japanese - vegetarian recipes

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japanese vegetarian recipes

Restaurant Highlight: Soya In Paris, France

December 6 2018 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Soya in Paris is not advertised with flashing lights or creatively crafted signs. This urban chic organic restaurant is located just steps away from the loud buzz of Place de la République, but its eaters have to step off the beaten path to find it. As I scrambled to find the restaurant on a summer night, suddenly the noise of the lively locals watching football in the square turned to a quick hush as I slipped down the side street to the discreet doors of the restaurant. I quietly stepped inside, and my hungry belly was instantly satisfied to see the crowd of happy diners smiling between bites of delicious plant-based cuisine. With its high ceilings, homey wooden benches, classic white décor, and cheery candle lights, the cozy restaurant is as inviting as an old friends loft. Rumor has it that space previously housed a workshop, and the calm, creative feel remains hanging in the air. Soyas owner, Christel Dhuit, was raised in the countryside of France, and her compassion for the land is evident in the vegetarian, 99% organic selection of ingredients for the restaurant. Her love of carefully-raised vegetables combined with her exposure to Korean, Japanese, and Thai […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Soya In Paris, France appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Japanese Vegetable Curry

November 13 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Japanese Vegetable CurryMilder and thicker than other curries and slightly sweet, Japanese curries are typically thickened with a roux. This Japanese Vegetable Curry from One-Dish Vegan cuts the fat and adds flavor by pureeing some of the vegetables in the curry to thicken it. This is also good made with fresh or frozen shelled edamame instead of the tofu and snow peas instead of the green peas. S&B brand curry powder works best in this dish. Japanese Vegetable Curry Milder and thicker than other curries and slightly sweet, Japanese curries are typically thickened with a roux. This version cuts the fat and adds flavor by pureeing some of the vegetables in the curry to thicken it. This is also good made with fresh or frozen shelled edamame instead of the tofu and snow peas instead of the green peas. S&B brand curry powder works best in this dish. - 2 teaspoons olive oil or 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) water - 1 large yellow onion, chopped - 2 carrots, peeled and cut into 1/­­4 -inch (6 mm) thick slices - 1 1/­­2 to 2 tablespoons (9 to 13 g) yellow curry powder - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons (24 g) tomato paste - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) wheat-free tamari - 1 to 2 teaspoons agave nectar -  1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne pepper, optional - 1/­­3 cup (82 g) applesauce - 3 cups (700 ml) vegetable broth - 1 large rurusset potato, peeled and cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) dice - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 tablespoon (16 g) mellow miso paste - 8 ounces (225 g) extra-firm tofu, well drained, blotted dry, and diced -  3/­­4 cup (113 g) fresh or (98 g) thawed frozen peas - Heat the olive oil or water in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the carrots and then stir in the curry powder, tomato paste, tamari, agave, cayenne (if using), applesauce, and broth and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and add the potato and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer until the vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes. - Transfer about 2 cups (455 g) of the mixture to a high-speed blender or food processor. Add the miso paste and puree until smooth. Stir the vegetable puree back into the curry along with the tofu and peas and simmer for 5 minutes longer. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. - Serve hot. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission.   The post Japanese Vegetable Curry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Best Vegan Restaurants - San Francisco

October 9 2018 VegKitchen 

Best Vegan Restaurants - San Francisco The San Francisco Bay Area is among the most vegan-friendly places in the US. Whether you like Chinese, Japanese, or Thai food, San Franciscos got it. Mexican, classic BBQ, healthy smoothies, and delicious vegan cookies--whatever you think of, youll likely find it here If youre looking for cafes and restaurants with excellent plant-based menus, heres a short list of some of the best vegan restaurants in San Francisco. 1. Golden Era Vegan With an immense reputation and exceptional food and service quality, Golden Era Vegan Restaurant qualifies as one of the best vegan restaurants San Francisco has to offer. The restaurant is located on Golden Gate Avenue and is open daily from 10:30AM to 8:30PM. The substantial menu is completely meat-free and covers breakfast, lunch, and dinner options. Some of the most popular dishes include the Shrimp Delight, the garden vermicelli, the spicy noodle soup, and the curry beef. When it comes to desserts, the mocha cake and the Oreo cake are the crowd favorites. 2. Shizen Vegan Sushi Bar & Izakaya Shizen Vegan Sushi Bar & Izakaya offers a mix of traditional Japanese izakaya foods and modern American restaurant aesthetics. This fancy eatery is located on 14th Street and […] The post Best Vegan Restaurants - San Francisco appeared first on VegKitchen.

Sesame Mochi

September 25 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Sesame MochiThe Japanese confection known as daifuku mochi are small, smooth rice cakes or balls stuffed with a sweet filling. Mochi are made with mochiko, a flour made from ground sweet glutinous rice called mochigome. For daifuku mochi, the rice is pounded into paste, stuffed with a filling (usually sweet red bean paste) and molded into various shapes. They are often coated in a fine layer of cornstarch, potato starch, or confectioners sugar to keep them from sticking. These treats are eaten year-round, but are also a traditional food for the Japanese New Year. I admit I was never a fan of the traditional red bean paste filling, but when I tried them with a sesame filling, I was hooked. The microwave method used in this Sesame Mochi recipe was developed by Eleanor Urakawa, a mochimaker for thirty years, living in Hawaii. Note: Glutinous rice flour, also called mochiko, is available at Asian markets or online. Sesame Mochi The Japanese confection known as daifuku mochi are small, smooth rice cakes or balls stuffed with a sweet filling. Mochi are made with mochiko, a flour made from ground sweet glutinous rice called mochigome. For daifuku mochi, the rice is pounded into paste, stuffed with a filling (usually sweet red bean paste) and molded into various shapes. They are often coated in a fine layer of cornstarch, potato starch, or confectioners sugar to keep them from sticking. Note: Glutinous rice flour, also called mochiko, is available at Asian markets or online. - 1 1/­­4 cups glutinous rice flour (mochiko) ((see headnote)) - 1/­­3 cup sugar - Pinch salt - 1 1/­­4 cups almond milk - 1/­­3 cup sesame paste - 1/­­3 cup cooked white beans - 2 tablespoons confectioners sugar - 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds - Coconut flour or finely ground unsweetened coconut, for dusting - In a heatproof bowl, combine the flour, sugar, and salt. Stir in the almond milk and mix well. Cover with plastic wrap and microwave for 5 minutes, then uncover and set aside to cool for 5 minutes. Cut into twelve pieces. - In a food processor, combine the sesame paste, white beans, confectioners sugar, and sesame seeds and mix well. Set aside. - Dust your hands with coconut flour, then flatten each piece of mochi into a small disk. Place 1 1/­­2 teaspoons of the sesame mixture in center of each piece of mochi. Pinch closed to seal, then lightly roll it into a ball, using both palms. Repeat with the remaining mochi and filling. - Pour about 1/­­2 cup of coconut flour into a shallow bowl. Roll the balls in the coconut flour to keep the mochi from sticking. Transfer to a plate and serve. Mochi will keep for up to 2 days at room temperature. If not using right away, they will keep in the freezer for up to 2 weeks. Do not refrigerate, or they will become hard. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington. The post Sesame Mochi appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice

September 19 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice Our farmers market is painted with all the stunning violet and purple shades of eggplant right now. I have the hardest time choosing which eggplants to get, since they are all so different and beautiful: plump, dark ones, speckled ‘graffiti’ ones, skinny Japanese eggplants… I want to buy them all. Eggplant is definitely up there among my favorite vegetables of all time. I also know that it’s quite a polarizing one, since a lot of people don’t enjoy the flavor or find eggplant intimidating to prepare. Whenever someone tells me they don’t like eggplant, I try to point them in the direction of my marinated eggplant recipe – it’s in our latest cookbook, and it impresses seemingly everyone. Eggplant is spongy and absorbent, so marinating it transforms it into this super flavorful, velvety version of itself that seriously tastes like heaven. I also really like adding eggplant to curry or ciabotta and broiling it in the oven with a miso glaze. It has so much potential to be really delicious! This eggplant fried rice is our latest obsession. It’s weeknight-friendly, satisfying, and full of fresh, late summer flavors. The preparation here is quite simple. Eggplant is cooked first and separately from all the other components of the dish, because that’s how it tastes its best in my experience. After that, all the ingredients are added to the same pan in stages, building up the flavor from the bottom up. What makes the flavors pop here is the addition of a quick, ginger-lime sauce, as well as a few tablespoons of desiccated coconut, which gets nice and toasty together with the rice. Don’t be afraid of adding tons of basil here, too. It does such a great job of elevating the whole dish with its brightness. Hope you enjoy this one! Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 2½ tablespoons coconut oil - divided 1 large or 2 small-medium eggplants - cubed into 1 pieces sea salt 1 small yellow onion - diced 1 large or 2 small bell peppers or sweet peppers - sliced pinch of red pepper flakes 2 garlic cloves - minced 1½-2 piece of ginger - peeled if not organic juice from 1 large or 2 small limes 1 tablespoon coconut aminos or tamari 1 tablespoon brown rice vinegar ¼ teaspoon sesame oil 3 cups cooked white or brown basmati rice (from 1 cup dry) - preferably leftover or chilled 2 tablespoons unsweetened desiccated coconut, plus more for garnish large handful of basil - sliced handful of crushed toasted cashews - for garnish (optional) Instructions Heat up a large sauté pan over medium heat. Melt 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in the pan. Add the eggplant and sauté until soft and golden brown on all sides, about 15 minutes. Mix in a pinch of salt towards the end. Remove the eggplant from the pan to a plate or bowl and set aside. Wipe the pan clean if necessary. Add another 1 tablespoon of coconut oil to the pan, along with the onion, pepper, red pepper flakes, and another pinch of salt. Sauté until the onion and peppers are cooked through, about 10 minutes. Add the minced garlic and stir it around for another 30 seconds, until fragrant. While the vegetables are cooking, grate the ginger into a jar or a bowl through a fine strainer. Add the lime juice, coconut aminos/­­tamari, brown rice vinegar, and sesame oil, and stir/­­shake to mix. Once the onions and peppers are done, push them over to one side of the pan and add another ½ tablespoon of coconut oil to the empty side of the pan, letting it melt. Add the rice and desiccated coconut to the pan and mix it with the onions and peppers. Increase the heat a little bit, and let the rice and coconut toast for 2-3 minutes, stirring frequently. Mix in the ginger-lime sauce and let it absorb for about a minute. Stir in the eggplant and let it heat through with the rest of the ingredients. Turn off the heat and stir in the basil. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the rice, garnished with toasted cashews, if using, and more desiccated coconut. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Tahini Hot Chocolate Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream - Ice Cream S... Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel Spring Tea Party by The Rose Journals .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby

January 7 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby Beth Kirby is a photographer, cookbook writer, entrepreneur, and the creator of Local Milk, her food, travel, and lifestyle blog. We are endlessly amazed by Beth’s ability to present her work with both authenticity and style, and we were completely blown away by each one of her thoughtful and inspiring answers in this interview. It’s a true gem. In this dialogue, Beth tells us about self-care as the foundation for happiness, having a schedule as a way to avoid stress, why she doesn’t believe in the idea of work-life balance, and how her routine has changed since becoming a mother, as well as her newfound love for weight training, the adaptogens and herbs she incorporates into her everyday potions, beauty, motivation, sustenance, and much more. There’s some amazing business advice here, too! Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Routine is so very important to me. Routines ensure that time is carved out for the important things in my days & life. Im super flexible with my routines so theres no such thing as failing, but the closer I adhere to the routine, the more impact I tend to make in my day. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I actually just wrote a little guide to a slow morning routine that details mine! I usually wake up when my baby wakes up, between 6:30-7:30 AM. The first thing I do every morning is make the bed because I feel this sets the tone for the rest of my day. My husband takes the baby to give me 10 minutes to meditate (I love the Headspace app) and do a few sun salutations to wake my body + mind connection up. After that I brew my morning elixir, a simple lemon, ginger, and turmeric tea, and then I do some journaling while I drink it. After that comes breakfast & a matcha potion, a shower & getting dressed for the day, a quick tidy of my space if I need it, and then Im down to work! I dont always do every single thing, but the more of them I hit, the better my morning! -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Im so exhausted at the end of the day, I dont usually need much help sleeping! I love making moon mylks with sleep promoting herbs as a little night time luxury. We keep the bedroom a sleep only zone with no television or computers, so its quite easy to pass out once Im in my own bed (or whatever bed I happen to be in!) -- How has your routine changed since you had your daughter? Its gotten a lot more flexible! If shes having a bad morning, things like preparing breakfast can take a lot longer or maybe I skip the shower (truth time!), but in a lot of ways, its made me more routine because if I dont have a plan and stick to it, the day can slip away a lot more easily when you have kids. I kinda floated through my days doing whatever I wanted whenever I wanted before she was born because I had all the time in the world. Now its make hay while the sun shines or forget having any hay! Haha. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  Miso Soup, 7 minute veggie & egg steam, and rice. After spending a fair amount of time in Japan, this has become my breakfast of choice. I keep dashi in the fridge for a quick miso soup so it takes literally minutes, and I steam a few veggies, whatever is on hand, in my steamer with an egg in its shell for 7 minutes. It all, including the egg, comes out perfectly! We cook rice in a rice cooker or donabe depending on where we are. I usually have a little miso dressing in the fridge to dip my veggies and eggs in and enjoy them alongside the rice & soup. Its so comforting and healthy, but its also really quick and easy as long as you throw the rice in a rice cooker and have dashi on hand. Lunch –  Smoothie! I usually hit my work stride during midday, and I dont like to take a massive amount of time (or make a big mess!) for lunch, so my favorite thing to do is whip up a super food adaptogen rich smoothie. I love pineapple and avocado as a base, and if its after a workout I make sure to throw some hemp & moringa in there for a plant based protein punch. Snack –  Ume plum onigiri. I almost always have leftover rice on hand, so I make rice balls with pickled plums in the center and wrap them with toasted nori for a quick snack. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Coffee makes me crazy, so I only have it on special occasions (like if Im near a really, really amazing café I might have a cappuccino), but when Im at home Ive started making a morning matcha potion.   -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I used to! But its lessened over the past couple of years as I cut back on candy & sweets. I love sugar, but I like to save it for feast days like holidays and celebrations instead of consume it as part of everyday life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I incorporate adaptogens & tonic herbs--particularly rhodiola, ashwaghanda, he shou wu, astragalus, maca, and reishi--into a lot of my food like smoothies, mylks, and matchas. I also love Wooden Spoon Herbs tinctures, especially Anxiety Ally (anxious lady over here!) as well as her Green Protein Powder after workouts. Ive also recently discovered tocos and MCT oil, which I work into either my smoothie or matcha each day. -- Youve spent significant amounts of time in both Japan and France. How have those cultures influenced your cooking? For sundry reasons, Japan has definitely had a bigger impact on my cooking than France even though we live in Paris about half the year. I love to eat French food, but I find a lot of it is richer than I care to eat on a daily basis, and because I cook vegetarian at home 99.9% of the time, Japanese cuisine is, in my experience, much easier to adapt to that. And I just love Japanese flavors. I would say I cook Japanese inspired meals more than anything else (even when in Paris!) -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Weve done baby led weaning which simply means offering solids around 6 months and letting her decide what and how much shed like to eat of what we offer. We try to make sure shes offered a wide variety of whole food options, and dont worry about it after that. She eats what we eat, and at 16 months shes still breastfed, and thats fine by me. We are super, super laid back about it. She eats what and when we eat, and she can still have mom milk whenever she wants. That said, those organic baby food pouches are a lifesaver on the go because she can hold them! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I see a personal trainer for an hour a day, five days a week. On my days off I do one day of cardio and one day of rest. I do mainly resistance training with weights and bodyweight and a little cardio. I think a lot of women do a toooonnn of cardio and are afraid of weights because they think theyll bulk up when in reality getting big is incredibly difficult. Instead weights make you stronger, toned, healthy, and able to eat more…which I love! Before Eula I ate very few calories and did lots of cardio, and while I was thin, I never felt healthy. Now I eat as much healthy food as I want when Im hungry and lift weights. While Im not where I want to be post-baby yet, Im on the road! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I freaking hate cardio. Especially running. I dont run. Unless something is on fire. I actually like weight lifting and resistance training. Its hard, but the time flies, and I can feel my body getting stronger. Having a trainer, while an investment, has been the trick for me. I need that accountability, and I needed to feel like someone who knew my goals for my body was guiding me towards them as opposed to me just randomly doing things. What motivates me is freedom from issues around food, being fit for the first time in my life, being a good example to my daughter, keeping up with my fit husband, and getting a toned butt! Haha! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? This is probably cliché but confidence. When someone is confident in their own skin and in who they are as a person, confident about where they are in the journey whether theyre only beginning or years down the road, that is beautiful. When you love yourself inside and out, you glow. Easier said than done, I know, but when we work towards banishing self loathing we arent only more beautiful to ourselves, we are more beautiful to others as well.   -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? As for my face, I keep it super simple: I wash and exfoliate with Aesop, and then I tone with Thayers Rose Tonic and hydrate with Evan Healy moisturizer. I love her formula because its natural and it isnt greasy like so many. It goes on so light. I also get a HydraFacial every couple of months. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I drink tocos daily in my smoothie or matcha, as its amazing for skin. He Shou Wu is another herb I take for beauty, again usually stirred into tea or a smoothie since I have one of those two things almost every day. I also take an ultra collagen supplement by Reserveage.   -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Dont wash your hair everyday! This strips hair of its oils and can dry it out and make it brittle. I wash mine once every 3-4 days, and I use a dry shampoo by Oribe on the days in between as needed. And if nothing else, if I can throw on a bit of Benefit Porefessional, mascara, and do my brows, I feel done. But the truth is, I hardly ever do my make up unless I have an event or am going to be on camera. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Not taking on more than I can handle, delegating, saying no as often as needed, having a schedule, and planning help me avoid stress. As a very DIY spirited entrepreneur, I constantly have to fight the temptation to just do it myself, and as a person who really likes to do what I feel like doing when I feel like doing it, I have to fight the urge to float through my days working on whatever catches my eye. Instead, batching days and time blocking (i.e. Mondays are for marketing & meetings, Tuesdays are for client work, Wednesdays are for editing & writing, Thursdays for content creation, Fridays are for finance, Saturday is for family, and Sunday is for weekly food prep, etc...) helps keep me on track. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Meditation is my not-so-secret weapon. And exercise. And sleep. If Im meditating, sleeping at least 7 hours a night, and getting my work-outs in, I can field whatever stress comes my way with reasonable grace. And it does come. I also find the simple belief that everything happens for a good reason calms down the stresses of life, big and small. Whether Im stuck at a red light when Im running late, or I didnt get something I thought I wanted, this belief frames it as a blessing. I choose to believe the universe knows better than I do what should happen and when. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic! I immediately start sucking on cloves of garlic. More than 50% of the time this knocks it out. It smells strong, but hey, it works! It has antibiotic properties (they called it Russian Penicillin during the war!), and it can kill bugs. I also start drinking a lot of herbal tea. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This may sound strange to say, but I dont believe in work life balance. Balance implies everything has equal weight all the time. I believe in boundaries, but not balance. I dont believe anything great was ever created meting out time to it in a stingy way. Passion is going all in. Its long days and late nights. Its a pendulum swing. Whats important to me is not living these perfectly balanced days where everything gets equal weight, but rather in knowing when to swing back. You have to define your non-negotiables, and then the rest of your time is fair game. My non-negotiables are my weekly workouts, morning routine (though I shorten it as needed depending on the day), and an hour or so at the end of the day to cuddle and connect with my family. When Im in a season of intense work, say launching something new or writing a book, people know they will see less of me. I will spend less time on other things. And when I need a break or when its complete, I will just the same pour myself all into to rest and enjoying the people I love. Its about knowing your own limits, setting boundaries so that the priority gets to be the priority, pushing it to the boundary, and then stepping back when its time. Thats my approach. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself. When you truly, fully grasp that if you dont take care of yourself all the other things you want will forever remain out of your grasp, then it becomes really easy to stay motivated and prioritize yourself. We all have different goals and dreams, but what most people have in common is that they quite simply want to be happy. You can make seven figures and be perfectly miserable if you dont take care of yourself. Its the foundation the rest is built on. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Working out, specifically weight training. I have spent my entire life avoiding exercise. I always really hated it, and it felt like a waste of time when I could be working. Which was so silly! It gives me more energy, better focus, elevates my mood, and helps me make better food choices because when you make one good choice it becomes easier to make others. Also, full disclosure, it really helps with libido! As a woman who is crazy about her husband but definitely suffered from sloth like tendencies post baby, this has been awesome! Intimacy is such a priority for me, and working out has totally reenergized our relationship. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Ha! Story of my life. Honestly, I lean into it. What those periods mean, usually, is that Im burnt out or theres some big issue in my life or business that isnt working, and Im not dealing with it. In those periods, I let myself rest. And I take a look at whats not working, and I try to develop a solution. If Im simply burnt out, a good rest will leave me totally inspired. And if theres something that isnt working in my life or business, taking time to figure it out becomes the priority. Once the problem is solved, motivation and inspiration return. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Tools of Titans, The One Thing, and Essentialism are all books that deeply influenced my routines and my general philosophy on life. While largely geared towards entrepreneurs, I think their principles can apply to anyone. Knowledge -- Your home birth story was incredibly inspiring and touching. How did you come to the decision to have a natural home birth? Do you have any resources to recommend to future parents thinking of doing the same? Well, Id actually planned to give birth at the hospital for the majority of my pregnancy. I decided to have a home birth weeks before she was due! It was kind of crazy. In the process of writing my birth plan, I realized how against the grain I was going for a hospital birth by simply wanting no medication or unnecessary medical interventions. I didnt want to be swimming upstream while doing the hardest thing I would ever do. If someone is thinking about doing the same, I would say do a lot of research on the quality of midwifery care in your area. Not every area of the world is created equally when it comes to available care. The Farm Midwifery Center has lots of great resources for people considering the option! -- Do you have any tips for surviving or minimizing jetlag, and for dealing with a jetlagged baby? I actually have a whole blog post on traveling with baby! If you are traveling across many, many time zones and its at all possible, build a few extra days into your schedule to take it easy and recover from jetlag. When she was under one year old, we took turns getting up with her those first few nights, and tried to keep her awake as long as possible near bed time. And while I know a lot of people might not be comfortable with this, once she was over one year old we gave her a small, weight appropriate dose of benadryl the first two to three nights to help reset her clock. It was an amazing life saving discovery that our pediatrician approved, and we felt comfortable with after lots and lots of research. If you dont want to do that, you can try melatonin or herbal remedies like No Jet Lag. In the end whether you use anything or not, the baby adjusts much quicker than the adults in my experience! -- Youve masterfully created your own brand, and your photography style is instantly recognizable, yet weve read that you are completely self-taught. What was your path to building such a successful lifestyle brand? What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out? Oh man! I have WAY too much to say about this. Im writing e-courses for 2018 that deal with this very topic. So! My path was to embrace the public learning curve. I didnt wait until I had it all figured out to start. I just started, and I got better as I went along. The better I got, the more readers and opportunities I had. There was no overnight success. There was passion, hard work, and showing up everyday for years. I have ALWAYS focused on two things above all else: content and relationships. I dont deal in mediocre and always strive to produce the best content I possibly can, and I aim to treat everyone I come in contact with love and respect. Those are the foundations, in my estimation, of any successful enterprise. The advice I would give to someone starting out, the short version, is this: First, you need to figure out what youre passionate about and be super specific, start with one thing. For me, that was cooking. You can branch out into other niches later, but start with one. Then you need to figure out the core values of your brand. For instance beauty, mindfulness, and authenticity are some of the core values of Local Milk. This is going to set the tone for all that you do. The next thing, the most important thing, you need to figure out is who youre talking to. Who is you dream customer, client, audience? What do they love? What are their hopes, dreams, fears, struggles? How can you make their lives better? This is where youll get ideas for content, revenue streams, copywriting, and everything. Its so important. You cant skip it. You cant hit a target you arent aiming for, and you need to know what your target audience looks like (eg: is it magazine editors or stay at home moms? or both? why?) and responds to before you go on to create your brand. I could keep going! But Ill leave the nitty gritty details for the e-course! The biggest advice I can give is: Just start! There is ALWAYS room at the top, and NO ONE starts there. -- You are a true believer in the fact that a dream life and dream job is achievable for anyone, even those at their lowest point. Can you tell us a bit more about how you were able to come to this realization? Well, Im living proof, so its an easy thing for me to believe. I spent the first decade of my adult life in the throes of bipolar and drug addiction. Im a high school AND college drop out. I started this business when I was 29 on VERY little money. The only thing Id ever done before this was wait tables. I had to heal myself before I could start this journey, but once I did that, I didnt quit, and I didnt look down. Every small win felt like a huge win to me. I was grateful for the first $20 I was ever paid for a photo. And to be honest, it was probably only worth $20. I have the unshakeable belief that if you work hard at something youre truly passionate about, you cannot fail. But you have to work hard. And you have to be passionate, you have to love it. Before you can do any of it, however, you must take care of yourself spiritually and physically. That was the key to all of my success. Ten years of failure because I could not and would not take care of myself. Once I started, it all just flowed. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? In no particular order: sailing anywhere with clear blue water, Netflix and chill with my husband, and playing Warcraft. Haha! I try to make it to the sea at least once a year, and I love to hang out with my husband doing anything or nothing. When work is done for the day, I like to relax with a good series. And Warcraft is my secret pleasure. Especially when Im really burnt out, and I just need to get away”. I absolutely love video games, specifically WoW, and while I cant play full time anymore, whenever Im taking one of those breaks from work to rejuvenate, Ill get on there for a few days. Im hoping to find time soon to play! Its great because it has NOTHING to do with work. And when you have a lifestyle brand, EVERYTHING can be turned into work! But I think its safe to say the World of Warcraft remains and always will remain firmly off brand! -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Nabokovs Lolita (topic notwithstanding its some of the best writing in the world) Song/­­Album – Songs of Leonard Cohen Movie – The Empire Strikes Back (its my favorite movie, so you know...it sure feeds my soul!) Piece of Art – anything by Cy Twombly -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are a few essential objects that would be in yours? This is actually labeled my minimalist packing list in my evernotes! camera laptop external hard drive phone earphones passport/­­visas wallet medicine dry shampoo brush Cosmetics aesop face wash + exfoliant thayers rose tonic deodorant toothbrush + paste underwear black boots blockshop scarf sunglasses 1 oversized necklace 1 pair earrings 1 hat 2 trousers 2 elizabeth suzann linen tunics 1 over sized sweater 1 silk shift dress 1 pair black tights lauren manoogian capote coat socks -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Heidi Swanson, Jenna Kutcher, Alison Wu, and Melyssa Griffin are my current woman crushes. Photos by Beth Kirby. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Kitchen Creativity

December 12 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen Creativity In a break from my usual recipe posts, I’d like to share an excerpt from Karen Page’s new book entitled Kitchen Creativity. Beyond a cookbook, Kitchen Creativity is a guide to inventive cooking (without recipes!) that will inspire you to think, improvise, and cook like the world’s best chefs. Great cooking is as much about intuition and imagination as it is about flavor and technique. Kitchen Creativity gives insights into these creative processes from more than 100 top restaurant kitchens, including the Bazaar, Blue Hill, Daniel, and Dirt Candy. Based on four years of research and dozens of in-depth interviews, Kitchen Creativity illuminates the methods of culinary invention. Part I reveals how to learn foundational skills, including how to appreciate, taste, and season classic dishes before reinventing the classics from a new perspective. Part II’s A-to-Z entries are an invaluable culinary idea generator, with exercises to prompt new recipe ideas and combinations. While not a cookbook, nor a vegan book, for that matter (although vegan chefs and ingredients are very well represented), Kitchen Creativity has a lot to offer for cooks looking to broaden their creativity in the kitchen.  The following is an excerpt from Kitchen Creativity on one of my favorite topics, umami… “Umami” from Kitchen Creativity by Karen Page The taste of umami is imparted by glutamate, a type of amino acid discovered in 1908 by Dr. Kikunae Ikeda of Tokyo Imperial University. In studying kombu (kelp), Ikeda managed to isolate glutamate as its own compound, giving it the name of umami, which translates as savoriness. Thus, 5,000 years after the discovery of salt, and 4,000 years after the discovery of sugar, and 3,500 years after the discovery of sour (vinegar), umami is a relatively new taste concept. Japanese cooks had been using umami-rich ingredients intuitively for centuries, long before their scientific properties were discovered to enhance flavor. While we first mentioned umami in our 1996 book Culinary Artistry, it did not begin to gain more widespread acceptance until after 2000 when glutamate receptors were discovered on the tongue. The main sources of umami are those deriving from 1) the amino acid glutamate (found in, e.g., kelp); and those deriving from 2) so-called nucleotides--such as a) adenylate (aka AMP, which is found primarily in fish and shellfish), b) guanylate (aka GMP, which is found primarily in plants and fungi, e.g., shiitake mushrooms, esp. dried), and c) inosinate (aka IMP, which is found primarily in meat and fish, e.g., bonito flakes). The big umami magic happens when one or more nucleotides are combined with glutamate, as there is a synergistic affect--resulting in umami with as much as eight times the potency. Umami Dynamics Umami can enhance a bland dishs appeal with mouth-filling savoriness. Umami can also enhance a dishs perceived sweetness, while tempering its perceived bitterness. If you find yourself with too much of a good thing when it comes to umami, try balancing with salty, sweet, bitter, acidic, or piquant ingredients. Umami is a taste that tends to linger on the palate--something referred to as a long finish in the wine world. Because it contributes to the qualities of deliciousness and satiation, umami is especially prized as a taste in dishes and menus. Note: Certain herbs and spices can also emphasize a dishs savory aspects, such as bay leaf, cumin, oregano, paprika, sage, and thyme. Using Umami Chefs praise black garlic (aka fermented garlic) for its ability to add depth and earthiness to dishes ranging from vegetables to meats. If you doubt umamis importance as one of the five primary tastes, consider the fact that leading chefs like Michael Anthony, Eric Ripert, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten believe dashi to be a key component of their cooking. Some chefs use it to replace liquids in countless preparations, from brines to broths to salad dressings. Chefs have rising enthusiasm for all manner of fermented ingredients (e.g., fermented soybeans, kimchi, miso, pickles, sauerkraut), which bring umami to dishes including vegetables. The corn smut known as huitlacoche is prized as a Mexican delicacy, not only by chefs cooking in the vernacular like Rick Bayless, but also mainstream chefs who find themselves using it in quesadillas, soups, and tacos. Sean Brock declares is insanely delicious and luxurious, like black truffles. Kombu (aka kelp, the sea vegetable) is prized for its umami by Yoshihiro Narisawa. Brad Farmerie is fanatical about miso, which allows him to achieve a rich mouthfeel without butter or cream. Miso is an integral part of Farmeries roasted chile caramel Brussels sprouts, which involve caramelizing sugar (sweet) before adding chiles (hot), cilantro stems (bitter), lime juice (sour), fish sauce (salt/­­umami), and miso (richness). He adds miso to sweet potatoes + brown butter + rosemary to create another dish hes not able to take off the menu. Other chefs will add misos (e.g., white) to salad dressings or soups for an umami boost. From his time in Japan, Michael Anthony picked up a love of sea weeds and pickles. Thomas Henkelmann describes rich, flavorful stocks as essential for cooking in every season. Umeboshi paste is prized by chefs, including Isa Chandra Moskowitz of Omahas and Brooklyns Modern Love, for its umami quality. Moskowitz adds it to her Caesar salad dressing for its anchovy flavor. Even native Brits like Mark Levy fall prey to the charms of white truffles, which he prizes for their mysterious aroma and short availability. Excerpted from Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius--with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the Worlds Most Creative Chefs by Karen Page (Little, Brown, October 31, 2017). Save Save Save Save The post Kitchen Creativity appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Entering Into The World Of Vegan Sushi

November 28 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

What the hell is a maki... Those were my first thoughts when I arrived at El Buda Profano in Arequipa, Peru. I feel a bit bashful admitting it, but I am no sushi connoisseur. Well, I wasnt, at least. Traveling through Peru brought a wide range of experiences. It brought me everything from a serious case of travelers flu to a serious case of spiritual awakening (long story). But maybe most importantly, it brought me awareness about the joys of vegan sushi, something that I think about now more often than most people would consider to be normal. It turns out that maki are basically just small morsels of rice with fresh veggies wrapped up in nori, which was just one piece of insight that I was to learn. The owner, Alan, was kind enough to let me come in twice a day for a whole week, sampling their entire menu and never once asking, You sure you can eat all that? My kinda guy. With every visit, I was further impressed at the wide array of not only sushi, but other traditional and not-so-traditional Japanese flavors that were coming out of their kitchen. One day I was shown the mystical […] The post Entering Into The World Of Vegan Sushi appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Nearly-Instant Vegan Miso Soup

May 11 2017 VegKitchen 

Nearly-Instant Vegan Miso Soup If youre vegan, you need to know that miso soup served in a Japanese eateries is often made with fish stock, so do ask when ordering. Its a warming treat thats a shame to miss, it’s nice to know that making traditional-style miso soup at home (minus the fish) is quite easy. Lately, though, Im […] The post Nearly-Instant Vegan Miso Soup appeared first on VegKitchen.

Hydrating Fennel, Mango and Avocado Smoothie

April 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hydrating Fennel, Mango and Avocado Smoothie I’m generally one of those people that won’t eat ice cream or drink smoothies when it’s cold outside, but as soon as spring hits, I start dreaming of smoothies. I’m in that phase right now – the warmer air and blossoming trees are making me crave refreshing foods, and I can honestly imagine myself drinking a smoothie for every meal. This year, I’m trying to be a bit more experimental with my smoothies and to get out of my usual routine. My general go-to recipe is swampy in color, full of greens, berries, a frozen banana, and whatever superpowders I have lying around. It’s good, but also gets repetitive after a while, as well as too sweet. I’m striving to use less bananas and more fruit/­­veg other than berries and kale. In today’s smoothie, I combined a bunch of ingredients I’ve been craving lately, specifically fresh fennel, mango and avocado. I then figured that a bit of ginger, mint and lime would go really well with all those things, and splurged on raw coconut water to use instead of regular water. The smoothie turned out so insanely refreshing, hydrating, and barely sweet (in a good way), that I knew I was onto something and had to share the recipe here. I honestly cannot wait until tomorrow morning, when I can make it again. I’m pretty certain that this smoothie will still turn out great if you use regular water instead of the coconut kind (maybe add a bit more lime juice in this case), and I also think you can skip the mint if you don’t have any. Hope you give it a try. There are some great links below that we’ve collected over this past week. Enjoy your Sunday :) Rome in April – we’re going to Rome this coming fall and Pauline’s beautiful photos are adding to our excitement. Mostly Veggie Chocolate Smoothie – I’ve been trying out (and liking) smoothies made with more frozen veggies and less bananas, and Lindsey’s recipe looks so good. David Hockney’s Home in 1983 – photos from the Architectural Digest archive Peaceful Cuisine – just discovered this Japanese vegan chef’s (wildly popular) cooking videos. They have such a calming effect on me. Check out the Lemon Curd Tarts, Homemade Kim Chee + the rest of his food videos. Daphne Javitch of Doing Well – interviewed on the Atelier Dore podcast (love her instagram, too) Catzorange – dreaming about one of these bags for the summer Hydrating Fennel and Avocado Smoothie   Print Ingredients 1 avocado 1 cup cubed frozen mango 1 fennel bulb - roughly chopped (use the green fronds, too) 1-inch piece ginger juice of 1 lime handful fresh mint leaves (optional) ½ - ¾ cup raw coconut water - depends on the kind of consistency you like, I used ½ cup for a creamy, spoonable smoothie Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a blender until smooth. Adjust the amount of liquid if needed. Garnish with fennel fronds and mint leaves. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sprouted Almond Romesco Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower and Blistered T... Gingery Rutabaga and Pear Handpies Welcome Spring Raw Cake from Karolina Eleonóra Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hydrating Fennel, Mango and Avocado Smoothie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Savory Superfood Sprinkle

April 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Savory Superfood Sprinkle I love having a jar of this meal-saver sprinkle in my refrigerator, because it always comes in handy when a quick savory meal or snack is missing a bit of sparkle. The inspiration here comes from sesame salt (gomashio), which is a Japanese condiment made up of a mix of toasted sesame seeds and salt. It’s a genius thing, because there is generally much less salt in proportion to the amount of sesame seeds, but the flavor is still satisfyingly salty, plus toasty from all the sesame. Gomashio is also highly regarded in the macrobiotic diet as a healthier salt alternative. So, sesame salt is my inspiration here, but I mix in a few other healthful, sprinkle-appropriate ingredients – dulse seaweed (iodine = thyroid love), nutritional yeast (B12) and hemp hearts (protein!). I depend on dulse and nutritional yeast for their naturally salty properties, so the amount of actual salt is minimal in this recipe. I like to toast half of the dulse and leave the other half raw, which gives another dimension to its flavor. The whole mix is perfectly salty, toasty, with hints of the sea from the dulse and umami from the nutritional yeast. Most importantly, so many meals and snacks can be saved from being boring with this stuff – salads, veggie bowls, avocado halves, savory porridge, etc. etc. Give it a try! There are some links below, Sunday hugs :) S-Town – you’ve probably already heard of this podcast a million times and possibly already binge-listened to the whole thing. But if you haven’t, we highly recommend this amazing series from creators of This American Life/­­Serial. Georgia O’Keeffe’s Powerful Personal Style + This Interview with Wanda Corn, Curator of Georgia OKeeffe: Living Modern New Zealand Road Trip with a Toddler Heidi Swanson’s Youtube Channel De Maria – this restaurant’s beautiful Instagram Hannah Henderson (owner of the General Store) on Garance Dore Savory Superfood Sprinkle   Print Serves: around ¾ cup Ingredients ½ cup sesame seeds (I used a combination of regular and black) 2 tablespoons dulse flakes 2 tablespoons hemp hearts 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast ½-1 teaspoon sea salt (preferably flaky) Instructions Warm a dry pan over medium heat and add the sesame seeds. Toast, tossing frequently, for 1-2 minutes, until the seeds begin to pop and become fragrant. Be careful, the seeds can burn quickly. Transfer the seeds to a medium bowl. Coarsely grind half of the toasted sesame seeds in a mortar and pestle or a dedicated coffee grinder, and put them back into the bowl. In the same dry pan, toast 1 tablespoon of dulse for 1-2 minutes until fragrant. Stir frequently and take care not to burn. Mix the toasted dulse into the bowl with the sesame seeds, along with the remaining 1 tablespoon of the raw dulse. Mix in the hemp hearts and nutritional yeast. If using flaky salt, massage it into the mixture with your hands to break it down a bit. If using regular salt, just mix it in with a spoon. Keep the mixture refrigerated in an air-tight glass container to preserve the freshness of the raw dulse and to keep the seeds from going stale. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Temaki-zushi Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Savory Superfood Sprinkle appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage

November 6 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage This past week, we posted a recipe for a Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower, which was pictured served with this very nourishing and super tasty Celeriac and Parsnip mash. We promised to come back with the mash recipe this weekend, so here it is. I grew up on mashed potatoes – my mom probably made them twice a week or more, which is quite standard for a Russian household, where potatoes somehow make it into every meal every day. I love mashed potatoes to this day and can easily put away a good portion, which I think is true for a lot of people due to the dish’s comfort food status. I remember discovering that other roots could be eaten as a mash upon moving to the U.S. – I was at one of my first Thanksgiving dinners and was quite impressed with the mashed sweet potato option that was offered. Slowly, I came around to the idea at home, and now, whenever I have a craving but don’t feel like being weighed down by the inevitably large portion of mashed potatoes I will consume, I make something similar with other, more nutritious and lighter roots. This celeriac and parsnip mash is my absolute favorite version for that scenario. Each of the pale roots are known for their unique, characteristic flavors, which combine well in this mash and become quite complementary with that earthy sweetness they both have going on. This is mash elevated – lighter and more nourishing than mashed potatoes and more interesting in flavor than mashed sweet potato, but still starchy, creamy and very comforting. This stuff is great to have on your holiday table to surprise your guests with something new, yet familiar, or just make a batch of it to have alongside your meals for the week, to get more nutritious wintery roots in your diet. Frying up sage leaves until they are crispy is an easy trick for fancying up a modest looking autumn dish like this one, and the chip-like sage itself is surprisingly delicious. There are some weekend links after the jump, have a cozy Sunday ;) How to Master the Art of Getting Noticed – Austin Kleon’s advice to aspiring artists Salad for President – always so much good stuff on this website, like Leif Hedendal cooking salad at the David Ireland House, Yuri Shimojo’s home and Japanese Crudité Recipe, Laila Gohar’s food as installation art and more The Woman Code Cleanse Review – just read Alisa Vitti’s The Woman Code (and loved it), and was very excited to read about Dana’s experience of the gentle four-day cleanse proposed in the book Noël Graupner – new instagram crush, plant-based private chef with an Ayurvedic tradition background and great photography skills Street Vendors of Hanoi, Photographed from Above – amazing Jade Rolling – have you tried it? I saw a lady doing this on the subway recently (weird setting for that), and it looked really relaxing. Three New Cookbooks, for Health’s Sake – so many health-centered cookbooks coming out nowadays, and these three look great (two of them are from our publisher!) I have a copy Dandelion and Quince and it’s a beauty. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 large or 2 medium celeriacs - peeled and roughly chopped 2-3 parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped sea salt 1 large red onion - peeled and sliced into 8 wedges 1-2 garlic heads - separated into cloves (no need to peel the cloves) coconut oil - to taste freshly ground black pepper any plant milk or cooking water from boiling the roots - to taste ghee or olive oil - to taste 1 small bunch sage - leaves smoked paprika - for garnish (optional) olive oil - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven 400° F (200° C). Bring celeriac and parsnips to a boil in a large pot of water. Reduce heat to a strong simmer and cook vegetables for 10-15 minutes, until soft throughout, adding salt towards the end. Place onion and garlic onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Add coconut oil, salt, pepper and mix well. Bake for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, garlic should be done but the onions might need more time - in this case, remove garlic from oven and finish baking the onion until completely soft and caramelized. Slip garlic cloves out of their shells. Drain the boiled vegetables, reserving some of the cooking liquid if youll be using it in place of plant milk. Place vegetables into a large bowl together with the roasted garlic and mash with a potato masher to your desired consistency. Place roasted onion and ½ cup plant milk/­­cooking water into a blender and blend until smooth. Add blended onion to the mashed vegetables, adding more liquid if needed to achieve your desired consistency. Add ghee or olive oil to taste. Alternatively, mix all the vegetables in a food processor together with the plant milk/­­cooking liquid, which will make for a smoother, less textured puree. Heat 2-3 tablespoons coconut oil in a medium pan on medium heat. Add well-dried sage leaves to the pan along with salt and pepper and fry, stirring, for a couple of minutes until crispy. Mix the oil left over from frying the sage into the mash. Optionally, mix in some of the crispy sage into the mash as well. Garnish mash with crispy sage, smoked paprika and olive oil, and serve. Notes You can use just celeriac or just parsnips for this mash as well. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries Raw Rainbow Lasagne with Heirloom Tomatoes, Mushrooms, and Castelvetra... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Sweet Potato & Black Bean Tacos

September 21 2018 Oh My Veggies 

For better or worse (often for worse), I am an idea person. Not really in an inspiring, visionary type of way. More in a “Hey, I have an idea! I’m going to glue Japanese candy wrappers to a piece of cardboard and frame it!” kind of way. I’m less Steve Jobs, more lady on Hoarders who saves empty yogurt containers to make Christmas ornaments. I have ideas! Lots of ideas! For a while, I wanted to start a second blog, for desserts, called Oh My Pants. But then I realized that the fact that I don’t bake much might get in the way and really, I just wanted a blog called Oh My Pants. So then I came up with another idea. I’d start a blog called Oh My House. We’d buy a house (bonus points if it was a former crack house or brothel–hello, interesting backstory!), renovate it, decorate it, and blog about it. Oh sure, the domain might have been taken, but I had the house picked out and everything! Except that there are eleventy billion home reno blogs out there right now. And we can’t buy a new house 2 years after moving into this one. Also, […]

Is Miso Soup Vegan? Discover the Truth About This Japanese Dish

September 16 2018 VegKitchen 

Is Miso Soup Vegan? Discover the Truth About This Japanese Dish Miso soup is slowly but surely moving from the dining tables of the Japanese into the Western mainstream. Although most people can enjoy the energizing flavors of miso soup, there is still one important question to answer--is miso soup vegan? The saddening truth is that most traditionally-made miso soups are not vegan. However, most restaurants in Japan and the West would usually be willing to prepare a vegan miso for you. A few preparation tips and tricks will allow you to enjoy the pungent vegan miso taste at home as well. You can also ask a Japanese chef to do it for you, but dont be surprised if you get a smirk or two. One way or the other, it is all about the ingredients that go into the soup. Here is what you need to know to have a better understanding of miso. Traditional Japanese Miso Soup In general, Japanese cuisine adheres to a set of relatively strict rules that involve a characteristic preparation style and specific ingredients. The same rules apply, even to a seemingly simple dish like miso soup. But rules are there to be bent, right? Anyway, traditional miso soup has a few main ingredients and […] The post Is Miso Soup Vegan? Discover the Truth About This Japanese Dish appeared first on VegKitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya

December 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Satsuki Shibuya is an artist and spiritual thinker based in L.A. We are in awe of Satsuki’s intuitive watercolors, her constant willingness to go deeper, and her incredibly thoughtful approach to work and life as a whole. In this interview, Satsuki tells us about her morning, bedtime, and exercise routines, as well as love as a form of self-acceptance, what it’s like to see the energy of others, her unique approach to her life schedule, her mother’s universally wise beauty advice, the lifestyle change that helped clear up her skin, nourishment, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I find myself being right in-between, but veer on the side of things being more open and free within a loose schedule. It is dictated not so much by a 9-5 setting, but more dependent on what my body is communicating for the day. I’ve found that the more I am able to flow naturally, without resistance, better work is produced. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. My mornings are usually the same -- wake up sometime between 7 and 7:30am, wash up, meditate/­­journal/­­read for about an hour or some light gardening. Around 8:30am, start preparing breakfast for the household and eat while catching up on some articles online. By 10am, I am warming up to start the work day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Not a bedtime ritual, per se, but I do find my biological clock the happiest when I am in bed by midnight. Any later and I will wake up feeling groggy. Unfortunately, some of the best messages come through from the Universe around this time and find myself writing clear into the witching hour. -- We read that you have a unique approach to your work schedule. Can you tell us about it and why it works for you? Sure. It’s not so much as my work schedule, but life schedule as a whole. As I am quite sensitive to energies, especially from people, as much as I love being with others, I also need a lot of down time to recharge, otherwise, burn out. The best balance I’ve found thus far is to have a point system where each time I am interacting with another, depending on the intensity, receives a particular number of points. For example, going to a doctor’s appointment would be 1/­­2 a point since there is not much interaction, overloading of the sensory system, and is one-on-one contact, which doesn’t require too much processing of different energies. On the other hand, if I am scheduled to do a talk or to meet people at a large gathering, it would be 2-3 points. The points correlate with how many days it might take me to recover and recharge. 1/­­2 point would be half a day of recharging afterwards whereas 2-3 points would be two to three days of recharging necessary after the event. Then, I go week by week and figure out how many points are available for social interactions. If a week is only 3 points maximum, then that might mean 1 meeting and 1 doctor’s appointment (1/­­2 point + 2.5 points) and the rest would be downtime, meaning minimal outside interaction. Depending on where my entire being is (body, mind, soul), the weekly points, or I usually go monthly, will fluctuate. If I am getting over a cold, there may only be so many points available to a week, but if balanced, there may be more available. When I first started this system, it was more rigid, but now, relaxed as it has become second nature. This helps not only to keep a balance, but also to set boundaries in order to create space in my heart. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Something light, centered upon veggies and fruits with some grains. I usually opt for some gluten free toast, an avocado with hummus, and either dried or freshly cut fruit or miso soup with rice. Light and simple. Lunch – The heaviest meal of the day and usually containing either a plant-based or animal-based protein. It can be anything from a rice bowl to a large salad, but usually a variety of ingredients. Snack – I have a soft spot for chips or crunchy nibbles so like to have something around 3:30pm and/­­or a piece of fruit. Dinner – A medium sized meal, usually Japanese-based, but other times adventure elsewhere. Mostly veggies and some protein, usually not much carbs as it tends to make the digestive system a bit sluggish before going to sleep. Some tea afterwards while doing dishes is always a treat. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I am not able to partake in caffeine as it makes my heart pitter-patter like no other, but do love the smell of coffee or English Breakfast tea.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to have a horrible sweet tooth where if I did not have at least one thing sweet each day around tea time, whether cake or a sweet bean bun, I would be the crabbiest crab of the land! I’ve since stopped eating sugar (going on 4 years now) due to health reasons and thankful for the difference in my health -- it is night and day! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I see a Naturopathic Doctor regularly and through her, work with supplements, herbs, and tinctures/­­tonics, which do truly help to keep my body in balance. Otherwise, on my own, I find meditation, working with crystals, burning incense specifically from Ry?an-ji temple in Kyoto, and spraying Aura Cleanser from Botanical Alchemy works wonders for my overall well being and energy. I do know this formula may be different for each individual due to our aura body make-up, but currently, this program seems to work best. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I wouldn’t say I’m a gym bunny, but do love the feeling of working with the body/­­mind simultaneously and yoga seems to fit the bill quite nicely. Still a long ways to go, but hoping to be able to integrate yoga into my morning preparations for the day. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I wish I could say I love to exercise, but in truth, it does take a lot of willpower to get myself to do physical activities. I’ve never been very competitive in nature and therefore sports did not appeal as a possible opportunity for exercise, but since meeting yoga, feel I’ve finally found something that speaks to my spirit. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I believe the internal comes through to the external in all aspects -- if our organs are taken care of, our skin clears, if our emotions are balanced, our smiles appear, and when our soul is nourished, our being glistens. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Simple seems to be the way my entire being prefers things, including skincare for face and body. I’ve been a huge advocate for natural skincare and use one that consists of face wash, toner, moisturizer, Balancing Oil for night time and eye cream. Sometimes spot cream for blemishes and face scrub/­­face pack a few times a week. For body, I use a 5-ingredient, shea butter bar soap. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? No sugar. This alone has cleared up my blemish-prone skin considerably. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Nothing much, except for beauty advice my mother has shared since I was young, “Invest in your skin, trim your hair often, and moisturize your elbows.” I continue to follow her advice. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? I try my best to keep a balance in my schedule, not overload it with activities and make time to tune into my higher self. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? To close my eyes and tune into my breath. Speak slower. Concentrate on one happening at a time. To hide away in the bathroom for a few minutes and catch my breath. Check-in internally and focus on my root chakra. Ground my energies into Mother Earth. Also, to understand that nothing is permanent and the stressful situation, too, shall pass. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Eat shiitake mushrooms, drink a hot tea of lemon with manuka honey, down some bio-available vitamin C, up the liquids including broths, and consciously raise my energy. Also, lots of sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Work/­­life balance is key to my well-being. I continue to let go of rules that I have placed upon myself in order to feel complete in the world and instead, tune into what makes me feel whole. Saying yes to what resonates and no to the things that do not fulfill my spirit. My approach is to tune into my intuition and let it be the guide towards where I need to go next. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself. The simple answer to this is love. Not so much the cliché love we think of, but of accepting oneself for where we are currently and not force ourselves to be someone we are not. With acceptance, comes letting go and by letting go, we are able to fill in our space with a being entirely made up of our true selves. When this can be done, we are able to share love with ourselves and in turn, share love with others. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? To not worry about success in terms of monetary gain, but of spiritual awareness. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Allowing the lack of inspiration and procrastination to take me where I may go. Not to try and stop it, but to experience it fully and understand where it is originating. I don’t necessarily think it is a bad thing -- sometimes we need rest to appreciate our next step. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a painter? After being on hiatus for a year and a half due to an unexplainable illness, I received a message to paint. After reconnecting back to my childhood self, of sensing and seeing beyond the physical realm, leaning into this part of my being opened up new ways of communicating beyond and through this, the message came through. -- Intuition plays a key role in your watercolor work. Why do you find it to be crucial to your approach? The medium has shown the necessity of letting go, trusting the process and understanding that there is more than what we can see in the physical realm. By approaching my work intuitively, it becomes almost meditative, channeling energies beyond and appearing as is, without any manipulation. -- Can you tell us a bit about the energy readings that you do? When did you discover that you have the ability to feel an individual’s soul energy and aura? It was by accident. I’ve always been able to read others’ energies and since young, would do so to the detriment of my own health. I found myself at the doctor’s office, when often, every other week, to which many times, no illness could be found. During my year and a half of being ill, I began to understand what I was sensing since young and honing in, began to receive messages in code. After deciphering many of these messages in my journal, I decided to share my internal self with my mother, who was in the dark about this internal world, to which she was extremely shocked. It took her a good week, after speaking with many of her friends who have known me since I was born, to figure out that she was actually the only one  not recognizing this ‘other self’. After coming full circle with my mother, during a gathering consisting of elder buddhist practitioners, which I attend with my mother from time to time, I shared my spiritual insights with the group. A woman sitting next to me whom I met for the first time that day, asked if I could read her energy. I’d never explicitly read another’s energy before and did not know what to expect, but agreed as I, too, was curious as to what would come forth. I saw images, colors, movie-like scenes, shapes, sensed emotions, all flashing, happening and shared, as if a translator, all I was seeing, experiencing simultaneously to her. After finishing, she looked at me and said, “How do you know all these things about me?” To which I said, “I don’t know. I just said what I saw.” Since then, I’ve done many energy readings and now have a better understanding of what happens during a session. I liken it to a translation of the other’s energy, subconscious, and higher self; sometimes beyond. What is important to note, though, is that all the things I see, sense, and share are things the individual already knows, whether consciously or subconsciously. I just bring it to the forefront and at times, help word it in a way so that the message can understood in the best possible way. -- Besides being a painter, you also write poetry, play music and make books. Do you feel that all these disciplines are interconnected for you, or do you treat them as separate entities? Yes, they are all interconnected, all coming from the same source, just expressed differently. I would say painting is the most direct form of expressing what I experience internally, without translation. The next being words -- a way of describing what I am experiencing. Music being another translation, although not as intuitive as painting or writing. Books are my passion and feel it is a way to leave energies in this world even after passing onto the other side. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love watching Japanese comedy shows and dramas, while eating chips. In an ideal world, though, instead of chips, I would be eating a fruit tart. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Untethered Soul by Michael A. Singer Song/­­Album – All Things Must Pass by Rourourourous Movie – Laputa by Studio Ghibli Piece of Art – Any of the older pieces created by Agnes Martin -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Rice in Manhattan Beach -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? For carry-on: - a comfortable eye mask - slippers and socks - pressure point bands - iphone for listening to music and audio books - bottled water purchased after passing through security For suitcase: - jeans - sneakers - flat shoes that are a bit more dressy, but still comfortable - small travel pillow as I have a sensitive neck - food stuffs for my dietary needs (I have a many food allergies) - book, journal, pencil case - tshirts, long shirts, under shirts, and extra underwear - a warm top - and anything that allows me to be comfortable while still feeling in line with my own style - slippers for usage in room - warm socks as my feet tend to get cold - pajamas - room wear - pyrex for heating up my own food - liquid dish soap for washing dishes/­­utensils - one set of semi-dress up clothes, in-case  -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Rei Kawakubo. Artwork by Satsuki Shibuya. Photos by Sisilia Piring and Women With Superpowers /­­ Tasya Van Ree + Nitsa Citrine. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford

December 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Trinity Mouzon Wofford is the founder of GOLDE Turmeric, a line of high-quality turmeric blends for golden milk, lattes, and more. We are in love with everything GOLDE, and were so excited to get a peek at its radiant founder’s wellness routine. In this interview, Trinity tells us about her rule-free approach to self-care, her path to self-acceptance, and the importance of giving the body exactly what it’s craving, as well as a Geisha-approved moisturizer that works wonders for her skin, her number one cold remedy that’s likely in your kitchen right now, exercise, beauty, stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think having some form of a routine is crucial to your mental health when you run a business from home. It’s been sort of tricky as of late because we’re in transition from our home in Upstate New York to moving back down to Brooklyn. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. On an ideal day, I’m up around 6:30am and checking my phone for email and GOLDE‘s social media. Following that, I’ll do a bit of stretching to loosen up, and then hop in the shower. After I’ve gotten ready, I’ll sit down to work and make a to-do list for the day -- this is crucial for me. I forget things and get really anxious about what I’m forgetting if I don’t bother to organize my thoughts and tasks in advance. I’ll usually dig into whatever those tasks are for an hour or so before pausing for breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My partner, Issey, and I always make sure to have a cut-off time for work, barring emergencies. Once that point rolls around (it varies day-by-day), I’m usually catching up on the news or my favorite blogs while Issey preps dinner. We’ll eat together and then usually end off binging some TV show. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Issey’s miso soup with tons of mushrooms and seaweed. He makes it completely from scratch using his mom’s recipe. Lunch – Lunch is usually whatever is leftover from dinner that week  -- lately its a lot of hearty stews. Snack – We’ll do a little crudite plate with raw veg from the farmer’s market: carrots, turnips, radishes, persian cucumbers. Always with some cheese and seed crackers. Sometimes also with wine. Dinner – Tibetan food from our favorite spot in Jackson Heights, Queens. It’s a lot of dumplings (momos), noodles, and warming soups. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I can’t, really. I love the taste of coffee, but it turns me into a shaking, anxious mess. I always start the day with a turmeric tonic made with one of our blends -- usually cacao or original because the matcha also makes me a bit hyper. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Yes, yes, yes. I try not to “keep it in check” so much as listen to it with a variety of foods. Sometimes it’s fruit or homemade popcorn with coconut sugar. Sometimes it’s half a box of Dots eaten while laying on the couch. Refined sugar is trash for your system, but so is getting too regimented with your foods. I keep it light (emotionally) and eat what I’m craving. When junk food isn’t off limits, you’re not going to crave it every day. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Well, turmeric, of course. It makes such a difference in my skin and immunity. Issey loves it for instant allergy relief. There are apparently over 10,000 medical studies on its effects on the body --it’s really incredible. We’re also huge proponents of ashwaghanda in our household. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Upstate New York is not exactly the land of boutique fitness, so it can be more challenging to get in a sweat on the regular. I focus mostly on stretching and going on walks/­­hikes on the weekend. I think I’ve probably gained a bit of weight since I’ve been up here because I’m not moving as much as I did in NYC, but I don’t really mind. It’s okay for your body to fluctuate with your circumstances, as long as you’re treating it with respect. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? It varies. I really like working out as a method to clear my head, so often I do look forward to it. But that said, I don’t really try to push myself too much. If you want to be a world-class athlete, then by all means, train 2+ hours a day. I’m just looking to keep my body and psyche in good health, so if I don’t feel like making it to my workout, I don’t feel the need to punish myself later. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I grew up black in a very white town, so I’ve had a lot of really emotional moments coming to terms with what beauty means for me. At the moment, I like to keep things really natural with my curls out and minimal makeup. It took a while to accept my looks for exactly what they are, so now I’m really openly embracing it. I feel more beautiful now than I did 5 years ago, mostly due to opening myself up to the concept that I’m perfectly fine just as I am. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I try to keep my routine relatively simple. I’ll wash my face with raw African black soap or something gentle like Cerave. I love Drunk Elephant products, and I apply their C-Firma and B-Hydra serums every day. They help a lot with keeping my skin clear and getting rid of dark marks. After that I’ll moisturize with raw shea butter, or a cream that has that. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Turmeric, again. Because it’s anti-inflammatory, I’ve found it to be really helpful in clearing up redness or breakouts. Besides that, I try not to get too bogged down with a ton of supplements. I focus mostly on eating a variety of plants every day. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Shea butter is amazing for my skin. My partner’s Japanese mother recently put me on to this cream called Secret de Maiko. It contains shea butter and a few other natural, organic ingredients. Apparently this is what young Geisha girls would use as a moisturizer/­­makeup base. This cream is better than pure shea butter because it won’t leave you greasy at all. I use it twice daily. It’s great for keeping your skin clear and calm. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Well, cannabis helps. I use a vaporizer pen so there’s no smoke-related health detriments/­­lingering smell. I really want to try the Hmbldt pen because I’m a sucker for sharp design. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? There’s going to stress sometimes. I try to deal in healthy ways like going for a walk to clear my head, or talking to a close friend about whatever I’m dealing with. But life isn’t perfect, so sometimes you just end up being a bit tense for a few days. I think that’s normal and natural -- I try not to fight it too much. You have to let yourself feel it so that you can process it and move past it. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic!! At my old job, everyone in the office knew about this because I would practically through bulbs of raw garlic at anyone who complained of illness. Nothing works better for immediately beating a bad cold. If I feel something coming on, I take 2-3 whole cloves (swallowed like horse pills) with a ton of water. That can save you in just a couple hours -- it’s crazy. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I really like to work, so what I consider to be a healthy work/­­life balance might not be the right approach for someone else. I genuinely enjoy spending my free time dreaming up new campaigns, product ideas, or designs for GOLDE. I guess that’s the benefit to doing your own thing -- it doesn’t always feel like work. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I’ve gotten a lot better with this with age. I try not to have any food or exercise rules. Being militant about your body is not self-care, and it can really easily spiral into disordered behavior that veers on the edge of “orthorexia.” I mostly just listen to my body and allow itself what it wants, whether that has to do with food, movement/­­exercise, socializing vs. indulging my natural introvert, etc. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I really think doing away with rules (re: food, etc.) has been the most important change I’ve made. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with avoiding gluten or dairy because it upsets your stomach or causes breakouts, but don’t complicate your life with structure that does not serve you. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Usually moments like these mean I need to re-focus myself. I’ll start by making to-do lists, and go from there. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting GOLDE? I was pre-med at NYU, with plans to practice holistic medicine. By my senior year of college, I wasn’t so sure about spending more time and money on schooling, and sort of fell into a marketing role at a tech startup. I really loved the creative aspects of marketing, and found that GOLDE was a way of combining my interests in sharp branding with making holistic health more accessible. The interest in turmeric actually came from my mom, who has Rheumatoid Arthritis. She noticed a huge difference in her overall levels of inflammation when she started incorporating it into her daily routine -- that’s when I started paying attention. -- How do you approach the sourcing of your ingredients for GOLDE? We actually just started sourcing all of our turmeric with a company called Diaspora Co. They focus 100% on supporting ethical and high-quality spice trade that empowers rather than disenfranchises the people of color who have been growing and ingesting medicinal plants like turmeric for generations. The turmeric that we’re going to be using is an heirloom variety with almost twice the typical amount of curcumin. It’s grown on a fourth-generation, family-owned farm in India, and farmers are paid 6X the standard commodity prices to ensure truly fair wages. We’re really excited to be featuring a product that’s not only incredibly high-quality, but also works to re-build lingering inequality left in the wake of colonialism. -- What’s your favorite way to use your wellness blend? I love to have it just with hot water and raw honey in the morning. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Heading to the Union Square Greenmarket is one of my favorite activities. When I’m in the city, I like to go every Monday morning when it’s not too crowded. It’s mostly just you and the chefs (or their assistants?) shopping for what they’ll be preparing that day. I also love infra red sauna. I go to Higher Dose in the East Village. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie Song/­­Album – Songs in the Key of Life – Stevie Wonder -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I am nowhere near as regimented as our dear Joan. Usually my suitcase is packed haphazardly with whatever clothing is clean and well-suited for the weather. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? More people of color, please! A few of my favorites: Diane Chang Yaminah Mayo Dr. Tiffany Lester Latonya Yvette Nikisha Brunson Alex Elle Lauren Ash Sana Javeri Kadri Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Issey Kobori and Nico Behnzukeh. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. Lunch – Beans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Japanese Carrot Pickles

July 25 2017 VegKitchen 

Japanese Carrot Pickles These traditional Japanese carrot pickles are great on their own as a snack or appetizer, but their flavor and texture truly shine when paired with other Asian dishes. This recipe is gluten-free, oil-free, soy-free, and super quick to prepare. Recipe and photo credit: Bold Flavored Vegan Cooking by Celine Steen, Page Street Publishing Co. (C) 2017. Reprinted by […] The post Japanese Carrot Pickles appeared first on VegKitchen.

Onigiri (Vegan & Gluten-Free)

May 18 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Onigiri is a classic Japanese dish that’s both a comfort food and a to-go meal. It’s a delicious rice ball that can be plain or filled (and the possibilities for the fillings are endless) and is usually wrapped with nori (dried seaweed)! You can eat onigiri as a complete meal or just a snack. Something Vegan created a really yummy onigiri recipe idea that uses avocado, edamame and a few other ingredients as the filling. Check it out below: Read the full recipe in the video description here. The post Onigiri (Vegan & Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Babamesco Dip

May 7 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Babamesco Dip Baba ganoush + romesco = babamesco! One fine day, I had some but not all of the ingredients to make romesco, as well as a few baba-ganoush appropriate items, and I was craving some kind of powerful dip/­­spread/­­sauce. I combined the two and ended up with something really special. I’m pretty sure that everyone who sampled it loved it, and that goofy name that I threw out in the moment really stuck. I’ve had friends call me and seriously ask me when I’ll be making another batch of babamesco. Now I can’t imagine calling it by any other name. A few ways it can be used: as a dip for pita chips, sandwich spread, pizza sauce, veggie bowl component, sauce for vegetables (try it with grilled ramps or roasted cauliflower). There’s a step-by-step video above and some weekend links below. Happy Sunday :) Dimes Spiced Porridge on Munchies – can’t wait to make this someday soon! Tortus Copenhagen – this ceramicist’s instagram is addicting. The potter’s wheel videos are so meditative and satisfying. Unsweetened Miso Chocolate Bar – Valentina used our almost savory raw chocolate recipe as a starting point for her own unsweetened chocolate bar, and it looks amazing. Margaret Atwood on What ‘The Handmaids Tale’ Means Today – have you been watching the show?! I find it to be so eerily believable. Loved this article from the author about how the novel relates to the world today, and this bit: ‘One of my rules was that I would not put any events into the book that had not already happened in what James Joyce called the nightmare of history, nor any technology not already available. No imaginary gizmos, no imaginary laws, no imaginary atrocities.’ Jessica Koslow of Sqirl – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman Simplicity City – our favorite fashion instagram that draws from the past Babamesco   Print Serves: around 4 cups Ingredients 2 red bell peppers 1 small eggplant or 3 small Japanese eggplants - sliced in half 1 head of garlic neutral coconut oil or olive oil, plus more for garnish sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons tahini juice of 1 lemon handful of parsley, plus more for garnish zaatar - to garnish (optional) microgreens - to garnish (optional) Instructions Place the bell peppers on a baking sheet and turn your broiler to high. Broil the peppers for 2-4 minutes, flipping every minute or so, until the skin is blistered and the peppers are soft. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C) and prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the eggplant on the sheet. Break the head of garlic into cloves and place them next to the eggplant, with the skins intact. Drizzle the eggplant and garlic cloves with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix with your hands to coat. Place in the oven. The garlic should be done after about 15 minutes, while the eggplant may need another 5-10 minutes until its ready, a total of 20-25 minutes. Once the bell peppers are cool enough to handle, peel off their skin and remove the core and seeds. Slip the skin off the roasted garlic cloves. Scoop the eggplant flesh out of the skin and discard the skin. In a food processor, combine the roasted pepper, eggplant, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, salt and pepper until just smooth. Add in the parsley and pulse to incorporate. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the babamesco with a drizzle of olive oil, a sprinkling of zaatar and microgreens, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash Raw Apricot Lavender Tart and a Giveaway Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Babamesco Dip appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Swirled Mousse Jars + US book events

April 11 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Swirled Mousse Jars + US book events So, David and I had a full evening without the kids last weekend (we still had the baby to look after but that is basically like holiday for us). Our grand plan was to go out for dinner at a busy Swedish/­­Japanese restaurant which we haven’t been to for years. Then rent a proper Hollywood movie and watch it in the couch (instead of the usual watching-half-a-tv-series-on-the-phone-while-the-kids-are-sleeping-on-top-of-us-mode) while eating a yummy dessert. It turns out that the food at that restaurant wasn’t as good as we remembered it and the movie was the worst catastrophe movie we have ever seen. Dessert was however right on point. Our first intention was to buy ice cream but we both felt slightly nauseous after dinner so David said he would improvise and make something fresh instead. These jars took 10 minutes to prepare (which he since then has speeded up to 7), looked pretty, had very few ingredients and tasted super good - creamy and limey with dark chocolate, crunchy nuts and nut butter on top. It’s a dessert that is very nice to keep up your sleeve, so we thought we’d share it with you. Encouraged by last weeks video, we did a short one of this recipe as well. Press play! US book events! And on the subject of being kid-free. David and I (+baby) are coming to the US for the release of our new book there. Yippie! We will be in New York for a couple of days to do some PR and press stuff. We have teamed up with Sur La Table and we’ll be doing a hands-on cooking class there on Sunday 30 April. Get your tickets for the class here! Be aware that there are only a limited amount of seats. We will also have a little mingle, book signing and Q&A at CAP Beauty on Monday May 1st. We would LOVE to meet and chat with as many of you as possible there. We don’t have an RSVP-link for that yet but will let you know as soon as we do. David will then continue on to the West coast for some more events there. I would have loved to join him but I simply couldn’t handle too many days of work while also looking after the little one + jetlag. And I don’t want to be away from the other kids too long either. Sorry! David is the funny and talented one of us anyway so you should definitely go see him. Although he will probably tell a lot of lies about me - dont believe him ;) The schedule isn’t entirely ready yet. He will host another Sur La Table cooking class in Los Angeles May 5th. Get your tickets here! There will also be a mingle, book signing an Q&A at Credo Beauty in LA and we will post the link for that asap. We will update soon with more information about a possible event in San Francisco too. Lots of love! /­­Luise PS. Notice that the baby currently is back on a no-name status - aaargh! Okay, back to these jars. You might recognize that the base is similar to the Key Lime Mousse in Green Kitchen Travels. The smart thing here is that we use the same base for the top layer as well but with an additional flavor, which makes it really simple and quick. Enjoy! Super-Quick Swirled Mousse Jars Serves 2 Note: It’s optimal to use chilled avocados or chilled glasses as you don’t want the bottom layer to be lukewarm. Best advice is to keep ripe avocados in the fridge. Or look for frozen precut avocado, which is becoming increasingly popular in the supermarkets (and often cheaper than buying fresh). 2 avocados 3 lime 6 soft dates, stoned 1 cup /­­ 150 g frozen blackcurrants (or frozen blueberries, raspberries or blackberries)  1/­­2 tsp cardamom 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml yogurt Topping 1 oz /­­ 20 g dark chocolate 10 almonds 2 dollops nut butter of choice Cut the avocados in halves, remove the stone, scoop out the flesh and add it to a food processor or blender (a food processor is a little easier as it has a wider base and this is thicker than a smoothie but a blender works if you add a splash of water) along with the juice of 3 lime and 6 soft dates. Mix until creamy, adding a splash of water if needed. Taste and add more lime or dates if needed. Scoop out half of the mousse into 2 jars. Add berries and cardamom to the remaining avocado mousse in the blender and mix again until smooth. Add a few spoons of yogurt to the jars and then add the berry mousse. Use the backside of a spoon to swirl the layers a bit and then top with dark chocolate, almonds and a large dollop of nut butter. Enjoy!

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl

March 10 2017 My New Roots 

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Poke seems to be everywhere these days, from fine restaurant menus, to fast-casual and even food trucks. Chefs are coming up with clever combos and creative reinterpretations - even fish-free versions for the veg set. I knew had to take a stab at it. Or at least a poke. Sorry. For those of you hearing about poke for the first time, this fresh and tasty dish (pronounced POH-kay), hails from Hawaii. In its most unadulterated form, poke is raw fish, originally combined with sea salt, candlenut and seaweed. It evolved over the years as ingredient availability increased, and the salt was replaced with soy sauce, the seaweed with spring onion, the candlenut with sesame and so on. Once it hit mainland America a few years ago, poke mania ensued and the dish evolved to become more of a meal - not just a snack. Now it is often served atop rice and garnished with all manner of innovative ingredients. Fully-focused poke restaurants have established themselves in major cities across North America. Many of these eateries allow their patrons to customize their bowls with veggies, sea weed, pickles, beans, nuts, and alt-grains, tapping into the to the fact that fast, fresh, healthy meals are becoming mainstream. Which totally rocks. I had most of the elements for my own poke-inspired version in my head...except for the fish (the most important part?). I racked my brain to come up with something that looked just like tuna or salmon, but didnt want to use fruit, like watermelon or papaya, since I didnt want the dish to be sweet. It wasnt until I was trying to fall asleep one night, that it came to me...chiogga beets! Chiogga, or candy-striped beets are gorgeously two-toned when they are raw. Sliced thin horizontally, they reveal rings of deep pink pigment and creamy white, resembling something that your grandmother keeps on her coffee table in a crystal dish. But for anyone who has ever roasted these stunning creatures will know that the magic doesnt last; the magenta bleeds into the white during cooking, resulting in an almost homogenous pale pink, with slight variegation. WHICH LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE TUNA. I almost couldnt sleep. Too excited. The next day I gathered up all the things Id like in a poke bowl: short grain brown rice (not long grain - an important distinction), spring onion for bite, carrot for crunch, edamame for pop and protein, and avo for creaminess. I took this last one a step farther and blended it with lemon and wasabi for the most boss sauce ever. This alone would be delish on most things...please try it. And for the fishy component, I thought back to the raw vegan tuna I made for my first cookbook, and how effective adding a sprinkle of nori was to boost that fresh-from-the-sea flavour. This is not a deal breaker for the overall dish, but it definitely made it taste complete. If you cant find nori flakes, just crunch up a couple sheets of the stuff that youd use to make sushi. Easy fix! I like to use wasabi powder in the avo cream since the pre-made stuff in a tube is questionable. Have you ever read the ingredient list on one of those packages? It can be scary stuff. In a pinch, use it, but tracking down the powder is worth it from a nutrition standpoint, and also a flavour one. The real stuff tastes infinitely better! What a shocker. Wasabi is Japanese horseradish, and like its western counterpart, it belongs to the Brassica family, like cabbage, broccoli and mustard. The root is dried and then pulverized, which gives us the powder that we can blend with water to create wasabi paste. It is a difficult crop to grow, which explains the high price for the genuine product. Most wasabi powders dont contain any wasabi at all, but are instead a mix of mustard powder and regular horseradish mixed with green food dye. A high-quality wasabi powder should be organic and contain only horseradish and wasabi. The colour should be pale green - not disco neon. Most health food stores carry wasabi powder. This is a good brand. Everything unfolded just as Id hoped it would. The beets came out perfectly pink with those thin white stripes that look just like fat striation. The marinade that I tossed them around in was acidic and ginger-y and just plain yum. Building the meal up with the rice, the beans, the veggies, a dollop of cream, a sprinkle of nori and roasted sesame, was ever so satisfying and fun. This healthy, fresh meal is calling you. No need to poke about, just make it. Again, sorry.     Print recipe     Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g short grain brown rice, soaked overnight if possible 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 2 cups /­­ 250g edamame beans, fresh or frozen 2 tsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches flaky sea salt Beets & Marinade 3 medium Chiogga (candy striped) beets 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. finely grated ginger pinch fine sea salt Avocado Wasabi Cream 2 medium ripe avocados 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1-2 tsp. wasabi powder, to taste pinch fine sea, to taste 2 spring onions, sliced lengthwise into ribbons 2 medium carrots, julienned 2 Tbsp. sesame seeds 3 Tbsp. nori flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wrap beets in aluminum foil and place on a baking sheet in the oven. Roast until tender, about 45 minutes (to check doneness, peel back the foil of one beet and insert the tip of a sharp knife. If there is little resistance, its ready). Peel back foil from each beet and let cool slightly. 2. While the beets are roasting, make the rice. Drain and rinse well. Place in a pot with 2 cups /­­ 500ml of fresh water and salt. Cover, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Cook until tender (add more during cooking if necessary), about 45 minutes. 3. While the rice is cooking, make the Avocado Wasabi Cream. Scoop out the flesh from both avocados and add to a food processor. Blend on high, then add the lemon juice, wasabi powder and salt. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, ginger and salt. Slip the skins off the cooled beets. Cut the beets into cubes and toss in the marinade. Let sit for at least 20 minutes. 5. While the beets are marinating, bring a medium pot of water to the boil. Add a few pinches of salt and the edamame. Simmer for a couple minutes until bright green and tender (do not overcook!). Drain and rinse under cold water to halt cooking. Toss with a little olive oil and sprinkle with flaky salt. 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast sesame seeds, stirring often until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. 7. Julienne the carrots. 8. To assemble, divide the rice among the bowls. Add the marinated beets, edamame, carrots and a dollop of Avocado Wasabi Cream. Sprinkle with nori flakes, the toasted sesame seeds and top with the spring onions. Enjoy! I’m on my last few days of the North American tour now. Honestly, it’s been just magical and I am so grateful to all of you who came out to show some love and connect with the healthy community around them! I have just one more event left, and if you’re in LA, please come to The Springs tomorrow! I’ll be giving a lecture on Improving Immunity, Digestion and Detoxification, serving a delicious lunch, and launching a recipe collaboration with their chef! Hope to see you there. All love and smiles, Sarah B Show me your bowls on Instagram! #mnrpokebowl The post Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl appeared first on My New Roots.

Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba

November 2 2016 My New Roots 

Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba Danes are not big pumpkin eaters. Carrots, sure. Cabbage, indeed. Potatoes, definitely. But even though they seem to have caught on to the Halloween jack-o-lantern carving thing, actually consuming pumpkins is not high on their list. Just last week I was at the grocery store and saw a display of huge spaghetti squash on clearance, being promoted as autumn decorations.  Pfff, what?! I scooped up as many as I could (I mean, they were less than two bucks a pop) and I excitedly starting telling the cashier about the wild and crazy deal in the produce aisle, all the amazing things you could do with this gourd, and how it turns into freakin noodles. She raised an eyebrow, but was largely unimpressed. Maintaining conviction, I awkwardly carried my bushel of spaghetti squash to my bike, but not before telling two random customers on the way out as well. Just trying to spread the word, people! So aside from decorative (and reminder: totally edible) spaghetti squash, there is really only one proper pumpkin here in Denmark, and that is the Hokkaido. These spherical, bright orange beauties are available at most grocery stores, and for good reason: they are a very delicious and super versatile variety. They are yummy roasted, stuffed, baked, blended into dips, or in soups and stews. I dig them because you can eat the skin, which gives a serious boost of carotenes and fibre. Hokkaido pumpkins can also be called Kuri squash, and similar varieties include red Kabocha, Hubbard and Ambercup. As a PSA to Denmark, I would love to suggest growing these or other varieties of pumpkin since every single type has something special to offer, besides a being a decoration that is. Anyway, on to the recipe! As soon as the one-and-only pumpkin hit the stores a couple weeks back, I made this soup. Craving something creamy and soothing to combat autumn drizzle, I blended the steamed pumpkin with ginger and miso for the most luscious of broths, made even more satisfying with the addition of soba noodles. A few nights later I made it again and added even more goodies: spring onion, seaweed, toasted sesame and sautéed shiitake mushrooms. So. Good. I am obsessed with the combination of the sweet pumpkin and savoury miso, especially with the spicy warmth of the ginger to bring it all together. I also love the consistency of the soup, which is thinner than most of the purées I make. Its really more broth-like, and coats the soba in the perfect way. Unbelievably comforting on a chilly fall night, this dish will be on heavy rotation here this season, and I hope in your home as well. Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba comes together in under 30 minutes, so its the perfect weeknight dinner. Plus, it is made mostly with pantry staples, so all you need to pick up at the store is a pumpkin! If you want to make this meal even faster, you can skip the toppings altogether, as the soup on its own is totally delicious, and can be made in under 20 minutes. It also freezes well, so make a double batch and store half in the freezer for your next there-is-nothing-to-eat emergency. You can thank me later. Miso delicious! Most people are familiar with miso from Japanese restaurants where miso soup is served, but beyond that I think Westerners greatly under utilize this miraculous umami gift from the gods! It is a consistent condiment in my kitchen repertoire and most times when I use it in something Ive served to guests, they often ask why the dish tastes so special. The answer is miso. Miso is a Japanese word meaning fermented beans. Traditionally, miso is made from soybeans and is found in the form of a thick paste. The process of making miso involves soaking cooking, and mashing soybeans, then finally inoculating the mix with koji (a specific mold spore) and salt. This mixture is transferred to a crock or barrel where it is left to ferment for months or years. Miso comes in various colours, depending on whether or not other legumes or grains were used in the fermentation process, and the length of fermentation. White, yellow, red, brown and dark brown miso are some of the shades youll see in the store. In general, lighter miso tends to be sweeter and milder, while darker miso leans towards the saltier and pungent. I generally keep two kinds in my fridge, since they taste so incredibly different. This recipe calls for light miso, and I really stress using this variety since a dark miso would be far too rich and overwhelming. I prefer to use dark miso in things like gravies and sauces. Either way though, miso is an explosive umami bomb that will add tons of complex, satisfying flavour to many of your favourite foods. Because of this six taste, miso gives plant-based foods that umph that it can be lacking. When buying miso, look for an organic or non-GMO product that is raw /­­ unpasteurized. Unpasteurized miso will always come in the form of a paste, whereas the instant miso soup that you can find on the dry goods shelf is likely pasteurized and therefore not as health-promoting. If your miso comes packaged in plastic, transfer it to an airtight clean glass jar or ceramic crock when you get home, and store it in the fridge for up to a year. Unpasteurized miso is full of live cultures and for that reason it should never be boiled. If you read this recipe through, youll see that I only add the miso at the end when the soup is in the blender. This is to ensure that we preserve all of those delicate nutrients and precious enzymes that would be destroyed with high heat. If you are going to reheat this soup, make sure to do so gently and stir constantly to avoid scorching. Some notes on the recipe ingredients: if you absolutely cannot find light miso, a simple vegetable stock or bullion can be used in its place. But it’s worth tracking down. Soba noodles can be found at Asian supermarkets, health food stores, and gourmet foods shops. Make sure to look for noodles that are 100% buckwheat flour, as many brands of soba will add wheat flour to act as a binder, and keep in mind that these will not be gluten-free. Some people also find the taste of pure soba noodles off-putting since buckwheat can taste very strong, but I love it! Finicky kids (and adults) may prefer the milder-flavour of brown rice noodles, or even whole grain pasta.     Print recipe     Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba Serves 4 as a main, 6 as a side Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 medium yellow onion 3/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 3 cloves garlic 1 medium, 2 lb /­­ 1kg Hokkaido pumpkin (or other favourite hard winter squash) 3 – 4 cups /­­ 750ml - 1 liter water 3 – 4 Tbsp. white or light miso 1 Tbsp. minced fresh ginger 175g /­­ 6oz. soba noodles (100% buckwheat) toppings: spring onion sesame seeds sautéed shiitake mushrooms seaweed, optional (I used oarweed, but any sea vegetable is good!) Directions: 1. Roughly chop onions, mince garlic. Wash the pumpkin well (as youll be eating the skin), and chop into chunks. 2. In a large stockpot, melt the coconut oil. Add the onions and salt, stir to coat and cook for about 10 minutes until the onions are just starting to caramelize. Add garlic and cook for about a minute until fragrant. 3. Add the pumpkin and stir to coat. Add 3 cups /­­ 750ml of water, cover, bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer for about 15 minutes, until the pumpkin is tender. 4. While the soup is cooking, prepare the toppings: Bring a pot of salted water to the boil. Cook soba noodles according to package directions, drain and lightly rinse. Slice spring onion, lightly toast sesame seeds in a dry skillet over medium heat, about 2-3 minutes. Sauté mushrooms in a lightly oiled skillet over high heat for 5-7 minutes. 5. Transfer the soup to a blender and blend on high until completely smooth. Add more water if necessary - youre looking for a creamy consistency, but it should not be thick like a paste. I like the soup to be on the thinner side for this dish. Add the miso, ginger and blend again until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Transfer soup back to the pot and keep warm (reheat if necessary, but try not to boil). 6. Ladle soup into bowls, top with soba, spring onion, sesame seeds, mushrooms and crumble the seaweed over top. Serve immediately and enjoy. This soup is wildly tasty and saisfying, and will probably make you look forward to cooler temperatures and nights spent in. I hope you all are having a lovely fall so far. Sending big love and cozy moments to you all, Sarah B. Show me your soups on Instagram: #MNRpupmkinmisobroth The post Pumpkin Miso Broth with Soba appeared first on My New Roots.


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