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Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes

January 1 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes Lauren Haynes is a folk herbalist, medicine maker, plant enthusiast, and the founder of Wooden Spoon Herbs, a small apothecary line based in the Appalachian mountains. Take a look at Lauren’s shop offerings, and you’ll be immersed in a world of plant-powered tinctures, salves, oxymels, and teas, each one more magical than the other. In this interview, Lauren tells us about self-care as a form of self-respect, kindness as a form of beauty, her favorite plants for stress, beauty, and colds (and more!), the importance of sourcing her ingredients locally and working with what’s available, as well as exercise, sustenance, inspiration, procrastination, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Oh, open and free, absolutely. Since I work from home, things end up being pretty routine: tea, emails, breakfast. But if I have my way I love to see how the day unfolds uninhibited. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Most mornings start with a hot tea or something creamy with raw milk and occasionally marshmallows. I check and return emails first thing, then Ill meditate and make some breakfast and get to work. On lazier mornings well go into the small town nearby and eat eggs benedict and read the paper. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My new favorite nighttime tool is the Flux app for my computer. It gradually turns your screen from blue light to orange with the arc of the day, so the blue light doesnt deter melatonin production come bedtime. Other than that, just reading a great book until my eyes get tired. Living out in the county where its dark and quiet helps me sleep soundly every night. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – smoked salmon omelette with sauteéd greens Lunch – egg salad sandwich with a bowl of good soup Snack – fruit or hummus or a little chocolate Dinner – soul food: pinto beans, cornbread, a baked sweet potato and collard greens, topped with hot sauce and ferments and a slice of blue cheese -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink tea most mornings. Sometimes matcha or Earl Grey, or sometimes just ginger and lemon balm, to ground and calm myself before a hectic day. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Um... yes, check. I have a major sweet tooth and Lilys stevia-sweetened chocolate bars save my life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Right now my regimen includes fish oil, Mothers Best beef liver pills, a tincture of medicinal mushrooms, and evening primrose oil. I also love using lymphatic herbs steeped in vinegar throughout the year. Every spring I steep whatever edible herbs are coming up naturally in raw apple cider vinegar: plantain, violet leaf, dead nettle, dandelion greens, chickweed and cleavers. That lasts me all year and keeps me feeling vital, just a spoonful a day. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I try to exercise but if I have a full schedule its the first thing I cut out. I live on a tract of wilderness, so walking a few miles a day is super easy and I do that interspersed with yoga when Im feeling too tired to get outside. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? A little bit of both! Its definitely hard to make the time for it since I work from home and just go, go, go. I definitely find walking in the woods pleasurable, so that keeps me motivated to exercise. I cant even imagine going to a gym... Maybe someday. Exercise is something Im starting to get excited about. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? True beauty is when someone makes you feel like your soul is illuminated by the way that they treat you. Thats what is beautiful to me. If I want external beauty, Ill just scroll Instagram for a bit, you know? But true kindness is actual beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Laidback is how I would describe my skincare routine. See also: erratic. I use a rosewater and witch hazel toner daily (Poppy & Someday), followed by a blend of rosehip and carrot seed oil (Zizia Botanicals). Sometimes I use a gentle rose quartz scrub on my face (Aquarian Soul), followed by oil cleansing, but usually Im pretty lowkey. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! Nettle and alfalfa infusions, and also evening primrose oil internally. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Drink tons of water, sleep as much as you can, and wear red lipstick. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Consistent routines are hard for me, but I am constantly checking in to make sure I dont get overwhelmed by stress, even if that means five minutes of yoga in the middle of the day. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I really love regular acupuncture treatments and massage, as well as daily meditation and moxibustion. Calming teas that ease tension, like ginger and chamomile. Also just goofing off as much as I can get away with. You cant be silly and stressed at the same time. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? My first line of defense is a few dropperfuls of fire cider. I make one called Sunshine Cider with turmeric and rosehips, but my friend Gretchen made me some with habanero peppers and that always helps me stay on the right side of health. Fire cider, a shot of elderberry syrup and then some red root tincture, an amazing lymphatic herb that relieves a sore throat. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely bleed together, as I work from home and run my business with my partner. I try to take the weekends off and get out of the house daily to break up the work mode, even if its just a drive to the post office. Luckily, I love my work because its a huge part of my life. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Honestly, mindfulness is key. Just checking in with myself constantly to see how Im feeling, why Im feeling that way and what I need. I just take little tea or chocolate breaks or go put some sun on my face or make a nourishing meal. A hot shower if Im feeling cold. Self massage if Im feeling anxious. Shutting the computer if Im getting tired. And making time for the little things that make me happy, like reading a book. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Cleaning up my diet was key for me in resolving a lot of health issues. In college I was just eating garbage and drinking alcohol and doing all the teenage things. Once I realized that youre literally what you eat, and started treating my body with respect, a lot shifted for me. I really feel like that small change helped align me with the path Im on now, which is 100% what Im supposed to be doing. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Im usually brimming with ideas and running myself ragged trying to make them all happen, so if I struggle with anything its occasional procrastination. Usually this looks like doing the easier things on my to-do list before the hard-hitting work chores, which isnt such a bad thing. I just kind of let myself have some slower times, because I work really hard. I may sip tea and pull tarot cards and then eventually get a burst of energy. Or sometimes I do nothing for like two full days. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So, so many. I love The Gift of Healing Herbs by Robin Rose Bennett and Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz, as well as so many books from the 70s by obscure hippies and natural living advocates. Living on the Earth by Alicia Bay Laurel, for example. Knowledge -- What was your path to studying herbology and founding Wooden Spoon Herbs? I came to herbs when looking for a path to self-sufficiency. I romanticized living off the land, providing all that I would need for myself through my connection to the earth. And thats basically how it happened. I got all the books I could find about herbalism, read them, and started making herbal remedies. I started selling them slowly and it just kind of took off. Then I got to put my business hat on and thats been such a rewarding challenge. -- Can you talk a little bit about your decision to work only with herbs native to your home region of Appalachia? Theres so much to say about this. When I started opening my eyes to the bounty that surrounded me, it struck me as absurd to order herbs from suppliers that sourced from the far corners of the earth, when we had so many of the same herbs that could be sourced from the bioregion of Appalachia. For example, why am I going to order nettle that comes from Croatia when my friend has an acre of it on her farm? And no offense to Croatia or the herbalists that use those sources, but it just wasnt for me. I saw the opportunity to create a righteous supply chain and source from local farmers and forage my materials. To this day I still source directly from small organic farms around the country. Appalachias medicinal herbs are legendary: ginseng, goldenseal, bloodroot. People from all over the world use these herbs exclusively. And many of the herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine grow in Appalachia, because when the continents were Pangea parts of what is now China and parts of Appalachia were the same land. The geography of these regions is still very similar, and that is really special. So I wanted to learn about these plants for myself, because they are my neighbors and we share the same space. Not to mention that my family has been on this land for at least five generations, probably more. Its my most recent ancestral tradition, and I think its really important to learn about the traditions of your own ancestors so that youre not co-opting someone elses. Our pasts are precious. Finally, I believe in slow, local medicine for the same reasons I believe in slow, local foods – because theyre more potent and they taste better. -- What are some of your best-selling products and what herbs is your customer most excited about at the moment? My bestsellers are the Anxiety Ally, Brain Tonic, Moontime Magic and Migraine Melter tinctures. Elderberry Sumac Syrup is always a hit, as well as the Golden Cocoa (adaptogenic golden milk meets hot chocolate). I also have some new, more esoteric offerings based on the elements, and the Spirit one has been selling really well. I think my customers are just always after herbs that ground and expand the spirit, which is super beautiful. That and herbs for stress, always. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment?  Podcasts! All the podcasts: Medicine Stories, Thats So Retrograde, So You Wanna Be A Witch, Being Boss. That and the color cobalt blue. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love seeking out hot springs, getting massages and acupuncture, going to the movies with my partner and eating at good restaurants. In the summer, swimming in the river behind my house and lying in the sun. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Caravan by Stephen Gaskin Song/­­Album – Tried So Hard by Gene Clark Piece of art – the entire Motherpeace tarot deck -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? My favorite mohair cardigan, a striped shirt, high-waisted leggings and denim, Poppy & Somedays Gypsy Rose Toner, whatever books Im reading, a notebook and Uniball pen, magazines, calming tinctures, bagged tea, thermos, Ricardo Medina botines, charcoal toothbrush -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jess Fuery, Beatrice Valenzuela, Shiva Rose, the founders of Cap Beauty, Ashley Neese, Connie Matisse of East Fork Pottery, jeweler Annika Kaplan, Erica Chidi Cohen, Rachel Craven, Beth Kirby of Local Milk, Rachel Budde of Fat and the Moon, Kristen Dilley of Nightingale Acupuncture, and, naturally, Ilana Glazer Photos by Beth Kirby and Lauren Haynes You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Eatin Good in Granada

November 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Although I dont think it formally deserves this title, so far Spain feels like the meat capital of the world. However, Granada (in the south of Spain) has a booming vegan scene thats growing every year!  I didnt get to spend much time in Granada, but I did have the opportunity to work with an incredible little vegetarian restaurant that offered a heap of superb vegan dishes by the name of AlLaurel. This cozy veggie bistro is centrally located by the famous Catedral de Granada and welcomes you in with chic styling, a delicious menu del día, and local artisanal wines and cervezas. While there I got to sample a few of their famous dishes including a leek and ginger soup, seitan skewers (drooling), and traditional tomato and avocado salad. The cuisine was fantastically fresh, obviously organic, and perfectly plated by Ále (short for Alejandro), the restaurants lead chef. I left AlLaurel with a happy tummy and a newfound respect for seitan. The next day, while in search for some lunch in town, I stumbled upon a little vegan tapas bar called El Ojú. You heard me right, a vegan TAPAS bar. You know, where you buy a drink and you […] The post Eatin Good in Granada appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Pumpkin Pasta Squares with Red Cabbage

December 16 2016 Veganpassion 

Pumpkin Pasta Squares with Red Cabbage Hey lovelies! Christmas isn't too far away and I'm dreaming about a christmas menu. I cant decide which courses I'm going to put into my four exciting menus. On saturday I'm going to show you my four favourite christmas menus including the recipes! The pumpkin paste squares are a treat for one's buds at autumn-winter time and they're a lot of fun cooking with the whole family. Through the easy technique they're made very quick and they taste gread either you boil them or roast them. Makes 4 portions. For the pasta dough: 200 g coarse-grained spelt flour 90 ml water, lukewarm 3 tbsp. olive oil 1 pinch of salt Give coarse-grained spelt flour and salt into a mixing bowl and mix together. Add water and oil and mix again. Put the dough crumbs on a worktop and knead about 10-15 minutes until the dough is smooth. Put the dough into clear film and in a box and let it rest for about 20-30 mintues while preparing the filling. For the pumpkin filling: 500 g hokkaido pumpkin (420 g without seeds) 1 tsp. lemon juice 3 tbsp. water oilve oil salt, pepper 1 onion 150 g smoked tofu 1 tbsp. (30 g) almond butter 60 g breadcrumbs, whole spelt 1 tbsp. yeast flakes nutmeg, paprika spice sage Cut pumpkin into stripes and sprinkle with lemon juice and water. Heat up the pumpkin until the water has vaporized. Then add olive oil and roast it. Add onion rings and smoked tofu crumbs and roast everything. Flavour it. Put the mixture in a mixing bowl and add almond butter, breadcrumbs and yeast flakes. Mix everything together and taste it. Cut sage or put dry sage into mortar and bump it. Put some flour on your worktop and roll out the pasta dough very thin. If you have a pasta machine you can use this one but it will work with a rolling pin as well. Roll dough out longish and put each 1 tbsp. filling with some space on it. Fold the dough and press the interfaces together. Then simply cut out the pasta squares. Put the squares on a plate with flour and sprinkle with flour and let them rest. For red cabbage with apple: 600 g red cabbage 1 onion 1 apple 100 ml orange juice laurel, cloves, cinnamon Slice cabbage fine. Cut onion and apple into cubes. Roast the onions in some olive oil and add apple and red cabbage and base orange juice on it. Flavour it and let it cook on average heat about 10 minutes. Bake pasta thoroughly with sage in some olive oil or some margarine and serve with red cabbage. Enjoy your meal!

How to Join a Food Swap

March 18 2015 Vegetarian Times 

How to Join a Food Swap Trading edibles may be a time-honored school ritual, but adults looking for more variety in their menus are getting into the act too. Options include food swaps, package swaps, garden swaps, and community-supported agriculture box swaps. ?Take your pick, and start swappin. Why should kids have all the fun? Meet-and-Greet Swaps Cook up something delicious, package it in individual serving sizes, and when you arrive at your food swap location, set the servings on a table. Dont forget to put out samples! ?Now circle the table with other swappers. See something youd like ?to trade? On the sheet of paper next to the item, write your name and what youve brought to the table. ?When times up, check the sheet ?next to your item to see who wants ?to barter. Let the swapping begin! Samples, Please Among the 100 percent veg swaps youll find nationwide, the NW Philly Vegetarian/­­Vegan Food Swap meets the first Monday of the month. We all love cooking, and were all mostly health-conscious, says Amy Doolittle, who has been with the group since its inception. The DC Vegan Baking Swap gathers the first Saturday of the month. Every month we use recipes from a specific cookbook or blog, says Laurel Gowen, the groups organizer. Each member bakes ?a different recipe. Favorites include ?a mango lassi cake from Cheers to Vegan Sweets--Gowen requested it for her most recent birthday. Sign Up Visit meetup.com for food swaps in your community. Also check bulletin boards at local cooking schools, fitness studios, health-food stores, and community centers. Once you decide on a swap, Doolittle suggests you clearly identify what youre contributing and list ingredients so people with allergies can take note. And allow plenty of time for the swap, says Doolittle: Time can sneak up on you. Pen-Pal Swaps A package swap is like Christmas every month. Simply sign up ?with an online organizer, who pairs you with another swapper. Next put together a package filled with your favorite vegan or vegetarian items from your area. Send it off, and wait for your ?swap partners package to arrive. Samples, Please Im a dark-chocolate lover, says Chicago resident Diana Morrow. So when she opened ?a recent package from the Power to the Veg! swap, she was happy to see ?a 99% chocolate bar from trendy TCHO. Morrow has participated ?regularly in the swap, organized by Jessica Schoech as an offshoot of her Power to the Veg! Facebook group. Schoech figured that a swap box would be a great way to introduce ?new vegans to the lifestyle. Power to the Veg! swap partners can live anywhere in the U.S.; Vegan Package Swap is an international package swap: It would be easier to list countries ?not represented, but were in 40 countries for sure, says organizer Glauce Ferrari. The variety of products you can get from different countries is amazing! Sign Up Morrow offers this advice for putting together your ?first package: Ask questions of ?your partner in the first e-mail exchange, for example, Any dietary restrictions? Any kids or pets who might like a treat? Whats your favorite and least favorite cuisine? She also suggests mixing it up: Anything local and difficult to ?get elsewhere is appreciated. Ferrari cautions swappers to ?watch the weight of their package--otherwise shipping costs can be expensive--and avoid sending ?fresh fruits and vegetables to ?other countries, a no-no due to customs laws. Packaged goods ?are fine, however. So is chocolate, though usually not in summer. ?It makes a mess because it melts, Ferrari explains. Green-Thumb Swaps Knee-deep in zucchini? Overrun by oranges? The garden swap is an organized version of what gardeners have been doing informally for years: trading bumper crops. Similar to taking part in a meet-and-greet swap, you bring homegrown items to a central location, put them on display, and make note of what youd like to trade. Once everyones perused the options, the swapping begins. Samples, Please Every Tuesday evening, from April through October, the tiny town of Albany, Calif., holds a garden swap. Weve grown from 20 to up to 40 traders each week, says swap coordinator Mary McKenna. She notes the best exchanges arent always the fruits and vegetables: Ive learned more about gardening by listening to the tips and advice swappers give each other. Darnell Stewart, host of a weekly garden swap in Richmond, Calif., says its introduced him to new varieties of produce. In Maryland, the Eldersburg Branch of the Carroll County Library holds a different kind of garden swap: here, large boxes are put in the lobby, and anyone with extra produce to share places it in the box. Weve had everything from habanero peppers to zucchini and tomatoes, says library associate Christine Kirker, who started the program. Sign Up The best part about trading at a garden swap is your produce doesnt have to be perfect. Gardeners understand smaller fruits, bruises, and misshapen items, McKenna says. San Francisco-Bay Area residents can search playndirt?.com, a Web site organized by Stewart, for swaps close by. Elsewhere, check local libraries, garden clubs, community centers, and state extension offices (educational networks created by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture) for swaps in your area. Produce-Box Swaps You know those CSA boxes filled with fruits and vegetables grown by a local farmer? Sometimes, the box you receive is filled with items--say, radishes--that you rarely eat, and not nearly enough bell peppers for your famous stuffed-peppers recipe. What to do? If youre lucky, your CSA may offer a swap box. Samples, Please Our farmer brings an extra share of vegetables, which we put into the swap box, says Jen Robertson with the ?Greenwood Heights CSA in ?Brooklyn, N.Y. Every member ?is welcome to trade for something else. There is no guarantee that ?there will be anything in the swap box that you want to trade for, but there is the opportunity. Any leftover produce is up for grabs ?for members who work the shift, ?and what remains is given to people in need. Sign Up To learn more about CSAs, visit the Local Harvest Web site, localharvest.org/­­csa. Enter your location for a list of local farms that offer CSA subscriptions. Youll need to check with the farmers about whether they offer a swap box.


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