kohlrabi - vegetarian recipes

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kohlrabi vegetarian recipes

Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich

June 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Everything tastes better on the beach. The sun and saltwater create a special kind of exhaustion that will make even the blandest piece of food taste mind-blowing. When I was a kid, we were usually handed fresh peaches after a long, tiring swim. The peach juice would inevitably end up all over our faces and running down our arms, but no one cared because the way they tasted made the whole world go quiet. Those same peaches never seemed quite as delicious at home, and one year I even made a point of only eating them when at the seaside. Today’s sandwich can be eaten anywhere and anytime, but it will also make for one very special beach snack. The main component of the sandwich is a white bean ‘tuna’ that has all of the best flavor components of tuna salad, with a little summer flare from fresh cucumber and basil. When mixed with red onion, pickles, olives, sunflower seeds, herbs and a mayo-like sauce, white beans taste remarkably close to tuna salad, especially sandwiched between some bread. Once you have all your ingredients at the ready, the ‘tuna’ comes together easily, and the batch will last you for close to a week’s worth of sandwiches. It’s sturdy and portable, and as a bonus has none of that characteristic scent that follows a tuna sandwich lunch. It’s satisfying and nutritious too, since white beans (as well as all pulses, aka chickpeas/­­beans/­­lentils/­­dry peas) are protein and fiber-packed little superfoods. This year we are partnering with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on sharing some tasty, simple recipes centered around pulses, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. The goal is to kindly inspire you to include at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week, for sustainable, nourishing and tasty meals. This sandwich is a good start :) Summery White Bean Tuna Sandwich   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the white bean tuna salad juice of half a lemon ¼ medium red onion - chopped ½ cup dried white beans (such as cannellini, navy, baby lima, etc.) - soaked overnight in purified water and cooked ½ cup chopped English cucumber ⅓ cup chopped pickles ⅓ cup chopped olives ⅓ cup toasted sunflower seeds ⅓ cup chopped dill and/­­or parsley 1 tablespoon capers 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper handful basil leaves (optional) ½ teaspoon garlic powder (optional) ¼ cup mayo, or more to taste - recipe follows sea salt - if needed for the mayo 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon sunflower butter or any nut/­­seed butter 1 teaspoon sriracha juice of 1 lemon or more if needed sandwich add-ins shredded red cabbage tomato slices more whole basil leaves sprouts or microgreens Instructions to make the white bean tuna salad Pour the lemon juice over the chopped red onion in a small bowl and let it sit while preparing the rest of the ingredients. Combine the onions in lemon juice with the rest of the ingredients in a food processor. Pulse a few times, taking care not to over process; the mixture should be slightly chunky. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container. Serve on good sandwich bread, with red cabbage, tomato, more basil, sprouts/­­microgreens, or any other favorite sandwich add-ins. to make the mayo Combine all the ingredients, except the lemon juice, in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the lemon juice and combine thoroughly. Add more of the lemon juice, if needed to achieve a creamy, slightly runny consistency. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice Lemon Tarts from Laura at The First Mess Ethiopian Injera with Mustard Lentils and Braised Cabbage .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Oriental Quinoa Salad with Kale

March 30 2017 Veganpassion 

Oriental Quinoa Salad with Kale When I was walking through the organic market the other day I found some fresh kale. I was so excited to get some of my favorite veggies. To make the salad a full meal I decided to add some quinoa and carrots. You can easily take it to work. Kale is very mild that's why you can enjoy it in smoothies or salads. If you can't find any kale you can replace it with chard or kohlrabi green. Makes 4 salad portions. Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup (100 g) quinoa 1 cup vegetable broth a bunch of kale 1/­­4 cup peanuts 1 carrot Cook quinoa with closed lid for about 15 minutes. Put it aside and let it soak. Wash kale under water and pour it off. Pull of the leafs and stew them with 2 tbsp. of water a few minutes. Shred the carrot. Mix quinoa, kale, carrots and peanuts. For the dressing: 2 tbsp. penut butter 1 tbsp. lemon juice salt, pepper 1 tsp. yeast flakes 1 garlic clove a small piece of ginger 1 tsp. agave syrup 1/­­4 cup water 1 pinch of cumin 1 pinch of cilantro For the dressing mix peanut butter, lemon juice, some pepper and salt, 1 tsp. yeast flakes, garlic clove, a small piece of ginger and agave syrup. Put some water to it and blend it until it's smooth. Add cumin and cilantro. Add dressing to the salad and enjoy!

Millet Patty with Pumpkin Ketchup

February 27 2017 Veganpassion 

Millet Patty with Pumpkin Ketchup Millet is one of my favorite cereal species. All-round talent, delicious and clean I could eat it all the time. From my morning muesli until my evening patty. I really love millet. And that's why millet is my favorite veggie of the month. Enjoy! Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 1 cup millet 1 3/­­4 cup vegetable broth 1 black Spanish radish or 1 kohlrabi 2 carrots 1 onion 1/­­4 cup + 1 tsp. chickpea flour 2 tbsp. dairy-free milk salt, pepper nutmeg, cumin mustard seed olive oil Cook millet in vegetable broth for about 15 minutes. Shred carrots and radish and cut onions into cubes. In a mixing bowl, mix together millet, veggies, chickpea flour and dairy-free milk and spice everything. Form 12 pattys and roast them in olive oil on each side. Additionally: 2 romaine lettuce 1/­­2 cucumber Pumpkin Ketchup 4 tbsp. vegan parmesan 1 garlic clove salt, pepper 1 tsp. agave syrup 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup + 1 tbsp. water 1 tbsp. olive oil Was lettuce and cucumber and cut into pieces. Blend parmesan, garlic, spices, agave syrup, vinegar, water and oil in a mixer. Best dressing ever! Serve some lettuce and dressing on four plates and serve everything with 3 millet pattys. Serve with pumpkin ketchup.

Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache

December 8 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache Since we’ve been making a point of keeping things festive around here for the past month or so, we thought it was time that we do a proper cake recipe. By proper I mean layered, frosted, stunning and decadent. Then again, this cake is also vegan, gluten-free and the chocolate layers contain no added sugar, which are all elements not very commonly seen in those ‘proper’ cakes, but that’s just the way we do things around here ;) By now it’s no secret that sweet root vegetables are not to be underestimated when it comes to vegan baking. They are so good at contributing that right texture, moisture and body to baked goods, together with a neutral base for any flavor. Beets, the root vegetable I use in this cake, are all that and happen to be nature’s very best food coloring. The rich and moist chocolate layers of this cake are made of a mixture of gluten-free flours, dates and beet, and get their depth of flavor from cocoa, chicory coffee and a splash of balsamic vinegar. If you are wondering what the coffee and balsamic are doing in this recipe – they both work well at emphasizing the chocolate flavor and taking it up on the decadence scale. The beet-colored frosting is based on home-‘condensed’ coconut milk and is creamy but very light, and the same can be said for the chocolate ganache that glazes over the cake. Although this is a layered cake that requires time, attention and ritual, I would say that technique-wise, this cake is on the simpler side when it comes to traditional layer cakes. All the elements come together fairly quickly, and I find the assembly and frosting to be the most challenging part, as always. We hope this beauty makes it on your holiday table or birthday table, or rainy day baking table. In any case, let us know how it goes :) Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache   Print Serves: one 6-inch, double layer cake Ingredients for the pink frosting 2 cans full fat unsweetened coconut milk ⅔ cup raw sugar 2 tablespoons coconut oil, plus more for oiling parchment paper 1½ cups cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours, divided ¼ small beet root 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice ⅔ cup almond milk or purified water for the cake 1 cup brown rice flour ½ cup almond flour ½ cup cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda pinch sea salt 1 cup Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 1 cup chicory coffee (1 teaspoon ground roasted chicory root or coffee substitute such as Dandy Blend per 1¼ cups boiling water, brewed for 5 minutes and strained) or strong regular coffee ⅓ cup apple sauce 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 1 medium beet root - peeled and shredded for the chocolate ganache ½ cup condensed coconut milk (reserved when making frosting) ¼ cup cashews (reserved when making frosting) 5-7 tablespoons cocoa powder 2 tablespoons almond milk or water Instructions to make the frosting Combine coconut milk and sugar in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat to establish a strong simmer and cook, stirring often, for 20 minutes, until the mixture thickens and resembles condensed milk. Stir in coconut oil until well incorporated. Reserve ½ cup of the condensed coconut milk and ¼ cup soaked cashews for the ganache, below. Combine the rest of the condensed coconut milk, remaining soaked and rinsed cashews, beet, lemon juice and almond milk/­­water in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Scoop into an airtight container and chill in the refrigerator until firm, preferably overnight. to bake the cake Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare two 6-inch spring forms or cake pans by lining them with lightly oiled parchment paper (if you only have one spring form/­­pan, you can bake one chocolate cake layer at a time). Combine all flours, cocoa powder, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a large bowl. Reserve ½ cup of the date soaking liquid and combine it with the dates, chicory coffee/­­regular coffee and apple sauce in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Add coconut oil and balsamic vinegar and pulse to incorporate. Pour the blended liquid into the bowl with the dried ingredients and mix to combine. Fold in the shredded beet. Divide batter in half between prepared pans and bake for 40-45 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean (or bake one at a time if you only have one pan). Remove from the oven and let cool completely. to make chocolate ganache Combine reserved ½ cup condensed coconut milk and ¼ cup reserved soaked and rinsed cashews with cocoa powder and 2 tablespoons almond milk/­­water in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Set aside. to assemble the cake Invert one of the chocolate cake layers onto a large plate or cake stand. Frost with about ⅓ of well-chilled, firm frosting. Place the other cake layer on top and frost the entire cake with the rest of the frosting. Chill the cake in the refrigerator for 10-15 minutes to firm up the frosting once again. Take the cake out of the refrigerator and pour the chocolate ganache over the cake, taking care to create photogenic drips, if you wish. Place the cake in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to an hour before slicing. Keep the leftovers refrigerated. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream Raw Berry Tarts with a Peach and Herb Sorbet .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Kohlrabi Curry

May 12 2016 seitan is my motor 

If you ever thought that kohlrabi is a weird word and maybe switched on your computer to look it up, Wikipedia will have told you that it is a German word. (It’s not really. Kohlrabi is a composite derived from two Latin nouns. The first part has a lot in common with the name ofRead more The post Kohlrabi Curry appeared first on seitan is my motor.

9 Odd-Ball Vegetables to Try This Summer

July 6 2015 Meatless Monday 

9 Odd-Ball Vegetables to Try This SummerTrying a new food is exciting; especially if its a vegetable youve never seen before. But what is it called? How can you prepare it? And really... what is it? Farmers market odd-balls are a delicious way to make your Meatless Monday extra special or punch up a meal any day of the week. Kohlrabi Image Credit: Shape.com This farmers market favorite is a leafy green with a thick, bulbous stem about the size of a baseball. Try the greens in your favorite kale or collards recipes, and enjoy the stem raw or cooked, just like a turnip (simply peel off the woody skin first). Daikon Radishes Image Credit: Shape.com These white root veggies have a spicier kick than many other radishes, and can be over a foot in length! Like more typical radishes, they can be eaten raw on salads, sautéed in stir-fry blends, or roasted. Garlic Scapes Image Credit: Shape.com These curly, woody greens sprout from the everyday garlic bulbs you know from the grocery store. You can use scapes to replace garlic (one whole scape is roughly one cloves worth of flavor) or you can poach, stir fry, steam, or even grill them. Ramps (Wild Leeks) Image Credit: Shape.com Ramps pack a flavorful punch and taste like a blend of garlic, chives and scallions. The whitish bulbs are perfect for pickling, while the green stalks can be prepared in any way that youd cook scallions or traditional leeks. Hakurei Turnips Image Credit: Shape.com These roots can grow up to the size of a softball, and the bulbs have a mildly sweet flavor. Try them raw on a salad or roast them for a more intense sweetness. Pick up a bunch with healthy greens and you can steam or braise those for a tasty side dish! Purple Potatoes Image Credit: Takepart.com These potatoes cook up like red new potatoes, making them ideal for colorful potato salads or a strikingly violet mash. To make their color even stronger, try adding a little lemon juice as you cook them. Romanesco Broccoli Image Credit: Takepart.com More like cauliflower broccoli, this cone-shaped veggie has a milder, sweeter flavor than standard white cauliflower. Try roasting to enhance its flavor or using it as a cauliflower replacement in your favorite recipes. Purple Carrots Image Credit: Takepart.com These violet cousins of the orange carrot have the same flavor and can be enjoyed in the same ways: raw, steamed, roasted, and more. Their bright purple color tends to bleed when cooked, so be ready for your dishes to have a purplish-pink hue! Manioc Image Credit: Firstwefeast.com This tuber is long (many are over a foot long when harvested) with a brown skin. Also known as cassava or yuca, manioc is ideal for mashes or fritters. A ground meal made from dried manioc can be used as a thickener in sauces and puddings. Hungry for more? Check out these meatless recipes perfect for summer meals and snacking. The post 9 Odd-Ball Vegetables to Try This Summer appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Dig Inn is Changing the Way People Eat

June 1 2015 Meatless Monday 

Dig Inn is Changing the Way People Eat Dig Inn is a thriving chain of fast-casual restaurants thats making healthy food accessible like never before. As part of their Spring Into Summer promotion, Dig Inn is collaborating with Meatless Monday. Its less about a marketing tactic to get people in the door on Monday, said founder Adam Eskin. Its more, were in support of anything that furthers the cause. We see it as an opportunity to support an organization and a movement. Offering Meatless Monday options is not a big stretch for Dig Inn, since 70% of the food they serve is vegetables. We cook everything fresh here every day...and its crazy the amount of vegetables that we cook, said Dig Inn chef Matt Weingarten. When it comes to meat hes most concerned about finding the right source, for the highest quality and lowest environmental impact. But when it comes to cooking and recipes, he says, I spend more of my time thinking about how I cook our vegetables than how I cook our meat. Dig Inn already has eleven locations in Manhattan and by the end of 2016 they hope to be in Boston, Chicago, and L.A. They feature unique sandwiches and hearty protein-filled salads, but the signature offering is called Marketplates. You start with an entrée (salmon, steak, or veggie options like tofu) then you get to add ridiculously good hot sides (like roasted sweet potatoes and upstate mac) and cold sides (spinach w/­­ mango, asparagus w/­­radish.) By the time you get to the end of the line you want to double back and try all the things you couldnt fit this trip through. And you get all this for around $10-12. Affordable food for everyone, said Eskin. Whats the point otherwise? If we just wanted to do fancy, high-end vegetables, we could probably do well and make money, but what impact would that have? In order to have impact, accessibility has to be on your radar. But it cant be to the detriment of the quality of food you serve. Its a balancing act, but what weve been able to do with supply and food opps has allowed us to charge a little less than everyone else. With no restaurant experience other than being a busboy at age 15, Eskin was asked by the equity firm he worked for to parachute in and save a flagging restaurant investment. He soon saw that what was happening in the grocery channel with Whole Foods was going to happen in the restaurant world as well.  For me the idea became wildly obvious. This type of food, in this type of setting, he said, referring to his new Madison Park location. With this amount of speed and accessibility, at this price point, and with this much care and commitment to the food and where it comes from. For him its about building a nice business and having fun doing it, but its also about effecting change. Eskin is troubled by the obesity problem in the U.S., and got positively giddy when a large group of teens sat near us, their plates overflowing with Dig Inn specials. Thats what gets me excited. When you getem early, its like, You are eating kale for life, kid! Imagine what happens when theyre older and feeding their kids. Thats why the opportunity for us, as a business, is so important. The restaurant business is notoriously difficult, and when you add to that the extra prep that comes with a predominantly vegetarian menu, the desire to source ingredients locally, and relentless competition, its daunting. We didnt pick the easiest path, says Eskin. Actually just the opposite. We took the most complicated and challenging path and are trying to make that work. When it does, its very rewarding. One thing they have in their favor: theyve built solid relationships with their suppliers over time, to the point where they actually list farms where their food comes from on their menu. Whether its helping partners pay for seeds up front or sending them to Cornell to learn about food safety, they continue to invest in relationships and engage with partners at every level that is mutually beneficial. Another smart practice: recruiting people from outside of the restaurant industry. Were getting a ton of amazing talented people who want to join us just because of what were trying to accomplish, said Eskin. And were figuring out how to take their passion, intellect and experience and put it to use inside the four walls of our company. Analytics are at the core of their business. Youd expect that from a numbers guy like Eskin, but Chef Weingarten also sees their value. Analytics are huge for helping us understand our customers preferences and what is selling well. Im kind of a systems guy. I get geeky about how to get things done. And to work within this model and say, hey, we can cook vegetables this fast and this good in this many locations...for me as a craftsman, I love it.   Having come from a fine dining background, he feels fortunate to have learned under masterful chefs and brings that experience to what he does every day at Dig Inn. Thanks to analytics they could immediately answer what their most popular vegetables are – its seasonal, but Brussels sprouts lead over the year, with kale and cauliflower not far behind. We just put kale & rhubarb as one of our sides, said Chef Weingarten. Its pickled so it stays firm, crispy, and juicy, both sweet & sour. Folks internally said, I dont eat rhubarb but they tried it and...so far its got a 100% conversion rate.  Success for Weingarten is to introduce people to new flavors and new foods. To put out kohlrabi and have everyone digging on kohlrabi. And thats just a matter of time. These kids, he said referring to the teens, theyre going to be down with kohlrabi. Just as Meatless Monday is trending upward, Dig Inn is on a similar trajectory. Were leading the change and thats where we want to be, said Weingarten. We all want to have better food thats more accessible at an affordable cost. And the more the big food systems adjust to that, the better it is for all. The post Dig Inn is Changing the Way People Eat appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Saturday Six | Mediterranean Zucchini Noodles, Kohlrabi Schnitzel & Vegan Cheesecake

April 11 2015 Oh My Veggies 

Were rounding up some of our favorite recipes from this weeks Potluck submissions, including Mediterranean zucchini noodles, a meatless take on schnitzel and mini vegan chocolate peanut butter cup cheesecakes.

Kohlrabi Hash with Corn and Chevre

September 22 2014 Meatless Monday 

Hash may be everyone’s favorite brunch side, but this version using kohlrabi in place of potatoes is produce packed, making it an excellent main course any time of day. Look for kohlrabi, a bulbous cabbage cousin, in your local farmers market. This recipe comes to us from Olga of Mango & Tomato. Serves 2-4 - 2 teaspoons olive oil - 2 medium kohlrabi bulbs, peeled, diced 1/­­4″ - 1/­­2 white onion, diced - 1/­­2 green pepper, diced - kernels from 1 ear of corn - salt to taste - 2 teaspoons smoked paprika - 1 roasted red pepper, diced (jarred or home roasted) - 1 tablespoon chopped parsley - 1/­­4-1/­­3 cups chevre Heat a cast iron skillet. Add oil and allow the oil to get hot. Add kohlrabi, onions, green pepper and corn. Season with salt and smoked paprika and sauté for 15-20 minutes. You want the kohlrabi to be cooked through and slightly caramelized. Add roasted red pepper and allow to heat through. Serve topped with parsley and chevre. The post Kohlrabi Hash with Corn and Chevre appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Turnips, Kohlrabi, Radishes, and Other Odd Vegetables: Are They Our Key to Survival?

August 3 2014 VegKitchen 

Turnips, Kohlrabi, Radishes, and Other Odd Vegetables: Are They Our Key to Survival?Last week, we got kohlrabi in our CSA boxes for a second time in a row. Chatting with a fellow CSA* member she complained, “Why did we get kohlrabi again? Can’t they just give us vegetables we know?” Our personal vegetable kingdoms are frequently divided between “vegetables we know” and “everything else.” The former category includes perennial favorites like tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers and peppers. The latter is a dumping ground for those vegetables we never buy or that don’t have instant taste appeal, like kohlrabi, collards, radishes, turnips, parsnips, and celeriac. If we can go to the store and buy easy things like carrots and spinach, why go to the effort of buying and cooking odd vegetables that present such preparation and palatability challenges? It’s a fair question, and I’ve often asked it of myself, especially since our classes frequently use vegetables from the “everything else” category. The answer can be summed up in one word:  Diversity. I recently attended Food: Our Global Kitchen, at the Colorado History Museum. Two juxtaposing displays really drove home the point of diversity.  The first described how, at the time of the tragic Irish Potato Famine, millions of Ireland’s population subsisted largely on just one crop, the potato. To make matters worse, they relied on just one variety of potato. So when the pathogen P. infestans (a/­­k/­­a potato blight) struck in 1845, it “spread alarmingly quickly, cutting yields from that year’s harvest in half. By the next year, harvest from potato farms had dropped to one quarter of its original size.” In the ensuing famine, over one million people died of starvation. The second display described a very different situation across the globe, where native populations in the Andean highlands had developed nearly 4000 potato varieties over thousands of years, each capable of withstanding different diseases, pests, water availability, soil conditions, etc.  So even though P. infestans is believed to have originated in Peru, the Andean region was spared its devastation. My great grandmother was a Potato Famine emigrant, so these displays really left me shaken.  Monoculture, i.e., the practice of planting acres and acres with a single variety of a single plant, leaves us so frighteningly vulnerable -- just one disease from disaster. Sadly, we haven’t learned much. Not many years after the Irish Potato Famine, American farmers continued planting fields upon fields with just a few varieties of potatoes. These became an “ocean of breakfast” for the next potato scourge: the Colorado potato beetle, which has been a continuing pest epidemic ever since, kept in check only by massive and multiple applications of pesticides. What’s to save us? Diversity. It’s the “technology” Nature has always deployed to keep disease and pests in check. Faced with a riotous mix of species and varieties, insects and pathogens can’t multiply and adapt to dangerous levels. Which brings us back to turnips, kohlrabi, and radishes. The more odd things on our farms, the less we are vulnerable to massive crop failures. And should pests or hail or a water shortage bring down one crop, there’s a good chance the damaging condition will have little or no affect on other crops or varieties.  Last year, for instance, our CSA farm was hit by fury of hail that sheared the tops off most crops-but all the root crops were safely buried in the ground. So we rued the loss of Monroe’s famous melons, but cheered at the bounty of carrots, potatoes, beets, and celeriac. Diversity yields benefits on a personal level, too. As we eat a greater variety of foods, our bodies benefit from a wider range of nutrients. In fact, our CSA farmer, says this is an important reason for including vegetables from the “everything else” category, i.e., so members get a chance to try and benefit from new foods.  And there’s nothing like a variety of tastes -- from the sweetness of peaches to the earthiness of turnips -- to create a dish with deep, well-rounded flavor. In a world where easy and familiar vegetables are shipped in to your grocery store no matter the month, it’s easy to ignore the odd vegetables. But perhaps you want to help transition us to an environmentally sound, resilient food system, where tomatoes aren’t shipped in from places 1,000 miles away and we aren’t dependent on drought-ravaged California for 90% of our food supply. One of the best ways to contribute is also one of the easiest: simply buy, use and create demand for the odd vegetables. And don’t worry about the taste. Over time, our taste buds grow and develop so that we come to treasure the “unique” flavors of each member of the vegetable kingdom. Find ways to experiment and learn tricks and tips to make the odd vegetables a natural part of your diet. Mary Collette Rogers is the author of   Take Control of Your Kitchen . * In addition to writing, she offers kitchen makeover services, meal planning consultations, and classes on healthy cooking, in the hope of sharing her practical KitchenSmart habits and tools so busy people everywhere can enjoy wonderfully delicious and nourishing meals. Visit her at  Everyday Good Eating .   *This post contains affiliate links. If the product is purchased by linking through this review, VegKitchen receives a modest commission, which helps maintain our site and helps it to continue growing!  

Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday

June 5 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday This Sunday’s flavors are lavender, chocolate and tahini. I’ve talked about my love for lavender on this blog quite a lot, and it’s hard not to sound like a bit of a broken record, but this small flower really does hold a special place in my heart (I cannot wait to make this milkshake and tart sometime this summer). I’m sharing my go-to vegan lavender ice cream recipe with the addition of rich and decadent chocolate-tahini bits. It has a creamy, luxurious texture, which combines so well with the refreshing flavors of lavender and chewy, bittersweet pieces of chocolate. Read on for some weekend links + a few more snaps, and enjoy your Sunday. Rachel Roddy’s Instagram – author of the Five Quarters cookbook shares snaps from her very Italian kitchen. Love the ‘real’ photography style and all the beautiful produce/­­dishes (also, her recipes at The Guardian). Aquafaba – have you tried cooking with it yet? I haven’t, but gearing up to. Olafur Eliasson – loved this feature on him and cannot wait to check out his cookbook, Food is more important than art. You die from not having food. You die from not having art, too--just not as fast. Ingredients in an all natural banana do not sound as natural as one would think – a fun infographic, plus blueberry and coffee bean Claire Cottrell on Apiece Apart Woman – enjoyed this interview and photos (love her Instagram as well) I found this to the point Q&A about antibiotic resistance to be very clear and helpful Things the world’s most and least privileged people say – for some perspective Blog Love – turmeric honey almond butter, vegan onigiri, white chocolate mousse with strawberry compote Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the chocolate tahini bits ½ cup dark chocolate chips or chopped chocolate ¼ cup tahini pinch of salt for the lavender ice cream 2 cans full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup plus 1 teaspoon dried lavender flowers ¼ cup maple syrup ½ teaspoon xanthan gum or 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder handful blueberries - for color (optional) Instructions to make the chocolate tahini bits In a double boiler, combine chocolate, tahini and salt. Gently heat to melt and stir to achieve a smooth mixture. Prepare a parchment paper-covered tray or cutting board. Spread the chocolate over the parchment in a thin layer. Place in the freezer to harden until ready to use. to make the ice cream In a medium saucepan, combine coconut milk and ¼ cup lavender. Bring to a boil over a medium-high heat, reduce to a simmer and let cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat, let cool to a room temperature and strain. In a blender, combine the lavender milk with the remaining 1 teaspoon of lavender flowers, maple syrup xanthan/­­arrowroot, blueberries if using, and blend until smooth. Place the mixture in the refrigerator and let cool thoroughly, preferably overnight. Process in an ice cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. When the ice cream is almost done, remove the hardened chocolate out of the freezer and chop. Add to ice cream machine with the motor still running. Spoon ice cream into a container. Serve immediately as soft serve or place the ice cream in the freezer for 4 hours/­­overnight to harden. Remove from freezer 5-10 minutes before serving to let soften. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Melon Basil Summer Rolls Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Raw Chocolate Layer Cakes with Black Cherry and Orange .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

4 Ways to Use Kohlrabi

September 24 2015 Oh My Veggies 

Not sure what to do with the kohlrabi you got in your CSA box? Weve got some ideas!

Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos

June 28 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos Paloma and I made it to my hometown in the Southwest of Russia, where we are thoroughly enjoying our stay at grandma’s house. Because I don’t get to visit here very often, my days are completely packed with family, friends, daily trips to the market, nature walks, and all sorts of leftover business. This time, we added a kitchen renovation to the mix, along with piano and swimming lessons for Paloma. The days fly by, and I’m always caught by surprise when the night falls and it’s time for bed. As usual, we’re indulging in my mom’s home cooked delicacies and consume the local berry harvest by the kilo. The most abundant crops right now, which we have no access to in Florida, are sour cherries, black, red and white currants, wild strawberries and mulberries. We walk around with berry-stained hands and wouldn’t have it any other way. I prepared this recipe in Florida, right before we left, where a very hot summer was in full swing, making me want to stay away from the oven as much as possible. I craved crunchy raw vegetables like kohlrabi and jicama, along with chilled watermelon and ripe mango, which often replaced my lunch. I came up with this easy salad – a combination of jicama, mango, avocado and grilled corn with loads of cilantro and lime juice. It’s a quick and refreshing dish on its own and even more filling and delicious when served in a taco shell. Lastly, I have a bit of housekeeping to discuss. If you haven’t signed up for our newsletter, you can do so here. We recently changed the format to a better looking one, and along with recipe updates, the newsletters will include seasonal ingredient highlights and any other Golubka Kitchen related news. And for the French readers, the translation for the Rhubarb Raspberry Fizz from Sarah Kieffer’s guest post is up here. Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos serves 4-6 2 ears of corn – grilled 1 medium jicama – sliced into cubes or small matchsticks 2 ripe, sweet mangos – cut into small cubes ground chipotle – to taste (optional) 1-2 limes 1 bunch cilantro 1-2 ripe but firm avocados – cubed your favorite taco shells hot sauce of choice Cut kernels off grilled corn ears. Combine corn kernels,  jicama and mango in a large bowl, add chipotle, if using. Squeeze lime juice over. Add cilantro leaves and mix gently. Distrribute the salad between taco shells, top with abocado slices, sprinkle with more lime juice, cilantro leaves and your favorite hot sauce. Serve right away.

KOHLRABI COCONUT SOUP W/ CRISPY ROASTED RADISHES, NIGELLA SEEDS + CILANTRO GREMOLATA

April 17 2015 That's Food Darling 

KOHLRABI COCONUT SOUP W/ CRISPY ROASTED RADISHES, NIGELLA SEEDS + CILANTRO GREMOLATA   Hello friends, it's actually spring! That's why I'm sharing this spring-like kohlrabi coconut soup with you today. Cooking with the seasons makes lots of fun. Today is all about kohlrabi and radishes. As a child I was used to snack them raw, together with our common "Brotzeit". Um, well, we cut them into sticks/­­pieces and served them to our bread and butter breakfasts, lunches or dinners. I was wondering how I can turn these both spring vegetables into something zeitgeisty, more grown-up at once, and how they work together best. Have you ever turned kohlrabi into soup or even roasted radishes? Not yet? You're missing much! I bet you'll never wanna eat kohlrabi and radishes another way.  As to the soup, it's texture is creamy no end thanks to rich coconut milk. The soup is aromatic and mild at once, what makes it very pleasant and soothing - it has presence without demanding attention. On to the radishes, that are roasted with nigella seeds - my newest king of spices - they are crispy, and will make you shout: "Oh wow!".  The refreshing cilantro gremolata, that is freshly pestled in mortar with garlic and other good stuff, makes the recipe complete, and it all works out. Th is soup is easy and quick to make, looks like spring in a bowl and even tastes like spring. Serve it with slices of toasted sourdough and this soup is worth making for either lunch or dinner once a week all spring, as it is such a vibrant trio - soup, topping + gremolata. Here it is, a recipe for tasty and hearty kohlrabi coconut soup with roasted radishes, nigella seeds and cilantro gremolata - make sure you have fresh bread at hand to soak up all leftover soup in the bowl. KOHLRABI COCONUT SOUP W/­­ CRISPY ROASTED RADISHES, NIGELLA SEEDS + CILANTRO GREMOLATA |serves 2 as a hearty main entree or 4 as a side dish| INGREDIENTS 350 g kohlrabi, peeled + diced 1 medium potato, peeled + diced 1 tbsp. coconut oil 1/­­2 yellow onion, diced 1/­­2 leek, white part cut into thin rings 1/­­2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground coriander 400 ml low-sodium vegetable stock 100 ml canned coconut milk 1-2 tsp. apple cider vinegar freshly ground sea salt + black pepper to taste 8 red radishes, halved 1 tsp. nigella seeds 2 tsp. olive oil freshly ground sea salt + black pepper to taste handful of fresh cilantro, finely chopped 1 tbsp. olive oil a squeeze of lemon juice 1 tsp. grated lemon zest 1 clove garlic, finely diced a pinch of sea salt fresh bread for serving INSTRUCTIONS Preheat the oven to 190°C. In a large saucepan, heat coconut oil on medium heat. Add onions, leeks, cumin and coriander. Sauté until onions and leeks are soft, not browned, about two minutes. Next put kohlrabi and potatoes into the saucepan, season with sea salt and pepper, toss properly, sauté for further two minutes while stirring continuously. Add the vegetable broth and coconut milk, bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium, cover, and simmer for 15 minutes or until all the vegetables are tender. Take the saucepan from heat. Add apple cider vinegar, and blend the soup using an immersion blender until smooth. Add extra coconut milk if desired and adjust seasoning.  Toss together the radishes, nigella seeds, olive oil salt, and pepper. Transfer to a baking sheet and roast for 12-15 minutes, until both crispy and tender. To make the gremolata, put cilantro, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, lemon zest, and a pinch of  sea salt in your mortar, and pestle until the cilantro leaves' liquid exits and everything is mixed up. Serve soup hot, in two bowls, with fresh cilantro gremolata, and roasted radishes right out of the oven. Enjoy the soup with either cripsy toasted or fluffy fresh bread. Notes:  If you don't own a mortar and pestle, you also could mix up the cilantro gremolata in a small bowl.

Winter Rainbow Panzanella

March 16 2015 My New Roots 

Winter Rainbow Panzanella Dear colour. I miss you. Please come back soon. Your pal, Sarah B Ive joked before about the oh-so dark, single-toned, and super grey city Copenhagen becomes in the winter. After months upon months of this, I feel as if my eyes have turned into little slits, and only capable of seeing in black and white. Needing some kind of sign that I wasnt turning into a subterranean mammal, I cycled down to the central market of Copenhagen last week to find some inspiration in the form of light and colour. I was pretty shocked when I arrived to see a plethora of vibrant veggies, all lined up and waiting for me take them home. I guess Id gotten into such a routine with my shopping that I had failed to remember that winter does in fact offer a lot of brightly hued food, and that I am, undoubtedly, a human. Excited and hungry, I hurried home with a whack-load of produce and a plan brewing in my brain. Oh the colours! Oh the possibilities! Oh what a nerd I am! With some stale sourdough rye sitting on the counter and a knob of ginger in the fridge, a hearty, satisfying salad began to take shape in my mind, a rainbow swathe of vegetables stretched out before me like a beacon in an stubborn steel grey sky. Super Cool Kohlrabi Kohlrabi is a mysterious and intimidating vegetable, dont you agree? Ive gotten a lot of questions about this prehistoric looking creature, as many of you out there seem to be quite scared of even taking it home! Well fear not. Kohlrabi is not going to take off a finger or worse if you approach it with a knife. It is a rather gentle and yielding brassica, a cross between a cabbage and a turnip that can be enjoyed cooked or raw. Its pleasantly crisp texture is perfect julienned in salads, but its also a tender treat roasted in the oven in slices or batons. The flavour is somewhere near to broccoli but a tad milder and sweeter. I really like it in soups as well, blended up with white beans or chickpeas. The leaves are also edible and very delicious in salad or stir-fried with garlic like collards or Swiss chard. Key nutrients in kohlrabi include vitamin C, for fighting infection, vitamin E for preventing arterial plaque build-up, and a range of B-vitamins for combating stress. The potassium in kohlrabi helps the body maintain proper fluid balance, while the calcium manages the acid/­­alkaline balance of our blood. Other minerals in kohlrabi include iron, magnesium and zinc. When buying kohlrabi, look for bulbs that are firm, smooth and free of holes or cracks. Typically this part of the vegetable is pale green, but you can also find purple varieties like the one pictured above. The younger ones can be eaten with the skin on, but as their season (late fall to early spring) stretches, youll find peeling the more mature bulbs is a tastier choice. The leaves should be taut and unblemished. To prolong the kohlrabis shelf life, remove the leaves and wrap them in a damp towel, place them in a plastic bag in the fridge for up four days. The root bulb can be stored separately in the crisper as well, and will keep well for couple weeks. To the panzanella! Traditionally, this is a salad made with stale white bread and tomatoes, a popular dish in Tuscany. My version is a far, Nordic cry from the classic, but its a meal in itself and a very satisfying one at that, since there is just so. much. going. on. The key to building this dish, or any dish for that matter is layers and balance; flavours, textures and of course, colours. Taking into consideration that the base of this dish would be hearty winter greens I knew that I needed something creamy and yielding, like roast veggies, and something dense and crusty, like the Garlic Sourdough Rye Bread Croutons to contrast and compliment. From a flavour perspective, especially in salads, balancing tastes is very important for success. Because the roast vegetables are so sweet, its important to have an acidic hit to add brightness. I made some very tasty Ginger-Pickled Carrots in advance, but capers would also be a nice touch if you are pressed for time. The point is to step back and look at your dish as a whole, then adjust all the levels of salt, sugar, and acid as needed tipping the scales until everything is just right. And just a special note about these croutons, because they are so darn delish. I first came up with these in the good ol days when I was cooking at a very small café here in Copenhagen, inventing new dishes every day and being creative with what I had available. The odd time we had any leftover rye bread, I would make these garlic croutons, few of which actually made it onto any finished dishes because I would typically eat them all up before service with my kitchen mates. They are addictive. The kind of thing you wouldnt necessarily think of as a terrific little snack, but wow, are they ever hard to stop eating! There is a high amount of garlic-to-bread ratio, but because Danish rye is so rich and flavourful, youll need that amount of garlic to be heard. If youre using a lighter bread, a spelt loaf for instance, you can scale back just a touch unless you really love your garlic and/­­or not planning on making out with anyone for a couple days. This dish may seem component-heavy, but most of these elements can be made in advance so the whole thing comes together when youre ready. The only thing you need to do before serving in fact, is massaging the kale and kohlrabi leaves. Now excuse me as I dive face first into this bowl of rainbow ecstasy! Okay, good-byyyyyyeeee!     Print recipe     Winter Rainbow Panzanella Serves 4 Ingredients: 4 cups /­­ 100g shredded kale and kohlrabi leaves (or any hearty winter green) 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice a couple pinches sea salt A variety of winter vegetables suitable for roasting. I chose: – sweet potato – golden & red beets – kohlrabi – parsnip – Brussels sprouts Other suggestions: – celeriac – butternut squash – purple potatoes – Jerusalem artichoke – cauliflower – broccoli – leeks Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. Scrub veggies well, chop into similar sized pieces (no need to peel!) and place on a baking sheet with a few knobs of coconut oil or ghee. Place in the oven and when the oil has melted, remove pan from oven, toss to coat veggies and return to the middle rack. Bake for 25-35 minutes, depending on the size of your veggies. Remove from oven, season with salt and pepper, and a drizzle of olive oil. 3. While the veggies are roasting, prepare the kale and /­­or other greens. Wash and dry then well and chop into small pieces. Place in a large bowl and dress with olive oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Vigorously massage the oil and juice into the greens for two whole minutes until they are tender and dark green. Season to taste. 4. To assemble salad, Top the greens with the roasted veggies, add as many pickled carrots as you like, drizzle the dressing over and toss. Top with garlic croutons and serve. Overnight Ginger-Pickled Carrots Ingredients: 300g carrots 1 cup /­­ 250ml apple cider vinegar 1 cup /­­ 250ml water (or more if needed) 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1/­­2 Tbsp. fine grain sea salt small knob of ginger (about 10g), peeled and sliced Directions: 1. Scrub carrots well. Using a vegetable peeler, slice the carrots lengthwise into long, thing ribbons. Place into a 1-quart /­­ 1 liter glass container. 2. In a measuring cup combine the vinegar, water, maple syrup, salt and ginger, and stir to dissolve the salt. Pour over the carrots and top up with more water as needed to cover them completely. Place in the fridge for 24 hours and enjoy the next day. Grainy Mustard Dressing Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar 1 Tbsp. whole grain mustard 1 tsp. maple syrup generous pinch of sea salt Directions: 1. Whisk all ingredients together. Season to taste. Garlic Sourdough Rye Bread Croutons Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 200g stale dark sourdough, cut into generous cubes (any bread here would work, but make a healthy choice) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee (ghee is definitely the tastiest) 2 fat cloves garlic, finely minced or grated on a microplane a couple pinches flaky sea salt Directions: 1. Melt oil in a small saucepan over low heat. When it is melted, grate in the garlic and stir to combine. Cook just until the garlic starts to simmer, immediately remove from heat and let cool slightly. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. Cut bread into generous cubes and place in a medium sized bowl. Pour the garlic oil over the top and toss to coat, using your hands to squish the oil into the bread. Spread out bread cubes on a cookie sheet, sprinkle with salt and place in the oven. Toast for 10-15 minutes, tossing a couple times during cooking. Croutons are ready when they are crisp and golden around the edges. Once cool, store leftovers in an airtight container for up to three days. *   *   *   *   *   * Hey guys! I have some very exciting news...Im going on tour with my cookbook! Although we are still working out some of the hard details, I wanted to let you know when and where Ill be so you can make a note of it. It would be so rad to meet you, and I hope that you can come out and celebrate! I will update this page and post the events on my Events page and Facebook as they are finalized. Looking forward to it, more than you know! TORONTO April 9-14 VANCOUVER April 15-17 LOS ANGELES April 18 + 19 NEW YORK April 22 + 23 I hope that everyone who has pre-ordered the book is enjoying the Bonus Pack of recipes! Thanks for all of your very positive feedback so far. There is still time to get yours if you’re interested…click here!

Kohlrabi, Corn & Tofu Curry

August 17 2014 Oh My Veggies 

Not sure what to do with kohlrabi? This easy curry dish pairs it with fresh summer tomatoes, sweet corn, and tofu.


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