lavender - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel

Custard cake recipe | eggless custard cream cake | custard powder cake

Vegan Lentil Mushroom Stew with Mashed Sweet Potatoes – Instant Pot or Stovetop

Brown Rice and Apples Salad










lavender vegetarian recipes

Golden Broth Rice Noodles + Favorite Natural Cold Remedies

November 3 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Golden Broth Rice Noodles + Favorite Natural Cold Remedies It seems like everyone around has been sick with a cold recently, so we thought it our duty share another recipe involving our favorite golden broth formula that’s helped numerous friends and family fight so many colds. The broth is infused with all kinds of anti-inflammatory and mineral-rich ingredients that are said to be immunity powerhouses – think ginger, turmeric, black pepper, garlic, kombu, shiitake, bay leaf, and more. It also tastes deeply nourishing and delicious, and has the most beautiful color. There are so many ways it can be served, too. Drink it on its own, use it as a base for dahl or curry, or very simply pour it over noodles and top with some seasonal vegetables, like in this recipe. Today we are also sharing some natural cold remedies that we find to be powerful, especially when employed during the very first signs of a scratchy throat. Oregano Oil This stuff is serious! It’s both anti-viral and anti-inflammatory, and works wonders when taken consistently during the first signs of sickness. It’s incredibly potent and should be diluted with a carrier oil (I use this one), and it burns quite a bit when going down. You do get used to it though. I usually hold it under my tongue for about 15 seconds before swallowing. Salt Water Gargle This is an ancient folk remedy that’s still prescribed by modern doctors…enough said. If I wake up with a scratchy throat, I make a point of gargling with salt water every few hours, which feels incredibly soothing, helps take down any swelling, thins down mucus build up, and more. I use the ratio of about 1/­­2 teaspoon of salt to 1 glass of water. Sang Ju Yin Sang Ju Yin is a Chinese herbal formula recommended to us by our acupuncturist. I’ve had a few instances, where it completely healed me of an early cold. I’m a total convert now, and make sure to keep it on had at all times. Vitamin C All Day It’s great to eat Vitamin C-rich foods during cold season, but I find that supplementing with lots of Vitamin C is especially helpful when showing the first signs of a cold. Since you can’t really overdose on Vitamin C, I take it very often, about every 1-2 hours when fighting a cold. Just a warning that taking a bunch of Vitamin C can cause an upset stomach, which doesn’t happen to me personally, but I know that it’s a common side effect. I also make sure that I’m getting sufficient Vitamin D, either from the sun or supplements. Garlic The natural antibiotic that’s in everyone’s kitchen! I know a lot of people who will chew on a whole clove of garlic when they start feeling sick. I’m not brave enough for that, but I did realize from Trinity’s self-care interview that you can just swallow a whole clove or garlic like a really large pill (how did I not think of that?). My tip is to choose a very small clove of garlic, since they can be pretty uncomfortable to swallow, and to score it a tiny bit before swallowing. I also recently tried Amanda’s trick of putting a clove of garlic in my ear (kind of feels like iphone headphones), which really wasn’t as big of a deal as I thought it would be, and it helped. Probiotic Foods The link between our gut health and overall health is undeniably strong. I try to uptake my intake of things like sauerkraut, kimchi, and other living foods when feeling under the weather. Neti Pot For me, the worst part of having a cold is the stuffed and runny nose. Once my nose starts down this path, it doesn’t stop for at least a week, and it’s total agony. Rinsing my nasal passages with the help of a neti pot right before bed makes a world of difference when I’m sick. I’m also currently on the market for a nice, handmade ceramic neti-pot. There’s so many good ones on Etsy! Diffuse Essential Oils Purify the air in your living space and show some love to your nasal pathways and throat by diffusing pure essential oils. It’s helpful to have an ultrasonic diffuser (I have one from Saje), but you don’t have to have one. You can heat up a pot of water, drop some essential oils in the heated water, and stand over the pot, inhaling the steam. Or you can put some essential oils on the floor and walls of your shower while taking a hot shower, which will give a similar effect to the diffuser. My favorite essential oils to breathe in during a cold are: eucalyptus, lavender, and lemon. Liquid Gold Up your intake of turmeric any way you can! Make the recipe in this post, or try our Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy, or Fresh Turmeric Moon Milk. Check out Diaspora Co. for some super-potent, organic, heirloom turmeric powder. Hydrate and Rest These two are such no-brainers, but sometimes none of the other stuff works, and you just need to go to bed early, sleep in, and drink liters and liters of lemon water in between. I love rubbing some vetiver essential oil on the soles of my feet before bed for deep, quick relaxation. What do you do to help your bod fight and heal when you feel a cold coming on? We’d love to hear! Golden Broth Rice Noodles   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 small yellow onion - chopped sea salt pinch of red pepper flakes 3 garlic cloves - minced 1½-inch piece of fresh ginger - minced 1 tablespoon turmeric powder 2 dried shiitake caps 2-inch piece kombu 2 bay leaves 8 cups purified water 1 small or ½ large butternut squash - peeled, seeded, and cubed 1 broccoli head juice from 2 limes - divided 10 oz rice noodles cilantro - for garnish toasted sesame oil and sesame seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm the oil over medium heat in a soup pot. Add onion, salt and red pepper flakes, and sauté for 5 minutes. Add garlic, ginger and turmeric, and stir around for 2 more minutes. Add shiitake, kombu, bay leaves, water and more salt to taste, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 10 minutes. If you have time, turn off the heat and let the broth infuse for another 30 minutes. Remove the rehydrated shiitake caps, slice, and return to the pot. Remove the kombu and discard. Add butternut squash to the pot, adjust the heat back to a simmer and cook for 7 minutes. Add broccoli and cook for another 5-7 minutes, until crisp-tender. Add half of the lime juice. Check for salt, adjust if needed. Soak the rice noodles in well-salted hot water according to the instructions on the package. Drain the noodles, divide between plates, and ladle the soup over the noodles. Squeeze more lime juice over each bowl, and garnish with cilantro. Optionally, drizzle with some sesame oil and sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Yellow Split Pea Chowder from Power Plates Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 Smooth Vegetable Gazpacho with Watermelon Pieces .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Golden Broth Rice Noodles + Favorite Natural Cold Remedies appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lavender Ice Cream

October 1 2018 VegKitchen 

Lavender Ice Cream Lavender blossoms give this ice cream a unique, delicate flavor. I love it with a mild-flavored cake like pound cake. Its also delicious topped with berries. This is one of my most-requested recipes. Recipe and photo courtesy of Cathe Olson, from Lick It! Creamy, Dreamy Vegan Ice Creams Your Mouth Will Love.* Makes: 1 quart 1 1/­­4 cups soymilk or other nondairy milk 1/­­4 cup fresh lavender flowers and buds (about 8 large sprigs) 1 (14-ounce) can full-fat coconut milk 1/­­2 cup granulated sugar or agave nectar Pour the soymilk into a small saucepan and warm on medium-low heat until it just begins to boil. Stir in the lavender flowers and buds. Cover and remove from the heat. Steep for 20 minutes. Place a fine-mesh strainer over a medium bowl. Pour the soymilk through the strainer to remove the lavender. Whisk in the coconut milk and sugar. Cover and chill in the refrigerator for at least 3 hours. Then freeze in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturers directions. Explore more of Vegkitchens Vegan Ice Cream recipes. Sweet tooth still craving? Here are more Vegan Baking and Sweets. Cathe Olson is the author of Simply Natural Baby Food, The Vegetarian Mothers Cookbook,* and Lick It! […] The post Lavender Ice Cream appeared first on VegKitchen.

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte

October 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte This happens to me pretty much every day at around 3 o’clock, providing that I’m working from home. I get up from my desk, put on the teapot, throw a bunch of things in the blender, whirl it all together, and end up with a cozy and satisfying latte-ish drink that gets me through to dinner time. I don’t drink caffeine anymore, because I’ve always been very sensitive to it, and found that avoiding it altogether really helps with even energy levels (I may have made a few exceptions in Italy :)). But this little ritual takes me back to the days when 3 o’clock meant a cup of really good tea or a matcha. There’s really nothing better. I end up making a different drink every time, based on my mood and the ingredients I have on hand, but the general formula is the same. There’s always something for creaminess, something for flavor, something for an energy boost… So I thought I’d give a ‘no-recipe’ recipe here, as well as a few of my favorite combinations. Midday super-latte making is a really fun routine to add to your day if you’re around a blender, and it’s good for your in a number of ways: it gets you out of the busyness of the day and nudges you to take a break, it’s creative, and the beverage you’ll end up with will likely be good-for-you, warming and tasty. Tahini Hot Chocolate This was one of our most popular recipes last winter. It’s an incredibly satisfying blender hot chocolate that comes together in seconds. Rosemary Hot White Chocolate Another hot chocolate, but this one is a white hot chocolate infused with rosemary. A great case for using cacao butter in drinks, which lends both its chocolatey flavor, as well as a richness and a froth. Spirulina Latte Another blender latte, but this time boosted with all the green benefits of spirulina, without the swampy taste. Chamomile Latte The most grounding and delicious latte to drink before bed. Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca Playing off New Orleans-style coffee, this herbal mocha is a great option for those trying to take a break from coffee and missing it dearly. Chicory brings a coffee-like richness, while maca and cacao boost energy. Honey Miso Latte This is basically a golden milk latte, but boosted with the flavor and health benefits of miso and raw honey. I like to drink this one before plane journeys, since miso might be helpful when it comes to countering the radiation we are exposed to on any given flight. Hibiscus Ginger Latte This latte gets is beautiful color and a pleasant sour note in the flavor from steeped hibiscus flowers. Pear Cranberry Chai Any modesty aside, this is the best chai I’ve ever had or made in my life. A great example for how creative you can get with your beverages, this one uses both fruit and a bunch of healing spices to achieve an otherworldly flavor. No-Recipe Vegan Cozy Latte Start With: This is your base liquid, which will determine what other ingredients you will add to your blender. Choose one or a couple. Hot water is a blank canvas, while herbal coffee and tea will give you a base flavor, which you can play off off with your other ingredients. - hot water - chicory coffee or Dandy Blend - tea – herbal, black, green, etc. - hot plant milk – coconut, almond, cashew, oat, etc. Creamy: Add one of these ingredients or a combination of a few of them for a rich, extra-creamy latte, especially important to include if you are just using hot water as the base. - coconut butter - tahini - almond butter/­­cashew butter/­­any other nut butter - tocos - cacao butter Frothy: This is optional if you already have a creamy element, but adding some extra fat to your latte contributes to the most beautiful froth. Also, if your base is something with caffeine like a black or green tea, this will help slow the absorption of caffeine for a more even boost of energy (like in Bulletproof coffee). - Coconut oil/­­MCT oil - Ghee Sweet: Add as much sweetness as you need, tasting as you go. - dates - raw honey - maple syrup - date syrup Flavor: Play off your drink base while adding some flavor. Both cacao powder and turmeric do well in creamy, milky drinks, while spices, herbs and vanilla can be used millions of ways (just see the drink round-up above). - cacao powder - cacao butter - turmeric - other spices like cinnamon, cardamom, nutmeg, ginger - vanilla - herbs - miso Extras & Boosts: My absolute favorite energy-boosting ingredient for drinks is maca powder – it instantly wakes me up and tastes so delicious. But there are a ton of other boosters you can add to your lattes, some ideas below. - maca powder - cacao butter - other adaptogens: chaga, reishi, lion’s mane, cordyceps, ashwagandha - more: pearl powder, tocos, mucura pruriens, spirulina, etc. etc. Blend all your components until frothy and enjoy :) You might also like... Berry Kombucha Float Peach and Zucchini Smoothie Avocado Kiwi Smoothie and a Jus by Julie Cleanse Giveaway Honey Miso Latte .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. Lunch – Beans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches

August 23 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches We’re trying to get all of this summer’s most successful ice cream recipes out while it’s still prime time for frozen treats :) This one is our absolute dream-come-true ice cream sandwich with a no-bake chocolate brownie crust and a vanilla and cherry ice cream interior. Give us cherries and chocolate any time, and we’re in heaven. The chocolate brownie crust is no joke here – it’s rich, soft and so fudgy, very much like the real deal. All of that is achieved with a magical combination of coconut flour, tahini and cacao, sweetened with dates and banana. It’s a totally oven-free affair, too, which is always a bonus. The interior of the sandwich is store-bought, dairy-free vanilla ice cream (this one is my favorite), studded with fresh cherries. There’s a bit of waiting around for the layers to freeze, but otherwise, this sandwich is surprisingly easy and really fun to put together. The recipe makes sixteen sandwiches, and of course they keep well in the freezer. Make these, and you’ll have the tastiest, homemade dessert around your kitchen for a few weeks, possibly. Hope you’ll give this one a try! I will be making my third batch this coming weekend :) Chocolate Brownie and Cherry Ice Cream Sandwiches   Print Serves: 16 sandwiches Ingredients for the brownie 1½ cups tahini or any other nut/­­seed butter, or even a blend of two butters 6 large, soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 2 ripe but firm bananas - try to choose ones that are not too ripe or overly sweet ½ cup raw cacao powder pinch of sea salt splash of vanilla extract (optional) ¼ cup coconut flour for the ice cream 2 pints dairy-free vanilla ice cream 1½ cups frozen or fresh, pitted cherries (we used frozen ones from Trader Joes, which are really sweet and juicy) Instructions to make the brownie Spoon the tahini into a food processor. Drain the dates, reserving the soaking liquid and add them to the food processor, followed by the bananas. Process until smooth. Add the rest of the brownie ingredients to the food processor and process until well combined. Add 1-2 tablespoons of the date soaking liquid if your processor needs help to get going. Transfer the mixture into a mixing bowl and finish mixing with a spoon, if needed. You should have about 3 cups of the brownie mix total. Cover a 9 x 9, rimmed baking dish with parchment paper, extending the edges of the paper up the sides. Spread half of the brownie mixture over the bottom of the pan in an even layer with wet hands. Carefully lift out this first brownie layer from the pan by the extended edges of the parchment paper and place it onto a cutting board. Transfer the board into the freezer. Re-line the same dish with parchment paper, extending the edges of the paper up the sides. Make the second brownie layer with the remaining mixture. Leave it in the dish and place in the freezer. Let the brownie layers freeze while you are mixing the ice cream. to prepare the ice cream Remove the ice cream from the freezer and let it soften at room temperature, until its just spreadable. Take care not to over-thaw. Scoop the ice cream into a mixing bowl and stir it until evenly smooth and creamy. Fold in the cherries. to assemble the sandwich Check your brownie layers and make sure that they have solidified in the freezer, so that you can spread the ice cream layer over them, without smudging the brownie. Remove the dish with the brownie layer from the freezer and spread the ice cream over the brownie in an even layer. Remove the cutting board with the other brownie layer from the freezer and quickly invert the brownie over the ice cream to make the top layer. Peel off the parchment paper. Lightly press on the brownie to adhere all the layers together. Place the dish back in the freezer until completely frozen, preferably overnight or at least 4 hours. When your sandwich is ready to be cut, take the pan out of the freezer and lift out the sandwich onto a cutting board, using the extended edges of the parchment paper. Run your knife under hot water. Optionally, trim off the uneven edges for a cleaner appearance. Slice the sandwich in half lengthwise and crosswise,into 4 large squares. Proceed to slice each square diagonally into triangles, then slice each triangle in half one more time to end up with 16 triangular sandwiches. Enjoy right away or keep frozen. Remove from the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines

April 28 2017 My New Roots 

Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Done is better than perfect. I cant tell you how many times I repeat this to myself on a daily basis, as a sort of mantra to soothe and convince the perfectionist inside me to just follow through. To just put it out there. I almost pushed publish on this blog post yesterday afternoon, but something was holding me back. Two things, in fact. First, the photos werent what I wanted them to be: they were on the boring side without a lot of colour, and not really inspiring. Second, the recipe itself just wasnt there. I was trying to make a vegan yogurt coating with coconut butter and although it was tasty, the texture was all wrong: chunky and gritty. Was it good enough? Probably. Would anyone have noticed what I saw as shortcomings? Probably not. But could I deal with it? Apparently, no. As I was putting the finishing touches on the post, it hit me like a bolt of lightening: I needed to use cashew butter to achieve the silky consistency I was after. Noooo! It was the solution I had been calling in, but to arrive at the witching hour just seemed cruel. How could I start all over at this point? Was I crazy to even try, considering I didnt know for sure that it would work out? With only minutes to make a decision, I hopped on my bike and cycled to the health food store. Again. Cursing myself, my brain, my ridiculous inability to know when to let go, and my insistence that what I put out in the world is my absolute best, really started to annoy me. I bought all the ingredients for the third time, raced home, and got to work. The cookies were the best theyd ever been. Perfect, in fact. But was it worth it? For anyone out there nodding their heads in recognition that they too, have these borderline masochistic tendencies to achieve an arbitrary portrait of perfection, may I ask what it is that drives us to create and then hold it all back if its not exactly what we imagined in our heads? Because nothing is perfect! When do we draw the line and just push publish? Is done really better than perfect? Because done for me it seems like settling for mediocrity a lot of the time. Even if its just a friggin cookie. Im not looking for answers here, just venting I suppose. But if you want to share your similar struggles, feel free in the comments. Its not often I open up or vent in this space, so maybe we can all throw a perfectionist party, and make sure to have these very perfect cookies on the table. Speaking of! Florentines are traditionally almond-centric biscuits, sometimes with the addition of dried fruit like cherries and orange zest, with a rich chocolate coating on the bottom. Because I really love dessert for breakfast, I was motivated to make a morning-appropriate version that wouldnt make me feel like a glutton. I chose to add some buckwheat to the mix since I love to start my day with whole grains, and swapped out the chocolate for a vanilla-cashew butter coating that I basically want to pour over my entire life. Like I mentioned, my original thought was to go with something yogurt-like, but once I made this saucy concoction, there was no need to pretend it was something else. Pure, divine, silky-smooth pleasure glaze! Ahem. I love these cookies because they are so simple to make with just a few ingredients, and incredibly fast. On my third testing, they were done - mixed, baked and glazed – in 20 minutes. If youre in a rush to get your treat fix, leave the cashew coating out of the equation, and youll still have a gorgeously tasty and satisfying little snack. As far as additions and flavours go, these wicked little morsels are kind of a blank slate. I made a couple batches with orange zest and one without. Personally, I really loved the citrusy warmth that the orange lends, and its nod to morning fodder, but you can also omit it for a more neutral taste. Instead, spice them up with cinnamon, cardamom, lemon zest, rose, lavender, coconut etc. I think adding cacao nibs would also be really delicious, as would dried blueberries, dried figs, or apricots. Whatever you choose to do, get ready to be very excited to get up in the morning. Couple these cookies with a turmeric latte, a piece of fruit and youll be good to go. Until 4 oclock when you want another one.     Print recipe     Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines Makes 12 Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 90g raw buckwheat groats 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70g slivered almonds (or sunflower seeds) 1/­­3 cup /­­ 45g almond meal 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup a couple pinches sea salt zest of 1 organic orange, optional Vanilla Cashew Coating: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml cashew butter 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup seeds from 1 vanilla bean pinch sea salt Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Line a rimmed cookie sheet with baking paper. 2. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast buckwheat until golden, about 3 minutes. Transfer buckwheat to a mixing bowl to cool. In the same skillet toast the slivered almonds until golden, about 2 minutes. Transfer them to the bowl of buckwheat to cool, add the almond meal and stir to combine. 3. In the same skillet (no need to wash) over low heat, melt the coconut oil and add the orange zest, if using. Turn off the heat and whisk in the maple syrup and salt. Pour the liquid over the buckwheat and almond mixture and fold to combine. Do not wash the skillet. 4. Using a tablespoon measure, scoop out the florentine cookie mixture and set each one on the lined baking sheet with plenty of space in between (I baked these in 2 batches of six). Using the back of the spoon, flatten the cookies out a little. Place in the oven and bake for 7-10 minutes until the edges are golden and bubbly. Remove from oven and let cool for about 5 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack and repeat with remaining mixture. 5. While the florentines are baking, make the cashew coating. Melt the coconut oil in the same skillet over low heat, then add the cashew butter and stir well to combine. Once melted, add the vanilla bean and maple syrup. Stir well and turn off the heat. 6. Once the florentines have cooled, make sure that the cashew coating is still liquid. Spoon a couple teaspoons on the bottom of each cookie and spread it as evenly as possible. Place on a lined baking sheet, coating side up in the fridge or freezer to set. Once firm, repeat with remaining coating, except this time place the coating side down on the lined baking sheet. Place in the fridge or freezer to set, then enjoy! Store leftovers in the fridge or freezer in a tightly sealed container for up to two weeks. Once I started editing the new photos for this post, I realized that the last batch of Florentines werent as golden, or as flat as the previous batches. I decided to let that one go. And Im very proud of that. *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! Just a reminder about my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Cant wait to see you there.  The post Breakfast Buckwheat Florentines appeared first on My New Roots.

Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways

February 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways This post was created in partnership with Quinoa Queen. I’m pretty convinced that I’ll be on team homemade nut milk forever. I do buy bottled almond milk from time to time, and there are great brands out on the market that I feel lucky to have access to. But every time I make a batch at home and taste my first, bright-white sip, I make a mental note to never purchase the store-bought kind again. It’s that good. If you’ve never made nut milk at home, you’ll be surprised by how easy and satisfying the process is. It does take more effort than buying a bottle at the store, but the superior flavor and heavenly texture make it well worth it. Nut milk is made by blending nuts in water – the nuts break down and yield their creaminess and fattiness to the water, coloring it an opaque white. All you need for whipping up a batch of nut milk is a blender and something for straining out the nut pulp, once the nuts are blended up. I’ve heard of people using multiple layers of cheesecloth and fine-mesh strainers, but I’ve found the nut milk bag to be the most effective tool for the job. Run your blended mixture through the bag, give it a squeeze, and you have your milk. Easy! Another advantage to making nut milk at home is the amount of control you have over the process. Many nut milk brands add stabilizers, sweeteners and natural flavors to their mix, and by making your own, you are taking all that unwanted stuff out of the equation. You can soak your nuts/­­seeds, too, which I highly recommend. Soaking gets rid of enzyme inhibitors, which in turn makes the nuts easier to digest and improves their nutrient bioavailability. I’m pretty sure none of the nut milk brands out there are taking care to soak their nuts, so there’s another reason to make your own. You can have all sorts of fun with the kind of milk you make. Use any nuts you like, following the basic proportion, from the more common almonds and cashews, to hazelnuts, pecans and Brazil nuts. Seeds work really well, too! Pumpkin, sesame and sunflower seeds all yield delicious milk and make the endeavor more affordable. You can also make nut/­­seed blends and flavor your milk all kinds of ways. I give you a few luscious flavoring ideas here, including Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk, Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk and Spiced Pecan Milk. We’ll have more on what to do with the leftover pulp soon, too. I didn’t try my first bite of cereal until the early 90s, when American goods were finally allowed to be imported into Russia after the fall of the iron curtain. Back then, we looked at cornflakes, Snickers, McDonalds and chewing gum with wide and hungry eyes, taking in their then exotic flavors with all kinds of enthusiasm. Nowadays, I find most cereal brands out there to be much too sweet and full of too many unwanted ingredients. Still, a single bite of something crunchy and porous floating in (nut) milk sends me back to those times, when I coveted cornflakes like I now covet coconut butter. I’ve been loving Quinoa Queen, the gluten-free, 100% quinoa cereal brand that uses a minimal amount of wholesome, natural ingredients. The creator of Quinoa Queen is a food scientist and comes from the Andean mountains of Ecuador, where she works with her native community to harvest the quinoa used in her product. QQ cereal is not too sweet, and there is even an unsweetened, single ingredient option which I love, especially when combined with one of these flavored nut milks. The rest of the flavor offerings are subtle and well-considered, there is a lightly sweetened one, as well as a citrusy one, which my eight year old has been eating for breakfast with the Chocolate Orange Hazelnut milk (so it’s kid approved, too). Quinoa works so well as a cereal ingredient, it’s neutral in flavor and contains a wealth of protein and fiber, among other vitamins and minerals that help with starting the morning off right. I’m pretty thrilled to have found a wholesome cereal I can enjoy with all my homemade nut milks, and if you are looking for something similar, consider giving Quinoa Queen a try. Note: You can use raw almonds, cashews or any other nuts or seeds of choice for any of these milk variations. Cashews are especially convenient, as they don’t need to be strained – their pulp breaks down enough in the blender. Chocolate-Orange Hazelnut Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw hazelnuts - soaked overnight in purified water 3 large, soft Medjool dates, or more to taste 2 tablespoons raw cacao powder, or more to taste 1 teaspoon maca powder (optional) zest of 1-2 organic oranges Instructions Drain and rinse the hazelnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the hazelnut milk back into the blender, add dates, cacao and maca, if using, and blend until smooth. Add the orange zest and pulse several times to combine. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Spiced Pecan Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 heaping cup raw pecans or walnuts - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 5 green cardamom pods - green shells removed 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg or a few shaves/­­slices of whole nutmeg 2-3 soft Medjool dates - optional (I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pecans/­­walnuts. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for the future use. Pour the walnut milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226   Matcha-Mint Pumpkinseed Milk   Print Serves: 3-3½ cups Ingredients 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight 2 teaspoons matcha powder or more to taste handful fresh mint leaves - to taste sweetener of choice - to taste (optional, I like it unsweetened) Instructions Drain and rinse the pumpkin seeds. Combine them with 3 cups of purified water in an upright blender (high speed works best here). Strain through a nut bag, discard the pulp or save it for future use. Pour the pumpkinseed milk back into the blender, add the rest of the ingredients and blend until smooth. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings Pink Peppercorn Cookies from Small Plates and Sweet Treats Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Nut Milk and Quinoa Cereal, 3 Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche

December 16 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche We’ve been developing some recipes for Nuts.com, our favorite online one-stop-shop for bulk foods, using their amazing ingredients. This Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche is one of those recipes, and there will be more to come, since they are all too good not to share here. This quiche recipe is definitely of the lazy kind, since it comes together quite magically and quickly and requires no crust-making. Chickpea flour (protein, fiber and iron-rich) is the perfect ingredient for making vegan quiche, since it performs similarly to the egg/­­cream foundation of traditional quiche when mixed with water and oil, solidifying into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. So you basically place a pie pan full of batter and veggies into the oven and end up with a soufflé-like pie, all through a quick and satisfying process. This quiche is studded with roasted winter roots for some seasonal vitamins, and made delicious with flavor-building spices like turmeric, smoked paprika and black pepper. And if you love socca/­­farinata, this recipe is most definitely for you, as the quiche is reminiscent of a plumper, more substantial version of socca (basically any socca lover’s dream). This quiche would make for an excellent, nutritious addition to your holiday table or any other meal, served alongside soup or a green salad. And a bit of housekeeping – did you know that we have a newsletter that goes out every time a new recipe is posted? We love our newsletter community, so as a little holiday/­­new year gift and sign of gratitude to all our subscribers, we will be sending out one extra recipe a month starting this December and onto the new year. That is one nourishing bonus recipe that won’t be published anywhere else. December’s recipe might involve something along the line of cozy miso steel cut oats, so if that sounds good to you, you can sign up here, or in the signup form in our sidebar ;) Follow this link for the Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche Recipe :) You might also like... Raw Apricot Lavender Tart and a Giveaway Banana Toffee Tart Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

A Summer of Ice Cream

September 3 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

A Summer of Ice Cream Somehow, we’ve reached the weekend that is considered by many to be the last hurrah of summer. It always goes by in a blink, and every year, the blink seems like the fastest one yet. Though very sentimental, I also can’t help but feel some excitement toward the cooler temperatures, fall produce and general coziness to come. At the beginning of this summer, we gave ourselves a challenge to come up with a new ice cream to post here every Sunday. We are happy to have fulfilled the plan, and the result consists of twelve original ice cream recipes that we are very proud of (+1 recipe from an author we love). Sometimes, I really love setting difficult-but-realistic goals for myself that I know will make me grow, whether personally or professionally – this one made me grow in both ways. Some weeks, it was definitely challenging to think up yet another frozen treat, but mostly, it was very rewarding and quite fun. I generally find myself having a more lighthearted approach, when it comes to ice cream recipe development, as opposed to the more serious savory recipes. The abundance of summer produce made the process of coming up with new flavors quite fluid, and I worked with what was available. Below, a round up of our summer of ice cream. It’s neat to see it all lined up chronologically, starting with rhubarb in the early summer, followed by strawberries, peaches, very light sorbets for the hottest of days, tropical milkshakes, and my youngest daughter’s birthday cake. We are currently brainstorming ideas for a similar weekend series to run during the colder months of the year, and would love to hear from you on what kind of recipes you’d like to see (snacks? sandwiches? soups? It doesn’t have to start with an S!). Have a lovely weekend :) Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt – Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker. All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. Ive always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet – Aside from eating them just as they are, nothing showcases seasonal fresh berries more than homemade sorbet. This one is from Emmas beautiful cookbook, My Darling Lemon Thyme - Recipes from My Real Food Kitchen. One of the things I adore about Emmas cooking style is her love of fresh herbs. Just like her, I often include herbs in sweet dishes, its a little trick to turn many ordinary desserts into a completely unique and memorable treat. The inclusion of Thai basil in this recipe is genius and makes this creamy sorbet even more refreshing, aromatic and summery. Its also hard to believe that this intense crimson colour comes just from strawberries - a real show stopper. Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits – My go-to vegan lavender ice cream recipe with the addition of rich and decadent chocolate-tahini bits. It has a creamy, luxurious texture, which combines so well with the refreshing flavors of lavender and chewy, bittersweet pieces of chocolate. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream – Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. Theres that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Green Smoothie Pops – A green smoothie on a stick that can be easily eaten for breakfast on a very hot day, or as an extra nutritious dessert, on any day. Papaya Lime Sundae – Papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime - both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins - desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup. Pi?a Colada Milkshake – A recreation of my favorite beachside cocktail in non-alcoholic, vegan milkshake form. Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles – These lemonade popsicles, with a bit of zing from ginger, have been in my beat-the-heat arsenal for many summers now - a dessert for the toastiest of days, requiring minimal effort. The lemonade can also be had in its original, un-frozen state, and is an incredibly refreshing, summery drink. Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso and Caramel and Chocolate – These vegan tahini ice cream bars, covered with a generous drizzle of miso caramel and chocolate, very distantly remind me of Snickers ice cream bars, which I used to love, but these particular ones are much more healthful and interesting in flavor. Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core –  A recreation of my favorite Ben & Jerrys ice cream flavor, made vegan and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods, and complete with a decadent chocolate core. Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream – A classic ice cream flavor in milkshake form. Its creamy, with little hard specs of cacao nibs, invigorating with the addition of fresh mint, and topped with a chickpea-based vegan whipped cream. Pistachio and Raspberry Fields Ice Cream Cake – Paloma’s birthday cake, named for her obsession with the Beatles. Pistachio and raspberry complement each other perfectly here, the pistachio flavor being nutty and earthy, while the raspberry becomes its perfect, juicy and fruity pair. The cacao buckwheat crust adds just the right hint of chocolate and crunch to the mix. Berry Creamsicles with White Chocolate Drizzle – These beauties are a breeze to make, requiring no ice cream maker, and are colored lilac with all of summers sweetest, sun-ripened berries. The white chocolate drizzle, made with cacao butter and cashews, adds a nice, extra bit of texture to the creamy berry base, but the creamsicles are great on their own as well, in case you dont want to bother with the drizzle. The post A Summer of Ice Cream appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles

July 13 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles We made and photographed these beauties this past winter, but they kept getting pushed back on the blog post schedule, as something more seasonal or appropriate always came up. I recently re-made them for a birthday party, with big help from Paloma, who is home for summer break before she becomes a third-grader, and expressing lots on interest in participating in the kitchen. The truffles were such a hit at the party, that I decided to post them right away, since they passed the real life test with flying colors. Although there are millions of good vegan truffle recipes out there, this particular recipe is a bit different from most date and nut-based truffles – the velvety truffle texture here comes from sweet potato and nut butters, while dates are used as a sweetener (if looking for an easy date-based raw truffle recipe, here is a good one we posted 6! years ago). Sweet potato is generally a life-saver when it comes to vegan baking and desserts. It contributes that sought-after, creamy texture, with a very mild, subtly sweet taste that generally becomes background to any other added flavor, plus there is the bonus of having a nutritious root vegetable in your dessert. There are a few good reasons healthy truffles are so adored in the community – they are a breeze to make, and the result is surprisingly decadent, in this particular case so much so, that it’s hard to believe there is no heavy cream or butter involved. The recipe leaves plenty of room for customization, too – add hemp hearts, goji berries, maca/­­mesquite powders, spirulina, or any other superfood powders. Deciding on the natural superfood sprinkles is fun, and the possibilities here are endless. Paloma pointed out that, once coated, these truffles looked like various planets she’s been learning about, so that’s the origin of the cosmic name. She had fun assigning planet names to each particular coating and color – if I remember correctly, matcha was for Earth, while lavender represented Venus, turmeric – Mars, and so on. Enjoy! Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles   Print Serves: about 45 truffles Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato 1 cup hazelnuts or almonds ¾ cup chopped dark chocolate/­­chocolate chips (I like these) 1 cup soft dates - pitted ½ cup sesame tahini or any nut/­­seed butter of choice ¼ cup almond butter 2 tablespoons neutral unrefined coconut oil - soft, at room temperature 2 tablespoons cacao powder pinch sea salt sprinkles cacao powder (new favorite brand) matcha powder turmeric powder bee pollen (vegans beware) dried lavender flowers Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prick sweet potato several times with a fork and bake for 30-40 minutes, or until soft throughout. Set aside to cool. Lower the heat to 350° F (180° C). Spread the nuts on a baking sheet and toast in the oven for 10 minutes. Grind into a meal in a food processor and set aside. Melt chocolate on a double boiler. Peel sweet potato and add it to a food processor, along with dates, tahini, almond butter, coconut oil, cacao powder, salt and melted chocolate. Process until well combined. Add ground nuts and pulse to incorporate. Chill the mixture in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to 1 hour to let it firm up. Using 1 tablespoon of truffle mixture per truffle, gently roll into a ball between the palms of your hands, then roll in any coating of choice. Repeat with the rest of the mixture, arranging truffles on a parchment paper-covered tray or a cutting board. Keep in the refrigerator or even the freezer. Take out right before eating - the truffles will never be completely frozen. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Raw Green Mountain Parfait Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday

June 12 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday To continue with the herbal/­­floral theme from last week, this Sunday, we’ve got Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream. We’ve been having quite a steady supply of fresh chamomile at the local market, and those bouquets fill the house with the most calming, quiet aroma, which I usually associate with bedtime and all things peaceful, due to the herb’s well-studied chill-out properties. I’ve had a note to make chamomile ice cream ever since I made chamomile sorbet years ago, which was essentially frozen chamomile tea and honey – sounds so simple, but its refreshing flavor left quite an impression for all these years. Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. There’s that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Read on for the recipe and some weekend links, and have a chill Sunday :) Is sugar really bad for you? – starting in 2018, nutrition labels on packaged foods will have to list the amount of added sugars in addition to total sugars, and this article answers some important questions in regards to that. Obviously, we love sweets, so – everything in moderation :) Aloe Vera – summer beauty food The Voyageur – a favorite, dreamy online travel journal All You Need, You Already Have – an inspiring post on Zen Habits Kid Friendly Herbs – to go with the theme of this post, a round up of herbs that are ok to give to children Sarah Britton interview – “It was about three years before I got a comment from someone whose last name wasn’t mine.” One Part Podcast – been listening to this while doing things around the kitchen. So far loved episodes with Bryant Terry, Dana Shultz, Laura Wright. Blog love – we are in complete awe of The Artful Desperado’s food photography, green caesar non-alcoholic cocktail, soft meringue s’mores with blood orange, roasted artichoke and cauliflower with creamy harissa dip. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 cans full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup dried chamomile flowers ¼ cup honey - divided, plus more for drizzling juice and zest of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder Instructions Combine coconut milk and chamomile in a medium saucepan. Bring to a gentle simmer, preferably on a double boiler, or over regular heat. Simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from heat, cover and let infuse and cool to room temperature. Strain chamomile milk. In a blender, combine milk with 2 tablespoons honey, lemon juice and arrowroot. Blend until smooth. Chill the mixture well in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Process mixture in an ice cream machine for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon ice cream into a container in layers, drizzling the remaining honey between the layers. Serve immediately as soft serve or place in the freezer to harden further for at least 4 hours. Remove from freezer 10-15 minutes before serving. Garnish with lemon zest and more honey when serving. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream Raw Blackberry and Lime Miniature Tarts with Cardamom Ice Cream Bee Pollen and Manuka Honey Ice-Cream Beet Tahini Snack Bars .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday

May 22 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday I think I first got the desire to make rhubarb frozen yogurt when I saw a photo of Nigel Slater’s Rhubarb Eton Mess. Slater always does the most amazing things with rhubarb, making me dream about the days when the blushing pink bunches will appear at the market. Since those days are fully upon us, I went ahead and made this treat for the weekend, in celebration of rhubarb season and its elusiveness. I couldn’t resist appointing rose as a component of this frozen yogurt for two reasons – for one, rhubarb and rose has always sounded like the most magical combination that I’ve been thinking about for years, and secondly, I’ve had some beautiful dried roses sitting in my pantry without getting any use for too long. Yogurt is a complete weakness for me and all members of my family – we always have some in the fridge to use for breakfast and snacks. I like to make my own, whether with real milk or coconut, but I also love trying new brands. There seem to be many great yogurt companies out there today, which make it very easy to be a happy consumer – if you’re curious, I like Maple Hill, Wallaby, Seven Stars and Anita’s Coconut Yogurt is a delicious vegan variety. Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker (I’ve had an older model of this ice cream maker for years and it’s one of my favorite kitchen appliances). All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. With this possibility in mind, you are always less than an hour away from a dessert that many consider to be a treat to only acquire outside of the home. This batch matched my very high expectations. The first spoonful I had made me stop in my tracks and close my eyes for a second or two. I’ve always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Since I make so much ice cream/­­popsicles/­­frozen yogurt, we’ve decided that Sunday posts will be reserved for frozen treats of all kinds. We hope that will make you smile. Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt   Print Serves: 6-10 Ingredients 1½ lb rhubarb - sliced ½ cup dried rose petals (optional) ½ cup maple syrup - divided 32 oz Greek yogurt (I used Wallaby for this batch) 2 tablespoons rose water Instructions In a medium saucepan, combine rhubarb with rose petals, if using, and ¼ cup maple syrup. Bring to a boil over medium heat, reduce to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes, until rhubarb is soft. Let cool to room temperature and chill in the refrigerator for about an hour. Combine well-chilled yogurt with half of the rose-rhubarb mixture, remaining ¼ cup of the maple syrup and rose water. Process in an ice cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon into a container, alternating between layers of frozen yogurt and the remaining rose-rhubarb mixture. Eat right away as soft serve or place in the freezer and make sure to remove from the freezer 10-15 minutes before serving. Notes If you dont have an ice cream maker, you can make popsicles. Just pour the final rhubarb-yogurt mixture into popsicle molds and freeze. Rose petals are optional, rose water gives plenty of flavor. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Lavender Ice Cream with Apricots Poached in Blueberry Sauce Homemade Yogurt and Frozen Yogurt Lemongrass Raspberry Pops Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

18 Creative Smoothie Ideas from Potluck

January 12 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Who needs kale and bananas? Change up your smoothie routine with these unique recipes featuring ingredients like beets, cilantro and lavender.

Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte

July 20 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte Cooking with edible flowers has been one of my greatest pleasures in the kitchen. Floral infusions provide amazing flavor and can add beneficial, healing properties to any dish or drink. My favorite was the Rose Ice Cream and Rose Petal Mille Feuille I made a few years ago with organic rose petals and the purest essential rose oil from my perfume maker friend. The oil was so concentrated that a tiny drop turned a portion of ice cream into a magical bowl of aromatherapy. Here are two refreshing drinks we’ve been enjoying this summer, featuring some of the most loved, calming culinary flowers – lavender and chamomile. Chamomile is an amazing little flower, and its oils are anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal and antiallergenic. It has long been used as a sleep aid all over the world. Having a cup of chamomile tea before bed has become one of my daily rituals – it really does the job of getting me ready for some wholesome rest. Lately, I’ve been loving this creamy chamomile latte. My favorite way to enjoy it this summer is cold, but it also makes for a comforting warm drink for the cooler parts of the year. Lavender, with its own share of antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties, is king of the aromatherapy world – even the smallest whiff sends a relaxation signal to the mind. This milkshake combines lavender and blueberries, as the two are a match made in heaven. Drink it as a refreshing mid-afternoon snack after some time in the sun or even as dessert after dinner. The most important variable when cooking with dried edible flowers is their freshness. If a flower is freshly dried, a little of it will go a long way, while older dried flowers have likely lost their potency. It’s also important to remember that the best way to extract the beneficial oils from herbs such as chamomile and lavender is gently heating them in a double boiler for longer periods of time. Directly pouring boiling water over the herbs is a harsher method, which kills off many of their benefits. We are off to Sochi for the last stretch of our Russian vacation. Black Sea, here we come. Chamomile Latte serves 2 1 1/­­2 cups water 4 tablespoons dried German chamomile flowers – make sure to get them from a store with a good rotation 1/­­2 cup almond milk (I like homemade unsweetened) honey to taste – optional Combine water with chamomile in a small, heatproof bowl. Place the bowl into a heavy bottomed pot or pan. Add water to the pan, making sure that water level in the pan is lower than the bowl. Bring water in the pan to a simmer and simmer for 15 minutes. Let cool enough for safe handling. Strain chamomile tea, mix with almond milk and honey, if using. For an extra creamy and foamy consistency, blend the tea and almond milk in a blender. Drink warm or chilled in the fridge. I like it best cold and unsweetened. Lavender Milkshake serves 2 1 1/­­2 cups almond milk or other plant milk (I like homemade unsweetened almond milk) 1 tablespoon edible dried lavender flowers (make sure to get them from a store with a good rotation – flowers should be lavender, rather then grey in color, with a fresh, strong aroma) 6-8 scoops of your favorite vanilla, blueberry or lavender ice-cream handful of fresh or frozen blueberries – optional, for color handful of ice cubes – optional, for smoother texture splash of maple syrup – optional, to taste seeds of 1 vanilla bean or splash of vanilla extract – optional Combine almond milk and lavender flowers in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let cool. Strain and chill in the refrigerator. Combine lavender milk and the rest of ingredients in a blender and blend to a smooth and thick milkshake consistency. If your lavender flowers are very fresh and aromatic, you can skip the infusion step and simply blend almond milk, 1/­­2 tablespoon (or to taste) lavender and blueberries, in a high speed blender until completely smooth. Then add the rest of ingredients and blend to a smooth and thick milkshake consistency.  

No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars

September 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars It’s been difficult for me to contain my excitement about these Blueberry Coconut Bars ever since I nailed the recipe a few weeks ago. They check all the boxes: easy/­­no-bake, gluten-free, vegan, refined sugar-free/­­not too sweet, fun to put together, and so so delicious. It’s the perfect recipe for those wanting to hold on to summer with all their might. These bars are made up of three complementary layers: there’s a crumbly, no-bake ‘shortbread’ crust, followed by a rich coconut creme layer, which is then topped with a juicy, no-cook blueberry chia jam. The combination is truly heavenly, especially since this is a lighter dessert that won’t weigh you down. You can see all the steps of the cooking process in the video we made above (P.S. We have a Youtube channel with lots of cooking videos, you can subscribe here). These bars are a definite, universal crowd pleaser – absolutely all the friends and family that have tasted them genuinely loved them. They would be the perfect, easy yet impressive dessert to bring to a gathering. Or just make the bars for yourself/­­your family for the week ahead, they’ll keep well in the refrigerator. Hope you’ll give these a try :) No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars   Print Serves: 16 square bars Ingredients for the blueberry chia jam 3 cups frozen blueberries - thawed (do not use fresh, non-frozen blueberries for this recipe) juice of 1 small lemon 3 tablespoons maple syrup 3 tablespoons chia seeds 3 tablespoons chia meal (ground chia seeds) for the shortbread ¾ cup gluten-free rolled oats 12 Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes ¾ cup coconut flour ¼ cup melted coconut oil 1 tablespoon lemon juice pinch of sea salt for the coconut creme 1 can full fat Thai coconut milk - refrigerated overnight to separate fat from water ½ cup unsweetened dried shredded coconut 2 tablespoons maple syrup splash of vanilla extract Instructions to make the blueberry chia jam Thoroughly mix all the ingredients in a medium bowl. Cover and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight, until the chia seeds have bloomed and the mixture resembles a jam-like consistency. Mash the berries partially with a potato masher, leaving plenty of them whole. to make the shortbread Put the oats in a food processor and grind them into a flour. Drain the dates and add them to the food processor, along with the rest of the ingredients. Process until you have a well-combined dough that sticks together when pressed between your fingers. Prepare an 8 x 8 baking dish by lining it with parchment paper, extending the paper up the sides of the dish. Press the shortbread into the bottom of the dish in an even layer. Set aside. to make the coconut creme Scoop the separated coconut fat from the top of the can of coconut milk into a food processor (use the leftover coconut water in smoothies, soups, porridges or lattes). Add the shredded coconut, maple syrup and vanilla extract to the food processor and process until well combined. Be careful not to over-process, as the coconut fat can separate and curdle. to assemble the bars Spread the coconut creme over the shortbread in a thin, even layer. Take the blueberry jam our of the refrigerator and spread it on top of the coconut creme in another even layer. Place the dish into the refrigerator for a few hours or overnight, for the shortbread and coconut layer to set. Once the shortbread and the coconut layer have set, lift out the bar from the dish onto a cutting board, using the extended edges of the parchment paper. Cut into 16 squares or any size/­­shape of choice. Keep refrigerated. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Multigrain Pear Ginger Cakes with Macadamia Whipped Cream Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Babamesco Dip

May 7 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Babamesco Dip Baba ganoush + romesco = babamesco! One fine day, I had some but not all of the ingredients to make romesco, as well as a few baba-ganoush appropriate items, and I was craving some kind of powerful dip/­­spread/­­sauce. I combined the two and ended up with something really special. I’m pretty sure that everyone who sampled it loved it, and that goofy name that I threw out in the moment really stuck. I’ve had friends call me and seriously ask me when I’ll be making another batch of babamesco. Now I can’t imagine calling it by any other name. A few ways it can be used: as a dip for pita chips, sandwich spread, pizza sauce, veggie bowl component, sauce for vegetables (try it with grilled ramps or roasted cauliflower). There’s a step-by-step video above and some weekend links below. Happy Sunday :) Dimes Spiced Porridge on Munchies – can’t wait to make this someday soon! Tortus Copenhagen – this ceramicist’s instagram is addicting. The potter’s wheel videos are so meditative and satisfying. Unsweetened Miso Chocolate Bar – Valentina used our almost savory raw chocolate recipe as a starting point for her own unsweetened chocolate bar, and it looks amazing. Margaret Atwood on What ‘The Handmaids Tale’ Means Today – have you been watching the show?! I find it to be so eerily believable. Loved this article from the author about how the novel relates to the world today, and this bit: ‘One of my rules was that I would not put any events into the book that had not already happened in what James Joyce called the nightmare of history, nor any technology not already available. No imaginary gizmos, no imaginary laws, no imaginary atrocities.’ Jessica Koslow of Sqirl – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman Simplicity City – our favorite fashion instagram that draws from the past Babamesco   Print Serves: around 4 cups Ingredients 2 red bell peppers 1 small eggplant or 3 small Japanese eggplants - sliced in half 1 head of garlic neutral coconut oil or olive oil, plus more for garnish sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons tahini juice of 1 lemon handful of parsley, plus more for garnish zaatar - to garnish (optional) microgreens - to garnish (optional) Instructions Place the bell peppers on a baking sheet and turn your broiler to high. Broil the peppers for 2-4 minutes, flipping every minute or so, until the skin is blistered and the peppers are soft. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C) and prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the eggplant on the sheet. Break the head of garlic into cloves and place them next to the eggplant, with the skins intact. Drizzle the eggplant and garlic cloves with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix with your hands to coat. Place in the oven. The garlic should be done after about 15 minutes, while the eggplant may need another 5-10 minutes until its ready, a total of 20-25 minutes. Once the bell peppers are cool enough to handle, peel off their skin and remove the core and seeds. Slip the skin off the roasted garlic cloves. Scoop the eggplant flesh out of the skin and discard the skin. In a food processor, combine the roasted pepper, eggplant, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, salt and pepper until just smooth. Add in the parsley and pulse to incorporate. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the babamesco with a drizzle of olive oil, a sprinkling of zaatar and microgreens, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Raw Apricot Lavender Tart and a Giveaway Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Babamesco Dip appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spirulina Latte

March 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Spirulina Latte Checking in really quickly with this trippy spirulina latte. Half the fun of eating spirulina is its color, the other half is knowing its many incredible health benefits, while the swampy, algae flavor is no fun at all. I usually just include spirulina in smoothies, where the flavor gets masked by the sweetness of the fruit, but that also means that its magical, aquamarine color will get lost among the numerous berries that I put in my smoothies. This latte is a more direct and, let’s say, conscious way of consuming spirulina – it’s fun to make, warm, cozy, slightly sweet, and not at all swampy in taste. Drinking a beverage of this color will definitely make you appreciate spirulina in all its glory and provide you with a bright start to your morning or a smile during your afternoon break. There are some links after the jump, enjoy your Sunday! Immigrant Food Stories 25 Songs That Tell Us Where Music Is Going (have your sound on) Scott Chalky, America’s Favorite Farmer – interviewed on Here’s the Thing Laura Miller’s Talking in Circles This ‘Poke’ Bowl! Speaking of Superfood Lattes – check out the Good Sort’s… Enjoyed This Zadie Smith Interview on Fresh Air (from November ’16) Spirulina Latte   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients 2 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice (I used homemade hazelnut) 1-2 teaspoons organic spirulina powder 1 teaspoon maca powder (optional) ¼ - ½ teaspoon ground ginger 1 tablespoon honey or more to taste 1 teaspoon coconut butter (optional) 1 teaspoon sunflower lecithin (optional) beet powder mixed with coconut sugar - for garnish (totally optional) Instructions Pour the milk into a medium saucepan and warm over medium high heat until pleasantly warm but not boiling. Put the warmed milk into the blender together with the rest of the ingredients, except the beet powder garnish. Blend until smooth and frothy. Distribute between cups, garnish with the beet powder and enjoy warm. Store the leftovers refrigerated in an airtight container. This latte can also be enjoyed chilled or iced. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte Juicing Elderflower Lemonade Honey Miso Latte .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spirulina Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices

January 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices This post was created in partnership with Amira. This month we are focusing on recipes that will hopefully be helpful to those wanting to hit the reset button after all the holiday eating and drinking. I wanted a very manageable weekday dinner to be the first in the series, because we haven’t had one up in a while, and because I myself have been on the hunt for some new but trustworthy, quick and wholesome meal ideas. Most of my focus right now is on completing the kitchen renovation, a good part of which my husband and I have been doing ourselves. It’s been dragging on much longer than we expected – a common theme when it comes renovations, as I hear. We are finally down to the small finishing touches, but they somehow seem to be the hardest to complete. Cooking up large batches of un-elaborate, nourishing dishes like this stew to have on hand during the week has been one of my strategies for staying sane throughout this whole process. It’s amazing how helpful a home-cooked meal can be during times of stress. When looking for inspiration for balanced winter weeknight meals, I often turn to South Indian cuisine for its array of delicious vegetarian dishes and Ayurveda-approved ingredients. This particular stew is based on a recipe for sambar – a mung dal (yellow split mung beans that are protein-rich and affordable) stew that comes in hundreds of variations. The base for sambar is most commonly made up of mung dal that’s been cooked down to a porridge-like consistency and spiced, after which almost anything goes. You can include one or many stew-friendly vegetables in season, as well as other fun add ins like desiccated coconut. I love the versatility of this dish and usually just add in whatever vegetables or greens I have on hand. For this version, I kept things simple and only added chopped butternut squash and dried coconut – it can be as simple or as involved as you’d like. The ingredient list might seem long, but it’s mostly composed of spices, which play a huge role in building flavor in this otherwise modest stew. Each spice also brings its unique healing properties to the table – fennel helps aid digestion, turmeric is anti-inflammatory, fenugreek helps with blood sugar balance and much, much more. Like many Indian dishes, sambar is traditionally served over rice, and I’ve been truly enjoying serving it over Amira’s fragrant Thai Jasmine Brown Rice. Amira sent me a few of their premium long grain rice varieties to try, and I was consistently impressed with their quality and how distinctly different each kind tasted. Besides the jasmine brown rice, the variety that stood out to me is their Smoked Basmati Rice, which has a very unique smoked flavor and is really good in salads, and as a base for all kinds of veggie bowls. I’m crazy about smoked foods, so that one really hit the spot. If you see Amira rice in your grocery store, give it a try, I think you’ll really enjoy it! Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 3 cups water ½ cup mung dal ¼ teaspoon turmeric ¼ teaspoon cumin ¼ teaspoon whole fenugreek seeds (optional) 3 sprigs fresh curry leaves (optional) 1 small yellow onion - chopped ½ medium butternut squash - peeled and cubed ¼ cup desiccated coconut sea salt 1 tablespoon red chili powder 2 tablespoons ghee or coconut oil ¼ teaspoon whole black mustard seeds 1 whole dried red chili - torn in half ⅛ teaspoon whole fennel seeds 1 tablespoon fresh lemon or lime juice 1½ cups cooked rice of your choice - for serving cilantro - for garnish (optional) coconut milk or yogurt - for garnish (optional) Instructions Bring 3 cups of water to a boil in a medium pot. Have a tea kettle or another pot with about 1 more cup of hot water ready, in case you need more water later in the process. Once 3 cups of water in the pot are boiling, add mung dal, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek and curry leaves (if using). Lower heat to establish a steady simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Mix periodically to ensure the mung dahl doesnt stick to the pan. Discard curry sprigs, if using. Add onion, squash, desiccated coconut, and salt to the pot. If it seems like there isnt enough liquid in the pot, add a little more hot water from the tea kettle until the vegetables have room to simmer in the water, keeping the dal consistency like a soupy porridge. Continue simmering, covered, for another 20 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked through. Stir in chili powder at half time. Mix periodically to prevent any sticking. Once the vegetables are around 5 minutes away from being done, warm ghee/­­oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add mustard seeds and let toast for about 30 seconds, tossing all the while. Add the chili and fennel seeds and toast for another 30 seconds or until fennel is toasted in color and fragrant. Add the toasted spices along with the ghee/­­oil from the pan into the pot with the stew, mix it in and let simmer, covered, for another 5 minutes. Once stew is done cooking, discard the pepper and mix in the lemon/­­lime juice. Taste and adjust the salt. Serve stew over rice, garnished with cilantro and coconut milk/­­yogurt if desired. Notes 1. You can add any vegetables/­­greens you have on hand in place of the butternut squash here and simmer until done, thats what makes this stew so versatile. 2. Curry leaves are completely optional here, but if you can get your hands on some, add them - their unique flavor works very well in this stew. 3. Traditional sambar calls for hing and tamarind. If you have one or both, add ⅛ teaspoon of hing to the pan with the toasting spices, towards the end and add to the stew with the rest of the toasted spices and ghee/­­oil. Add 2 teaspoons tamarind paste in place of the lemon/­­lime juice and simmer stew for another 5 minutes to let the flavor incorporate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Purple Kale, Aubergine & Blackberry Salad

September 7 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Purple Kale, Aubergine & Blackberry Salad At first, it was a coincidence. When we looked at the vegetables we had brought home from the market this weekend, many of them just happened to have purple, violet and dark lavender tones. We talked about how that huge bunch of purple kale could make a beautiful salad base together with the rainbow chard, mint flowers and purple sugar snaps. It was at that point my obsessive side took over. “Let’s ONLY DO purple ingredients!” I shouted into Luise’s ear. She turned her head towards me with that hesitant look she always has when I get one of my “brilliant” ideas: “Ok, slow down now, let’s talk about the flavours first”. Of course I didn’t hear her as I was already writing a list with all the purplish ingredients I could think of: “aubergine, purple cauliflower, plums, figs, olives, blackberries, grapes, beetroot, red onion, …”. Some recipes are born out of genius flavour combinations or new preparation methods, this one simply started out as a colour. Luise did however quickly gain back control and started shifting focus to the flavour and combination of vegetables as well. In the end, I think we managed to combine both flavour, colour and texture in a great way. We roasted aubergine and purple spring onion in warm spices until soft and sweet. Massaged the kale with a flavourful dill, mint, lemon and honey dressing to round off its flavour and make it less sturdy. Cooked black lentils were added as a filler, along with rich and creamy avocado (even though it’s more black than purple - and green inside!). Hazelnuts are not purple at all but they added a nice crunch to the texture. Juicy blackberries made a perfect topping. The result was beautiful, a true harvest salad. Maybe not as purple as I originally imagined it (basically because most vegetables loose their colour when they are cut/­­baked/­­cooked), but still with lovely deep hues and so many interesting flavours - a mix of herby, sweet and tangy. When the salad was assembled it still felt like we missed a creamy element, so we tried the honey roasted feta that we had seen on New York Times Cooking last week. It was perfect. Burnt and caramelised on the outside and almost melted on the inside. It completely ruined the dark purple theme but flavour- and texture wise, it was worth the sacrifice. You’ll notice that I smudged it in mashed blackberries as a poor attempt to camouflage it.   We should perhaps add that this wasn’t our kids favourite dish. They picked out the blackberries, avocado and feta cheese from the salad, leaving the raw kale to us. I guess purple isn’t their colour… Purple Kale & Blackberry Salad with Roasted Honey Feta Vegans can just skip the feta cheese or replace it with hummus. And replace honey with maple syrup. Baked vegetables 1 aubergine /­­ eggplant 4 spring onions or 2 red onions 2-4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp ground cumin 1 pinch ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1 handful hazelnuts Cooked lentils 1/­­2 cup uncooked lentils (we used black lentils) 1 1/­­2 cup water 1 pinch sea salt Dressing 1/­­3 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 tsp honey or more to taste sea salt & pepper 1 large handful mixed fresh dill, parsley and mint Other salad ingredients 4 stalks curly kale, green or purple 4 stalks rainbow chard or spinach 2 avocadoes 1 small handful snap peas 1 punnet fresh blackberries, halved Roasted feta with honey (from NYT) 1 block feta cheese, patted dry 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp honey Start by preparing the baked vegetables. Preheat the oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wash and cut the aubergine into large cubes and trim and slice the onions, then place in a mixing bowl. Stir together oil and spices in a small bowl, pour the oil mixture over the aubergine and onions and toss to combine. Transfer to a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes or until very soft and golden, check every now and then to prevent from burning, the baking time depends on the size of the vegetables. Add the hazelnuts halfway through. Meanwhile, cook the lentils in a saucepan with the water for 15 minutes or until tender and can be mashed easily between two fingers. Add sea salt towards the end of the cooking time. Drain any excess water and leave to cool. Prepare the dressing by mixing oil, lemon juice, honey, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Chop the herbs finely and add to the oil mixture. Taste and adjust to your liking. Remove the stems from the kale and coarsely chop the leaves. Finely slice the chard. Place all in a large mixing bowl, add 2 tbsp of the dressing and massage for a couple of minutes until soft. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Mix the lentils with the remaining dressing and pour them over the kale and chard mixture. Cut the avocado into cubes, slice the snap peas and roughly chop the hazelnuts. Add to the salad bowl together with the roasted  aubergine, onions and hazelnuts. Toss slightly to combine and then scatter blackberries on top. If you like to serve the salad with the baked feta cheese, follow the instructions below. Keep the oven at 400°F /­­ 200°C. Place the feta cheese in a small ovenproof dish covered with baking paper and cover with oil. Bake in the oven for about 8 minutes, until soft but not melted. Melt the honey. Remove the cheese from the oven and turn the heat to broiler. With a baking brush, paint the cheese with the melted honey. Place back in the oven and broil until the top starts to brown. Use a spatula to immediately and carefully transfer the cheese to the salad, or serve it on the side.

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core

July 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core This week, I wanted to re-create my favorite Ben & Jerry’s ice cream flavor, making it vegan (though B&J came out with their own non-dairy ice cream, which is so awesome) and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods. Another thing I know people can’t get enough of in B&J’s ice cream are their decadent cores, so I went ahead and gave these Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops a chocolate core to really drive the point home. If you’re wondering why the pops are minty-colored, it’s due to the addition of spirulina, along with other nutritionally dense ingredients like hemp hearts and cacao nibs. A bonus – no ice-cream maker is needed for these. Moving to the U.S. from small-town Russia in the 90s and going to a Ben & Jerry’s ice cream shop for the first time was completely mind-blowing because a) back home, we did not have dedicated ice cream shops, b) ice cream flavors I grew up with were very basic and I had never seen so many extensive flavor options c) they sold little tubs of ice cream to take home, which was unheard of in Russia at the time d) everything tasted incredibly decadent and delicious. So here’s my B&J tribute, as a thanks for opening my eyes to possibilities I didn’t know existed. Read on for some weekend links and have a peaceful Sunday. Kids Taste-Test the New Ben & Jerry’s Vegan Ice Cream  Essentials – since we get many questions about our chosen kitchen and photography tools, we’ve made a page with links to all our favorite and most-used products – Kitchen Tools here, Photography here (also working on a round-up of favorite health-related books/­­cookbooks and natural beauty!) The Sad, Sexist History of Salad – Americans, in particular, strongly associate healthy or light foods, such as salad, chicken, and yogurt, with women, and unhealthy or heavy foods, such as beef, potatoes, and beer, with men, both men and women preferred unhealthy foods with masculine packaging and healthy foods with feminine packaging. Fascinating. The World’s Most Innovative Companies in 2016 – according to Fast Company Julia Turshen on the One Part Podcast – loved this, especially her point on asking for credit/­­compensation – if you don’t ask, you will never know what the possibilities are. You may know Turshen from co-authoring Gwyneth Paltrow’s cookbook, along with many others. Cannot wait for her own cookbook to come out. Meryl Streep: A League of Her Own, also, Taste of Streep!? Obama After Dark – how one can average only 5 hours of sleep a night AND run the country is beyond me, also Obama Sets the Record Straight on His 7-Almond Habit :) About Us – we’ve updated our about page a bit, with very important info like our zodiac signs ;) Snapchat – follow @golubkakitchen for all behind-the-scenes Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core   Print Serves: 7-10 pops Ingredients for the cherries 1 heaping cup cherries - pitted and halved 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon water for the spirulina mix 1½ cup raw cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours 1 cup canned unsweetened full fat Thai coconut milk 3 tablespoons maple syrup or more to taste ½-1 tablespoon spirulina powder ½ tablespoon vanilla extract ½ teaspoon xanathan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder (optional) 1 tablespoon shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 1-2 tablespoons cacao nibs for the chocolate core ⅓ of the spirulina mix 2 tablespoons shaved dark chocolate or raw chocolate 3 tablespoons raw cacao powder for the pops 7-10 tea cups, small glasses or pop molds neutral coconut oil for oiling the cups spirulina mix (recipe above) chocolate core (recipe above) 7-10 wooden sticks - soaked for 2 hours or overnight hemp hearts cacao nibs Instructions to prepare the cherries Combine cherries with maple syrup and bring to a boil in a small saucepan. Reduce the heat to a simmer and simmer for 2 minutes. Combine arrowroot powder with water in a small bowl and add to the saucepan, while stirring. The cherry compote should thicken slightly. Remove from heat and let cool. to make the pops Make the spirulina mix. Drain and rinse cashews and put into an upright blender, preferably high-speed. Add coconut milk, maple syrup, spirulina, vanilla, and xanathan gum/­­arrowroot powder, if using and blend until smooth. If not using a high-speed blender, optionally strain mixture through a fine-mesh strainer for the most smooth and velvety texture. Spoon about ⅓ of the spirulina mix into a medium, heat-proof bowl and set aside. Add shaved chocolate and cacao nibs to the blender with the remaining ⅔ of the spirulina mix and pulse to combine briefly. Transfer the mixture into a separate bowl, then fold in the cherries. Make the chocolate core. Place the reserved ⅓ of the spirulina mix onto a double boiler, add chocolate and let it melt, stirring to incorporate. Remove from the heat, add in cacao powder, mix to combine and let cool. Make the pops. Oil your cups/­­molds generously with coconut oil and spoon the spirulina-cherry mix in, leaving a well in the center for the core. Spoon the chocolate core into the well. Even out the surface and insert the wooden stick. Repeat with the rest of the pops. Freeze until completely firm. Prepare a plate with cacao nibs and hemp hearts for coating, along with a parchment paper-covered surface for placing pops onto. Take cups with pops out of the freezer and place into a dish with hot water for a minute, for easier removal. Remove popsicles from cups, pulling them out by the sticks. Dip the top of each pop into the prepared hemp/­­cacao nib mixture and press gently to make the pieces stick. Place onto a parchment paper-covered surface and keep frozen until ready to eat. Take the popsicles out of the freezer 5-10 minutes prior to eating. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi

June 15 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi My kid is completely obsessed with sushi rolls, and I’m starting to figure out that it’s the format itself that elicits all her fondness – she will eat anything wrapped up in nori and rice. Take these rolls, for example – there are strawberries, which Paloma loves, but there is also asparagus, which, at this stage in her life, she would never consider eating on its own. But last week, I made one batch of this sushi, most of which was eaten by Paloma with no notice of asparagus, and the next day she asked me to make more of the ‘same exact thing’… If that’s what gets her eating asparagus, I’m all for it! For the adults and the less picky, these sushi rolls have it all. They are summery, light and bright, a great small meal or snack for the sunny days ahead. I used black rice, one of my favorite grains out there, for a little more bite and nutrition. There are sweet summer strawberries, tender, crisp asparagus, and spinach for that extra green. Avocado is always a great finishing touch to any vegetable sushi, its buttery texture just goes so well with rice and slightly crunchy nori. There’s a certain belief out there about sushi being difficult to make at home, but unless you are shooting for Jiro-like perfection and tradition, it’s not a big deal at all, I promise. With a casual approach, it only takes a few fun motions to roll up a mean sushi meal for yourself. Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi   Print Serves: 32 sushi rolls Ingredients 2 tablespoons brown rice vinegar - divided 3 cups cooked black forbidden rice 1 teaspoon neutral coconut oil about 8 asparagus spears - tough ends cut off sea salt and black pepper - to taste 1 avocado - quartered 1/­­2 lemon or lime - juice 4 nori sheets - raw or toasted about 4-6 medium strawberries - sliced about 2 cups baby spinach Instructions Drizzle brown rice vinegar over cooked black rice in a medium bowl, mix to coat evenly. Warm coconut oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Add asparagus to the pan, followed by a pinch of salt and black pepper and saute for about 5 minutes, until bright green and crisp-tender. Slice each avocado quarter into three wedges. Squeeze lemon or lime juice over the avocado to prevent discoloration. Place one nori sheet at a time on a sushi mat or a cutting board, shiny side down and lines going horizontally. Measure 3/­­4 cup of black rice and cover the nori with it evenly, leaving a 1-inch border at the side opposite to you, parallel to the horizontal lines of the nori. Wet your hands to prevent rice from sticking to them when distributing. Arrange 3 avocado wedges along the side of nori closest to you, slightly overlapping them. Top with about 5-6 strawberry slices, overlapping those as well. Place 2 asparagus spears next to strawberry slices, tips facing the edges, followed by a few spinach leaves. Lightly moisten the uncovered border of the nori with water. Start rolling by folding the end of nori closest to you over the filling, squeezing firmly, and continue rolling to the end. The moistened border will stick and seal the roll. Wrap the sushi mat around the roll and squeeze gently to form the roll into its final shape. If not using a mat, squeeze with your hands to stabilize. Put the roll aside, seam-side down, and repeat with the rest of nori sheets and filling ingredients. Place one roll at a time on a cutting board and slice in half with a sharp, moistened knife. Then cut each piece in half again, wiping the knife in between cuts if necessary, and repeat by cutting each of the 4 pieces in half one last time. You should have 8 pieces. Serve immediately with tamari. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle Mango Salsa and an Ayurveda Birthday Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry and Asparagus Black Rice Sushi appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday

June 5 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday This Sunday’s flavors are lavender, chocolate and tahini. I’ve talked about my love for lavender on this blog quite a lot, and it’s hard not to sound like a bit of a broken record, but this small flower really does hold a special place in my heart (I cannot wait to make this milkshake and tart sometime this summer). I’m sharing my go-to vegan lavender ice cream recipe with the addition of rich and decadent chocolate-tahini bits. It has a creamy, luxurious texture, which combines so well with the refreshing flavors of lavender and chewy, bittersweet pieces of chocolate. Read on for some weekend links + a few more snaps, and enjoy your Sunday. Rachel Roddy’s Instagram – author of the Five Quarters cookbook shares snaps from her very Italian kitchen. Love the ‘real’ photography style and all the beautiful produce/­­dishes (also, her recipes at The Guardian). Aquafaba – have you tried cooking with it yet? I haven’t, but gearing up to. Olafur Eliasson – loved this feature on him and cannot wait to check out his cookbook, Food is more important than art. You die from not having food. You die from not having art, too--just not as fast. Ingredients in an all natural banana do not sound as natural as one would think – a fun infographic, plus blueberry and coffee bean Claire Cottrell on Apiece Apart Woman – enjoyed this interview and photos (love her Instagram as well) I found this to the point Q&A about antibiotic resistance to be very clear and helpful Things the world’s most and least privileged people say – for some perspective Blog Love – turmeric honey almond butter, vegan onigiri, white chocolate mousse with strawberry compote Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the chocolate tahini bits ½ cup dark chocolate chips or chopped chocolate ¼ cup tahini pinch of salt for the lavender ice cream 2 cans full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup plus 1 teaspoon dried lavender flowers ¼ cup maple syrup ½ teaspoon xanthan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder handful blueberries - for color (optional) Instructions to make the chocolate tahini bits In a double boiler, combine chocolate, tahini and salt. Gently heat to melt and stir to achieve a smooth mixture. Prepare a parchment paper-covered tray or cutting board. Spread the chocolate over the parchment in a thin layer. Place in the freezer to harden until ready to use. to make the ice cream In a medium saucepan, combine coconut milk and ¼ cup lavender. Bring to a boil over a medium-high heat, reduce to a simmer and let cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, let cool to a room temperature and strain. In a blender, combine the lavender milk with the remaining 1 teaspoon of lavender flowers, maple syrup xanthan/­­arrowroot, blueberries if using, and blend until smooth. Place the mixture in the refrigerator and let cool thoroughly, preferably overnight. Process in an ice cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. When the ice cream is almost done, remove the hardened chocolate out of the freezer and chop. Add to ice cream machine with the motor still running. Spoon ice cream into a container. Serve immediately as soft serve or place the ice cream in the freezer for 4 hours/­­overnight to harden. Remove from freezer 5-10 minutes before serving to let soften. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Melon Basil Summer Rolls Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Raw Chocolate Layer Cakes with Black Cherry and Orange .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Italian Cheesecake Jars

May 13 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Italian Cheesecake Jars I asked Luise if this was too simple? It’s almost not a recipe, just a quick thing we have been making when we crave dessert but don’t feel like busting out any mixers or even turning on the oven. “What, too simple? That’s my favorite kind of recipe. Nothing can ever be too simple!” she told me. So here it is. A simple Italian twist on cheesecake, served in small jars or glasses. It features two of our favourite summer fruits on a bed of creamy lemon & vanilla mascarpone and the simplest raw crumble you’ll ever make. Even though we sometimes make it on regular weeknights, this is the most perfect thing to serve on a summer buffet table. It’s quick and effortless and looks really pretty in small jars or shot glasses. It’s easy to quadruple the recipe too, so you could make 30 jars in no-time. The crumble is simply made from mashed dates, roughly chopped almonds and a pinch of salt. Simple and crunchy. It also keeps well without going soggy. The mascarpone filling is deliciously decadent. It can be replaced with thick Greek yogurt for a lighter twist. It can also be made vegan by replacing the mascarpone with coconut yogurt or by making the cashew filling from our flower power cake. We let the fruit macerate in a squeeze of lemon and honey. It makes it even more flavourful and it also helps the fruit release liquid that will sip down the sides of the jar like a natural fruit syrup. This simple fruit salad is also really good on its own or on top of any breakfast bowl. Italian Cheesecake Jars Makes 8 small jars or 4 larger ones If making this ahead, we’d recommend only filling the jars with crumble and mascarpone, and keeping the fruit salad in a separate jar until right before serving. Strawberries and peaches are often heavily sprayed so choose organic if possible. 15 strawberries, rinsed and hulled 3 peaches, rinsed 1 lemon, washed 2 tbsp (unheated) runny honey or maple syrup 80 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup raw almonds 8 soft dates, stones removed 1 pinch sea salt 250 g mascarpone 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla or pure vanilla extract  a small handful lemon balm or mint leaves Cut the fruit in smaller pieces and place in a bowl. Squeeze over 1/­­2 lemon and 1 tbsp honey, toss and let sit for 15 minutes. Roughly chop the almonds and mash the dates with a fork. Stir together and divide on the bottom of 8 small glasses or jars. Stir together mascarpone and vanilla, add zest and juice from the rest of the lemon together with 1 tbsp honey, stir until combined and then dollop it into the glasses on top of the date crumble. Add the marinated fruit right before serving them on the buffet table, top with lemon balm and decorate with flower petals, lavender or elderflowers. We have developed this recipe for ?hléns campaign Alla Länders Land which focuses on welcoming more food cultures to the Swedish summer table. 

Blackcurrant and Lavender Pie

September 4 2015 seitan is my motor 

Blackcurrant and Lavender PieToday’s Vegan Mofo challenge is called “Tell us about a weird food combination that you love.” Ha, good one. I don’t think I like a single weird food combination. I am very boring when it comes to flavours and sweet and sour is already too much for me. When I think about new recipes for this blog, I usually go for complementing and supporting flavours. Some of these combinations could be labeled as weird. For example, I like tart berries a lot and I like to exaggerate their flavour by pairing them with herbs. Black currants, sea buckthorn, blackthorn (sloe) are rarely sold at stores. They haven’t made it next to the much sweeter varieties such as raspberries, strawberries, and cultivated blueberries. Black currants, sea buckthorn berries, or sloes all have different flavours, but they have one thing in common. If you taste them, their flavour makes you think of Scandianvian forest, of moss and water drops on dark green leaves. You can smell conifers and moldy soil. Or in the case of sea buckthorn you can feel the wind in your face and hear the waves. These berries have a complex flavour, a hint of intractability, that is not pleasant for everyone. Some of their flavour comes from the essential oils and tannins present.  That is why they are not widely popular, I think. But this is what makes them so outstanding. Herbs usually have essential oils, too and that’s why they go so well with tart berries.  My favourite combination used to be berry plus rosemary, but this year I finally made use of the lavender bush in our yard. I used two teaspoons of dried lavender buds, but you can halve the amount, if you don’t trust this flavour combination. But that probably doesn’t count as weird anymore. If you don’t have black currants available you can use blueberries.   Print Black Currant and Lavender Pie IngredientsFor the crust 210 g (1 3/­­4 cups) flour 200 g (2 2/­­3 cups) ground hazelnuts 100 g (1 sifted cup) powdered sugar 100 g (1/­­2 cup) granulated brown sugar 110 g (1/­­2 cup) soft refined coconut oil 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) vegetable oil 1/­­2 teaspoon ground vanilla 1/­­2 teaspoon salt For the topping 450 g blackcurrant jam (storebought or homemade) 2 teaspoons dried lavender buds InstructionsTo make the crust, combine all ingredients except for the oils in a bowl. Add coconut and vegetable oil and knead until a crumbly dough forms. Reserve 1/­­4 of the dough for the topping and form the remaining dough into a disk. Wrap in foil and place in the fridge for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 200°C (400°F). Grease a round pie or tart pan with a diameter of 28 cm (11 inches). Roll the dough out between two sheets of plastic foil and press into the bottom and the edges of the pan. For the filling combine jam and lavender buds. (If the jam is very thick you can heat it for easier handling.) Pour into the crust and form the reserved dough into large crumbs. Distribute on top of the cake. Bake for 35 minutes and let cool completely before removing from the pan. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­09/­­blackcurrant-and-lavender-pie/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com

July 2015 Produce Picks: 5 Fruits and Vegetables to Use Now

July 10 2015 VegKitchen 

July 2015 Produce Picks: 5 Fruits and Vegetables to Use NowApricots – with all the melons and berries bursting onto the markets, dont forget about the stone fruits, especially apricots. These diminutive, smooth fruits often get overlooked, and theres more to do with them aside from eating out of hand or using in fruit salads, in both sweet and savory preparations. Here are a few: - Zucchini, Apricot, & Almond Salad - Lavender-Nut Chevre-Stuffed Apricots - Israeli Couscous Summer Pilaf Cherries – July brings out the best in these beloved sweet fruits. The best way to enjoy cherries is to just eat them out of hand, but there are other ways to use them other than putting them out in a bowl, though admittedly, pitting them can be a bit of a pain. Try some of these recipes; a few call for frozen cherries but of course, you can substitute fresh: - Cherry-Pomegranate Refrigerator Jam - Cherry-Basil Crumble Bars - Chocolate Cherry Bomb Smoothie - Kale Salad with Cherries and Lime Dressing Green beans – the season for fresh tender green beans is unfairly short; whereas these days you can get decent asparagus and greens all year round, it seems like midsummer is still the true season for perfect green beans that arent stringy and gnarly. Take full advantage! Youll find lots of ideas in our Green Beans category. Beets – Though available year round, midsummer is the time to get bigger bunches at great prices. Beets are a favorite among VegKitchen visitors, as several of our beet features are among our most popular. Beets can be a bit perplexing to prepare, so you may find How to Cook Beets (or use them raw) useful. Make sure to look for summer varieties like golden and chiogga beets. Youll find lots of great ways to use them in our Beets category. And if youd like a more curated set of our favorites, here are 5 Delicious Recipes for Using Beets. Eggplant – Eggplant lovers rejoice in midsummer, as this versatile veggie becomes widely available in all shapes and sizes, including your standard dark purple variety, plus white, striped, and the slender Japanese type. Youll find lots of tasty ways to use it in Eggplant: An Extravaganza of Recipes. For a curated set of ideas, see 6 Satisfying Eggplant Recipes.


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