leek - vegetarian recipes

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Potato Quinoa Waffles ( Aloo Tikki Waffles)

Green Chili Enchilada Soup

The Worlds 10 Best Vegan Ice Cream Shops

7 Instant Pot Tips the Manual Doesnt Tell You










leek vegetarian recipes

Vegan Easter Recipes

March 25 2021 VegKitchen 

Vegan Easter Recipes Planning a plant-based Easter feast? You’ve come to the right place. I’ve rounded up all my favorite Vegan Easter recipes right here, so you can plan the perfect menu. From easy appetizers, to hearty main dishes, to sweet desserts – there’s something for everyone. Easter is the perfect holiday for putting together a vegan brunch or dinner. With all of the fresh, seasonal product of spring – these recipes are filled with light leafy greens, fresh asparagus, beets, carrots, and bright, citrusy flavors. So much deliciousness! Use these mix and match vegan menu suggestions to create a memorable Easter feast for your family and friends. Vegan Easter Appetizers Deviled Tomatoes Mushroom, Asparagus, and Artichoke Medley Beet Muhummara Spinach or Arugula Strudel Green Pea, Parsley, and Pistachio Dip Raw Vegan Cheddar Cheese Spread Rosemary Roasted Mushrooms Mushroom, Asparagus, and Artichoke Medley Vegan Easter Soups Greek-Flavored Spinach and Orzo Soup Vegan Tomato Gazpacho Lemony Leek and Mushroom Soup Creole Carrot Soup Vegan Cream of Broccoli Soup Creole Eggplant Soup Classic Leek and Potato Soup Vegan Easter Salads Spring Greens Salad with Endive and Oranges Mixed Greens Salad with Beets and Walnuts Asparagus with Mustard-Dill Sauce Beet and Red Cabbage Slaw Orange and […] The post Vegan Easter Recipes appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Spring Dinner Recipes

March 14 2021 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Spring Dinner RecipesAdd a healthy punch to your plate with these veggie-centric vegan spring dinner recipes! A recipe collection chock-full of lovely spring produce like leeks, spinach, asparagus or carrots! Make the most of spring’s abundance with these Vegan Spring Dinner Recipe Ideas! Let’s bring on spring produce! After a long winter, I simply cant wait to hit the farmer’s market and come home with a big wicker basket filled with spring’s best produce. Crisp green stalks of asparagus and bunches of fresh spinach, young potatoes, leeks, carrots – more than I can probably handle on my own, but I’m up for the challenge and I know my friends will love to try some of these spring dinner recipes, I already have on my to-make list! Want to join in? Let’s get our hands on those spring greens and get cooking! Here are some of my favorite veggie-tastic spring dinner recipes that are colorful, wholesome, and simply feel and taste like spring. Most of these are very easy to make and you will find both light spring cuisine as well as comforting recipes for those colder days. Artichokes Vegan Spinach Artichoke Pasta Bake You will love this delicious vegan spinach and artichoke pasta bake recipe. It's like having spinach and artichoke dip, but for dinner! TRY THIS RECIPE Artichoke Spinach Cauliflower Bean Burgers. Grill-able Vegan Veggie Burger Recipe. These Grill-able Aritchoke Spinach burgers are easy and great for summer. Use any favorite dressings or toppings. TRY THIS RECIPE Vegan Spinach Artichoke Dip Recipe Easy 1 Pot Vegan Spinach Artichoke Dip Recipe. Ready in 30 Minutes. This Creamy Cheesy artichoke dip is perfect for parties, picnics, game day. No Cream cheese or vegan cheese subs. Can be glutenfree, nutfree. Use a 9 inch skillet or stoneware dish to bake TRY THIS RECIPE   Asparagus Vegan Lemon Asparagus Pasta Vegan Lemon Asparagus Pasta - 30 mins! Creamy Lemon Alfredo style sauce with tofu with fettuccine and pan roasted garlic asparagus and more lemon. Vegan Nutfree Recipe. Can be Glutenfree. 17 gm of protein TRY THIS RECIPE Fettuccine with Tomato Cream Sauce and Asparagus Fettuccine with Tomato Cream Sauce and Asparagus. Easy tomato Cream sauce with pasta and garlic roasted Asparagus. Use other veggies of choice. Add some chickpea chorizo or smoked coconut for variation. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Can be gluten-free with gf pasta. TRY THIS RECIPE Roasted Asparagus Basil Soup. Vegan Glutenfree Recipe This Roasted Asparagus Basil Soup is a simple soup with fresh asparagus, basil, dill, onions and cashews. Creamy, Vegan and Gluten-free Recipe TRY THIS RECIPE Chickpea Tofu Asparagus Curry Easy Asparagus Curry with Chickpea Tofu, Spinach, Indian Spices and tomato curry. Indian Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Serve with Rice or flat-bread. Asparagus Ki Geeli subzi TRY THIS RECIPE Bulgogi Roasted Spring Veggie Bowl Bulgogi Roasted Spring Veggie Bowl. Spicy, sweet Korean Gochugaru blend roasted Cauliflower Mushroom Asparagus Bowl. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Recipe TRY THIS RECIPE   Carrots Carrot Zucchini Chickpea Fritters Vegan Recipe Carrot Zucchini Chickpea Fritters Vegan Recipe. Eggless, nut-free, yeast-free. Can be made gluten-free. Cooked Chickpeas, shredded veggies and turkish spices. Makes 7 to 8 patties TRY THIS RECIPE Vegetable Carrot Fried Rice - Carrot Pilaf Vegetable Carrot Fried Rice with Indian spices. Carrot Veggie Brown Rice Pilaf. Colorful flavorful side for Easter or Holidays. Vegan Glutenfree Soyfree Recipe. Add more Peas or chickpeas to make this a full meal. TRY THIS RECIPE Peanut Butter Roasted Cauliflower and Carrot Salad Bowl Peanut Butter Cauliflower Bowl with Roasted Carrots. Cauliflower tossed in peanut butter sauce and roasted, carrots tossed in hot sauce and roasted. Vegan Recipe, Gluten-free option.   TRY THIS RECIPE   Radishes Fusilli with Broccoli and Basil pesto and Red radish Fusilli with Broccoli and Basil pesto is an easy and quick meat free meal, a great recipe after a long day at work TRY THIS RECIPE Roasted Cauliflower and Radish with Mustard, Nigella, and Fennel Seeds This recipe is super-easy and addictive. Fennel and nigella seeds give the vegetables an Indian pickle flavor profile. Roasted cauliflower is always a hit, and here you can try roasted radish as well. I like to use baby red radishes because they make the dish look so colorful. Serve this with Northeastern dals such as odia dal or cholar dal, and with spicy curries that use fennel seeds. (Recipe from http:/­­/­­www.amazon.com/­­gp/­­product/­­1941252095/­­vegric-20 Copyright (C) 2015 by Richa Hingle. TRY THIS RECIPE   Spring Cabbage Instant Pot Indian Cabbage and Peas (Patta Gobi Subzi) Instant Pot Indian Cabbage and Peas! Patta Gobi Ki Subzi This Cabbage Curry is made in a pressure cooker. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Braised Cabbage Recipe. Stove top option in notes TRY THIS RECIPE Vegan Okonomiyaki - Cabbage Carrot Pancakes Vegan Okonomiyaki - Cabbage Carrot Pancakes. Japanese Okonomiyaki made vegan. Served with home made tonkatsu sauce.Makes 5 to 6 pancakes TRY THIS RECIPE   Avocado Avocado Pasta with Smoky Pecans Avocado Pasta with Smoky Pecans. This 20 Minute Creamy Avocado Basil Sauce is great over spaghetti or zoodles. Serve with smoky spicy pecans for amazing flavor.  Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Can be nutfree.  TRY THIS RECIPE Mediterranean Quinoa Salad with Arugula, Avocado Mediterranean Quinoa Salad with Arugula, Avocado and Lemon Oregano Olive oil dressing. The Mediterranean Lemon Garlic Dressing brightens up this Summery Quinoa Salad. Perfect to make ahead and serve at Picnics. Vegan Gluten-free, Nut-free Soy-free Recipe. TRY THIS RECIPE Spicy Avocado Chickpea Salad Sandwich Easy Smashed Avocado Chickpea Salad sandwich spiced with cumin and cayenne. Serve over soft fresh bread layered with greens and juicy tomatoes. TRY THIS RECIPE   Spinach Vegan Palak Tofu Paneer - Tofu in Spinach Sauce This Vegan Palak Tofu Paneer is the easiest and the tastiest dairy-free, gluten-free Saag Tofu. Tofu in Spinach Sauce. Can be made soy-free with chickpea tofu. Ready in 20 Minutes! TRY THIS RECIPE Cauliflower Chickpeas and Spinach in Mustard seed Curry Leaf Sauce This easy cauliflower chickpea and spinach saute features a fragrant Mustard Seed & Curry Leaf Sauce - an easy vegan meal that is ready in 30 minutes. Packed with healthy cauliflower, creamy chickpeas, and super food spinach in every bite TRY THIS RECIPE Garlic Potato Spinach Stir fry ( Lasooni Aloo Palak) Garlic Potato Spinach Stir fry - Lasooni Aloo Palak. Potato Spinach curry with garlic and Indian spices. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Soy-free Recipe TRY THIS RECIPE   Potatoes Gujarati Potatoes with Sesame Seeds - Bateta Nu Shaak Gujarati Potatoes with Sesame Seeds. Indian Spiced Potatoes with sesame seed and peanuts. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Indian Gujarati Recipe. Bateta Nu Shaak. TRY THIS RECIPE Potato Pesto Pizza - Vegan Pesto Pizza Easy Potato Pesto Pizza with Thin Crust. Basil Spinach Pesto makes for a refreshing Pizza base topping with thin potato slices, onion and garlic. Bake or make on the grill. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. TRY THIS RECIPE   I hope you found your favorite amongst my vegan spring dinner recipes! If you want to keep on browsing, here are more spring recipe round-ups that also include sweet treats: - Spring Recipes  - Vegan Easter Dinners - Mother’s Day Brunch Ideas    The post Vegan Spring Dinner Recipes appeared first on Vegan Richa.

WORLD 2.0 vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

November 2 2020 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

WORLD 2.0 vegan cookbook on Kickstarter Visit Kickstarter to pre-order: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2TE62bO  My first book has been a bestseller for almost eight years, but ever since the sequels came out, I’ve wanted to go back and massively upgrade the visuals on the original book: to re-do the cover artwork and re-shoot most of the food photos. After publishing 5 other books and spending additional years in the kitchens of the world, I knew I could improve the recipes, add outstanding dishes that didn’t make it into the first versions, and bring more culinary authenticity and cultural awareness to the entire book. The newly updated, re-photographed and freshly illustrated edition of The Lotus and the Artichoke – Vegan Recipes from World Adventures is my classic, first journey in the world of vegan cookbooks reimagined and upgraded. Its my tribute to powerful memories, awesome individuals, and fantastic meals that Ive made, found, and shared with countless others like you. I’ve wanted to re-create my first cookbook for years, but the opportunity didn’t really arise until the surprises and challenges that have been this monster of a year, 2020. Yasai Izakaya Genki, Tokyo 2019 You see, I’d planned to return to Japan and continue my adventures from late 2019. Ultimately, now, Id be wrapping up The Lotus and the Artichoke – JAPAN. But when Corona hit, not only did it cancel nearly all my events and most of my income, like for so many people, lockdowns and border closures meant drastic changes not just daily life but to our travel plans as well. The struggle to return to a form of life that is more predictable and free has been different for all of us. As life has become more routine and restricted, our travels have been more in our minds and through the eyes of others-- through art, music, video and social media. A big part of my own escape these last months has been getting into the kitchen and diving back into my first cookbook - revisiting the intense dishes, unforgettable places and global flavors that shaped my life and projects over the last eight years. Ive cooked for the family, for friends, and for neighbors. Hopefully opportunities for more lunch and dinner parties and big cooking events will shape up soon! updated world map & photo collage for WORLD 2.0 edition NEW in Vegan Recipes from World Adventures 2.0: - brand NEW cover art & illustration! - NEW introduction & kitchen info! - more travel stories! - 8+ totally NEW recipes (not found in earlier editions!)  - 70+ newly photographed dishes!  - 100+ updated & improved recipes!  - better recipe names with respect to cultures & inspirations - 8+ additional pages of adventures & travels! As with all 6 of my cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. - My fully updated and re-envisioned first cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide -  224 pages with 100+ recipes and over 90 full-page color photos  - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in over 50 countries.  - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients  - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Palak Paneer – North Indian spinach with tofu paneer Pad Thai – rice noodles with tofu, crushed peanuts & lime Omelette *NEW RECIPE* Mombasa Red Curry – with sweet potatoes & tofu Buka – Nigerian stew & Jollof – Senegalese rice *NEW RECIPES* Koshary – Egyptian pasta, lentils & rice with red sauce & fried onions *NEW RECIPE* Mini Meat Pies – made with lentils & vegetables Lasagna – with smoked tofu, cashew cheese, zucchini & mushrooms Recipes in Vegan Recipes from World Adventures 2.0 AMERICAS -  Salade a la Montréal arugula, pears, walnuts & lemon dressing -  Lower East Side Salad avocado and tomatoes on quinoa & carrot ginger dressing -  Jersey Summer Salad spinach, tomatoes, mushrooms, walnuts & raspberry dressing -  Pancakes American breakfast classic -  Waffles *NEW*  -  French Toast another American breakfast classic -  Tofu Scramble with mixed vegetables -  Omelette *NEW*  -  North End Pasta Spaghetti & Vegan Meatballs with red sauce -  Ithaca Mac & Cheeze baked casserole -  TLT Tempeh Lettuce Tomato sandwich -  Black Bean Burgers 90’s style classic burgers -  Three Bean Chili with assorted vegetables -  Mango Pear Crumble with ginger & cinnamon -  Roasted Walnut Brownies double chocolate delight -  Oatmeal Cranberry Walnut Cookies American classic -  Guacamole Latin American avocado dip -  Salsa Latin American spicy tomato dip ASIA -  Cold Sesame Noodles Chinese dim-sum classic -  Wontons Chinese steamed dumplings with soy ginger dipping sauce -  Congee savory rice porridge *NEW*  -  Horenso Goma-ae Japanese chilled sesame spinach -  Miso Soup Japanese classic with tofu -  Teriyaki Tempeh Japanese stir-fry with vegetables -  General Tsos Chicken Cantonese classic -  Sesame Ginger Tofu Chinese fusion -  Tom Kha Thai coconut soup with tofu & vegetables -  Pad Thai rice noodles with tofu, crushed peanuts & lime -  Pad Horapa Makua Thai stir-fry with eggplant, basil, tofu & cashews -  Bai Cha Cambodian fried rice with smoked tofu & vegetables -  Gói Cuôn Vietnamese fresh spring rolls with ginger peanut sauce -  Pho Vietnamese noodle soup with smoked tofu & vegetables -  Banh Mi Vietnamese seitan sandwich -  Mirza Ghasemi Persian eggplant -  Gajar Masala grated carrots with pineapple, dates & cashews -  Aloo Raita Indian potatoes and cucumbers in yogurt -  Poha Indian flattened rice with potatoes & spices -  Gobi Tikka Indian baked marinated cauliflower -  Pakoras Indian spinach fritters with apple tamarind chutney -  Masoor Dal North Indian red lentils -  Chole Bhature Indian chickpeas with fried flatbread -  Hyderabadi Biryani South Indian rice dish -  Dhokla South Indian savory steamed chickpea cake -  Masala Dosa South Indian cr?pe with spicy potato filling -  Sambar South Indian vegetable & lentil stew -  Coconut Coriander Chutney South Indian condiment -  Paneer Makhani North Indian tomato curry with tofu paneer -  Mutter Paneer North Indian peas with tofu paneer -  Palak Paneer North Indian spinach with tofu paneer -  Navratan Korma North Indian creamy vegetable curry -  Vegetable Jalfrezi North Indian spicy mixed vegetables -  Dal Makhani North Indian creamy bean curry -  Sindhi Bhindi Masala North Indian okra -  Bengan Bhartha North Indian eggplant -  Chilli Paneer Indo-Chinese tofu paneer -  Vegetable Manchurian Indo-Chinese dumplings -  Halva Indian semolina sweet -  Saffron Mango Lassi Indian yogurt shake -  Naan North Indian flatbread -  Nariyal Chaval South Asian coconut rice -  Haldi Chaval North Indian golden rice with turmeric -  Jeera Chaval North Indian rice with cumin seeds AFRICA -  Plasas & Fufu Gambian spinach peanut stew with mashed cassava -  Koshary Egyptian pasta, lentils & rice with red sauce & fried onions *NEW* -  Tanjine Moroccan stew with couscous *NEW* -  Mombasa Red Curry with sweet potatoes & tofu -  Ful Medames North African spicy bean dip *NEW* -  Hummus North African & Middle Eastern chickpea spread -  Buka Nigerian stew mushrooms and soy meats *NEW* -  Jollof Senegalese seasoned rice *NEW* EUROPE -  Endive Sprout Boats with sesame soy dressing -  Field Greens & Seared Apples with chickpea ginger parsley dressing -  Borscht Russian beet soup -  Blintzes Russian-Ukrainian cr?pes -  Gazpacho cold tomato & cucumber soup -  Carrot Ginger Zucchini Soup classic & creamy -  Roasted Root Vegetables with rosemary & spices -  Rotkohl German stewed red cabbage -  Kartoffelpuffer German potato pancakes with homemade applesauce -  Semmelknödel Bavarian bread dumplings -  Auflauf German zucchini & potato casserole -  Zwiebelkuchen German baked flatbread with onions & smoked tofu -  Schnitzel Austrian-style breaded bean cutlets -  Käsespätzle Swiss-German noodles with leeks & cheeze sauce -  Tofu Mushroom Stroganoff with fresh herbs -  Quiche French savory pie -  Cashew Mushroom Risotto with sun-dried tomatoes -  Lasagna with smoked tofu, zucchini & mushrooms -  Tempeh Stuffed Mushrooms with garlic & herbs -  Stuffed Peppers with tomato rice & smoked tofu -  Spinach & White Beans with sun-dried tomatoes & herbs -  Vegan Meat Pies with lentils & vegetables -  Turkish Bulgar Pilaf with Tofu-Feta & fresh herbs -  Grah Balkan bean stew with seitan -  Gibanica Balkan cheese pie -  Bratäpfel baked apples stuffed with dates, figs & walnuts -  Apfelstrudel Austrian-German apple pastry -  Lebkuchen traditional German Christmas cookies -  Tarte au Citron French lemon pie -  Mandeltorte German-Swedish almond pie Dal Makhani – North Indian creamy bean curry Masala Dosa – South Indian cr?pe with spicy potato filling, sambar & coconut chutney Pad Horapa Makua – Thai stir-fry with eggplant, basil, tofu & cashews Borscht – Russian beet soup Blintzes – Russian-Ukrainian tofu cheese cr?pes with jam Beaner Schnitzel – Austrian-style breaded bean cutlets Käsespätzle – Swiss-German noodles with leeks & cashew cheese sauce Pasta Famiglia – Spaghetti & Vegan Meatballs with red sauce Teriyaki Tempeh – Japanese stir-fry with vegetables Hyderabadi Biryani – South Indian rice with vegetables Chilli Paneer – Indo-Chinese spicy stir-fry with tofu paneer Vegetable Manchurian – Indo-Chinese dumplings The Lotus and the Artichoke – World Adventures from World Adventures 2.0, my updated, re-photographed & illustrated original cookbook is only available for pre-order on Kickstarter for 21 days!

New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Holidays

November 1 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Holidays We are so excited to tell you about our new holiday ebook! It’s a collection of our favorite, festive, plant-based recipes, developed with the intention of bringing color and joy to your holiday table. As always, the focus is on flavor-packed, whole food ingredients and inspiring, seasonal produce. This project was so incredibly fun to work on. Dreaming up a celebratory table of vibrant, plant-forward dishes, and bringing it to life is just a really gratifying thing to do. Coming together around a table of good food is one of the undeniable pleasures of life, and we hope that these recipes will become yours as you celebrate with your loved ones. We are also launching the holiday ebook bundle, which includes the holiday ebook along with our desserts ebook for $4 off the total price. You can check out a few sneak peek photos from the ebook, plus the full recipe index below. Buy the Holiday Ebook /­­ Buy the Holiday Ebook Bundle ($4 Off) Recipe Index *all recipes are vegan, all but 4 recipes are gluten-free - Sour Cream and Shallot Dip - Stuffed Mushrooms with Smoky Quinoa and Cashew Parm - Smashed Potato Latke Bites - Beet Caviar - Butternut Squash, Farro and White Bean Salad - Holiday Slaw with Tahini-Orange Dressing - Miso-Roasted Cauliflower and Grapes with Green Caper Sauce - Leek and Potato Soup with Brussels Sprout Chips - Maple-Mustard Brussels Sprouts - Mashed Potatoes with Mushroom White Bean Gravy - Herb and Walnut Stuffing/­­Dressing - Sweet Potato and Caramelized Onion Casserole - Creamy Butternut Squash and Apple Soup with Fried Shallots - Cranberry and Pear Sauce - Leeks in Vinaigrette - Cardamom Rice - Lentil Loaf with Balsamic Glaze - Coconut-Braised Red Cabbage - Orange and Sage Tempeh - Red Onion Tart with Tofu Ricotta - Quinoa and Vegetable Pot Pie with Gluten-Free Crust - Chocolate Fudge - Seeded Pumpkin Bread with Apple Butter - Rosemary Almonds - Gingerbread Banana Granola Buy the Holiday Ebook /­­ Buy the Holiday Ebook Bundle ($4 Off) The post New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Holidays appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lemon-Dill White Bean & Potato Soup

May 13 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Lemon-Dill White Bean & Potato Soup Coming to you with a recipe that feels simultaneously springy and warming. Spring here in the Northeast has been on the chillier side, and smoothies and big, raw salad lunches feel pretty far away. We’re still eating lots of soups/­­stews, and not hesitating to turn on the oven to roast vegetables. We’re also going through a BIG dill obsession in our household. It’s just such a unique herb, perfect at brightening up whatever dish it touches. We’ve been having tons of it in the form of lemony herb oil, served with creamy white beans, and also in potato salads. This soup is a compilation of all those flavor favorites in one bowl of coziness. All the ingredients in this soup are pretty straightforward. We start building flavor with a standard trio of onion (or leeks), celery, and carrots, followed by some spices, garlic and salt. We cook the white beans and potatoes in broth, until the potatoes are tender, and then blend half the soup for a creamy but slightly chunky texture. We finish it off with lots of fresh lemon juice and zest, and tons of dill. So simple and satisfying! Hope you and yours are well :) Lemon-Dill White Bean & Potato Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients olive oil or avocado oil 1 yellow onion - diced finely, or 2 sliced leeks (white parts only) 1 medium carrot - diced finely 2 stalks celery - diced finely sea salt 4 garlic cloves - minced freshly ground black pepper ½-1 teaspoon red pepper flakes, plus more for garnishing 1½ teaspoons ground coriander 4 medium yellow potatoes or new potatoes (about 1lb) - cut into ½ chunks 2 cups cooked white beans (or 1 15 oz can) 6 cups vegetable broth 1 tablespoon white/­­mild miso a few large handfuls baby spinach (optional) zest from 2 lemons scant ¼ cup lemon juice (from about 2 medium lemons), plus more for garnishing 1 small bunch dill (about ⅓ cup packed) - stemmed and chopped, plus more for garnishing Instructions Warm a soup pot over medium heat and add a generous pour of oil once the pot is hot. Add the onion/­­leeks, carrot, celery, and a pinch of salt. Sauté over medium-low heat for about 15 minutes, or until the onion is translucent and the other vegetables are soft. Add the garlic, black pepper and red pepper flakes to taste, and coriander. Cook for about another 30 seconds, until the garlic is fragrant. Add the potatoes and another generous pinch of salt, mix to coat the potatoes. Add the beans and vegetable broth, mix, cover, and bring to a simmer. Simmer, covered, for 20 minutes, or until the potatoes are just tender. Transfer about half the soup to an upright blender, along with the miso, and blend until just smooth. You can also do this with an immersion blender, leaving some of the soup chunky. Return the blended soup to the pot. Mix and taste for salt/­­pepper, adjust if needed. Turn off the heat, wilt in the spinach, if using, and mix in the lemon zest, juice, and dill. Serve the soup warm, garnished with lemon wedges, more dill, and red pepper flakes. Notes - Dill stems are really easy to strip with a quick motion like you would do when stemming kale. This saves a lot of time! - The flavor and acidity of fresh lemon juice dissipates quite quickly, so I recommend serving any leftovers with more squeezes of lemon juice in each bowl. 3.5.3226 The post Lemon-Dill White Bean & Potato Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sesame Ginger Cabbage with Tofu and Shiitake

February 23 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Sesame Ginger Cabbage with Tofu and Shiitake Cabbage is a pretty underrated vegetable I think. It was a total staple growing up in Russia, making its appearance in everything from borscht to savory pies. I can’t say that I loved it back then, not unless it was framed by some kind of dough (like in pirozhki), but my whole view of cabbage has changed completely as an adult. I enjoy the fact that it’s super affordable and keeps in the fridge forever. I also love that it’s versatile and can be eaten both raw and cooked, and I think that we don’t cook it nearly enough. Cooked cabbage takes on a whole new life – it becomes sweet and silky soft, and gets the best caramelized bits when cooked long enough. This skillet with tofu and shiitake is a little tribute to the humble cabbage and all that it can do! It’s been on serious repeat in our kitchen lately. We quickly marinate tofu in a gingery sesame marinade and brown it in a pan, followed by leeks and shiitake. We then slowly sauté the cabbage and carrots until tender and caramelized, and flavor them with the remaining marinade. We serve the cabbage mixed with the leeks and mushrooms, studded with the golden tofu, and showered with toasted sesame seeds. This dish is surprisingly filling and can definitely be a main, but it can also make a nice side or a component of a multi-course meal. Have a great Sunday! Sesame Ginger Cabbage with Tofu and Shiitake   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2-inch piece ginger - grated 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon tamari, plus more for the vegetables 1 tablespoon rice vinegar 2 teaspoons Sriracha or other hot sauce 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 1 teaspoon maple syrup juice of 1 lime 14 oz extra-firm tofu, pressed and cut in cubes or triangles 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons avocado oil or refined coconut oil - divided 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil - divided 1-2 leeks - white and light green parts only, sliced 8 oz shiitake mushrooms - stemmed and sliced 1 small head green cabbage - sliced thinly 1 medium carrot - julienned, cut into sticks or grated sea salt freshly ground black pepper toasted sesame seeds - for garnish green onions and/­­or cilantro - for garnish Instructions Combine the ginger, tamari, vinegar, Sriracha, sesame oil, maple syrup, and lime juice in a shallow dish or large bowl. Add the tofu and toss gently to coat. Leave to marinate while slicing the leeks, mushrooms, cabbage, and carrot. Warm 1 tablespoon of each avocado/­­coconut and sesame oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the tofu, leaving the marinade behind in the dish. Fry the tofu for 5-6 minutes, flipping every minute or two, until browned on most sides. Remove the tofu from the pan and set aside in a bowl. Wipe the pan if needed. Add 1 teaspoon of each avocado/­­coconut and sesame oil to the pan, followed by the leeks and shiitake. Add a generous splash of tamari and sauté for 10-12 minutes, until the leeks are soft. Remove from the pan to the same bowl as the tofu and set aside. Add the remaining 1 teaspoon each avocado/­­coconut and sesame oil to the pan, followed by the cabbage and carrot. Add a couple pinches of salt and freshly ground black pepper, stir to coat. Sauté for about 5 minutes, until the cabbage wilts down by about ⅓-1/­­2 in volume. Add 1 tablespoon of purified water, cover the pan, and reduce the heat to a medium-low. Cook, stirring periodically, for 10-15 minutes or longer, until the cabbage is soft and caramelized in parts. Add the remaining marinade, increase the heat to a medium and sauté until its absorbed, a minute or so. Add the reserved tofu and vegetables/­­mushrooms to the cabbage, toss gently to combine and let everything warm back through. Taste for salt and add another splash of tamari if needed. Serve sprinkled with sesame seeds and sliced green onions/­­cilantro. 3.5.3226 The post Sesame Ginger Cabbage with Tofu and Shiitake appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Leek Pea Medley over Rye Toast

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Leeks are sautéed with fresh peas and lemon juice and then tossed with steamed fava beans, artichoke hearts and fresh baby spinach. This salute to spring veggies is made decadent when goat cheese and fresh mint are thrown in, all served atop a slice of toasted rye bread. This recipe comes to us from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 4 - 2 1/­­2 cups fava beans - 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 2 small leeks, finely diced - 2 1/­­2 cups peas - zest & juice 1/­­2 lemon - 3.5 ounces baby spinach - 1 10 ounce can artichoke hearts, quartered - 3.5 ounces goat cheese*, crumbled - 6 slices rye bread, toasted - fresh mint, for garnish *Optional Steam or boil the fava beans for 3-4 minutes, or until just tender. Rinse under cold water and peel when cooled. Place 2 of the tablespoons of olive oil in a large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the leeks and fry over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes, or until soft. Add the fava beans and toss, coating in oil. Add the peas and continue to cook over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes, or until the peas are just tender. Add the lemon zest, artichoke hearts and baby spinach. Toss until well mixed and thoroughly heated through. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the crumbled goat cheese and toss to combine. Whisk the lemon juice with the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil together in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper and set aside. Serve 1/­­4 of the fava beans and peas on top each piece of toasted rye bread. Drizzle with the lemon juice and olive oil mixture and finish with a few fresh mint leaves. The post Leek Pea Medley over Rye Toast appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?

December 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?Despite the frigid temperatures and seemingly barren landscapes all around, the winter months can be surprisingly abundant. In fact, much of our most popular produce is actually in-season during this chilly time of year. Thats right, apples, beets, broccoli, cabbage, broccoli rabe, Brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, celery, citrus fruits, fennel, garlic, leeks, mushrooms, onions, parsnips, pears, pomegranates, sweet potatoes, turnips, rutabagas, and radishes all fair pretty well in colder temperatures. But we dont. Thats why weve compiled a list of our warmest, most comforting meatless recipes -- all of which use seasonal winter produce -- to help you and your family stay toasty through the frosty months. Make them this Monday for a cozy start to the week. Carrot Soup with Parsnip Chips   Cauliflower and Chickpea Curry   Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts   Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth Roasted Fennel with Tofu and Oranges Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherds Pie Vegetable Fritters with Green-Chile Coconut Chutney   Interested in adding more Meatless Monday recipes to your cooking repertoire? Click here to access our recipe archives full of easy-to-make meatless and plant-based dishes.   The post Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Heart-y Artichokes, Green Beans, and Leeks

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Artichoke hearts, leeks, and green beans are roasted in the oven to a crispy perfection and are then topped with a sprinkling of pistachios and pomegranate seeds. With such a combination of flavors and textures, no two bites will ever be the same. This recipe comes to us from Joy Bauer’s book Yummy Yoga: Playful Poses and Tasty Treats . Photo credit: Lucy Schaeffer. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 2 tablespoons lemon juice - 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped (or 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder) -  1/­­2 teaspoon kosher salt -  1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper - 4 to 5 cups fresh green beans - One 14-ounce can quartered artichoke hearts, drained, rinsed, and patted dry - 2 or 3 leeks, sliced and cleaned (use only the white and pale green parts) - Nonstick oil spray -  1/­­2 cup pomegranate seeds -  1/­­2 cup roasted pistachio nuts, shelled   Preheat the oven to 425°F. Combine the olive oil, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper in a mixing bowl. Add the green beans, artichokes, and leeks. Stir to coat evenly. Mist a baking sheet with oil spray and spread the mixture on the sheet in a single layer. Roast for about 20 to 25 minutes or until the vegetables are slightly browned and crispy. (I think theyre extra delicious when the edges get super crisp!) Remove from oven and garnish with the pomegranate seeds and pistachios. The post Heart-y Artichokes, Green Beans, and Leeks appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust

November 3 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust Way back in the day when I was first getting interested in vegetarian cooking, I came across Mollie Katzen’s recipe for a Cauliflower Cheese Pie, which completely blew my mind. Maybe you know the one I’m talking about? It’s such a classic. I even developed a little tribute recipe to that pie for our first cookbook. This vegan cauliflower and leek version is not as directly inspired by Katzen’s pie, but I still fondly kept it in mind while working on this recipe. Cooked cauliflower itself already tastes kind of cheesy to me, and when baked in a ‘cheesy’ but also totally plant-based sauce like in this recipe, it’s complete heaven. This pie also features caramelized leeks and an addictive, gluten-free onion-pecan crust that’s packed with flavor. It’s definitely a special enough savory pie for a holiday table, and we can’t wait to make it again for ours. Hope you’ll consider it as well! If you’ve been cooking plant-based for a while, you’ve probably heard that boiled potatoes and carrots make for a surprisingly cheesy sauce, when blended smooth with a bunch of aromatic pantry staples like nutritional yeast, garlic powder, and miso. In this recipe, we also add sun-dried tomatoes and smoked paprika to that kind of sauce, for an extra hint of umami and smokiness. We cut a whole head of cauliflower into florets and brown it, then cook it until soft on the stovetop, where we also caramelize some leeks. The cauliflower, leeks and the sauce then get cozied up into the quickly pre-baked onion pie crust and baked all together. The crust is just 5 ingredients, which is a true achievement for gluten-free baking :) This pie is delicious the day of baking, but the leftovers are also amazing (if not better), so you could definitely make it a day ahead and reheat. We will be making the whole thing on our instagram stories this afternoon, if you’d like to see the whole step-by-step process. Happy November! Wishing you all the warmth and coziness. Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust   Print Serves: one 9-10 pie Ingredients for the crust neutral oil for oiling the pie dish 1¼ cup ground pecans (grinding directions in the recipe) ½ cup tapioca starch pinch sea salt 1 medium onion - roughly chopped 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds for the cheese sauce 1 large or 2 small white potatoes 1 medium carrot 2-3 sun dried tomato halves (soaked in hot water if not oil-packed/­­if very dry) or 1 tablespoon tomato paste ¼ cup non-dairy milk 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon miso 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika pinch of sea salt for the cauliflower and leeks avocado oil or olive oil 2 large leeks, white and light green parts only - thinly sliced sea salt red pepper flakes - to taste 1 large head of cauliflower - cut into florets Instructions to make the crust Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a 9-10 pie dish by oiling it well. Place a generous 1 cup of pecans in a food processor and grind into a flour, taking care not to over-grind. Measure out 1¼ cups of the ground pecans and transfer that amount to a large mixing bowl. Save the rest of the ground pecans for a future recipe, or see note. Add the tapioca starch and salt to the bowl, mix to combine. Add the onion to the food processor and puree it. Its okay to have some small onion chunks, but the puree should be pretty uniform. Transfer the onions to a medium bowl, add the ground flax and mix to combine. Let the mixture sit for 10 minutes, letting the flax bloom. Add the mixture to the bowl with the pecan flour and mix well to combine. Transfer the crust dough into the prepared pie dish and form an even pie crust, using a spoon and your hands. Place the crust in a freezer for 15 minutes to set. Cover the crust with parchment paper and baking beans, and blind bake for 15 minutes. Remove the cover and bake for an additional 5 minutes, until the base of the crust is dry to the touch. to make the cheese sauce Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Take care not to over-blend, so that the starch in the potatoes doesnt give the sauce a gluey texture. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. to prepare the vegetables and bake the pie Preheat the oven to 350° F (175° C). Heat about 1 tablespoon of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the leeks, a pinch of salt and red pepper flakes and cook the leeks for 8-10 minutes, until they begin to soften. Turn the heat down to low, cover the pan and cook the leeks for another 10 minutes. Remove the lid, turn the heat back up to medium and cook for another 5 minutes, until the leeks are very soft and somewhat caramelized. Transfer the leeks to a bowl and set aside. Wipe the pan clean and heat another tablespoon of oil over medium heat. Add the cauliflower florets along with a pinch of salt and mix to coat. Distribute the cauliflower in a single layer and let sear, undisturbed, for about 3 minutes, or until the undersides are nicely browned. Mix and keep cooking the cauliflower until soft throughout, for about 15 minutes. If your cauliflower is not softening, cover the pan with a lid and turn the heat down to medium-low, letting it steam until soft. Add the caramelized leeks and half of the cheese sauce to the pan and mix to combine. Transfer the cauliflower mixture to the pre-baked crust, carefully evening it out with a spoon. Add the rest of the sauce on top, evening it out. Cover the pie with parchment paper, foil, or a lid and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover and bake for another 5-10 minutes, until slightly browned on top. Let cool well before slicing. Notes If you have any leftover ground pecans, you can make a quick cheesy sprinkle by mixing them with nutritional yeast, sea salt, and black pepper to taste. Sprinkle over this pie, pasta dishes, avocado toast, etc. 3.5.3226 The post Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Recipe | Caramelized Onion & Eggplant Puff Pastry Tart

July 22 2019 Oh My Veggies 

There are a few ingredients that improve just about any dish you add them to: Truffle Oil Caramelized Onions Olives Roasted Red Peppers Basil Unfortunately, this Caramelized Onion & Eggplant Puff Pastry Tart does not have truffle oil. (Although I suppose if you really wanted to, you could add some. I mean, it’s a free country, right? Do what you want!) But! It does have caramelized onions, olives, roasted red peppers, and basil. It’s a veritable quadrifecta of deliciousness. After I made this Leek & Olive Tart from Rikki Snyder’s food photography blog, I had a leftover puff pastry sheet sitting in the freezer, just begging to be made into something awesome. My little finger eggplants have been producing like crazy, so I roasted two of those, along with a small rosa blanca eggplant from the farmers market, as a topping. Everything else was simply what I had in the refrigerator that needed to be used. With a thrown-together recipe like this, there’s usually a high failure rate (at least in my kitchen, there is), so I piled on the toppings and crossed my fingers. I try hard to make most of my recipes really easy, but this one does […]

Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie

May 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie Spring has been super rainy for us (it’s been raining for almost a full week now!), with only a sprinkling of a few nice days, so cozy food cravings are still in full swing around here. I seriously can’t wait until freezing cold smoothies, raw salads, and huge watermelon mono-meals regain their appeal, but I definitely don’t mind living on this pot pie til then :) It’s got almost all the comforting features of a traditional pot pie, but is made with bright spring produce and a blanket of thinly sliced vegetables instead of the more traditional pastry-based crust. Leeks, asparagus, peas, and spinach all made it into this pot pie in celebration of spring. There’s also quinoa for more substance and a stew-like texture, as well as carrots and zucchini. The crust is made up of thinly sliced potatoes (use new potatoes for the ultimate seasonal points) and zucchini. You could totally sub in your favorite pot pie pastry crust here if you’re looking for something even more substantial, store-bought biscuits would work too. Don’t be afraid to improvise and include other spring goodies that you might find around this time of year. Green garlic, spring onions, and ramps could replace some of the leeks. Quickly blanched fava beans could stand in for part of the peas. Chives can be used for garnish instead of scallions, and chive blossoms will always offer the most beautiful finish. Hope you enjoy this one :) Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie   Print technique adapted from The First Mess cookbook Serves: 6 Ingredients avocado oil or olive oil 2 leeks - white and pale parts only, thinly sliced 2 medium carrots - sliced into half-moons salt - to taste 3 medium zucchini - divided 5 garlic cloves - minced about ½ teaspoon each of dried herbs - such as thyme, rosemary, marjoram (you can use fresh herbs as well, about 1 tablespoon minced total) 1 tablespoon tomato paste ¼ cup uncooked quinoa freshly ground black pepper - to taste ½ cup dry white wine scant ¼ cup ground rolled oats or oat flour (gluten-free if needed) 2½ cups vegetable stock 1 small bunch asparagus - tough ends trimmed, cut into 1-inch pieces 4 cups baby spinach or other tender spring greens 8-10 oz fresh or frozen green peas 2 medium new potatoes or Yukon gold potatoes - thinly sliced into rounds on a mandoline fresh herbs - for garnishing Instructions Preheat the oven to 375° F (190° C). Warm a generous drizzle of oil in a soup pot or very deep pan over medium heat. Add the leeks, carrots, and a pinch of salt, and sauté for about 7 minutes, until the leeks are soft. Meanwhile, dice 2 of the zucchini into medium cubes and mandoline the remaining 1 zucchini into thin rounds, setting it aside together with the mandolined potatoes. Add the garlic, herbs, and tomato paste and stir to incorporate for about 30 seconds, until garlic is fragrant. Add the diced zucchini, quinoa, more salt, and pepper, and stir to incorporate. Pour in the wine and turn up the heat to a medium high. Let the wine cook off and absorb for 1-2 minutes. Add the ground oats/­­oat flour and the vegetable stock to the pot. Bring everything up to a simmer and cook for 3-5 minutes, stirring periodically, until the mixture is slightly thickened. Turn off the heat and let the pot sit off the heat for a few minutes, then stir in the asparagus, spinach, and peas, mixing to lightly wilt the spinach. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Spoon the stew into an oiled 9 x 9 baking dish (or a dish of a similar size), evening it out with a spoon. Arrange the mandolined potato and zucchini on top of the stew, overlapping them and alternating them in a pattern. Brush the vegetables with more oil and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 35-40 minutes, until the potato slices are fully cooked. Turn on your broiler on low and place the pot pie under the broiler for about 5 minutes, or until your crust is crispy, golden and blistered in places. Be careful not to burn the crust. Let the pot pie cool slightly and serve, garnished with fresh herbs. Notes You could divide the pot pie mixture and crust vegetables into small, single serve dishes or ramekins for individual pot pies. Just place the ramekins on a baking sheet and slide into the oven. 3.5.3226 The post Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Scallion Pancakes

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

These 3-ingredient Vegan Scallion Pancakes are incredibly delicious and very easy to make. Theyre also known as green onion pancakes and can be made with chives or leeks too. This recipe comes to us from Bianca Zapatka . See the step-by-step photos on her blog . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Makes 4 pancakes 2  cups  all-purpose flour (250g) 3/­­4  tsp  salt 3/­­4  cup  warm water (180ml) 1 1/­­3  cup  finely sliced scallions  green part only 4  tbsp  cooking oil  plus more for brushing   1. In a large bowl, mix the flour and salt. Then pour in the water and stir with chopsticks or a fork until all the water has been absorbed. 2. Using your hands, knead all the bits of dough together. (If your dough is still very dry after a bit of kneading, add 1-2 tbsp more water*). Then transfer dough to a working surface and continue kneading until the dough is smooth and soft, about 5 minutes. 3. Shape the dough into a round ball. Cover with foil (or a damp towel) and let rest for 20-30 minutes. After resting time, divide the dough into 4 equal sized pieces and shape them into balls. (Work with one piece at a time and cover the remaining pieces so they wont get dry). 4. On a lightly floured working surface, roll out one piece into a very thin circle. 5. Brush the circle with a bit of oil, and sprinkle about 1/­­3 cup chopped scallions all over the dough. 6. Roll up the dough into a log. Take one end of the log and curl it into a snail. 7. Use your hands to flatten the dough a bit, then use your rolling pin to roll it out again to another circle, about 8-/­­9-inch (20/­­22cm) in diameter. (Dont worry if some scallions poke out through the dough). 8. Repeat with the remaining dough pieces and stack them as you go, separating with parchment paper. 9. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a pan over medium heat and pan-fry each side of one pancake for about 2-3 minutes until golden-brown and crispy. Repeat with remaining pancakes, adding about 1 tbsp oil per pancake. 10. Cut Scallion Pancakes into quarters and serve hot with dipping sauce. Notes The pancakes are best eaten when hot. Theyll be still good when cooled, but will no longer be crispy. If you still have any fried pancakes left, you can reheat them in the oven. Sprinkle some grated non-dairy cheese on top and bake for a few minutes until crispy again. If they got a bit hard overnight, you could also put them in the microwave for a few seconds. * The ideal flour water ratio may vary slightly depending on the kind of flour you use and how you measure it.   The post Scallion Pancakes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celebrate Spring with Delicious Plant-Based Recipes Using Seasonal Veggies

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Spring with Delicious Plant-Based Recipes Using Seasonal VeggiesSpring has officially sprung, so its time to explore the local farmers markets and forage the grocery aisles for fresh seasonal vegetables. Trying new meatless recipes is a great way to utilize all of the ripe fruits and vegetables coming into season. Weve gathered delicious plant-based recipes from our Meatless Monday bloggers  and influencers featuring spring produce such as asparagus, spinach, sweet peas and broccoli. Enjoy the tastes of spring! Scallion Pancakes from Bianca Patka Lemony Spring Risotto from Healthy Voyager Spring Green Shakshuka from Happy Kitchen Asparagus Avocado Tomato Salad from Blondelish   Sweet Potato Pizza from It’s a Healthy Lifestyle Asian Noodles with Gingery Prune Sauce from Jackie Newgent Spring Leek and Asparagus Soup from The Domestic Dietitian Penne Pasta with Arugula Pesto, Red Potatoes and Spring Vegetables from She’s Cookin Flageolets and Dandelion from Soulful Vegan Ravioli in Creamy Garlic and Spinach White Sauce from The Kitchen Docs   Invite your friends and family to join you in a celebration of spring with these plant-based recipes. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Celebrate Spring with Delicious Plant-Based Recipes Using Seasonal Veggies appeared first on Meatless Monday.

New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1

May 27 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1 Our new ebook is here! It’s a collection of straightforward, plant-based recipes for busy people who love to cook. Each recipe was developed to be weeknight-friendly, with shorter cooking times and easier prep. Whole, plant foods are featured prominently throughout the ebook and make up the bulk of the meals within. We’ve been working on this project since last summer, and it’s so exciting to finally share it with you. We spent a lot of time putting every recipe through a weeknight filter, streamlining the ingredients and techniques and much as possible without sacrificing flavor. We are in love with every recipe, and we hope that they’ll bring some ease and joy to your weeknight dinners and beyond. You can check out a few sneak peek photos from the ebook, plus the full recipe index below. Click Here to Buy Recipe Index *all recipes are vegan and can be gluten-free if needed - Staple Red Lentils with Crispy Coconut and Chili Oil - Creamy Tomato Pasta - Baked Tofu with Crispy Kale - Cauliflower, Tomato and Chickpea Stew - Portobello and Red Lentil Bolognese - Sweet Potato Nachos - Cauliflower Caesar Salad with Chickpea Croutons - Weeknight Chili - Zucchini Mac & Cheese - Zaatar-Roasted Vegetables and Chickpeas with Tahini Sauce - Saag Tofu - Quinoa Pilaf with Lemony Green Beans - Cold Nut Butter Noodles - Maple-Mustard Baked Tempeh and Broccoli Bowls - Brothy Coconut Turmeric Noodles - Ratatouille-ish Summer Stew - Creamy Polenta with Smoky Mushrooms and Chickpeas - The Coziest Rice and Beans - Braised Lentils with Mushrooms, Leeks and Potatoes - Minestrone with Rosemary Walnuts - Coconut Rice - Coconut Bacon - Knife Salsa Verde - Cashew Crema - Cheesy Cashew Dust Click Here to Buy The post New Ebook: Weeknight Magic Vol. 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Brothy Beans & Greens Lunch

April 29 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Brothy Beans & Greens Lunch I pretty much always know what I’m having for lunch, especially right now, with this chilly spring weather and infrequent grocery trips. Greens and beans! This meal never gets boring because I change up a lot of things: the kinds of greens and beans I use, how I cook them, what other components I include or leave out, etc. It’s a hearty, nutritious, warming lunch that comes together quickly and doesn’t weigh me down for the rest of the day. I also love that it’s a no-brainer on busy days. Although there’s no exact recipe for this, I thought I’d explain my method here, and maybe you’ll try and love it as much as I do. One of my New Year food resolutions was to cook a pot of beans every week and it’s been the best thing following through with it. Basically I cook the beans with plenty of water and aromatics, so that at the end I don’t just have a pot of delicious beans but also a flavorful broth. At lunch time, I reheat a portion of the brothy beans and quickly cook up some greens with garlic, olive oil, and pepper. I serve the greens on top of the brothy beans simply as is, or with any other toppings I feel like/­­have on hand, and that’s it. This lunch is also delicious served with a slice of sourdough, which I’ve been baking weekly. I use the Tartine country bread recipe, and it has been the most exciting learning experience I’ve had in a while. Brothy Beans & Greens Lunch   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 cups dried beans of choice sea salt olive oil aromatics of choice (see below) greens of choice - stemmed, torn or sliced if necessary garlic freshly ground black pepper/­­red pepper flakes aromatic options for the bean broth smashed garlic cloves halved onion/­­other broth vegetables or their scraps like celery, carrots, leeks, etc. hot peppers herbs (fresh or dried) lemon zest bay leaves whole peppercorns/­­other spices topping ideas freshly ground black pepper red pepper flakes fresh herbs fermented vegetables like sauerkraut/­­kimchi toasted seeds/­­nuts avocado splash of olive oil hot sauce or harissa Instructions Prepare the brothy beans. Put the beans in a large bowl and cover with plenty of water. Let soak overnight or up to 24 hours. Drain and rinse very well. Add the beans to a soup pot, along with a generous amount of salt, a splash of olive oil, and any aromatics of choice. Cover with plenty of water, so that the beans are covered by at least 2. Cover the pot and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a gentle simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes to an hour, or until the beans are tender and creamy. Let cool. Discard any large pieces of aromatics (I usually leave in the garlic and peppercorns). Distribute the beans among jars together with their broth and keep refrigerated until ready to use. To make the greens and beans lunch, start heating up a portion of the beans and their broth in a small pot over medium-low heat. Heat a saute pan over medium heat for cooking the greens. Wash the greens youll be using and do not dry (if your greens are already pre-washed and dried, add a splash of water to the pan in the next step for steaming). Put the greens in the heated pan, cover, and let steam over low heat for 5-7 minutes, or until the greens are beginning to soften and are bright green in color. Remove the lid from the pan and grate a whole clove of garlic right into the pan on a microplane (or add minced). Season the greens with salt, freshly ground black pepper and/­­or red pepper flakes, and add a splash of olive oil. Stir the greens to coat, and continue cooking until they are soft enough to your liking. Transfer the beans and broth youve been heating up to a bowl, followed by the cooked greens. Add any toppings of choice and enjoy! You can also serve the beans over any grain of choice or with bread for an even more substantial meal. 3.5.3226 The post Brothy Beans & Greens Lunch appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mushroom Bourguignon

February 6 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Bourguignon This Mushroom Bourguignon is one of my favorite things to cook on a winter weekend. It’s so fun to put together (makes you feel a little bit like Julia Child), it fills the house with the most incredible, cozy smells, and the result is a savory, earthy dream. My husband and I cooked this for Valentine’s Day last year, and I shared the whole process on our Instagram stories. The amount of recipe requests I got afterwards had me thinking that I should write it up for the blog. Finally sharing it a whole year later! Make this with your love or friend, or just for yourself on Valentine’s day or any other day when you’ve got some time to cozy up in the kitchen. I think you will really love it. I find that this recipe does well with some time and care – it’s not really a weeknight type of deal, and that’s truly the fun of it. For one, I highly suggest making your own mushroom, veggie and miso broth for this stew. You can use store-bought broth and your Bourguignon will still be really delicious, but the homemade broth will take it to that next, next level. This dish is all about layers of deep flavors, and the broth is a true backbone of that. Making your own broth is also not hard at all – it’s just a matter of throwing things in the pot and letting them do their own thing. When I made the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here, I made the broth in the morning, and it was there waiting for me when I started cooking the stew later in the day. No big deal. I love that this dish is made mostly with very straightforward, common, pantry and crisper-friendly ingredients, but the flavor is so special and so much greater than the sum of its parts. These kinds of recipes are always my favorites. You can see how this Bourguignon comes together step-by-step on our Instagram stories later today. Enjoy! Mushroom Bourguignon   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the mushroom bourguignon olive oil or avocado oil 1 lb crimini or other mushrooms of choice - stemmed if necessary, sliced sea salt 20 Cipollini or pearl onions 1 yellow onion - diced 2 medium carrots - sliced 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves - chopped ½ teaspoon smoked paprika freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup red wine 3½ cups mushroom veggie broth (recipe below) or store-bought broth, plus more if needed 2 bay leaves 1½ tablespoon all-purpose flour mashed or smashed potatoes - for serving parsley - for garnish for the mushroom veggie broth 1 oz dried porcini 1 large carrot 2-3 celery ribs 1 yellow onion - skin on 1 leek - white and green parts 5 cloves of garlic - smashed handful fresh thyme 1-2 pitted dates - for deeper flavor (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon white miso Instructions to make the mushroom bourguignon Heat a soup pot over medium heat. Add enough oil to coat the bottom of the pot, letting it heat up. Add the mushrooms and begin browning. Stir once to coat the mushrooms in the oil, then let sit completely undisturbed. Depending on the variety of mushrooms youre using, they will likely release lots of water. Wait for the water to cook off almost completely before stirring, about 10 minutes, that way the mushrooms will brown properly. Stir, add a generous pinch of salt, and let the mushrooms cook for a few more minutes. Transfer the mushrooms to a bowl and set aside until later. Wipe the bottom of the pan if necessary and add another generous pour of oil. Add the Cipollini/­­pearl onions, stir to coat in the oil and let shimmer for the undersides to brown, about 2-3 minutes. Stir to flip and let brown for another 2-3 minutes. Add the yellow onion, carrots, thyme, smoked paprika, a generous pinch of salt, and lots of of black pepper. Sauté until the vegetables are soft, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and tomato paste, and sauté for 1 more minute. Add the cooked mushrooms back to the pot and stir to incorporate with the other ingredients. Add the wine to the pot, bring it up to a simmer and let simmer and reduce for 3-5 minutes. Add the broth, bay leaves, and another pinch of salt, making sure to add enough broth to achieve a chunky stew consistency. Bring the stew up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 1 hour, adding more broth if necessary. Discard the bay leaves at the end. Put the flour in a small bowl. Take a small ladle-full of the broth from the stew and pour over the flour. Whisk together until smooth. Pour the slurry back into the stew, mix, and let simmer for another 5 minutes for the stew to thicken. Serve the Mushroom Bourguignon over mashed or smashed potatoes, garnished with parsley. to make the mushroom veggie broth Combine all the ingredients in a large pot with at least 10 cups of purified water. Salt well. Its not necessary to include all the vegetables listed, but the more you include, the more flavorful the broth. You can also include any other ingredients that you like in your veggie broth like peppercorns, bay leaf, etc. Bring up to a boil, reduce to a simmer and simmer, covered, for about 1 hour. Put the miso in a small bowl and pour a little bit of the broth over it. Whisk together until you have a smooth paste. Pour it back into the pot with the broth and mix well. You will have leftover broth after making the bourguignon. Its delicious to sip on its own or in any other stew or soup, and it freezes very well. Notes We used crimini and white beech mushrooms for the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Bourguignon appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways

January 26 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways Here’s something fun that you can make to set yourself up for endless future wins in the kitchen. This freezer bouillon is a great thing to have on hand for those times when you don’t have veggie stock or just don’t want to buy any. Add a few teaspoons to your soup or sauce, and you’ll end up with a rich flavor base with very minimal effort. Inspired by both curry paste and a brilliant ‘Souper Mix’ recipe from The River Cottage Preserves Handbook, this freezer bouillon is essentially just a combination of different, whole food aromatics that you’d typically find at the base of any soup or broth, plus salt. The beautiful thing about this recipe is that there are no strange preservatives or weird ingredients that you might find in store-bought bouillon – just good old veggies and a few other, non-sketchy flavor enhancers. Today we’ve got two variations on the theme: a ‘classic’ freezer bouillon, based on the mirepoix trio of onion, celery, and carrot, and a ‘fiery’ variation, kind of like curry paste but without all the spices, starring, ginger, shallots, garlic and more. To make both of the bouillon variations, you just pulse up veggies and salt into a fine, pesto-like paste in the food processor. Distribute the bouillon among containers, label, and keep in the freezer. Because of the fair amount of salt in the recipe, the paste doesn’t completely freeze in the freezer and is easily scoopable. The salt also helps it keep for a really long time – pretty much indefinitely in my experience. This is a concentrated product and a little is meant to go a long way, so if you taste it as is, it will taste very salty and strong. I like to use the ‘classic’ bouillon variation in all kinds of legume-based soups like lentil soup and minestrone, and in rich sauces like mushroom bolognese. The ‘fiery’ version is really lovely in all kinds of curries and healing soups, meant to help clear the sinuses. But really, there are no rules for how and where you can use this bouillon, it’s really fun to experiment with. Just the other day, I cooked up a pot of plain chickpeas (just chickpeas and salt) and wanted to make a quick, single serving of chickpea soup for lunch. I heated up some olive oil in a small pot, added about a teaspoon of the classic bouillon, and let it get fragrant for about a minute. I then added the chickpeas to the pot with about 2 cups of their cooking water, brought everything up to a simmer for a few minutes, and wilted in some spinach at the end. I ended up with the coziest bowl of soup and a very flavorful, warming broth in just a few minutes. Hope you’ll give this a try this year! Classic Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 yellow onion - peeled, roughly chopped 1 leek - white and light green part only, roughly chopped 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 3 celery ribs - roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 1 bunch parsley - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste (optional) 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the tomato paste, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 Fiery Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 2 shallots - peeled, roughly chopped 6-8 total of ginger pieces - peeled if not organic, roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 1 jalape?o or serrano pepper - seeded, roughly chopped (optional, include for more heat) 1 bunch cilantro - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon white miso (optional) 1 teaspoon turmeric powder (optional) 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the miso and turmeric, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers, and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 The post Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More Vegetables

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More VegetablesEvery parents predicament: How do I get my children to eat more vegetables? Although theres no secret sauce (sorry ketchup), there are tried and true methods to get your kids to eat more adventurously. But what are they? The team at Meatless Monday spoke with Joy Bauer, bestselling author and health and nutrition expert on The Today Show, about her new book, Yummy Yoga: Playful Poses and Tasty Treats , and her creative ways to encourage kids to eat healthier. Yummy Yoga pairs healthy, kid-friendly recipes with fun yoga positions, giving the whole family the opportunity to get in the kitchen and on the yoga mat. But what sets this book apart is the collection of adorable yoga sculptures made out of fruits and vegetables that accompany each recipe (warning: they definitely encourage playing with your food). To celebrate the launch of her book, Joy shared with us some easy-to-apply tips and tricks that will spark a passion for veggies in even the pickiest of eaters. This Monday, follow Joys words of wisdom and help your kids establish a loving relationship with plant-based foods. Tip # 1: Make Healthy Food Fun The key to encouraging kids to eat healthfully is to make food fun and exciting. Thats the whole point of Yummy Yoga. The pages are filled with tasty, kid-friendly recipes -- smoothies, fruit skewers, veggie pizzas, super food ice pops, etc. -- and playful yoga poses to entertain and excite little ones as they discover healthy, new habits.   Tip #2: Eat More Produce Yourself Kiddie see, kiddie do. If your little ones (and big ones) see you eating a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, theyre more likely to do it, too. A study from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, found that preschool age kids were more likely to eat bell peppers (and prefer them in the future) after being shown a video of people eating the veggie compared to kids who didnt see the veggie video. Encourage your children to eat more fruit and vegetables by enjoying them yourself, and by pointing out other people (grandparents, siblings, cousins, friends, babysitters, and so on) who enjoy them, too!   Tip #3: Think Out of the Box If a picky spouse or child doesnt like steamed broccoli, dont give up. Instead, try another spin. Whip up a batch of Broccomole Dip (I mash steamed broccoli florets into guacamole), Roasted Broccoli , Creamy Broccoli Soup , Broccoli Tots , or top it with cheese sauce or marinara...you get the idea. Be creative and experiment until you find a recipe that your picky eater does like.   Tip #4: Give Them the Power of Choice Give picky eaters the power to choose--a fun recipe, a new fruit or a veggie to prepare as a side dish, or even the theme of the meal. Its a simple equation that will make mealtimes less fraught: more freedom = less fussing. When you involve picky eaters with planning and prep a few nights each week, youll find theyre less likely to argue about finishing their veggies. Good food, good mood...sounds appetizing, right?   Tip #5: When in Doubt, Hide it Sometimes, its easier to just slip veggies into their favorite foods. You can add a handful of kale or spinach into smoothies; add chopped broccoli, diced carrots or yellow bell peppers into mac and cheese (no brainer!); swap out standard noodles for veggie noodles, like spaghetti squash or zucchini linguini (aka zoodles); mix cauliflower rice with traditional rice; blend canned pumpkin puree into marinara sauce and taco meat -- the options are limitless!   Tip #6: Try it on a Monday Monday follows the weekend, which is when most people do their shopping and prep work-the veggies have been purchased, cleaned, peeled and chopped. Plus, its the perfect way to reset and reboot for a healthy and energizing new week ahead. Try Joy’s recipe for Heart-y Artichokes, Green Beans, and Leeks from the book and check out Yummy Yoga for more delicious recipes!   Want some more plant-based cooking tips for you and your picky eaters? Check out The Kids Cook Monday for more recipe inspiration and fun kitchen activities for you and your children to do together. The post Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based Recipes

November 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based RecipesWere all familiar with the four basic tastes -- sweet, salty, sour, and bitter -- but umami, the mysterious fifth taste, remains an enigma. Umami is responsible for giving foods their deep, savory flavor. When used properly, umami adds a pleasant richness to plant-based meals, balances the natural bitterness of nutrient-dense vegetables, and simplifies cooking by reducing the need for salt and other flavor-enhancing ingredients. Umami can be found in everything from corn, tomatoes, and mushrooms to aged cheeses, nori and soy sauce. While its easy to find foods that contain umami, its not always as simple to coax that savory flavor out of them, which is why umami remains an underutilized culinary tool in many home kitchens across America. Thats why the team at Meatless Monday was so thrilled to work with Yondu Vegetable Umami to develop a free, downloadable e-cookbook complete with umami-rich plant-based recipes. When scrolling through the recipes, youll see the breadth and versatility of this one simple ingredient. But tasting is believing. For starters, try this super simple 3-Minute Veggie Soup , which includes aromatic leeks, sugary snap peas, cool slices of fennel, and a couple of tablespoons of vegetable umami. At only 54 calories per serving, its a nice, light way to open a meal. Catering to a crowd? Pulse together a creamy Minted Pea and Walnut Dip in a matter of minutes. Have some leftover cauliflower? A spattering of chili flakes and lemons zest, along with a drizzle of olive oil and umami will transform this simple vegetable into a Quick Roasted Cauliflower worthy of any restaurant menu. To celebrate the cookbook release, Yondu is giving away 50 free bottles of their vegetable umami. All you have to do is click the link HERE and sign up, but move quick -- its first come first serve. And if you missed the giveaway, Yondu is also offering a coupon code for 50% off your order! Use code: 50umamimeals.   Download your free copy of the e-cookbook HERE and click over to Amazon to purchase a bottle of Yondu, $8.99 (lasts quite a while). Thanks to Yondus vegetable umami, you can effortlessly add a richness to any of your Monday meals. Need more inspiration? Check out Yondu.Us for more recipes. Tag @MeatlessMonday and @Yondu.USA in your umami food posts and share the e-cookbook link with friends and family to inspire easy Meatless Monday meal ideas. The post The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cozy Pantry Stew

September 29 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Cozy Pantry Stew Hello friends! We’re back from a little hiatus having to do with my wedding. I married my love of many years under the September full moon in upstate NY, and it was such a fun party. The wedding took all of our time and energy, since we did everything we could ourselves together with friends and family. That’s why it’s been extra quiet around here. I’m sharing a few wedding photos at the bottom of this post, but otherwise it’s back to regular programming around here! We’re excited to cook with all the fall produce popping up right now and have a few digital cookbook projects in the works for the coming months. We missed this space and YOU. On to this life saver of a stew. I don’t know if this is the case for you, but in our house, when we say we have nothing to eat, most of the time it’s not really true. That type of talk usually comes from laziness or not being in the mood for whatever ingredients we do have on hand. Both my husband and I are avid home cooks and generally obsessed with good food, so we have a well-stocked pantry. This year, we’ve been trying to be more mindful of those ‘nothing-to-eat moments’ and have been cooking more from the pantry. The results always save us money and end up tasting more nourishing than any takeout ever would. This stew is something that we make all the time, using pantry staples and odds and ends from the fridge. It’s flavorful, soul-warming, and so easy. Scrapping together meals out of seemingly nothing is one of my favorite ways to cook – I love anything having to do with economy in the kitchen. (Tamar Adler’s An Everlasting Meal is one of my favorite books). It’s like a game and so endlessly satisfying when that meal appears out of ‘thin air.’ I know everyone’s pantries are vastly different, but if you’re a vegan/­­vegetarian-inclined cook, I have a hunch that you’ll have at least some of these ingredients on hand. I love keeping red lentils around because they cook almost instantly and taste great – these make up the base of our stew. Then come the aromatics. Dig up those unused carrots and celery out of the crisper (soak them in cold water for a few hours if they’re really limp) and find an onion (or an unused half of one!), shallots, or leeks. That classic trio of onion, celery, and carrots help build great flavor for soup like nothing else does. Then, see if you have some leftover white wine in the fridge and grab a few cloves of garlic. Wine gives this stew that extra something and truly takes it to the next level. If you don’t have an open bottle, you could also open one to cook with and enjoy with dinner. Any other extras are up to you and your pantry/­­fridge. When it comes to spices, dried herbs are great, as well as turmeric, but you could also add coriander, cumin, or even curry. The stew pictured here has cherry tomatoes and sweet potato. Tomatoes add umami and I wouldn’t skip them, but if you don’t have fresh ones, you could add a little bit of canned tomatoes or even tomato paste. Sweet potato is totally optional, but use it here if you have one, or a regular potato, squash, or even cauliflower. At the end, wilt in some greens and finish the stew off with lemon juice for brightness. Add any garnish you like or have, like yogurt, herbs, or pan-fried mushrooms (as pictured), and you’re done! The description is long because I wanted to lay out our logic, but the stew itself comes together very quickly. Hope you’ll give this one a try

Ginger Roasted Leeks and Asparagus

June 10 2019 Meatless Monday 

Leeks are sliced paper thin and marinated with lemon juice, soy sauce and freshly grated ginger. Roasted asparagus makes the perfect canvas for the salty sour leeks in a side dish which celebrates springs bounty. This recipe comes to us from JL Goes Vegan. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1 bunch asparagus - 1 leek - juice of 1/­­2 a lemon - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon coconut aminos* - or - 1 tablespoon low sodium soy sauce - 1 teaspoon ginger, grated *Coconut aminos is a soy sauce substitute with 65% less sodium. Found in health food stores. Low sodium soy sauce can be substituted if coconut aminos are unavailable. Snap the bottom ends off of each asparagus spear. Slice the leek in slices as thin as possible with a madoline or a knife. Rinse the leek slices thoroughly. Toss the asparagus and thinly sliced leeks in a shallow dish with the lemon juice, olive oil, grated ginger and the coconut aminos or soy sauce. Let marinate for 20 minutes. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Roast the asparagus and leeks in their marinade for 8-10 minutes, or until the asparagus is cooked to preference. Divide into 4 portions and enjoy on the side. The post Ginger Roasted Leeks and Asparagus appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Green Shakshuka

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Spring Green Shakshuka is a versatile one-pot breakfast (or dinner) meal packed with nutrients and vitamins. Ready in less than 30 minutes. This recipe comes to us from Happy Kitchen.Rocks . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 2  tablespoons  olive oil 1  medium-sized yellow onion  chopped 2  cloves  garlic  minced 1/­­2 -1  jalapeno  with seeds for extra spiciness (otherwise, removed), chopped 1/­­2  teaspoon  ground cumin 1/­­2  teaspoon  smoked paprika 1/­­2  leek  chopped 4  spears asparagus  chopped 100  grams  or 1 cup mung bean sprouts 2  green onions  chopped 100  grams  or 1 cup baby beet greens 100  grams  or 1 cup stinging nettles  chopped, leaves only 100  grams  or 1 cup baby spinach 50  grams  or 1/­­2 cup wild garlic  chopped 2  sprigs oregano  chopped 4  eggs 2  tablespoons  chopped parsley  to garnish salt and freshly ground black pepper hot sauce  to serve (optional) crusty bread  to serve (optional)   1. Heat olive oil in a large skillet or cast iron pan over medium heat. Sautéing chopped onion, garlic and jalapeno until soft, for about 3 minutes. Add ground cumin and smoked paprika and cook for 1 more minute, stirring frequently. 2. Add chopped leek, asparagus, mung bean sprouts, green onions, baby beet greens, stinging nettles, baby spinach, wild garlic and oregano. Sauté until the liquid evaporates, stirring occasionally, for about 8 minutes. 3. Make wells in the green mass and poach eggs into them. Cook until the eggs are done. You can cover the skillet with a lid for a quicker result. 4. Garnish with chopped parsley and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Serve with hot sauce of your choice and fresh crusty bread (optional). The post Green Shakshuka appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lemony Spring Risotto

March 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

This vegan lemony spring risotto recipe is the perfect dish to bridge the gap between the warm comfort foods of winter and the light, fresh flavors of spring. This recipe comes to us from The Healthy Voyager . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 12  ounces  asparagus 1  cup  peas 1  quart  vegetable stock or vegan chicken bouillon stock - 2 cups water 1  tablespoon  olive oil 1  medium leek,  thinly sliced 2  cloves  garlic,  finely minced Salt and pepper 1 1/­­2  cups  Arborio rice 1  cup  dry white wine 1  tablespoon  fresh lemon juice 2  teaspoons  lemon zest 2  tablespoons  fresh, chopped parsley 1/­­3 cup vegan parmesan cheese  (about 1/­­3 cup)   1. Trim the ends from the asparagus. Cut the remaining stalks into 1-inch pieces. 2. Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil and add the asparagus. Cook until crisp tender, 3-4 minutes. If using fresh peas, add the peas along with the asparagus. If using frozen peas, add them during the last minute. 3. Transfer the vegetables to a bowl of ice water. Drain the vegetables and set aside. 4. Heat the stock along with water in a large saucepan. Add the trimmings from the asparagus and leek and the parsley stems to add flavor to the stock. Bring to a simmer and then keep warm on low heat while you make the risotto. 5. Heat the oil in a large, wide sauté pan over medium heat. Add the leeks and garlic and season them with salt and pepper. Cook until leeks are partially softened, 4-5 minutes. 6. Add the rice and stir to coat all of the grains with the oil. Cook 1-2 minutes to lightly toast the rice and then add the wine. Cook a few minutes until the wine is reduced, stirring occasionally. 7. Add the warm stock, a few ladles at a time, stirring the rice frequently. Each time the liquid is almost completely absorbed, add some more stock. Continue adding the liquid in this manner, stirring often, to develop the starch in the rice. It should take about 20 minutes for the rice to cook once you start adding the liquid. 8. When the rice is done, it will be plump and al dente- tender but still firm to the bite. At this point, lower the heat and stir in the lemon juice and zest, asparagus, peas, parsley, parmesan cheese, 1 teaspoon salt and 1/­­4 teaspoon pepper. 9. Stir to combine all ingredients well. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper as needed. Garnish with parsley and lemon zest. Serve hot. The post Lemony Spring Risotto appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!)

March 3 2019 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!) Dear Soup, Thank you for always reminding me there are better days ahead. Soups are mainstays around here, especially with snow on the ground and temps hovering in low twenties to single digits tonight, plus more cold on the horizon this week. And poison ivy. (Yup.) I've probably made six batches of this already this winter. It involves a food processor and a soup pot. That's it. Comes together in approximately five minutes and is satisfying, warm and delicious. Here's my take on this soup, which was originally inspired by this. Here's how I made my Vegan Pasta e Fagioli: 4 carrots 1 leek 6 cloves garlic 1 celery stalk 1/­­2 onion sliced thin 2 bay leaves 1/­­2 head of cabbage 1 can of cannellini beans (drained, rinsed) 1 can diced tomatoes 1/­­3 cup ditalini pasta (cooked in separate pot, then added to soup just before serving) 2 T. nutritional yeast 1 qt. veggie stock olive oil thyme oregano red pepper flakes salt & pepper to taste Add chopped veggies--carrots, leeks, garlic to food processor, pulse about ten times. Prep the soup pot with the olive oil over medium heat, add chopped veg. Cook till just tender. Add remaining ingredients and broth and seasonings, salt and pepper. Cover and let simmer two hours over low heat. Serve with a side of your best homemade bread. (Mine is Jim Lahey's --I made the ciabatta version). After a visit with the folks at Urgent Care yesterday for a infernal outbreak of poison ivy, I am now awaiting an agonizing three weeks for this painful mess to clear up. Or longer. Why does Mother Earth require such an evil, toxic plant? What purpose does it serve? I've been struck by this havoc on only a handful of times in my life because I am so gawdawful afraid. Sounds impossible. But trust me when I tell you: only to me, the Master Gardener, and in winter no less. And above is the culprit.  Our home is undergoing a transformation of sorts in a few weeks which will finally rid us of these old railroad timbers and be replaced with a more substantial wall of stone. (That will hopefully outlive us and beyond.)  So I found myself outside on a warm-ish day earlier last week in a bit of a snit over the demise of some cherished plants I couldn't bear to loose. I've spent fifteen years tending and planting, so obviously there are plants I want to keep. Out with the shovel and buckets and pots. Everything's dormant, ground was soft, sun was out: perfect. Until later that night when I woke with what I imagined to be some sort of bug bite. Then to the next afternoon when my arm reached up to scratch my wrist (pulling the long sleeve back and discovering to my horror what really had happened). OMG. WTH? Could this be? . . . is this? Noooooo!  And then began the seven stages of grief: shock, denial, guilt, anger and bargaining, depression and loneliness to reconstruction (the UC visit) and finally acceptance. Yes, I accept that I have the rash of the spring and summertime, of gardeners, campers, hikers and landscapers, the poisonous fury of: Leaves of Three Let it Be! Ah, but what about the roots?  I had come in contact with said dormant plant--through the roots. I had oh-so carefully lifted plants and divided, setting each clump aside. Gloves and long sleeves. I have replayed this moment back through my mind a hundred times: as I reached under one of my plants, I must have accidentally, on an exposed part of my wrist, come in contact with the worst plant root on the planet, unbeknownst to me.  I am more allergic than most and so, this lovely little visitor and its prescribed remedy dosed out (the horrid steroid treatment) is, well. It's hell. The rash has traveled from my left wrist, up my right arm, to my abdomen, and leg. There's a perfect dot-to-dot landscape you can follow if you wanted. I can see the entry at every point. It's like an incredibly cruel irony and one I will face with tears, determination, agitation and regret. As for the remainder of the plants. They'll be destined for demolition. 


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