lassi - vegetarian recipes

lassi vegetarian recipes

Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1

March 25 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1 I’ve been posting regular pantry cooking stories on our Instagram, and I thought I’d have those recipes live here in written form as well. We’ve been minimizing our grocery shopping as much as possible, mostly depending on pantry staples and some longer lasting produce for our meals. This is not your regular, well-photographed post since all the photos are just quick cellphone snapshots I took at dinner time, but hopefully you won’t mind. The recipes are also very off-the-cuff and based on what we had in the pantry, so please feel free to adjust them according to what you have on hand. That’s really what these dishes are all about! The theme here is canned tomatoes, since they are pantry royalty and can bring big flavor to all kinds of dishes, with very little effort. There are two tomato-based stews, a lush tomato pasta, a tempeh sausage recipe, and a little banana bread treat at the end. I hope to do more of these posts very soon as I continue exploring this theme. Let us know if you have any requests or need help with any particular ingredient/­­dish, etc. Sending big love as always. Few things are as easy and satisfying as a simple marinara pasta, which can be easily made with canned tomatoes. The extra garlic and extra cooking time makes this version especially lush. You can watch me make it here. Lush Marinara Pasta   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced sea salt 5 cloves of garlic - thinly sliced 1 28 oz can whole peeled tomatoes - crushed up with your hands pinch of red pepper flakes - to taste a few sprigs of fresh basil, plus more for garnish 2 teaspoons sugar (only if needed) about 10 oz pasta of choice Instructions Heat a medium pot over medium heat. Add a generous pour of olive oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and saute for another 30 seconds or until fragrant. Add the tomatoes, red pepper flakes, basil sprigs, and more salt if your tomatoes are unsalted. Bring the mixture to a gentle simmer and simmer, stirring frequently, for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until the sauce is thickened and glossy. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. If your sauce tastes too acidic, add the sugar. Transfer about half or more of the sauce to a separate container to use later, leaving the rest in the pot. Meanwhile, boil a pot of water and cook pasta according to the instructions on the package. Save about 1 cup of the starchy pasta water. Drain your pasta and add it to the pot with the reserved sauce. Start mixing, adding small splashes of the starchy pasta water, until the sauce is well-incorporated and sticking to the pasta. Garnish with more basil and enjoy. Notes You can use leftover pasta sauce in any of the dishes in this post that call for tomatoes. 3.5.3226   Pappa al Pomodoro is a Tuscan bread and tomato soup, and it’s the coziest thing ever, plus a great way to use up stale bread. We filled this one out with white beans and kale for a more one-stop meal. You can watch me make it here. Pappa al Pomodoro with White Beans and Kale   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients 4 thick slices of crusty bread, preferably stale 2-3 slices of garlic olive oil ½ large yellow onion - diced sea salt ½-1 teaspoon dried marjoram or oregano (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes - to taste 14.5 oz can diced fire-roasted tomatoes 1½ teaspoon coconut sugar 1 15 oz can or 1½ cups cooked white beans vegetable broth 2 large handfuls of kale - chopped Instructions If your bread isnt stale, toast it. Generously rub each piece of bread with the garlic on both sides. Slice or break the bread up into smaller pieces. Mince any left-over garlic. Heat a large pot over medium heat and add a pour of olive oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic, marjoram/­­oregano, if using, and red pepper flakes, and stir around for another 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes, coconut sugar, white beans, more salt to taste, and enough vegetable broth to achieve a chunky stew consistency. Bring to a simmer. Once simmering, stir in the kale. Let simmer with the lid askew for about 15 minutes. Taste for salt and spice and adjust if needed. Distribute the garlicky bread between bowls. Pour the stew over. Garnish with a drizzle of olive oil and/­­or any herbs of choice. Notes You can use any kind of canned tomatoes or even tomato sauce for this recipe, just adjust the salt and cooking times accordingly. 3.5.3226   This is not a traditional Chana Masala by any means, but it uses a similar principle of chickpeas stewed with tomatoes and spices. I think that roasted cauliflower goes really well with this dish, and the (super easy!) chutney brings a much-needed pop of green. You can watch me make this dish here. Chana Masala with Roasted Cauliflower and Cilantro Chutney   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients for the chana masala 1 head cauliflower - cut into florets avocado oil or other oil of choice sea salt black pepper 1 yellow onion - diced 1-inch piece of ginger - grated or minced 4 cloves of garlic - grater or minced 1 teaspoon curry powder, or to taste 1½ 15 oz cans or about 2¼ cups cooked chickpeas 1-1½ cups tomato sauce or other canned tomatoes purified water juice from ½ lemon for the cilantro chutney 1 bunch cilantro with stems - roughly chopped 1 serrano pepper - seeded if you prefer less spice 1 teaspoon coconut sugar sea salt juice from ½ lemon Instructions to make the chana masala Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a lined baking tray. Place the cauliflower on the tray, drizzle it with some oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 30 minutes, stirring halfway, or until the cauliflower is cooked through and caramelized in parts. Heat a pot over medium heat and add a pour of oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the ginger, garlic, curry powder, and some black pepper, and saute for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the chickpeas, stir to coat, and let the chickpeas toast in the spices for 3-5 minutes. Add the tomato sauce and enough water to thin everything out to a chunky stew consistency. Add more salt if needed (this will depend on whether your chickpeas and tomatoes were salted). Bring to a simmer and let simmer for about 15 minutes, or until the cauliflower is finished roasting. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Turn off the heat and stir in the lemon juice. Serve with the roasted cauliflower and cilantro chutney (recipe follows). to make the cilantro chutney Combine the cilantro, serrano, sugar, salt to taste, and lemon juice in a high speed blender. Blend until smooth. You shouldnt need water, but add small splashes of water if your blender has a difficult time getting going. Notes If you made our freezer bouillon, you can use about 5-6 teaspoons of the fiery freezer bouillon in place of the onions, ginger, and garlic in this recipe. 3.5.3226   This is a riff on the Italian classic of sausage and peppers, except that the ‘sausage’ is made by cooking tempeh with all kinds of herbs and spices, which makes it incredibly flavorful. Feel very free to adjust the spices according to what you have on hand, you kind of can’t go wrong here! You can watch me make this dish here. Tempeh Sausage, Peppers, and Onions   Print Serves: 4-5 Ingredients avocado oil or other oil of choice 1 yellow onion - sliced sea salt 2 red and/­­or orange bell peppers - cored and sliced splash of beer (optional) 2 8 oz packages of tempeh - crumbled tamari - to taste maple syrup - to taste 2 cloves garlic - minced 1 tablespoon minced fresh sage (or use dried sage) 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 teaspoon coconut sugar ½ teaspoon garlic powder ½ teaspoon onion powder ½ teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon dried thyme ¼ teaspoon chili powder pinch of red pepper flakes pinch of smoked salt (totally optional) Instructions Heat a large pan over medium heat and add a pour of oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and saute for 1-2 minutes to give the onions a head start. Add the peppers and another pinch of salt, and saute for about 5 minutes, until starting to soften. Add a splash of beer, if using, and let it cook off for 1-2 minutes. Turn the heat down to medium-low, cover the pan, and let the onions and peppers stew for 20 minutes, or until soft and melted. If your pan gets too dry, add a splash of water. Meanwhile, put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl and drizzle some tamari and maple syrup over it. Mix to coat and let sit. Gather all your spices for the tempeh sausage by measuring them out into one bowl: garlic, sage, tomato paste, coconut sugar, garlic powder, onion powder, smoked paprika, dried thyme, chili powder, red pepper flakes, and smoked salt, if using. Once the onions and peppers are done cooking, remove them from the pan and set aside for now. Add more oil to the pan. Add the tempeh and stir to coat it in the oil. Press the tempeh into the pan in one even layer and let brown undisturbed for about 3 minutes. Stir the tempeh, press it into the pan again, and keep cooking until mostly golden brown. Stir in the prepared spice mix and cook the tempeh for another 2-3 minutes, until fragrant. Taste for salt and spices and adjust if needed. Add the onions and peppers back in, stir to incorporate, and let everything warm through together. Enjoy the sausage as is or on sandwiches, over rice, etc. 3.5.3226   In our last post, I talked about my sourdough starter and how I’ve been experimenting with recipes that use up sourdough discard from feeding the starter. So far I’ve made cookies and this banana bread, which turned out delicious, but didn’t really taste like sourdough. It’s a great way to save some flour in any case, if you have a starter. You can watch me make it here. Vegan Sourdough Banana Bread   Print Adapted from The Baking Fairy - this is a great recipe to use if you dont have sourdough! Serves: 1 standard loaf Ingredients 5 very ripe bananas - peeled, divided ½ cup sourdough discard/­­starter ¼ cup refined coconut oil - melted or soft ¼ cup non-dairy milk 2 teaspoons vanilla extract ½ cup plus 1 tablespoon coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling generous pinch of sea salt 1½ cups all purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda Instructions Preheat the oven to 350° F (175° C). Prepare an oiled and parchment-lined loaf pan. Mash 4 of the bananas in a large bowl. Add the sourdough discard, coconut oil, milk, and vanilla. Use a fork to mix until smooth. Add the sugar, salt, flour, and baking soda. Mix to just incorporate. Transfer the batter to the prepared loaf pan. Slice the remaining banana in half lengthwise and use it to decorate the top of the loaf. Sprinkle more coconut sugar over the banana and top of the loaf. Bake for 50 minutes. Cover with a piece of domed parchment paper and continue baking for another 10 minutes, or until golden on top and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Let cool for at least 20 minutes in the loaf pan, then transfer to a cooling rack and let cool for another 20 minutes. Slice and enjoy. 3.5.3226   Other pantry-friendly recipes we’re cooking this week: - Cozy Pantry Stew - Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes - Fall-Apart Caramelized Cabbage The post Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Scalloped Potatoes (Spicy Baked Potatoes) in Creamy Sauce

March 25 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Scalloped Potatoes (Spicy Baked Potatoes) in Creamy Sauce (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Scalloped Potatoes (Spicy Baked Potatoes) in Creamy Sauce Scalloped Potatoes are a classic dish with layers of potatoes topped with a delicious creamy sauce! It is the perfect comfort food and side dish to any meal. A little background to the origin to this dish: When I first came to the United State, I was fortunate enough to meet a very kind elderly woman named Helen. She was so kind and helped me a lot when I first came to this country. She was the same age as my grandmother, but she wanted me to simply refer to her as Helen. We became so close that she eventually became another grandmother for my kids when I was away from my family and country. She truly was a blessing to our family. Scalloped potatoes was one of her favorite vegetarian favorite dishes to make for us. She would make this as a side dish for Easter and Thanksgiving. The ingredients are simple, and the dish is easy to make. I got inspired to make this dish while going through old photos. It has been 30 years since Helen passed away, but she will never be forgotten. I decided to add a variation to this recipe by adding some veggies and making it little spicy. This recipe will serve 4. Course Side Dish Cuisine American Keyword Baked Potatoes, Baked Vegetable, Cream Sauce, Creamy Butternut squash, easy cooking, Homemade, Main Meal, Side Dish, Spicy Baked Potatoes, Spinach Pasta, Vegetable Pasta, Vegetarian, Video Recipe, Zucchini pasta Servings 4 people Ingredients3 medium sized potatoes peeled and sliced about 1/­­8 inch thick 1/­­4 cup green peas 1/­­4 cup corn kernels 1/­­4 cup bell pepper chopped 1/­­4 cup carrots shredded 1 Tbsp green chilies finely chopped (this is optional) 2 Tbsp cilantro chopped For white sauce2 Tbsp olive oil 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour plain flour, maida 1/­­8 tsp black pepper 1/­­2 tsp red chili flakes adjust to taste 1/­­2 cup heavy cream 1 1/­­2 cup milk 1/­­2 tsp salt InstructionsSauceIn a small frying pan, heat the oil over low medium heat and add all-purpose flour, stir for a minute. Add black pepper, chili flakes, and salt, stir for another minute. Reduce heat to low. While stirring slowly add cream making sure there are no lumps. Add a small amount of milk at a time. The mixture will start becoming thick, continue adding a little milk at a time whisking until smooth. AssemblyPreheat oven to 350 degrees F (190 degrees C). I am using 5 x 7 Pyrex pan to make the Scalloped Potatoes. Grease the pan. layer the potatoes evenly in the pan. Pour cream sauce just covering the potatoes. Now spread the vegetables, bell pepper, carrots, green peas, corn, green chilies and cilantro. Layer the potato again over the vegetables. Pour the sauce making sure covering the potatoes evenly. Bake it for about 40-45 minutes, potatoes should be tender and should be brown from the top. Scalloped Potatoes are ready, nice color. Enjoy. NotesI prefer Yukon gold or Russet potatoes for this dish. You can use different vegetables of your choice, like broccoli, cauliflower, green beans, spinach. You might also like Vegetable Kathi Rolls, Mexican Bhel, Vegan Macaroni and Cheese The post Scalloped Potatoes (Spicy Baked Potatoes) in Creamy Sauce appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Gobi Aloo Wrap – Cauliflower, Potato & Toasted Red Lentil Vegan Hummus Wrap

March 18 2020 Vegan Richa 

Gobi Aloo Wrap – Cauliflower, Potato & Toasted Red Lentil Vegan Hummus Wrap This delicious vegan hummus wrap is layered with creamy red lentil hummus, fragrant Indian Aloo Gobi potato and pea stir-fry, and crisp pickled onions!  Perfect for packing for a healthy lunch! Jump to Recipe Editors Note: This post was originally published in September 2013 and has been updated for accuracy and comprehensiveness in March 2020. Red Lentil Hummus Wraps with Aloo Gobi & Pickled Onions Time for another delicious vegan wrap filled with a classic Indian dish – Aloo Gobi.  If you don’t like to eat a big Indian meal, all spread out on one big plate with a flatbread, breaking a flatbread into pieces using your hand. picking up the dry veggie side with the flatbread and dipping it in the lentil dal or other soups/­­stews etc. Well, then you can put everything into a wrap This vegan hummus wrap. Make it! It is filled with my Dad’s delicious Gobi Aloo Mutter (Indian Cauliflower Potato Stir-fry), some thick red lentil hummus – Masoor Dal, fresh cilantro and pickled onions. Serve with some cilantro chutney or Sriracha. Everything that can go on a Thali(plate), can go into this hummus wrap! I used red/­­pink/­­orange lentils for this hummus wrap since they cook really quickly. You can use any lentil or bean really. Just add some spices, cook and mash them up and use as a hummus base. Any Indian spiced Daal cooked with less water can be made into hummus. We should all eat more lentils:) Continue reading: Gobi Aloo Wrap – Cauliflower, Potato & Toasted Red Lentil Vegan Hummus WrapThe post Gobi Aloo Wrap – Cauliflower, Potato & Toasted Red Lentil Vegan Hummus Wrap appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-based

March 16 2020 Meatless Monday 

Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-basedFor many Americans, St. Patricks Day is a day to celebrate Irish culture -- the traditions, the people, and the cuisine. Youre likely familiar with many of the iconic dishes: shepherds pie, soda bread, braised cabbage, potatoes colcannon, corned beef, etc., but you may not be aware that many classic St. Patricks Day recipes can be made completely plant-based -- yes, even corned beef. Dont believe us? Read on to see how you can make Meatless Monday versions of your favorite St. Patricks Day dishes. Braised Cabbage Cabbage is a humble ingredient, but when gently braised it becomes nice and tender. Cook in butter (non-dairy), vegetable stock, dry wine, and apple cider vinegar for a flavorful side dish. Add a little sugar and carroway seeds for a livelier dish. For the Braised Cabbage recipe, click here. Meaty Mushroom Stew with Garlic Mashed Potatoes Straight from The Meatless Monday Cookbook , this recipe uses cremini and shiitake mushrooms and tamari to recreate the rich umami flavor iconic of traditional slow-cooked Irish stews. Pair the stew with a topping of garlic mashed potatoes and dinner is set. For the Meaty Mushroom Stew recipe, click here. Orange Cranberry Scone The scone is a welcomed reprieve from all of that rich St. Patricks Day food. This recipe is completely plant-based, utilizing coconut oil and coconut milk in place of dairy. Adding pumpkin spice, maple syrup, and orange zest to the sweet scone glaze makes this recipe perfect for any holiday. For the Orange Cranberry Scone recipe, click here.   Potatoes Colcannon A classic Irish side dish, colcannon is a marriage of creamy mashed potatoes and crispy green cabbage. Although traditional recipes call for butter and cream, colcannon can easily be made plant-based by swapping out the butter and heavy cream for plant-based alternatives. For the Potatoes Colcannon recipe, click here .   Shepherds Pie This completely plant-based version of Shepherds Pie can serve as the centerpiece of a St. Patricks Day feast. A smooth, creamy potato topping covers a hearty filling of lentils, cremini mushrooms, and diced veggies. For the Vegan Shepherds Pie recipe, click here. Soda Bread A variety of cuisines have their own version of soda bread, which gets its name from the use of sodium bicarbonate as a leavening agent rather than traditional yeast. This version uses plant-based milk and dairy-free butter to achieve a firm but delicate texture. For the Vegan Irish Soda Bread recipe, click here . Plant-based Corned Beef Yes, it is possible to make corned beef meatless. This recipe uses a seitan-substitute that is heavily spiced and mixed with a homemade beet puree. The loaf is then rubbed with spices and submerged in a slow-cooker brine with mushrooms, garlic, all spice, mustard, beet puree, and white wine vinegar. For the Vegan Corned Beef recipe, click here .   Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation.   The post Classic St. Patrick’s Day Dishes Made Plant-based appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Granola Candy Bars

March 12 2020 My New Roots 

Granola Candy Bars When I was a kid, I always wanted to go to other peoples houses for playdates. Not because I didnt like my own home. Because of the snacks. ?? Although my childhood diet included a fair amount of donuts and microwaved hot dogs, my mother had very distinct ideas of what was okay to eat on the regular, and what was not. Honey Nut Cheerios, okay. Lucky Charms, not okay. Granola bars, sure. Granola bars covered in chocolate, nope. My friends pantries were stocked with these things, also known as Kudos, which are somehow legally sanctioned to be labelled granola bars and marketed as a healthy snack, but definitely wouldnt pass my moms test by a long shot. So, I had to get creative to have access to said saccharine granola bar slathered with oozy, sweetened peanut butter, covered in a thick coating of milk chocolate. My teeth hurt just thinking about them now, but holy heck were they transcendent to my seven-year-old self. I would put up with all kinds of games I didnt want to play, cartoons I didnt want to watch, even annoying little sisters, just to have access to the cupboard of Kudos bars after school. My version of this recipe came from a craving, as they often do. Maybe I was longing for a little nostalgia, or a connection to a simpler time when my only goal for the day was ingesting as much sugar as possible without my parents knowing. Good times, haha! Anyway, I have successfully re-created Kudos bars, with massively improved ingredients and adult upgrades. My version is naturally sweetened (duh), uses dark chocolate instead of milk chocolate, and I swapped out the peanut butter for hazelnut butter, because it is just way more delicious! I added figs to the granola bars, since they pair so well hazelnuts. And last but not least, I included a healthy amount of salt for balance. Under-salted desserts make me want to light my hair on fire. Altogether, these Granola Candy Bars are serious craving-crushers. Crunchy, crispy, creamy, oozy, sweet and salty, totally rich and mouth-wateringly delicious. Im almost through my second batch and already planning my next one. I feel like a stockpile of these in the fridge would get me through just about anything, even ??the fifth, mind-numbing round of Candyland with my son, who bless his heart, just wants to eat sugar as badly as I did. Candyland is as close as he gets.    Chocolate and Energy ?For those of you following along on Instagram you know that each month in 2020 has a theme, and March is Energy. I thought it would be appropriate to talk about chocolate and how it affects us on an energetic level. A lot of people think that chocolate contains caffeine, and it does have a little bit, but caffeine is not in fact the most stimulating compound that cacao contains. Its something else called theobromine. ?? Theobromine is an alkaloid that gives chocolate its distinctive bitterness. The darker the chocolate, the more bitter, and the more theobromine it contains. Theobromine and caffeine are almost identical at a molecular level, which makes them behave in similar, energizing ways. The difference is that theobromine has one less methyl group (one carbon with three hydrogen attached), which makes it a less powerful stimulant, since it does not cross the blood-brain barrier as easily as caffeine does. Translation: theobromine offers a more relaxed, longer-lasting energy than caffeine, instead of the classic spike-and-crash. Both compounds act on our central nervous system, but only caffeine can make us feel anxious and jittery. Bonus: theobromine is also non-addictive (although I cannot help you if you get addicted to these Granola Candy Bars ?A 1 1/­­2 ounce /­­ 43g serving of dark chocolate (70% cacao solids) will give you about 115mg of theobromine and 20mg of caffeine. By comparison, an 8 ounce /­­ 250ml cup of coffee contains about 95mg of caffeine and no theobromine. The maximum recommended daily intake for caffeine is around 400mg, while theobromine (thankfully) is higher at around 1000mg a day. ??We need to keep in mind however, that most chocolate contains sugar or other sweeteners and additives that are very stimulating. It is no wonder then, that for sensitive individuals, the theobromine in cacao combined with sugar and a little caffeine can give us a serious blast of energy and make chocolate feel like more than a cup of coffee! Be mindful of your chocolate intake during the later hours of the day, especially if you struggle to fall or stay asleep at night. ???  Lets get to the recipe! I use honey to sweeten the granola bars, and to help bind all the ingredients together, but a good, vegan alternative could be date paste. Just make sure it has a high viscosity (like, real sticky). ??This recipe is gluten-free, just make sure you buy gluten-free oats if you are sensitive.?? Hazelnuts may be hard to find and depending on where you are, can be expensive. If youre looking for an alternative, almonds or cashews would be the best! The almonds may need more time in the oven, up to 25 minutes, but keep a good eye on them, as they can burn quickly. ?? Of course you dont have to make your own hazelnut butter for this recipe, but I highly highly recommend that you do. Its really easy and a step that will fit into making the granola bars anyway. Just add 2 extra cups /­­ 270g of hazelnuts to the baking sheets and roast as you would with the other ingredients. Blend hazelnuts in a food processor, scraping down the sides every so often, and eventually, youll have hazelnut butter. It can take up to ten minutes, so be patient. Add a splash of olive oil to get it going, if absolutely necessary. This will make about 1 cup /­­ 250ml, which is exactly what you need for the recipe. Youre welcome! ?????         Print recipe     Fig and Hazelnut Granola Candy Bars Ingredients: ? 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 150g rolled oats ?1 cup /­­ 135g raw hazelnuts (plus two more cups if making your own hazelnut butter, see headnote) ?2 Tbsp. coconut oil (I recommend flavour-neutral) ? 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml thick honey (creamed or white)? 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml tahini? 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract ?1/­­3 cup /­­ 60g chopped un-sulfured dried figs? 1 cup /­­ 20g puffed brown rice cereal? 1/­­4 tsp. flaky sea salt, plus more for garnish? 1 cup /­­ 250ml hazelnut butter ? 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup? 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt? 200g dark chocolate (80% or higher), have more on-hand for drizzle and just in case! ?????   Directions: ? 1. Preheat the oven to 325°F /­­ 170°C. Place the oats and hazelnuts on a rimmed baking sheet, trying to keep them as separate as possible, and bake stirring once or twice, until the oats are golden and smell toasty, 12 to 15 minutes. Remove from the oven, let cool, and roughly chop the hazelnuts. ? 2. In a small saucepan, melt the coconut oil over low heat. Add the honey, tahini, and vanilla; whisk thoroughly until fully combined. ? 3. Roughly chop the dried figs and set aside.  4. In a large bowl, combine the cooled oats and chopped hazelnuts with the figs, puffed cereal, and salt. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry and stir quickly to mix.? 5. Line an 8×8 brownie pan with plastic wrap or parchment paper. Spoon the mixture in and using slightly damp hands, press it firmly into the pan, especially around the edges and corners. ? 6. Combine the hazelnut butter with the 1/­­2 teaspoon fine salt and maple syrup - it should transform from runny, into a more solid paste. Spread over the top of the granola bars. Set in the freezer to firm up for at least 4 hours. 7. When the bars are ready to coat in chocolate, remove them from the freezer and cut the base into 12 even pieces. 8. Set a double boiler up on the stove, over a low simmer. Chop the chocolate into chunks. Melt in a double-boiler over medium heat. Dip each piece in melted chocolate, then place on a piece of parchment to cool and set. Drizzle remaining chocolate over the top, then sprinkle with a little more flaky salt. Once cool, enjoy! Store bars in the fridge for up to one month, or the freezer for 6 months. I know that this recipe will land with the child inside you, who is just trying to convince her parents that the chocolate-covered granola bars are healthy. Because at least now, well, they actually are. All love and happy treat-making, Sarah B Show me your treats on Instagram: #mnrgranolacandybars   *   *   *   *   *   * Okay, one more thing before I go, just because I’m pretty stoked about it…I have a show! It’s called The Substitute Baker, and it’s going to be on Food Network Canada’s digital platform. The series premiers March 25th on Facebook Watch, so you can see it no matter where in the world you are! I’ll be dropping more details about it on Instagram and Facebook, so please stay tuned there. Thank you to everyone who has sent a supportive comment or email – it means so much to me, and this opportunity was possible because of YOU. So thank you!  The post Granola Candy Bars appeared first on My New Roots.

Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort Foods

March 9 2020 Meatless Monday 

Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort FoodsInexpensive, packed with protein, and easy to store, tofu is an indispensable wonder food that you simply must have in your refrigerator at all times. Tofu is sold in different levels of firmness, which can range from silken (pillowy and custard-like) to extra firm (spongy). The less-firm varieties have higher water content, making them better for cream and dairy replacements. Tofu can also be used to boost the nutritional quality of your favorite dishes; blend a block of silken tofu into your typical roux-based cheese sauce for a plant-based protein boost, and no one will notice the difference. This Monday, experiment with tofu by incorporating this versatile ingredient into some of your favorite classic comfort foods. Our top tofu tips and hacks: o Press your tofu to remove water before cooking or marinating o Freeze and thaw tofu to achieve a texture more similar to meat o Marinate tofu with your favorite sauces, avoid oil-based marinades o Press, cube and air-fry or bake tofu with your favorite seasonings for easy and delicious toss-ins for salads, stir fry, burritos and beyond Alfredo Sauce Traditional Alfredo sauce is heavy, rich, but oh so delicious. Try using tofu for a version thats light, creamy, lower in calories, and higher in protein. Whats the secret? Just blend together silken tofu, vegetable broth, Italian seasoning, vegan butter, and a healthy amount of nutritional yeast. Liberally coat some fettuccine and enjoy. Buffalo Wings When battered, breaded, and baked, tofu becomes crisp on the outside, just like your favorite chicken wings. To make tofu wings, simply dredge extra-firm tofu blocks in cornstarch, dip them in a plant-based milk, coat in bread crumbs, seasonings and bake or air-fry until brown. You can create your own Buffalo sauce by mixing together hot sauce (Franks RedHot is the classic), butter or non-dairy butter substitute, and granulated garlic. Drooling for more? Check out this Crispy Tofu Finger recipe. Caesar Dressing No eggs or anchovies required to make this plant-based Caesar dressing . Blend together silken tofu, lemon juice and zest, garlic cloves, capers, Dijon mustard and nutritional yeast. Pour over some grilled romaine lettuce, and your first course it ready to go. Chicken Fried Tofu Chicken fried steak is a southern staple, but the technique, which involves a thinly sliced protein thats been breaded and pan-fried, can be made with tofu to produce the same crispy, comforting outcome. The recipe is straightforward : Simply drain, slice, and press tofu to remove as much moisture as possible; dip slices into a batter (use plant-based milk, flour, and some vinegar or lemon juice); and, finally, cover in your breading. Put the finished steaks on a wire cooling rack and bake, air-fry or sauté until golden and crispy. Jalapeno Poppers Ideal for game days and gatherings, the jalapeno popper has achieved mythical status as one of the ultimate appetizers. For a plant-based version , swap out the cream cheese for a tofu cream cheese -- which you can buy or easily make on your own . To make these plant-based bites, seed the jalapenos, slice down the middle, stuff with your tofu cream cheese and whatever other goodies you have available -- non-dairy cheese, scallions, chile powder -- and give them a quick roast in the oven until nice and charred, and top with some crushed potato chips for a little texture. Jamaican Jerk Tofu This is the kind of miracle dish that can convert anyone to tofu. The Jamaican jerk seasoning is sure-to-please. Its sort of like barbeque and sort of like curry, savory and sweet at the same time. The recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu is super simple: Just press and slice the tofu, submerge in the jerk marinade, and cook in a hot skillet. Lasagna Food doesnt get more comforting than lasagna. Approach this dish as you would your favorite lasagna recipe , but instead of ricotta cheese, blend together pressed tofu, nutritional yeast, garlic powder, and salt and pepper. Tofu Parmigiana   Italian night has never been easier. Press, bread, and sauté slices of tofu until their golden brown; add some tomato sauce to the bottom of a baking dish, line it with the lightly-fried tofu, top with remaining sauce, top with traditional or non-dairy mozzarella, and pop into the oven. Check out one of our favorite recipes here .   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Here’s How You Can Use Tofu to Recreate Your Favorite Comfort Foods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu

February 24 2020 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday MenuThis week, in honor of Mardi Gras, were celebrating Healthy-Fat Tuesday with a list of foods and ingredients rich in healthy fats. Fats are complex and often misunderstood nutrients. Despite their often-misleading name, fats play an important role in healthy balanced diets and their consumption doesnt necessarily lead to weight gain. Saturated and unsaturated are the two major categories of dietary fats. Saturated fats are typically solid at room temperature and are predominately found in red and processed meats, whole milk and whole-milk dairy products, cheese, and baked goods. Although fine in moderation, the USDA Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting saturated fat to under 10 percent of your daily caloric intake. Unsaturated fats come from vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fish, and are labeled as good fats because their consumption is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Try incorporating these foods and ingredients into your weekly Meatless Monday menu. Avocado With 77 percent of calories from fat, this pretty green fruit is actually one of the fattiest plant foods on Earth. Avocado is rich in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid associated with reduced inflammation. Easily add some to your diet with this recipe for Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast. Canola Oil Derived from the rapeseed, canola oil has a similar nutritional profile to olive oil but contains a slightly lower percentage of saturated fat. Its one of the most versatile cooking oils, which makes it excellent for frying and medium-heat cooking. It can also be used as the base for salad dressings, sauces, and marinades. Flaxseeds Flaxseeds are high in fiber and protein, but theyre also one of the richest sources of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids -- polyunsaturated fats that are associated with benefits for heart health. Hemp Seeds While technically categorized as a nut, the hemp seed is nutrient-dense and a terrific source of both omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids. Try adding a scoop to smoothies, muffins, or chia pudding. Olive Oil Although it contains small levels of saturated fat, olive oil is predominately composed of a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid. Studies link oleic acid to lower levels of inflammation, but the health benefits of olive oil range from a reduced risk of stroke and heart disease to weight loss. Peanuts An easy and accessible snack, a little pouch of peanuts can instantly cure your hunger pangs. Peanuts are so satiating because of their high-fat content. Classified as an oilseed rather than a nut, the peanut is nearly 50 percent fat, most of which is mono- and polyunsaturated. Try adding some to this hot and spicy Peanut Noodle. Tahini Made from pulverized sesame seeds, tahini -- along with chickpeas -- is one of the main ingredients in hummus. Sesame seeds are made up of 80 percent mono- and polyunsaturated fats, which research shows can help lower cholesterol levels. Tahini makes the perfect dressing for roasted vegetables or this Curry Carrot Salad. Walnuts Like most nuts, walnuts contain good fats, but they are also an important vegetarian source of omega-3 fatty acids. Research shows that omega-3 plays a critical role in reducing oxidative stress in the brain and can even help with the development and function of the central nervous system. Eat them roasted or blend them up with lentils to make the perfect plant-based meatball.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Top 10 Vegan Restaurants in London

February 15 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

London is known to be one of, if not the most vegan-friendly city in the world. With so much buzz lately on London, we figured we’d go ahead and give you a little more! To read about why London is so great for vegans, with some data to back it up, read our recent post on the rise of Vegan London. But on to the food – where are the top 10 best vegan restaurants in London?  Here are the ones you’ve got to try. Farmacy Everything on the menu is plant-based and free from dairy, refined sugars, additives and chemicals, and the best part? This vegan restaurant is putting the modern twist on the classics. Mediterranean fusion cuisine including pizza, pasta, and salads will keep you coming back. VeganE A place with something for everyone, stop in to VeganE. Big flavor and big portions thrown in with great service make it a must-visit in London. Try something with cheese – as their reviews rave about having the best cheesy dishes around! Purezza Purezza is the UKs first vegan Italian restaurant, who opened its London branch in March 2018. (The flagship outlet is in Brighton.) The menu features a wide […] The post Top 10 Vegan Restaurants in London appeared first on HappyCow.

Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Plant-Based ProteinsWill I get enough protein? is one of the most common questions asked by people looking to add more plant-based foods to their diet. The short (and long) answer is -- YES. Check out our Plant Protein Power Kit for downloadable social media graphics, plant-protein GIFs and printable posters. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the recommended dietary allowance for individual daily protein intake is 0.8 grams per of protein per every 2 pounds of body weight. Although this is an approximate calculation -- other factors such as age, sex, body type, and lifestyle must be considered for a precise nutrient recommendation -- it provides a reliable benchmark to measure your daily protein requirements.  This amounts to around 56 grams of protein per day for the average sedentary man and 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman. So, how do you reach that daily number eating only plant-based foods? Easy, check out our guide below and discover which seeds, nuts, legumes, vegetables, and plant-based products pack the biggest protein punch. Still have questions? Learn more about plant-based protein from the nutritional experts at Johns Hopkins University. Broccoli One of the most popular vegetables is also one of the most protein dense, with one cup of cooked broccoli containing 6 grams of protein. Roast it, sauté it, or steam it for a quick and nutritious side dish. Chia Seeds Small but mighty, 1 ounce of chia seeds packs nearly 5 grams protein. Drop a spoonful into a smoothie or combine with a liquid like juice or nut milk to make a fun-textured chia pudding. Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food: One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar. A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Frozen Veggie Burgers There are tons of different types of pre-made frozen veggie burgers varying in ingredients, texture, and flavorful, and although their nutritional profiles differ, you can generally expect between 10 - 15 grams of protein per patty. Try a range of brands and see which one(s) fit your palate. Hemp Seed Heralded as a superfood, hemp seeds have a subtle, nutty flavor similar to pine nuts. In baking, hemp seeds can be used as a nut replacement, but it can also be added to smoothies, with 2 tablespoons containing over 6 grams of protein. Jackfruit Jackfruit is often marketed as a plant-based alternative to pulled pork, with a meaty, stringy texture fit for faux barbecue platters and sandwiches. Jackfruit is rarely sold whole, but there are a handful of brands selling products made with jackfruit in the refrigerated section of supermarkets. Jack fruit is not the most protein-dense item on this list, but it still contains 3 grams per cup. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Mung Beans Mainly cultivated in East and Southeast Asia, the mung bean is often used as the foundation of stews, vegetable patties, or dal. One cup of cooked mung beans contains 14 grams of protein. Note: mung beans are easier to find dry rather than cooked and canned. Nut Butters Although not all nut butters are considered equal when it comes to protein content (or flavor), they generally contain around 4 grams of protein per tablespoon. Oatmeal A cup of cooked oatmeal contains 6 grams of protein; pair it with a scoop of peanut butter and a sprinkling of hemp or chia seeds for a protein-packed breakfast. Plant-Based Meat Thanks to plant-based meat, sources of vegan protein are all the rage. A typical plant-based burger patty contains 20 grams of protein. Many quick-service restaurant chains now offer versions of their classic menu items featuring some variety of plant-based meat. Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal. A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Seitan The original plant-based meat replacement, seitan -- which is made from wheat gluten -- is packed with protein and can be quite tasty when properly prepared. A 3-ounce serving of seitan includes between 15 - 20 grams of protein, a number that is comparable to most animal proteins. Soy Milk The market for non-dairy nut milks has exploded in recent years, but soy milk remains the most nutritious option. One cup of soy milk has 8 grams of protein, which makes it a nice base for smoothies and shakes. Sprouted Bread Sprouted bread is a certain category of bread made from grains that have been allowed to germinate (aka sprout) before being milled into flour. Ezekiel Bread -- a common brand of sprouted bread -- contains 4 grams of protein and only 80 calories per slice. Sunflower Seeds Who wouldve thought that the innocent little sunflower seed could pack such a protein punch? A half-cup of sunflower seeds has 15 grams of proteins. Bring some in a little baggy and keep with you for a quick and nutritious snack. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Below, weve curated a sample a menu to demonstrate how easy it is to hit your daily protein target eating only plant-based foods. Breakfast: Overnight Pumpkin Pie Oats (17 grams of protein) Lunch: Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast (13 grams of protein) Dinner: Veggie Meatballs (27 grams of protein) No time to cook? No problem. Meatless Monday On-the-Go is easier than ever. Creating a plant-based Meatless Monday masterpiece? Let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways

January 26 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways Here’s something fun that you can make to set yourself up for endless future wins in the kitchen. This freezer bouillon is a great thing to have on hand for those times when you don’t have veggie stock or just don’t want to buy any. Add a few teaspoons to your soup or sauce, and you’ll end up with a rich flavor base with very minimal effort. Inspired by both curry paste and a brilliant ‘Souper Mix’ recipe from The River Cottage Preserves Handbook, this freezer bouillon is essentially just a combination of different, whole food aromatics that you’d typically find at the base of any soup or broth, plus salt. The beautiful thing about this recipe is that there are no strange preservatives or weird ingredients that you might find in store-bought bouillon – just good old veggies and a few other, non-sketchy flavor enhancers. Today we’ve got two variations on the theme: a ‘classic’ freezer bouillon, based on the mirepoix trio of onion, celery, and carrot, and a ‘fiery’ variation, kind of like curry paste but without all the spices, starring, ginger, shallots, garlic and more. To make both of the bouillon variations, you just pulse up veggies and salt into a fine, pesto-like paste in the food processor. Distribute the bouillon among containers, label, and keep in the freezer. Because of the fair amount of salt in the recipe, the paste doesn’t completely freeze in the freezer and is easily scoopable. The salt also helps it keep for a really long time – pretty much indefinitely in my experience. This is a concentrated product and a little is meant to go a long way, so if you taste it as is, it will taste very salty and strong. I like to use the ‘classic’ bouillon variation in all kinds of legume-based soups like lentil soup and minestrone, and in rich sauces like mushroom bolognese. The ‘fiery’ version is really lovely in all kinds of curries and healing soups, meant to help clear the sinuses. But really, there are no rules for how and where you can use this bouillon, it’s really fun to experiment with. Just the other day, I cooked up a pot of plain chickpeas (just chickpeas and salt) and wanted to make a quick, single serving of chickpea soup for lunch. I heated up some olive oil in a small pot, added about a teaspoon of the classic bouillon, and let it get fragrant for about a minute. I then added the chickpeas to the pot with about 2 cups of their cooking water, brought everything up to a simmer for a few minutes, and wilted in some spinach at the end. I ended up with the coziest bowl of soup and a very flavorful, warming broth in just a few minutes. Hope you’ll give this a try this year! Classic Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 yellow onion - peeled, roughly chopped 1 leek - white and light green part only, roughly chopped 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 3 celery ribs - roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 1 bunch parsley - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste (optional) 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the tomato paste, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 Fiery Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 2 shallots - peeled, roughly chopped 6-8 total of ginger pieces - peeled if not organic, roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 1 jalape?o or serrano pepper - seeded, roughly chopped (optional, include for more heat) 1 bunch cilantro - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon white miso (optional) 1 teaspoon turmeric powder (optional) 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the miso and turmeric, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers, and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 The post Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Just-as-Sweet-as-Honey Cake

December 13 2019 VegKitchen 

Just-as-Sweet-as-Honey Cake Ashkenazi Jews consider honey cake to be an integral part of their New Year celebration. Here, a combination of agave nectar and maple syrup add up to make a vegan honey cake that’s practically indistinguishable from the classic version. Adapted from Vegan Holiday Kitchen. The post Just-as-Sweet-as-Honey Cake appeared first on VegKitchen.

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast

November 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving FeastThanksgiving is a time for family, giving, and gratitude. But its also the time for stuffing...and starches, and birds, briskets, casseroles, cranberry sauce, gravy, dressings, and desserts! But as we know from Thanksgivings past, the entire family doesnt always agree, especially when it comes to the food on the dining room table.  So, whether your guests prefer dark meat, white meat, or no meat, its important that your Thanksgiving spread accommodates everyone. Fortunately, the classic Thanksgiving fixings can be made completely plant-based without compromising tradition or taste. Weve compiled a collection of simple plant-based Thanksgiving swaps that allow everyone -- from the newly vegan to the traditional omnivore -- to enjoy the holiday feast, together. Mushroom Gravy from Trader Joes Sometimes your secret recipe is store bought. We wont tell. Trader Joes has an impressive Organic Savory Vegan Gravy made with onion, garlic, coconut milk, tamari, mushrooms, and a whole bunch of seasonings and zero work for you. Oh, its also gluten free. Roasted-Garlic Smashed Potatoes from Minimalist Baker The secret to incredibly light and fluffy dairy-free mashed potatoes isnt much of a secret. After boiling and mashing your potatoes (you can use a potato masher or hand mixer; if you use the latter, be careful not to overmix), fold in non-dairy butter and a whole head of roasted garlic to pump up the decadence.  Super Savory Vegan Stuffing from The Cheeky Chickpea A Thanksgiving spread is judged not on its turkey, but rather the quality of its stuffing. We scoured the internet to find the most satisfying stuffing recipe available. Chopped mushrooms, wild rice, bell peppers, vegetable bouillon, plant-based sausage, cubed up bread, and Thanksgiving seasonings -- fennel, garlic, parsley, fresh rosemary -- make this stuffing simply irresistible. Cinnamon Sugar Sweet Potato Casserole from Eat With Clarity Oh, sweet potato casserole; you sit innocently on the Thanksgiving table masquerading as a member of the main meal, but we all know youre our pre-dessert dessert...with your delightful topping of crushed pecans, coconut sugar, oats, and marshmallows. But the sweet and creamy nature of this indulgent side dish is a necessary counterbalance to all the punchy herbs and spices. This recipe adds another dimension to the traditional sweet potato casserole by using non-dairy milk, ground flax seeds, and melted coconut oil. Roasted Root Vegetables with a White Balsamic Glaze from Healthy World Cuisine No bacon necessary for these magical root vegetables. The recipe suggests fennel, carrots, and Cipollini onions, but you can add any of your favorite seasonal vegetables. Curried Green Bean Casserole from Omnivore’s Cookbook A spin on the classic, this curried green bean casserole adds a new dimension to the Thanksgiving table. Traditional green bean casseroles typically rely on a can of condensed cream of mushroom soup and a topping of bread crumbs and fried onion straws. This recipe is just as easy to make, but offers your taste buds so much more! No-Meat Loaf from Nora Cooks Turkey doesnt always have to be the star of the Thanksgiving spread. Meatloaf traditionally plays a supporting role, but this holiday season let it take center stage with this smoky, savory plant-based chickpea loaf. After its covered with a tangy ketchup glaze and baked in the oven, its look and texture become indistinguishable from its meaty counterpart. Cranberry Jam from Delish Theres something extraterrestrial-looking about the maroon cylinder of congealed cranberry sauce that you always find sitting menacingly next to the gravy boat. Its Thanksgiving, you deserve better. Treat your family (and yourself) with this simple-to-make four-ingredient cranberry jam. All you need is fresh cranberries, sugar, water, orange zest, and about twenty minutes. Your dinner rolls, stuffing, and other Thanksgiving starches will thank you. Chipotle Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Caper Vinaigrette from Goya Need an alternative centerpiece for your Thanksgiving meal? Look no further than this elegant whole roasted cauliflower with a smoky chipotle finish. Top your cauliflower steaks with a tart and briny caper vinaigrette for a perfect alternative to the big bird. Chocolate Fudge Brownie Pie from Sweet Vegan Sara Some people eat to live, others eat to get to dessert. Your patience has paid off. This plant-based chocolate fudge brownie pie looks sinful, but it really isnt. The crust uses a combination of almond flour, rolled oats, date sugar, and flax eggs (coagulated flax seeds), while the filling is as healthy as hummus, using chickpeas, nondairy milk, date paste, cocoa powder, rolled oats, and vegan chocolate chips. Creamy Coconut Pumpkin Pie from Loving It Vegan What makes this pumpkin pie filling so much more luxurious than the rest? A rhinestone-studded crust? Nope, this pie gets its extra decadent flare from a can of full-fat coconut milk. Fold in some brown sugar, maple syrup, pumpkin pie spice, and a little bit of cornstarch, and youve got yourself the ultimate Thanksgiving dessert.   Invite your friends and family to try (and share) these plant-based Thanksgiving swaps. If youre looking for more meatless recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery. The post Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Minestrone

November 23 2019 VegKitchen 

Minestrone Minestrone soup is an Italian cuisine classic. Here is our recipe for the Italian “vegetable soup” with beans and pasta! Save Print Minestrone Serves: The post Minestrone appeared first on VegKitchen.

Holiday Veggie Roast with Oven Cranberry Sauce

November 17 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Holiday Veggie Roast with Oven Cranberry Sauce This post was created in partnership with OXO. Today weve got a festive veggie roast recipe thats made in one oven with a lush cranberry sauce. The savoriness of the caramelized, mustard-miso roasted vegetables pairs so well with the tart, sweet, and juicy character of the cranberry sauce. Plus, the whole thing comes together in a pretty hands-off manner, with the oven doing the bulk of the work. Although Im generally excited and appreciative of any veggie side at the holiday table, I think that roasted vegetables (or any veg-centric sides in general) are often treated as an afterthought, not something that can be just as special as the main event. We are of course here to gently propose that vegetables can themselves be the main event – but even if thats not your thing, this veggie roast will be an exciting addition to your holiday table. Im particular about one thing when it comes to roasted vegetables and thats that they should be nicely cooked through, to the point of beautiful caramelization and crispy edges. Ive had so many instances of ordering roasted vegetables in restaurants, where they arrive looking beautiful, but turn out to be tough and raw on the inside upon the first bite. This is especially true for root veg of all kinds. A half-raw sweet potato or carrot is never a good thing. So its my strong belief that vegetables should be allowed plenty of time to get really, really happy in the oven. Just this little trick alone makes them taste so much better. For special occasions, I also like to roast vegetables in a mustardy sauce of some kind. Its an extra step, but it helps take the flavor to the next level and achieve that A+ caramelization. Thats what we do in this recipe. And since weve already got the oven heated up for the vegetables, we are making the cranberry sauce in the oven all at the same time. Turns out, it works just as well as the stovetop method, so why not go for the simplicity! The sauce features a luxurious mix of cranberries, green apple, and raisins, with orange juice and a kiss of cinnamon, for a beautiful balance of sweet and tart. Were very excited to partner with OXO on this holiday roasting recipe, since they make every kitchen tool youll ever need to prepare the celebratory meal of your dreams (plus much much more for your kitchen). I was so excited to upgrade to their non-stick half sheet baking pans – they are so roomy and sturdy, and perfect for roasting up big batches of vegetables without crowding them. We roast and bake a lot, so we used to go through tons of parchment paper. OXOs Silicone Baking Mat quickly took care of that problem. Its reusable, so easy to clean, and can be stored neatly rolled up in the drawer. Im so happy to replace a single use item like parchment paper with something that will last me years. They also make plenty of quality glass baking dishes, like the one that we used for the cranberry sauce, which comes with a lid so the leftovers are easy to store. OXOs pepper mill is a true dream, it grinds so smoothly and has adjustable settings for the size of your grind (we like it somewhere in the middle). I used to whisk all my sauces and dressings with a fork back in the day, but a whisk really does make the process so much quicker and more pro, and OXOs balloon whisk is a beauty. Holiday Veggie Roast with Oven Cranberry Sauce   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the mustard roasting sauce 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons white miso 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons avocado oil or olive oil 1 teaspoon chili powder sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste for the vegetables 1 small kabocha squash - seeded and sliced into wedges 1 small delicata squash - halved, seeded, and sliced into half-moons 1 lb Brussels sprouts - tough ends removed, halved 1 medium cauliflower - sliced into bite-sized florets 7-8 medium carrots or the equivalent of sweet potato (or both) - sliced into bite-sized pieces handful toasted pecans - for garnishing for the cranberry sauce 2 10 oz bags frozen or fresh cranberries - thawed if frozen 1 Granny Smith apple - peeled, cored, and finely diced 1 shallot - finely chopped 1 cup raisins (preferably golden) 1 1/­­2 cups coconut sugar 1 tablespoon fresh grated ginger 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/­­4 cup orange juice (from about 1 medium orange) zest from 1 orange pinch of sea salt Instructions to make the mustard roasting sauce and roast the vegetables Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). In a medium bowl, combine the mustard, miso, maple syrup, oil, chili powder, salt, and pepper, and whisk until smooth. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Distribute all the vegetables among two large, lined baking sheets. Pour half of the mustard sauce over one sheet of the vegetables and the rest - over the other sheet. Mix to coat well. Place the baking sheets in the oven, and roast, mixing periodically for 45-50 minutes, or until all the vegetables are tender when pierced with a knife, with caramelized edges. Serve the vegetables right away or reheat later, topped with the cranberry sauce and sprinkled with toasted pecans. to make the cranberry sauce In a 2 quart glass baking dish or a dish if a similar size, combine the cranberries, apple, shallot, raisins, coconut sugar, ginger, cinnamon, orange juice and zest, and salt. Mix well to combine. Place the baking dish in a 400° F (200° C) oven at the same time that you are roasting the vegetables (recipe above). Cook the sauce for about 45 minutes, mixing periodically. The sauce should be simmering while cooking in the oven. Let cool a bit before serving. The sauce will set up more once it cools. Store any leftover sauce in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week. Notes - You can easily make this recipe ahead of time. Just reheat the vegetables in the oven at 350° F (175° C) and serve the cranberry sauce right out of the fridge. - The recipe is very versatile, so you can include any of your favorite roasting vegetables in the mix. You can also include any of your favorite spices in the roasting sauce. The possibilities here are endless. 3.5.3226 The post Holiday Veggie Roast with Oven Cranberry Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this)

March 12 2020 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this) I threw these blondies together as I prepped a big batch of black bean burgers to freeze for later. (Yes, I am food prepping.) Probably made over a dozen batches of these cookies over the past few months. As usual, I took a break from sugary carb-craving in February. Things are much different now. Even though the grass is beginning to green up and my daffodils are blooming, the urge to bake and soothe my soul with comfort foods normally reserved for dark, winter months has returned with a vengeance.  (As a news-obsessed individual, I'm sure you can guess why.) My cookbooks lining the kitchen walls are more precious to me than ever right now. I've collected hundreds over the decades. I drop into flea markets looking for Pyrex and instead find myself with a two-dollar cookbook I'd wanted years ago. One more for the collection. Call me crazy, but in my Marie Kondo cleaning frenzy last spring--very few cookbooks left this house. Very. Few. One of my old stand-by cookbooks, an Alice Medrich classic, stands the test of time.   Published in 2010, my dog-eared, taped-page and post-it noted guides indicate the cookbook's utility.  Here's my vegan version blondie--and don't bake these in an 8" square pan. Use instead a rectangle if you can. Mine is 10 x 6" pan I purchased for eight bucks at the grocery store. Once you add the batter to the pan, you may look at it and think: this cannot be right--there's barely enough batter to cover the bottom of the pan. Trust the recipe, they bake up beautifully. And after a night in the fridge, even better.  Vegan Blondies (adapted) 3/­­4 cup unbleached AP flour 1/­­4 cup whole wheat flour 1/­­2 t. baking powder 1/­­4 t. fine sea salt 1 stick vegan butter 3/­­4 cup light brown sugar 1 t. vanilla extract 2 T. ground flax, plus 3 T. water, 1 t. olive oil (vegan egg) 2/­­3 cup walnuts or pecans 1/­­2 cup chocolate chunks Preheat oven to 350. Line pan with parchment paper, lightly spray. Mix dry ingredients together, set aside. Place small saucepan over low heat, add butter and sugar and stir until butter melts and sugar is mostly dissolved. Remove from heat. Add vanilla extract and flax egg. Mix well. Add dry ingredients to butter mixture. Mix just until flour is mostly incorporated. Add half nuts and half chocolate. Spread batter in pan, then sprinkle remaining nuts and chocolate over. Bake for about 20 minutes or just until the sides begin to turn golden. Let cool completely, then cut into squares and store in fridge. With all the bleak AF stuff out in the world lately, my own version of self-care includes a nice vitamin rich juice first thing in the morning. I've had my juicer for a dozen or so years now. It's come in very handy lately (even though it sat literally unused for about eight of these). If you think, "Hey, nice blondie recipe, but then juicing...how's that work?" Um, resistance is futile. I will always have chocolate in my life in one form or another. This is my favorite juicing recipe: 1 beet 1 carrot 1 celery stick 1 knob ginger 1 granny smith apple juice of half a lemon When I can, I make enough for two small pints (one before I eat oatmeal for breakfast, another to drink later in the day--you know, around three in the afternoon when I'd rather scarf down a whole package of M&Ms). I've been a believer in juicing for ages...has it helped? I have no damned idea. It makes me feel good. So yes. It "helps". Also been intermittent fasting. So basically the day goes like this: Eat between nine and five. Stop.  Went to my local WM on Tuesday, just as a precaution, trying to get my hands on bleach cleaner. Wow. I happened to turn the corner and spotted an out of place single bottle left. I was like: "Thank you retail-eagle-eye for helping me spot the thing that wasn't like the other things."

Pasta with Two Beans and Escarole

March 9 2020 VegKitchen 

Pasta with Two Beans and Escarole Pasta, beans, and greens are a classic trio in Italian cookery. Its easy to see why--the combination is healthful and hearty. Escarole is a sturdy green whose slight bitterness is tempered by cooking. The post Pasta with Two Beans and Escarole appeared first on VegKitchen.

Gulab Jamun Cake

March 1 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Gulab Jamun Cake (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Gulab Jamun Cake Gulab Jamun is one of the most well-liked and popular desserts in India. Gulab Jamun has a special place in my heart as it was my very first video showcased on my YouTube channel. I never thought I would be able to parlay my passion into doing something like "Manjula's Kitchen". Gulab Jamun also happens to be a family favorite so it is always a go-to dessert I prepare. My daughter-in-law, who also loves Gulab Jamun, wanted me to try out a variation of the traditional recipe. She saw a recipe online for a Gulab Jamun cake and asked me to try making my version of this recipe. She suggested that I bake the Gulab Jamun instead of frying them, but to also try and preserve the original taste. I decided to stick with all the original ingredients for this recipe. However, I did have to experiment with the measurements of the ingredients to maintain the cake texture. Because of the delicious cardamom flavor, another name for this recipe can be "Cardamom Cake". After experimenting with this recipe for some time, I was finally satisfied with the results. I serve the Gulab Jamun cake, adding a layer of chocolate ganache and sliced nuts. You can really experiment with this recipe and make it into a version you love. The cake tastes best if you let it sit for a few hours after baking as the texture improves the longer it sits. It also has a long shelf life when kept at room temperature for several days. Enjoy this variation on a classic dessert! This recipe will serve 8. Course Dessert Cuisine Indian Keyword bake gulab jamun, Balushahi, cake, cardamom, cardamom cake, Cooking Video, delicacy, delicious, Dessert, diwali, easy cooking, Eggless, eggless cake, holi, Home Cooking, Home Made, indian donut, indian sweet, jalebi, Mithai, no frying, popular sweet, royal taste of india, saffron, Sweet, valentine Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 30 minutes Total Time 40 minutes Servings 8 people Equipment9 1/­­2 by 5 1/­­2 loaf pan Ingredients2 cup milk powder 1/­­2 cup all-purpose flour – plain flour or maida 1/­­2 tsp baking soda 1/­­2 tsp baking powder 1/­­2 tsp cardamom powder 1 Tbsp sugar 8 Tbsp unsalted butter 3/­­4 cup whole milk syrup1 1/­­2 cup sugar 1 cup water 1/­­4 tsp cardamom powder 1/­­4 tsp saffron thread 1 tsp lemon juice For serving1 Tbsp pistachio sliced 1/­­4 cup chocolate gnash Also need9 1/­­2 by 5 1/­­2 loaf pan InstructionsTo make Gulab Jamun Cake first mix all the dry ingredients together in a bowl. Milk powder, all-purpose flour, baking soda, baking powder, sugar and cardamom powder. Mix it well In another bowl take butter, butter should be at room temperature not melted, whip the butter until it is fluffy. About 1 minute. Now add the dry ingredients with butter and mix it well. Slowly add the milk, milk should be at room temperature, mix it for about 2 minutes, batter consistency should be like cake mx. Grease the loaf pan. Pour the Gulab Jamun batter in the pan. Pre heated the oven at 300-degree Fahrenheit. Bake the cake for about 25-30 minutes, Cake should be light brown the Gulab Jamun color, from the top and when you insert the knife in the center of cake should pulls out clean. Keep the cake aside and now make the syrup add all the ingredients for syrup, sugar, water, lemon juice, cardamom, and saffron, in a saucepan. Bring it to a boil over medium-high heat. After syrup comes to boil lower the heat to medium and let it simmer for 2 about minutes. Remove the pot from the heat. Before poring the syrup over the cake, Poke holes in the cake with a fork, several places. Pour the syrup over the cake while it is still warm in the pan. Save about 1/­­2 cup of syrup. It will look like a lot of syrup, but the cake will soak it all up. Let the cake rest for 10 minutes, then invert it onto a plate. You can garnish the Gulab Jamun Cake in a variety of different ways. I am garnishing with chocolate ganache I have done the chocolate Ganache recipe see the recipe for chocolate cake and sliced pistachios. This recipe has wonderful flavor and appeals to all ages. NotesIt also has a long shelf life and can be kept at room temperature for several days. Butter and milk should be at room temperature. Extra syrup you can use if you like to serve the cake as Gulab Jamun with the syrup. The post Gulab Jamun Cake appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

10 Best Vegan Burger Restaurants in the World

February 22 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Burgers, you might think, are something sorely missed by vegans worldwide… or not! The vegan burger scene has taken off, and brought with it everything from fried ‘chikn’  to double cheese and bacon. These are not burgers for the healthy among us. They are truly comforting, saucy stacks. So without further ado, here are the 10 best vegan burger restaurants in the world.  10. Spiral Diner – 3 Locations in Texas, USA First opened in 2002, this diner and bakery now has three branches in Texas (Forth Worth, Denton, Dallas) – a real testament to their success. With 8 different burgers to choose from, including a bacon ranch cheeseburger and a chipotle mayo burger, you’ll be spoilt for choice here. You can even decide between 4 different patties: classic, portobello, cashew-quinoa, or The Beyond Burger(R). 9. Biff’s Jack Shack – London, England The whole concept of this place is that instead of meat, they have perfected the art of crispy fried jackfruit, turning it into the ultimate burger experience! It’s unique, and judging by the reviews, it’s amazing. 8. Plant Power Fast Food – 5 Locations in California, USA This modern, entirely vegan fast food joint has California locations […] The post 10 Best Vegan Burger Restaurants in the World appeared first on HappyCow.

aloo bhindi recipe | bhindi aloo ki sabji | aloo bhindi fry

February 11 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

aloo bhindi recipe | bhindi aloo ki sabji | aloo bhindi fryaloo bhindi recipe | bhindi aloo ki sabji | aloo bhindi fry with step by step photo and video recipe. north indian cuisine has a lot to offer both in the premium, classical and also in the day to day, less fancy categories. generally the premium ones takes the top spot and are more popular among other regions and states of india, without much emphasis on later one. one such easy and simple less fancy dry curry recipe is aloo bhindi recipe, known for its simplicity and taste. The post aloo bhindi recipe | bhindi aloo ki sabji | aloo bhindi fry appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Tofu au Vin

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

This meatless take of the French classic Coq au Vin slowly simmers tofu with pearl onions, mushroom, red wine and vegetable broth. The veggie version cuts hours off the cooking time so you’ll be sitting down to dinner just a half hour after you’ve started cooking. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 3 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 2 cups frozen pearl onions, thawed - 3 medium carrots, peeled and diced - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 bay leaves - 3 cups red wine* - 3 cups low-sodium vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar - 1 14 ounce package extra firm tofu, cut into 1/­­2 inch cubes - 4 tablespoons corn starch, divided - 12 ounces mushrooms, chopped - salt and pepper, to taste - 1/­­2 cup Italian parsley, diced as a garnish *3 cups vegetable broth mixed with 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar can be substituted for the red wine. Heat 1 tablespoon of the canola oil in a large pan over medium high heat. Add the onions, carrots and garlic. Saute for 3-5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add in bay leaves, wine, broth and soy sauce to the pan. Reduce heat so that liquid is slowly simmering. Simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently, until carrots and onions are soft and liquid has reduced by half. Once sauce is reduced season with salt and pepper to taste. Add 2 tablespoons of the cornstarch into 1/­­2 cup of water and mix until combined. Stir in the cornstarch mixture to the pan to thicken the sauce. Toss tofu cubes in the remaining 2 tablespoons cornstarch and a little salt and pepper until they are all evenly coated. Heat the 2 remaining tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat. Sauté coated tofu cubes, turning them occasionally with a spatula, for about 3 to 5 minutes, or until they are crispy browned on all the sides. Remove and set aside in a serving bowl. Add mushrooms to pan and sauté them 5-7 minutes, or until mushrooms are browned and softened. Add red wine sauce and mushrooms to tofu in the serving bowl. Sprinkle with parsley and enjoy!     The post Tofu au Vin appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Creamy Wild Mushroom Rice Soup

January 24 2020 Oh My Veggies 

And Soup Week continues! It also ends with this delicious creamy mushroom rice soup. I guess since I only post 2-3 recipes each week, theme weeks are not very epic around here, huh? Theme months would be way too much I think, but maybe I’ll start doing theme fortnights in the future. (Yes, I said fortnight. I’m fancy like that.) Having grown up in the midwest, I can tell you this: Midwesterners like their food creamy. We love cheesy casseroles, anything made with canned soup, and all kinds of concoctions made with sour cream, mayo, and/­­or cheese sauce (usually and, not or). Being sick last week, I was craving comfort food and to me, comfort food is creamy food. So I set out to make a vegetarian version of the classic Creamy Wild Rice & Chicken Soup. And then, because it’s the New Year and I’m trying to watch what I eat, I set out to make a lighter version. Behold, Creamy Wild Mushroom Rice Soup. The biggest obstacle was figuring out what to replace the chicken with. I’m always hesitant to cook with seitan on my blog because I don’t know if that’s readily available everywhere. And tofu in […]

Vegan Cheese Sauce

December 4 2019 VegKitchen 

Vegan Cheese Sauce This classic cheese sauce is extremely simple to make, and can be refrigerated for up to 1 week. Save Print Vegan Cheese Sauce Serves: 1 cup   Ingredients 1 1/­­2 cup Yukon potatoes, peeled and quartered ⅓ cup carrots, diced ¼ cup nutritional yeast 2 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp unsweetened almond milk 1 tsp lemon juice 1 clove garlic, minced ½ tsp vinegar ½ tsp salt ¼ tsp cumin Instructions Put the potatoes and carrots in a pot and cover with water. The post Vegan Cheese Sauce appeared first on VegKitchen.

Thanksgiving Torte

November 25 2019 VegKitchen 

Thanksgiving Torte This torte stands as the ideal vegan Thanksgiving dish. It combines all your favorite Thanksgiving varieties of classic textures and savory flavors which come from its combination of wild rice, mushrooms, nuts, and sage. This Thanksgiving Torte makes a hearty main dish when served with a robust Mushroom Sauce and goes well with all the typical Thanksgiving side dishes like cranberry sauce, sweet potatoes, chestnut stuffing, and veggie combinations. The post Thanksgiving Torte appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Pot Pie with Black Pepper Biscuits

November 22 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pot Pie with Black Pepper BiscuitsVegan Pot Pie with Black Pepper Biscuit topping. Veggies in Savory herbed sauce topped with easy No Oil Black Pepper Biscuit topping. Classic flavors, easier and simpler! Vegan Soy-free Recipe. Option for Nut-free Gluten-free. Jump to Recipe Holiday Meals wouldn’t be complete without a classic pot pie. This Savory herby filling reminds me of a chickin pot pie. The black pepper biscuit topping is crisp and delightful over this veggie filled pot pie. Change up the herbs and veggies to preference. Add some soy curls for a chickin like texture, use other biscuit topping, or puff pastry or a pie crust of choice.Continue reading: Vegan Pot Pie with Black Pepper BiscuitsThe post Vegan Pot Pie with Black Pepper Biscuits appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Scalloped Potatoes

November 9 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Scalloped PotatoesYou have to try My Creamy Vegan Scalloped Potatoes Recipe! No Dairy, No Nuts, No nutritional Yeast! in this Potato Gratin. Can be gluten-free and Soy-free. Oil-free option Jump to Recipe Lets make these Classic Scalloped Potatoes to add to the Thanksgiving menu! These Scalloped potatoes are Easy, use just a few ingredients, don’t need nutritional yeast for the cheesyness, have no nuts and are creamy, cheesy and all things delicious. Use herbs of choice for variation. Use a combination of veggies such as cauliflower with the potato. Top with a breadcrumb topping. Many options!Continue reading: Vegan Scalloped PotatoesThe post Vegan Scalloped Potatoes appeared first on Vegan Richa.


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