heat a generous glug of oil in large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and cook for about 10 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and another pinch of salt. If your large pan is still not large enough to fit all the mushrooms, add them in batches, they will cook down significantly. Cook for another 10-15 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Store refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226   2) Cook the Chickpeas and Vegetables for the Mash + Make Veggie Broth all in one go I love this step so much. Cooking beans (don’t forget to soak them overnight) is such a perfect opportunity to also make delicious, homemade veggie broth, and maybe even to boil a few vegetables for another dish in the process (which only further deepen the broth flavor). Here, we are cooking chickpeas for the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone, boiling potatoes and parsnips for the Potato-Parsnip Mash and magically making a very flavorful broth in the meantime. The broth will be used in the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce and the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone. Chickpeas, Potatoes, Parsnips & Broth   Print Ingredients 1 cup chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2 medium-large potatoes, Russet or Yukon Gold - peeled and cut into large chunks 2 large parsnips - peeled and cut into large chunks 2 cloves garlic - smashed 2 bay leaves 1 sprig of rosemary 1 small sheet of kombu seaweed (optional) any other vegetable scraps that you might have on hand (leek tops, onion skins, etc.) 14 cups purified water sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Place them in a soup pot, along with the potatoes, parsnips, garlic, bay leaves, rosemary, kombu and any other vegetable scraps, if using. Cover with 14 cups of water. Place the pot over high heat and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook covered, for 30 minutes, or until the chickpeas, potatoes, and parsnips are all cooked. Generously salt the broth towards the end of cooking. Tasting is very important here - the broth should taste very flavorful and well-salted. Remove the potatoes and parsnips with a slotted spoon. Store them away in an air-tight container in the refrigerator, until you are ready to make the Potato-Parsnip Mash. Remove the bay leaves, rosemary, kombu, and any vegetable scraps, if using, and discard. Measure out 9-9½ cups of the broth and leave it in the pot with the chickpeas. This will be your base for the Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone. Store the rest of the broth in a separate airtight container, you will be using it for the Alfredo and gravy and mash. Keep the broth and chickpeas refrigerated right in the soup pot if possible, since youll be using it for minestrone later in the week. Notes Chickpea cooking times vary depending on their age, so you might have to cook them longer than 30 minutes. If you find yourself having to cook the chickpeas much longer, take out the potatoes and parsnips with a slotted spoon to avoid the vegetables getting mushy. 3.5.3226   3) Make the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce This is a play on a creamy pasta sauce, complete with the earthy and sweet flavors of sautéed mushrooms and onions. Other flavor superstars like balsamic, miso, and lemon juice take this vegan ‘Alfredo’ to the next level. We’ll be using this sauce in the Pasta, Minestrone, and the Mushroom Gravy. Mushroom Alfredo Sauce   Print Ingredients half of the sautéed mushrooms and onions (from above, about 2¾ cups) ½ cup cashews - soaked in purified water for 2-4 hours, or boiling water for 10 minutes 1 tablespoon miso 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar 2 tablespoons olive oil juice from ½ lemon salt and pepper - to taste about ¾ cup chickpea broth (from above) - to achieve a saucy consistency Instructions Combine the mushrooms and onions, cashews, miso, balsamic, olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper, in a high-speed blender and pulse until smooth. Stream in the chickpea broth with the blender still running, until you achieve a good sauce consistency. The sauce shouldnt be too thick or too runny, aim for the sweet spot in between. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Store the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226   Recipes This dreamy pasta dish comes together in a flash, thanks to all the weekend prep from above. It’s so cozy and full of deep, wintery flavors from the Mushroom Alfredo and meaty slices of sautéed mushrooms. Lemon juice and fresh parsley provide some necessary brightness, and a dusting of nutritional yeast gives that final, cheesy finish. Mushroom Pasta Alfredo   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 10-12 oz penne pasta - gluten-free if needed ⅔ of the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce (from above, about 2 cups) ⅔ of the remaining cooked mushrooms and onions (from above) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast, plus more for sprinkling juice from ½ lemon ½ large bunch of parsley - chopped Instructions Cook the pasta al dente, in a large pot of well-salted water, according to the instructions on the package. Reserve ¼ - ½ cup of pasta water before draining. Meanwhile, place a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the Mushroom Alfredo Sauce, cooked mushrooms and onions, nutritional yeast, and reserved pasta water. Stir to mix and heat through. Once the pasta is done, add it to the pan with the sauce and gently stir to coat. Add the lemon juice and parsley and carefully stir to incorporate. Enjoy right away, reserving 2¼ cups of the mushroomy pasta for the minestrone (recipe below). Keep the reserved pasta refrigerated in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226     This Minestrone gives a second life to the Mushroom Pasta Alfredo from above. Minestrone is traditionally a soup made of whatever ingredients are around, and a perfect fridge-clean-out dish. We are honoring that here by adding some of our reserved mushroomy pasta to the flavorful chickpea broth and chickpeas that we cooked during prep. The sauce from the pasta gives even more depth to the broth, and the pasta makes the dish perfectly filling and satisfying. There’s also rosemary, kale, lemon juice, and black pepper. All simple ingredients that come together to make a layered and comforting soup, perfect for any winter meal. Chickpea Mushroom Minestrone   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup cooked chickpeas (from above) 9-9½ cups vegetable broth (from above) 1 tablespoon chopped rosemary 1 bunch kale - stems removed, torn into bite-size pieces 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast, plus more for serving 2¼ cup reserved mushroom pasta (from above) freshly ground black pepper juice from 1 lemon parsley - for serving Instructions Combine the chickpeas and broth in a soup pot (if not already combined). Optionally, add ½ cup of the chickpeas, ½ cup of the broth, and the rosemary to an upright blender and blend until smooth. Pour the mixture back into the soup and mix it in for a creamier consistency. Bring the broth up to a boil and reduce the heat to a simmer. Add the kale to the simmering broth and cook, covered, for about 10 minutes, until soft. Also add the rosemary with the kale if you didnt blend it in earlier. Stir in the nutritional yeast, reserved mushroom pasta, and black pepper to taste, and bring the soup back up to a boil once again. Turn off the heat, stir in the lemon juice, and enjoy, garnished with parsley. 3.5.3226   Continuing on our journey of giving a new life to leftovers, we are turning the Mushroom Alfredo into a gravy and serving it over a potato and parsnip mash. The mash is quickly thrown together with the vegetables we boiled while making the chickpeas and broth during prep day. Easy and so satisfying! Mushroom Gravy over Potato-Parsnip Mash   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the potato-parsnip mash olive oil 1 large clove of garlic - minced 2 boiled medium-large potatoes, Russet or Yukon Gold (from above) 2 boiled large parsnips (from above) about ¼ - ½ cup warmed chickpea broth (from above) sea salt and black pepper - to taste for the mushroom gravy remaining Mushroom Alfredo Sauce (from above, ⅓ of the total) remaining cooked mushrooms and onions (from above, ⅓ of the total after sauce) about ¼ cup chickpea broth (from above) salt and black pepper - if needed, to taste parsley - for serving Instructions to make the potato-parsnip mash Warm a generous glug of olive oil on a medium pot over medium heat. Add the garlic and stir around for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Mash the potatoes and parsnips in the same pot with a masher. Add the broth and more olive oil to taste, and continue mashing to a desired consistency, incorporating the garlic and oil from the bottom of the pot and warming the mash over medium heat. You can make the mash smooth or a bit chunky, however you prefer. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve right away. to make the mushroom gravy In a small saucepan, combine the Mushroom Alfredo, cooked mushrooms and onions, and just enough of the chickpea broth to achieve a gravy consistency. Warm the gravy over medium heat. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the gravy right away, on top of the potato-parsnip mash, garnished with parsley. Notes Any leftover broth can be frozen for future use. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

November 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegetarian Meal Plan | Sweet Potato Soup, Apple Pizza & Baked Gnocchi

September 29 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegetarian meal plan includes sweet potato, pear and leek soup, apple cheddar pizza with caramelized onions & one-pan vegetable baked gnoccchi.

Ginger Roasted Leeks & Asparagus

June 12 2017 Meatless Monday 

Leeks are sliced paper thin and marinated with lemon juice, soy sauce and freshly grated ginger. Roasted asparagus makes the perfect canvas for the salty sour leeks in a side dish which celebrates springs bounty. This recipe comes to us from JL goes Vegan. Serves 4 - 1 bunch asparagus - 1 leek - juice of 1/­­2 a lemon - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon coconut aminos* - or - 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce - 1 teaspoon ginger, grated *Coconut aminos is a soy sauce substitute with 65% less sodium. Found in health food stores. Low sodium soy sauce can be substituted if coconut aminos are unavailable. Snap the bottom ends off of each asparagus spear. Slice the leek in slices as thin as possible with a madoline or a knife. Rinse the leek slices thoroughly. Toss the asparagus and thinly sliced leeks in a shallow dish with the lemon juice, olive oil, grated ginger and the coconut aminos or soy sauce. Let marinate for 20 minutes. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Roast the asparagus and leeks in their marinade for 8-10 minutes, or until the asparagus is cooked to preference. Divide into 4 portions and enjoy on the side. The post Ginger Roasted Leeks & Asparagus appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Potato Pesto Pizza with Basil Spinach Pesto, Garlic and Pepper

May 30 2017 Vegan Richa 

Potato Pesto Pizza with Basil Spinach Pesto, Garlic and PepperEasy Potato Pesto Pizza with Thin Crust. Basil Spinach Pesto makes for a refreshing Pizza base topping with thin potato slices, onion and garlic. Bake or make on the grill. Vegan Soyfree Recipe.  Its not really pizza season with the crazy heat, but this is one delicious Pizza you want to make come sun or rain. Thin crust, loads of fresh pesto, potatoes, onions or leek, thinly sliced garlic, loads of pepper. Delicious! Bake or grill it up if you’d rather not start up the oven. This flatbread Pizza works well with sliced potato or sweet potato and onions.  I use my 20 Minute Pizza Crust with Spelt flour for this flatbread pizza. The dough is rolled out into thin rustic crusts to make 2 medium size pizzas. I use a quick basil spinach cashew pesto as the base. Spread the pesto, sliced potato, onion and garlic. Add other toppings such as veggie crumbles or vegan sausage or artichokes. a Drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and bake to make a crisp refreshing Summery Pizza. Continue reading: Potato Pesto Pizza with Basil Spinach Pesto, Garlic and PepperThe post Potato Pesto Pizza with Basil Spinach Pesto, Garlic and Pepper appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Spring Sweet Fresh Pea Soup

May 16 2017 VegKitchen 

Spring Sweet Fresh Pea Soup Sweet fresh peas, leeks, and leafy greens come together in this lavish green pea soup. This spring sweet pea soup can be made in a blink of an eye with readily available seasonal ingredients. Your palate will enjoy the tenderness of the peas and sweet potatoes, followed by the lingering aroma of garlic and leek […] The post Spring Sweet Fresh Pea Soup appeared first on VegKitchen.

Asparagus Protein Pancakes

May 3 2017 Veganpassion 

Asparagus Protein Pancakes Have you guys ever tried asparagus with pancakes? Delicious! To it a light and creamy sauce....yumm! I'm really into flours from different legumes.Green pea flour, red lentil flour or chickpea flour are so good in a sponge mixture. You can get a nutty taste with pumpkin seeds flour. Try it out! Makes 4 Portions. Preparation time: 30 miuntes For the pancakes: 1 1/­­2 cup legumes flour 1 1/­­2 cup whole spelt flour 1 tsp. baking soda salt 2 1/­­2 cup water oil for baking In a mixing bowl mix both flours, baking powder and salt. Stir in the water and let it stand for 10 minutes. For the veggies: 17 oz asparagus 10 oz champignon 1/­­2 leek 2 tbsp oil salt, pepper, nutmeg Peel off the lower thrid of the asparagus and cut off a size of a thumb. Cook it for 10-12 minutes. Cut the champignons and leek in slices. Heat oil in a pan and roast the veggies and spice it. For the creme: 2 tbsp oil 2 tbsp whole grain flour 1 1/­­2 + 2 tbsp oat milk 1 tbsp apple vinegar salt, pepper, nutmeg a bunch of lemon balm Heat the oil in a pot and stir in flour. While stiring add half of the oat milk. Chop the lemon balm and stir into the sauce. Add the other half of the sauce and spice it. Serve pancakes, veggies and cream and enjoy!


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