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Weekday Cauliflower Dal

November 15 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Weekday Cauliflower DalWe had a little vote on instagram the other day, asking which recipe we should post on here next. I was absolutely convinced that these Peanut Butter & Jam Chocolate Cups would be the winner. But there was instead a surprisingly large majority asking for a cauliflower dal. I suppose most of you just want to cozy up with warm food that hugs the belly right now. And that is exactly what this is. A belly hugger and a particularly simple recipe that doesn’t require any fresh herbs or unusual ingredients. Just a handful of pantry staples and a little trick for a flavor packed topping. We’ll teach you more about the recipe and the topping in a bit. But before we do that, we wanted to show you this video that we made. It is part of a new mini series that we are doing on on youtube where we travel around Sweden to source local ingredients and cook with friends. In this episode we took the train to the west coast to pick apples with Linda Lomelino and then she bakes a classic Swedish Apple Cake. Fun times! Luise was quite nervous about releasing this because she speaks in front of the camera more than she has done before, so please give her a little extra love. We have two more episodes coming before this year ends. Back to the dal. If you are not familiar with the name, it is essentially an Indian Lentil Soup. We have been sharing a few different dal recipes on here and in our books and this is a mix of them all. It is not our fanciest version but instead something that you can make on any given weekday. A dal is one of those recipes that you learn once and then know and cook for the rest of your life. I promise. I have been making varieties of this soup since I moved to my first apartment and learned how to cook. All ingredients are easy to find and can basically go into the sauce pan at the same time. If there is one thing that you should give a little extra attention, it is to use a good curry spice blend. The use of spices can vary in curries, we particularly love a version that includes ground fenugreek. But you can use any curry mix that you like. If you have some mustard seeds, coriander seeds and/­­or cardamom seeds in your spice cabinet, you can grind them into your curry blend to boost it with extra flavor. Because freshly grounds seeds/­­spices always taste more. The trick When we were on Sri Lanka a couple of years ago, we learned a dal trick from a local woman. After having cooked lentils and spices into a pretty good dal, she put another pan on high heat, added ghee and more spices to it and, when super fragrant, she stirred them into the soup. Adding those warm spices and butter last minute just boosted the soup and made it insanely flavorful. For this recipe we use a similar method for garlic and mustard seeds that we then wilt down spinach into. You can stir down the spinach into the dal, but we instead serve it as a topping (because our kids prefer it without the spinach). We normally add toasted pumpkin seeds on top as well but didn’t have any at home this time. Weekday Cauliflower Dal  Serves 4 Notes: You can either serve the soup chunky or mix it smooth with a hand blender. Our favorite way is to just give it a super quick whizz with the blender to make it a little creamier and yet keeping texture from the cauliflower and potatoes. If you want it a little sweeter and creamier, you can replace 400 ml /­­ 14 oz of the water/­­stock with a tin of coconut milk. We don’t add chili to it because of our kids but that can obviously also go in along with the curry. 3 tbsp coconut oil or butter/­­ghee 1 onion 2 cloves garlic 1 tbsp ground curry spice blend 1/­­2 tbsp mixed mustard seeds, coriander seeds and cardamom seeds (or just add 1/­­2 tbsp extra ground curry) 1 large chunk (5 cm /­­ 2 inches) fresh ginger 1 cauliflower (approx 500 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb) 3 potatoes, coarsely diced 200 g /­­ 1 cup red lentils 2 soft dates, pitted and mashed 1 litre /­­ 4 cups water or vegetable stock 1 tsp apple cider vinegar   Garlicky spinach 2 tbsp coconut oil 2 tsp mustard seeds 2 garlic cloves, finely sliced 2-3 handfuls spinach   Tomato salad 10 cherry tomatoes 2 tsp olive oil 1 tsp apple cider vinegar salt & pepper Make the Cauliflower Dal: Heat coconut oil, onion and garlic in a large saucepan on low/­­medium heat. Add the curry, grind the extra spices in a mortar and add those as well (or just add more curry). Stir constantly with a wooden spoon until it smells fragrant, but be careful so the spices do not burn. If it feels too dry add a spoonful, or more, of water. Break the cauliflower into florets and chop the stem finely. Peel the potatoes and dice them into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch bits. Add both to the sauce pan along with the lentils and dates. Stir and sauté for about a minute before adding water or stock. Let simmer for 30 minutes or until the lentils are starting to dissolve and the cauliflower florets are tender. Stir carefully (if you want the cauliflower florets to stay intact) a few times. Add apple cider vinegar and salt to taste. Give the soup 2-3 pulses with a hand blender (if you like, see note above). Serve in bowls with a dollop of yogurt (coconut yogurt or regular yogurt) and top with garlicky spinach and tomato salad. Make the Garlicky Spinach: Heat coconut oil in a skillet. Sauté mustard seeds and garlic on low/­­medium heat until golden and fragrant. Add spinach and turn off the heat. Stir until wilted. Ready for serving. Make the Tomato Salad: Cut the tomatoes in halves and place in a bowl. Add olive oil, vinegar salt and pepper and toss to combine. Serve on top of the dal for a fresh zing of flavor.

Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup

October 16 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Caribbean Greens and Beans SoupThis Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup is inspired by a delicious Jamaican soup made with callaloo (taro) leaves in a light coconut broth. My version calls for the more readily available spinach, although cabbage, kale, or chard may be used instead. The soup has a nice heat from the jalape?os, but you can omit them for a milder flavor or increase them if you want more heat. Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup This soup is inspired by a delicious Jamaican soup made with callaloo (taro) leaves in a light coconut broth. My version calls for the more readily available spinach, although cabbage, kale, or chard may be used instead. The soup has a nice heat from the jalape?os, but you can omit them for a milder flavor or increase them if you want more heat. - 1 tablespoon (15 ml) olive oil or 1/­­4 cup (60 ml) water - 1 medium-size red onion, chopped - 3 garlic cloves, chopped - 2 medium-size sweet potatoes, peeled and diced - 1 medium-size red bell pepper, seeded and chopped - 1 or 2 jalape?os or other hot chiles, seeded and minced - 1 can (14.5 ounces, or 410 g) of diced tomatoes, drained - 1 1/­­2 cups (266 g) cooked dark red kidney beans or 1 can (15.5 ounces, or 440 g) of dark red kidney beans, rinsed and drained - 4 cups (950 ml) vegetable broth - 2 teaspoons fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried thyme -  1/­­4 teaspoon ground allspice - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 9 ounces (255 g) baby spinach - 1 can (13.5 ounces, or 380 ml) of unsweetened coconut milk - Heat the olive oil or water in a pot over medium-high heat. Add the onion and sauté for 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for 1 minute longer. Add the sweet potatoes, bell pepper, jalape?o, tomatoes, and beans. Stir in the broth, thyme, and allspice and season to taste with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until the vegetables are tender, about 30 minutes. - Stir in the spinach and coconut milk, stirring to wilt the spinach. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Cook for 5 to 10 minutes longer to wilt the spinach and blend the flavors. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. Serve hot. From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission. The post Caribbean Greens and Beans Soup appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Jamaican Red Beans and Rice

October 5 2018 VegKitchen 

Jamaican Red Beans and Rice This is an easy version of a traditional Jamaican dish that is often simply referred to as rice and peas (though the peas are actually small red beans). I first learned to make this the authentic way from a Jamaican friend -- cooking the beans from scratch and cracking open and grating a whole coconut. Coconut milk and canned beans are good shortcuts! This dish is traditionally served with sautéed plantains, a starchy, banana-like fruit. Try them if youre feeling adventurous. You can also serve with Banana Fritters, another adaptation of a traditional Jamaican recipe. Photos by Evan Atlas. Save Print Jamaican Red Beans and Rice Author: Nava Recipe type: Grain and bean main dish Cuisine: Jamaican Prep time:  10 mins Cook time:  35 mins Total time:  45 mins Serves: 6 to 8   This is a version of a traditional Jamaican favorite, there simply called rice and peas (though the peas are actually small red beans). I Ingredients 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 large onion, finely chopped 3 cloves garlic, minced 1½ cups uncooked brown rice (see note) One 15-ounce can light coconut milk 3½ to 4 cups cooked small red beans (or two 15- to 16-ounce cans, drained and rinsed) 4 to 5 scallions, thinly sliced ½ teaspoon […] The post Jamaican Red Beans and Rice appeared first on VegKitchen.

Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches – Vegan Pulled “Pork”

October 1 2018 Vegan Richa 

Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches – Vegan Pulled “Pork”Easy Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches. Shredded Jackfruit seasoned with bbq seasoning and bbq sauce, baked and served with slaw. 6 Ingredient Vegan Pulled Pork. Nutfree Recipe. Can be gluten-free soy-free Unripe Jackfruit, a huge fruit commonly found in tropical climates, has a string like shreddable texture which works great in some applications to make vegan version of meaty meals. It is often used to make a pulled “pork” to fill up sandwiches or tacos.  While trying out my soycurl mango bbq tacos, I felt that this short method of directly baking works out best for me. No additional pans, no additional kitchen standing time! Just shred, mix bbq sauce + seasoning, spread and bake. And done! It cannot be simpler than that! Change it up with different seasonings such as a mix of bbq and cajun, jamaican jerk, taco seasoning etc. This slaw is a basic one with some vegan mayo, pepper, vinegar and sweetener. Make a double helping of the jackfruit and add to sandwiches, tacos or wraps!Continue reading: Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches – Vegan Pulled “Pork”The post Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches – Vegan Pulled “Pork” appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Meatless Monday Joins Slow Food at Leading International Event

September 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Joins Slow Food at Leading International EventOn Monday, September 24, Slow Food, the global grassroots organization, will highlight Meatless Monday with celebrated chefs at Terra Madre Salone de Gusto, one of the biggest international events devoted to food. Slow Food was founded in 1989 to inspire individuals and communities to change the world through food that is good, clean and fair for all. The global Slow Food movement is creating dramatic change in more than 160 countries. Now, Slow Food and Meatless Monday have partnered to provide a weekly platform to highlight the delicious taste, diversity and rich cultural heritage of plant-based cuisine around the world. At the Taste Workshop, Peggy Neu, president of Meatless Monday, will share the exciting story of the growth of the Meatless Monday Movement . Shell also introduce two celebrated chefs who will showcase imaginative plant-based recipes. Chef Drew Deckman, restaurateur and culinary consultant based in Baja, California, received a Michelin Star for his work and was acknowledged as a Rising-Star Chef when he was in Germany. Hell thrill taste buds with his Grilled Bread and Raw porcini salad with Parmesano Reggiano. Jennifer Jasinski, a James Beard Foundation award winner for Best Southwest Chef owns and runs several restaurants in Denver, Colorado. Shell refresh palates with her Chilled Beans Vinaigrette, Yellow Watermelon and Jimmy Nardello Jam. For more about Meatless Monday at Terra Madre, visit: https:/­­/­­www.slowfoodusa.org/­­meatless-monday-at-terra-madre The post Meatless Monday Joins Slow Food at Leading International Event appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Curry Fried Rice – 1 Pot 20 Mins

September 13 2018 Vegan Richa 

Curry Fried Rice – 1 Pot 20 MinsThis Curry Fried Rice is packed full of flavor. Easy to make and gluten free. Use other cooked grains, spice blends for variation.  1 Pot 20 Mins. A perfect golden fried rice side or a light meal. Glutenfree Soyfree Nutfree Recipe.  Jump to Recipe Versions of this Curry fried rice are often light dinners on the weekend. Use up any leftover cooked rice or grains, any leftover veggies in the fridge. Spice up the veggies, add the rice and toss well. Garnish and done. Add some baked tofu or chickpeas for a hearty meal, or serve as a side with curries and stir fries.  This golden fried rice is Easy, Delicious, versatile and quick. Use spice blends such as curry powder, garam masala, jamaican curry blend, cajun, berbere and baharat (all of these can be found in my Everyday Kitchen book).  Lets make this!Continue reading: Curry Fried Rice – 1 Pot 20 MinsThe post Curry Fried Rice – 1 Pot 20 Mins appeared first on Vegan Richa.

10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day Cookout

August 28 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day CookoutWere approaching Labor Day weekend here in the United States. Labor Day is traditionally thought of as the end of summer, even though summer doesnt officially end for another few weeks. Much like Memorial Day and Independence Day, this holiday is usually commemorated with backyard barbecues and picnics in the park. I love to celebrate with salads, sandwiches, seitan ribs, grilled vegetables, and skewers. Ive put together a menu of vegan Labor Day recipes that are perfect for your weekend cookouts. 10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day Cookout One of the great thing about this Pantry Pasta Salad recipe is that the portion size is easy to adjust. To increase the volume, cook an entire pound of pasta and add additional pantry goodies, such as olives, roasted red peppers, or pine nuts. This colorful Roasted Sweet Potato Salad is both a nice change from regular potato salad and an unusual way to serve sweet potatoes. Almond butter provides a creamy richness to the dressing and toasted almonds add crunch. A relative of the sweet potato, jicamas taste similarly to water chestnuts and can be eaten raw or cooked. They are especially good in this sprightly Cilantro-Jicama Slaw. These lip-smacking vegan BBQ Seitan Ribs are messy and fun to eat. Enjoy them with potato salad and coleslaw. Not only does jackfruit lend itself well to shredding for that pulled effect, but its also great at soaking up the zesty barbecue sauce, making it an ideal candidate for these hearty Pulled Jackfruit BBQ Sandwiches. I love the jerk-spiced sides at my favorite Jamaican restaurant, the vegan-friendly Nice Mile in Asheville, North Carolina, but these Jamaican Jerk Vegetable Skewers satisfy my cravings when I’m home. A popular Thai appetizer, satays are usually made with meat, but there are lots of plant-based ingredients that are idea candidates for this skewered and sauced treat. These grilled satays are made with eggplant. These tasty Spice Rubbed Vegetable Skewers are a crowd pleaser whether plated individually or heaped on a platter and served on a buffet. The version of Romesco sauce in this Grilled Vegetables with Almond Romesco Sauce uses a fraction of the olive oil thats in the traditional Spanish sauce. Vary the fruit you use to make these Grilled Fruit Satays with Pineapple-Coconut Peanut Sauce according to the season and your preference - bananas, apricots, and peaches are good choices. The post 10 Recipes for Your Vegan Labor Day Cookout appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Power Ball Energy Bites

January 9 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Power Ball Energy Bites Ideal for on-the-go breakfasts or between meal snacks, these tasty little no-bake energy bites pack a nutritious punch of protein, potassium, and other nutrients. If you dont have protein powder for this recipe, you can just leave it out. If the texture is too moist, add a bit more oats or walnuts to the mixture. Power Ball Energy Bites Ideal for on-the-go breakfasts or between meal snacks, these tasty little no-bake energy bites pack a nutritious punch of protein, potassium, and other nutrients. - 3/­­4 cup old-fashioned oats - 1/­­2 cup toasted walnuts - 2 tablespoons vegan protein powder (I use Sun Warrior vanilla) - 2 tbsp cocoa powder - 1 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 ripe banana, cut into chunks - 2 tablespoons almond butter - 1/­­4 cup maple syrup - 1/­­2 cup dried cranberries - 2 tablespoons ground flaxseeds - 1 cup shredded toasted coconut, ground - In a food processor, combine oats, walnuts, protein powder, cocoa powder, and cinnamon. Pulse until well mixed. Add the banana, almond butter, and maple syrup. Pulse until combined. Add the cranberries and flaxseeds, and pulse until combined. - Shape the mixture into 1-inch balls. If the balls are too soft, refrigerate or freeze them for an hour. Roll the balls in the ground coconut. - Transfer to a platter and refrigerate until firm, about 1 hour. Store tightly covered in the refrigerator. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Zsu Dever.      The post Power Ball Energy Bites appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Resolving to Go Meatless Monday? Here Are Our Most Popular Recipes from 2017 to Start You Off!

December 19 2017 Meatless Monday 

Resolving to Go Meatless Monday? Here Are Our Most Popular Recipes from 2017 to Start You Off!The end of the year always marks a great opportunity to think about a fresh start, try something new, and make resolutions to change your lifestyle and eating habits. Why not do something that improves your health and also helps the environment? Meatless Monday is an easy way to make a small change to your daily life that also affects the health of the planet as well as the livelihoods of local industries and farmers. This past year has seen many people jump on the Meatless Monday bandwagon, from social media followers to celebrities, to restaurants, schools, and cities. Weve made it easy for you to join the movement by giving you a head start on the New Year. Here are the 10 most viewed Meatless Monday recipes of 2017. Try some today, and let us know what you think.   #1: Jamaican Jerk Tofu #2: Black Bean Meatless Balls and Zucchini Noodles #3: Cherry Tomato Pesto Penne #4: Banana Date Smoothie #5: Zucchini Tomato Curry #6: Easy Veggie Lo Mein #7: Bell Pepper Egg Rings #8: Lentil Burgers #9: Sweet Potato Mac and Cheese Bake #10: Spinach Lasagna The post Resolving to Go Meatless Monday? Here Are Our Most Popular Recipes from 2017 to Start You Off! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Raspberry Thumbprint Cookies (Vegan, Gluten-Free)

December 12 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Here’s a holiday dessert that will keep everyone happy! This recipe from Simply Quinoa is vegan AND gluten-free, so it’s great for bringing to parties for guests who have various dietary restrictions. In this video, Simply Quinoa shares how to make soft, pillowy raspberry thumbprint cookies with only a few simple ingredients, including delicious homemade jam! And as mentioned, this recipe is totally customizable if you need to swap out any ingredients to better fit your preferences. Overall, a great cookie recipe to have on hand! Here’s how the magic happens: Read the full recipe here. The post Raspberry Thumbprint Cookies (Vegan, Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

November 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cannellini and Lentil Jamaican Curry – 1 Pot

November 11 2017 Vegan Richa 

Cannellini and Lentil Jamaican Curry – 1 PotCannellini and Lentil Jamaican Curry. 1 Pot 30 Minutes. Easy Coconut Curry with Jamaican Curry spices and beans and red lentils. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Recipe. 16+ gms of Protein.  This super flavorful curry came about when I wanted a hearty stew with lentils and chickpeas and of course spices. I was out of canned chickpeas (insert shocked emoji here) and lunch time was approaching in 30. I decided to shake off my urge to use berbere (seriously you need to make this blend), and used some of my Jamaican curry blend (new obsession begins).  This stew comes together very quickly. Just get everything out and ready to use. If you don’t have a Jamaican Blend, you can make your own. The onion caramelized, the spices cooked with it, then cook the lentils half way in a mix of coconut milk and water, add beans (add any cooked beans or chickpeas) and continue to simmer.  You can also add some veggies with the lentils. Add greens of choice, some lemon and cayenne and done. Serve as is, over rice, or with toasty bread. Amazing flavor and so satisfying! Continue reading: Cannellini and Lentil Jamaican Curry – 1 PotThe post Cannellini and Lentil Jamaican Curry – 1 Pot appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh

October 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Ally Walsh is a model and co-founder of Los Angeles-based organic coffee company, Canyon Coffee. Though we’ve never met, we love Ally’s easy-going approach to wellness, her beautiful instagram, and what her and her partner are doing over at Canyon. It’s an all-around girl crush :) In this interview, Ally tells us about her transition from a vegetarian diet to a feel-good, intuitive diet, the tonic she always takes before bed, the books she’s found to be instrumental to her well-being, exercise, beauty, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I love routine, but that probably has a lot do to with the fact that my schedule is constantly changing! I really enjoy my morning routine, waking up early and making coffee at home. But its always nice to switch things up and come back to that. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning.  I definitely try to ease into my morning. I used to grab my phone first thing when I woke up--now I keep it out of the bedroom. Instead, the first thing I do when I wake up (on a good day!) is sit upright and do a 20 minute meditation. To me, theres no better way to start off the day. Meditation is always followed by some Canyon Coffee. At home, I typically make a pour-over, which is another little opportunity to be mindful as I start my day. On a day off its so nice to sit outside on the porch with some friends and read and have coffee together. We get the New York Times delivered to our house on Sunday mornings and I could spend the whole day reading and relaxing outside in the sun. Its honestly one of my favorites things to do. If I’m shooting though, or out of town for a job, most days start early and end late. The schedule for modeling is often last minute--I sometimes dont know my schedule until the day or night before. In contrast, its nice to have Canyon, where I make my own schedule. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I make a glass of calm/­­magnesium before bed every night! I take that with me wherever I go--security always pull me aside at the airport to ask about what this white powder is ha :) Aside from magnesium, Ill sometimes make a warm tonic with some ashwaganda. And reading always helps me to fall asleep. I guess I wouldn’t call it a ritual, but I do love watching a show or movie before sleep, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast: I have a cup of black coffee and almond butter or avocado toast with gluten-free bread every morning. Im a creature of habit... I have my favorite go-tos, and Im happy eating them every day. If I have to work super early sometimes i like to make overnight chia seed oatmeal. Ill mix in some oats, chia seeds, almond milk, maca and flax seeds, and then in the morning top it off with some fruit and almond butter. Lunch:  Usually a salad with quinoa, avocado, kimchi, roasted seasonal vegetables, seeds, lemon and different oils like grapeseed, olive, and white wine vinegar. I would also be very happy with just roasted kabocha squash and pesto :) Snack: Cashews, pumpkin seeds, Dates and almond butter, green juice, avocado toast, and currently addicted to Honey Mamas Chocolate! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Well, it kind of comes with starting a coffee company ;) Some people are surprised to learn, though, that I only drink one cup of black coffee in the morning! Thats pretty much it. I cant do too much caffeine. Only on rare occasions, like when Im on vacation, will I have an afternoon espresso or cortado. I was in Copenhagen and Stockholm recently, and fell in love with oatmilk cortados! Definitely pushed my caffeine limit there! -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I honestly don’t! I love raw chocolate, but Im really sensitive to sugar! So Im kind of weird in that I really dont love sweets. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? In addition to magnesium at night (for sleep), Ill take ashwaganda at any time of the day for my adrenals, and probiotics daily. I feel such a difference when I take b12, too. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Yes. Yoga has been such an important practice to me, for years. I usually go to a class a couple times a week. I intersperse that with hiking in the Santa Monica mountains and walks on the beach. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I actually look forward to exercise. I dont really partake in any forms of exercise that arent enjoyable. For example, Ive never really gotten into spinning or boot camp-style workouts. I love getting out in nature for hikes, and I find an hour-and-a-half in the yoga studio to be very meditative. After a long work day, I really look forward to being able to do something nice for my body. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really think the most beautiful people are those that feel confident in their skin and are who they want to be--not what society expects them to be. Someone thats naturally comfortable in any setting. As a model, so much emphasis is put on the external, and thats important for a photograph or video. But in person, beauty really does come from within. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I think the most important thing for healthy skin is to eat and drink clean. Especially drinking lots of water. As for products, I use the most natural that I can find. I love Earth tu Face, True Botanicals, Osea and Linne! I use oils for moisturizing and just use water to wash my face in the morning. I love using Bodha and CAP Beauty rose water spray, too. Ill try to do a face mask once a week from Wildcare while taking a bath! Its very relaxing :) -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water! I also think getting a good night of sleep is just as important! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Stay hydrated. My mom is 59 & has the most beautiful skin – not one wrinklel! And she swears by drinking lots of water! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Im trying to get better at this, but acupuncture has been a life saver! Its a place to relax and reset. I see Maria at Elysia Life Care and she is life-changing! I think getting into a regular routine of acupuncture and meditation can help so much with stress. After having a consistent routine with both, you start to notice things that used to stress you or make you upset no longer have the same power or effect on you. You can laugh it off, or just observe it and not be affected by it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going on a walk always helps. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Lycopene vitamin C packets, lots of ginger and tea tree oil (usually just put it in my water!) -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This has been a learning process for me, how to balance everything. Modeling, Canyon Coffee, relationship with my partner, my friends, and time for myself. Especially with starting a company with your partner, that start-up grind can be all-consuming because theres always more work you can do! So weve had to learn how to turn off- and make sure to make time for a date night! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? My goal is to maintain a state of love (as opposed to state of stress, or lack, or anger, etc.). I was lucky to learn from a qi gong master named George Falcon for a couple years before he passed, and I feel like his teachings provided me with tools to help stay in this mindset throughout the stressors and obstacles of daily life. One of the big ones is to take responsibility for our actions and state of being. Its easy for us to blame, to say he, she, or it made me feel this way. But really its our decision. Of course, we sometimes fall out of that consciousness of love. When Im not feeling well, my first step is to take a break. To meditate, listen to a recorded guided meditation of George, go on a walk or a hike. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Ive made different changes throughout my life that have been substantial in terms of my wellness. I stopped eating meat when I was 19, then introduced fish (mainly salmon!) back in years later. Acupuncture has perhaps been the most substantial in helping me maintain balance and wellness. All of these changes or decisions are really informed by just listening to my body. You can get caught up in the mindset and identity of, say, Im vegan. But its important to check in with yourself and ask, Am I feeling good? Is this helping live a balanced and vibrant life? If not, then its important to make a change! -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So many books! If I had to pick two, Id say Anatomy of the Spirit by Caroline Myss and Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert. Anatomy really opened me to the power of our bodies to heal and self-nourishment. It helped me connect my mental and spiritual state to my health and well-being. Its a book you can go back to, re-read and continue to learn from over time. Big Magic was instrumental in motivating me to start Canyon Coffee. It made me feel like I had more to give, creatively, and pushed me to start something with a greater purpose. It brought clarity to the creative process for me, breaking it down in a way that makes it approachable and applicable to my own life. Its one of those books that really inspires you to follow your dreams, and what could be more important for self-nourishment? Knowlegde -- You run Canyon Coffee together with your boyfriend, Casey. What was your path to starting your own coffee company? Personally, I was feeling uninspired. I felt like I wasnt making the most of my creativity and talents. Ive always been grateful for my modeling career, but I had also always wanted to start something of my own, and I was feeling that itch. Casey and I had both fallen in love with coffee over the years... through making it at home together and visiting coffee shops in our travels and around LA. Casey actually started working in the coffee industry, and we became friends with a roaster, James. Eventually, our passion for it grew to the point that we had the thought: why not start our own company? It really was a natural culmination. The moment we decided we wanted to do it, we just never looked back. -- What is your process when choosing beans for Canyon Coffee? Are there certain growing practices, flavor profiles, or geographical locations that are important to you? The universal practice of tasting different beans is called cupping. It involves preparing small roasted samples of different beans exactly the same way and trying them at the same time. For Canyon, our parameters narrow down our options. We usually decide on a country first, and then see what organic, seasonal beans grown at high altitudes are available through the network of importers near us in California. Then we order samples, cup, and choose the bean that smells and tastes best to us. High altitude is important because the elevation makes the coffee plant grow slower and put more energy into producing cherries. The slow growth results in cherries (and coffee beans) that are much more flavorful and vibrant. To start Canyon, we focused on Latin American coffees and wanted to find amazing-tasting beans in the chocolatey /­­ caramel flavor profile. We went with beans from Guatemala and Colombia first, because theyre known for these flavor profiles and they have great infrastructure for small coffee producers to process and export their beans. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love going to the movies :) And a nice dinner out before or after. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit .. anything from Krishnamurti & Ram Dass Song/­­Album – Paul Simon – Graceland, Feist – Let it Die, Lord Huron – Lonesome Dreams Movie – Beginners Piece of Art – Robert Lango Men In the Cities, Alfred Stieglitz’ Portraits of Georgia OKeeffe -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Gjusta/­­ Gjelina, Honey Hi, Amara Kitchen, Pace, Botanica, Necco, Destroyer, Erewhon -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Im actually in the process of moving out of my house right now! Were taking advantage of the end of our lease to do some traveling and try out living in some new neighborhoods. As a result, Im having to put a lot of my stuff in storage. Its been really nice to get rid of a lot of things and simplify to the essentials. But as far as traveling goes, I always have with me.. – new book and magazines – headphones – Jesse Kamm pants – Nikes – journal – Bodha rose water spray – probiotics – magnesium and ashwaganda  – sparkling water – ursa major rings – eye mask – almond butter packets -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily LAmi of Bodha, and Lacy Phillips at Free & Native! Both these women are a constant inspiration! You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. Lunch – Beans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Quick Three-Grain Brown Bread

September 28 2018 VegKitchen 

Quick Three-Grain Brown Bread Pop this easy vegan quick bread into the oven while your favorite soup is simmering on the stove. It’s made with wheat and rye flours, plus cornmeal. Or, serve it with jam to accompany your favorite warm beverage -- coffee, tea, or cocoa. You’ll love this moist loaf! This makes one loaf, about 10 to 12 slices. Photos by Hannah Kaminsky. Save Print Quick Three-Grain Brown Bread Author: Nava Recipe type: Quick bread Cuisine: Vegan /­­ healthy Prep time:  15 mins Cook time:  40 mins Total time:  55 mins Serves: 10 to 12   Pop this easy vegan quick bread into the oven while your favorite soup is simmering on the stove. Its made with wheat and rye flours, plus cornmeal. Ingredients 1 cup whole wheat pastry flour ¾ cup rye flour ½ cup cornmeal 1½ teaspoons baking soda ½ teaspoon salt 1 cup plain nondairy yogurt, preferably coconut ⅔ cup unsweetened nondairy milk, or as needed ⅓ cup maple syrup, molasses, or barley malt syrup 2 tablespoons safflower oil Instructions Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Combine the first 5 (dry) ingredients in a large mixing bowl and stir together. Combine the remaining ingredients in another mixing bowl and whisk together until smoothly blended. Make […] The post Quick Three-Grain Brown Bread appeared first on VegKitchen.

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook!

September 18 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! It’s been around three years since we started working on this cookbook, so finally telling you about it today feels monumental, exhilarating, and terrifying all at the same time. Our new cookbook is called Simply Vibrant: All-Day Vegetarian Recipes for Colorful Plant-Based Cooking, and it’s available for pre-order now! It’s written by me, Anya, and photographed by Masha – the same mother/­­daughter team that’s behind this blog. Today, we are sharing some key details about the book, accompanied by a book trailer (above), sneak peak photos and ways to pre-order. We’ll also be talking about the pre-order bonus recipe bundle, which is a free gift that we created for anyone who pre-orders the book. SO excited to share all of this with you :) About the Book -- Simply Vibrant will be released on February 6th, 2018, but it’s available for pre-order now. Anyone who pre-orders the book will have access to a free bonus recipe bundle, consisting of 10 brand new, plant-based recipes, which won’t be published anywhere else. Just save your receipt! This is our way of thanking you for your support :) More on the bonus below. -- There are 129 recipes in the book, all of which are vegetarian, 124 of them are vegan, and 109 of them are gluten-free or gluten-free adaptable. My goal was to create healthful, everyday recipes that require accessible, whole food ingredients – mainly vegetables, fruit, herbs, spices, grains, and legumes. The recipes are very much influenced by the seasons, too. Our hope is that you’ll be able to find whatever good-looking produce you picked up at your market or store in the index of the book, and get some ideas on preparing it. -- I used comfort food classics from around the world as inspiration for the recipes in the book, which also influenced the book’s organization. The chapters are as follows: Morning Porridges and Pancakes – this chapter contains breakfast recipes for every season, both savory and sweet. Salads and Bowls – this one has a grain bowl recipe for every season, as well as plenty of vibrant salads for every occasion. Wraps and Rolls – this chapter celebrates the wrapping techniques seen in cuisines all around the world. There are recipes for summer rolls, enchiladas, burritos, maki (sushi), collard green wraps, and more. Soups and Stews – the recipes in this chapter range from hearty winter stews to refreshing and light summer soups. Risotto, Paella and Pilaf – for this chapter, I took the format of well-loved rice dishes from around the world, and reinvented them with the use of different vegetables and grains (there are even a couple of completely grain-free risottos!). Noodles, Pasta and Pizza – this one is all about the coziest foods out there, reimagined to be more vegetable-forward – there are recipes for homemade pasta and dumplings, but also for noodles and pizza crusts made with vegetables. Fritters and Veggie Burgers – this chapter has a veggie burger recipe for every season, as well as plenty of lacy, plant-packed fritters. Just Veggies – this chapter is here to prove that seasonal vegetables only need a simple nudge to taste amazing – there are techniques for marinating, pickling, braising, stewing, and glazing that will take your produce to the next level. Sweets for Every Season – the title of this chapter speaks for itself – there are brownies, galettes, pies, cakes, and pots de creme, made with unrefined sweeteners, fruit, and even some vegetables. Basics and Sauces – a foundational chapter, which will supply you with ammunition for creating vibrant meals quickly – from mind-blowing sauces to broth that will cost you $0 in extra groceries. -- I’ve been thinking a lot about the amount of waste we produce as humans, and I’ve been working on developing techniques for using up all parts of the produce I buy. I present some of these ideas in this book, from the aforementioned veggie scrap broth, to a watermelon rind marmalade, broccoli stem risotto, and more. -- The introduction has a story about my shoemaker grandfather, which has basically become folklore in our family. I was very excited to immortalize it in a book. -- If you have our first cookbook, The Vibrant Table, this book is a follow-up to that. While The Vibrant Table focused on creativity in plant-based cooking, Simply Vibrant is much more focused on the everyday. It’s all about putting breakfast, lunch and dinner on the table. -- The book is 328 pages long, hardcover, and 7.5″ x 10″ in size. Every recipe is accompanied by a beautiful photograph, with the exception of a few sauces. Praise Here are some kind words we’ve heard about the book from people and publications we greatly admire. “Simply Vibrant captures the kind of accidentally-vegetarian food we want to eat right now.” --Bon Appetit Simply Vibrant is intuitively organized and brilliantly executed. It illustrates how many of us are striving to eat these days: crave-able, template-style recipes with seasonal touches, simple techniques, and an underlying nourishing essence that reads as encouraging, rather than prescriptive. Anyas approach starts with a deep-rooted reverence for what nature provides in all of its seasons--and in all of its sometimes neglected or wasted forms. The thoughtful uses for carrot tops, chickpea soaking liquid, and barley cooking water--like the rest of the books delicious plant-based recipes--speak to both virtue and pure enjoyment. This book inspires me to cook (and live!) with a deeper sense of care and appreciation. --Laura Wright, author of The First Mess Cookbook Anyas approach to food and the seasons always stands out as creative, inventive, and colorful. Simply Vibrant contains an abundance of inspiring recipes and clever tricks to add more nourishment and adventure to your everyday meals. --Amy Chaplin, James Beard award-winning author of At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen Anya has the incredible ability to inspire her readers to cook, but more importantly, she helps them tap into their own intuition to create delicious meals in a more relaxed way. I love her emphasis on seasonality, and her creative approach to leaf-to-root cooking, using every ingredient to its fullest potential without wasting a single seed! This recipe collection is bursting with global flavors, unique ingredient combinations, and of course, vibrancy on the highest level. --Sarah Britton, holistic nutritionist and author of My New Roots and Naturally Nourished   We are longtime fans of Golubka Kitchen and Anyas creative and beautiful plant-based recipes. Her new book is jam-packed with healthy, flavorful, and simple recipes and lots of interesting suggestions on how to cook with the odds and ends of produce that usually are discarded--like making marmalade from watermelon rinds and risotto using broccoli stems. So clever! --David Frenkiel and Luise Vindahl, creators of the blog Green Kitchen Stories “Exciting, vegetable led food.” -- Anna Jones, author of A Modern Way to Cook, A Modern Way to Eat and columnist for The Guardian “What made me want to cook from Simply Vibrant is its more relaxed approach to plant-based cooking” --Toronto Star Pre-Order Here’s where you can pre-order Simply Vibrant. Many of these outlets are selling the book at a discounted price while it’s still in the pre-order stages. Amazon Barnes & Noble Roost Powell’s IndieBound Book Depository (ships worldwide for free) Amazon Canada Indigo Pre-Order Bonus Recipe Bundle To show our immense gratitude to anyone who pre-orders the book, we made a little thank you gift in the form of a free Bonus Recipe Bundle PDF. It’s sort of like a mini e-cookbook, complete with 10 brand-new, plant-based recipes that won’t be published anywhere else. The style of the recipes is very similar to that of the recipes in the actual book – everyday meals to make your home cooking more delicious and vibrant. Click here for instructions on how to claim your pre-order bonus and see a preview of the recipes within. Thank You This book only exists because of this blog, and this blog exists because of you – your support, kindness, and curiosity in visiting this space, cooking from our recipes, and reading our stories. Seriously, none of this would be here without YOU. So thank you! Truly, from the bottom of our hearts. – Anya and Masha The post Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 29 2018 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterThe Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl This year I traveled to Ethiopia in the weeks before Easter - one of several special times of fasting, when the majority of the country eats entirely vegan! I explored the central cities, traveled overland to the north, went trekking in the highlands and stayed with families in remote villages. As with all my travels and culinary research, I am extremely grateful for the privilege to learn, share & exchange, and be guided & supported by many families and professional cooks who invited me in their kitchens and shared amazing meals with me. Since returning to Berlin, I’ve been cooking Ethiopian and Eritrean food practically non-stop, recreating recipes and dishes, constantly inviting friends and guests to my cooking studio for lunch and dinner parties. Abebech showing me traditional village cooking in the Ethiopian Highlands. Making Injera for the first time in Ethiopia The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA is my newest cookbook with original recipes, artwork, photography and stories inspired by these latest culinary adventures. It includes over 70 recipes based on the mouth-watering meals in bustling cities & towns, at road-stop eateries, and in rural highland villages. As with my previous 5 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. The ETHIOPIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 6th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 140 pages with 70+ recipes and over 60 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in East Africa - Also based on experiences with international communities of Europe (London, Paris, and Berlin) and North America (Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C.) and over 25 years of vegan cooking - Ethiopian & Eritrean classics, familiar restaurant & family favourites, delicious delights, wonders & surprises, and creative culinary experiments - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Doro Wat – spicy seitan stew Spinach Dinach Butecha – Chickpea “Egg” Salad Minchet Abish – spicy soy mince & walnuts Duba Wot – pumpkin stew Shimbra Asa – chickpea “fish” Asa (Jackfruit) Tibs Fosolia – green beans & carrots Pizza Lalibela Ingudai Tibs – spicy mushrooms Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping Ambasha – sweet bread Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA - Traditional Berbere spice mix (simple + advanced) - Nitir Qibe – spiced butter/­­oil - Mitmita – extra hot spice mix - Yewot Qimen – black pepper spice mix - Shiro – chickpea/­­bean spice mix - Data (Yekarya Delleh) – roasted chili, garlic, onion & herb sauce - Traditional Injera – Ethiopian sourdough crepe - Quick Injera - Ambasha - sweet raisin bread - Doro Dabo – baked stuffed bread - Difo Dabo - spiced bread - Pizza Lalibela - with tomato sauce & roasted potato topping - Sambosa – savory pastry with lentil filling - Senig Karia – roasted spicy stuffed chilies - Injera Firfir – traditional flatbread with spicy tomato sauce - Yesuf Fitfit – chopped injera & lemon sunflower seed dressing - Kita (Injekita) – sweet breakfast flatbread & jam - Chornake /­­ Pasty – fried bread - Genfo – roasted wheat & barley porridge - Selata - super simple salad - Selata Delux - with mango, dates, avocado mixed greens & lentils - Butecha - chickpea “egg” salad - Selata Timtim - tomato salad - Selata Dinich - potato salad - Selata Bekarot - carrot salad - Telba - roasted flax dressing - Shiro Wot - chickpea puree - Misir Wot – red lentils - Doro Wot – spicy seitan - Soy Tibs - spicy soymeat strips - Ingudai Wot - spicy mushrooms - Bamia - spicy okra - Minchet Abish - spicy soy mince & walnuts - Shimbra Asa – spicy chickpea “fish” - Kik Alicha – yellow lentils - Atakilt Alicha – cabbage, carrots & potatoes - Keysir - beet root - Duba Alicha - pumpkin stew - Tikr Gomen - greens with garlic - Spinach Dinich - spinach & roasted potatoes - Fosolia – green beans & carrots - Asa Tibs – lemon pepper jackfruit fritters - Tofu Alicha - batter fried tofu in mild garlic & onion sauce - Ingudai Alicha – mushrooms w/­­ creamy cashew, lemon, pepper, thyme, parsley - Peppers & Potatoes - garlic ginger stir-fry - Inkulal Firfir – spicy tofu scramble & tomatoes - Ful – fava beans - Ayib – cottage cheese - Bedergan – roasted eggplant - Vegetable Lentil Soup - Vegetable Pasta – spaghetti with mixed chopped vegetables - Macaroni Firfir – noodles with garlic onion tomato sauce on injera - Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping - Ethiopian Mashed Potatoes - Traditional Coffee Ceremony - Spiced Black Tea - Roiboos tea with lemon, ginger &cardamon - Mango Moringa Banana Smoothie - Injera w/­­ dates - Banana Bread - Fasting Muffins - Rooibos Tea Ice Cream Video: Justin P. Moore Music: Nils Kercher Nanfulle from Ancient Intimations (live) (C)2016 Ancient Pulse Music PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl The post ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Wagon Wheel Cake

April 12 2018 Vegan Dad 

Wagon Wheel Cake This cake is insane. Its massive, probably too sweet, has 5 separate elements, and is totally awesome!  Of course, my health conscious mother never bought us Wagon Wheels when my brothers and I were young, and oh, how we jealously pined for them when other kids brought them to school for lunch! When Vegan Mom and I were dating (and not yet vegan) in university, we used to keep ourselves motivated to study through the positive reinforcement of Viva Puffs. This cake evokes all of those memories, and is simply a lot of fun to make and eat.  INGREDIENTS - about 1 1/­­2 cups raspberry jelly Cake INGREDIENTS - 227g all purpose flour - 65g cocoa - 1 1/­­2 tsp baking soda - 3/­­4 tsp baking powder - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 1/­­4 cup soy milk - 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar - 1/­­4 cup water - 1 cup sugar - 1/­­2 cup canola oil - 1 tbsp vanilla METHOD Preheat oven to 350 degrees 1. Grease two 10 inch round cake pans.  Cut out two circles of parchment paper to fit in the bottom of the pans.  Put the parchment papers in the bottom of the pans and grease it.  Flour both pans. 2. Sift flour, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda, and salt into a bowl.  In a separate bowl, whisk chocolate soy milk and vinegar together.  Add remaining ingredients and whisk well to blend. 3. Add dry ingredients and gently whisk until blended.  Dont overdo it. 4. Divide batter evenly between the two pans. 5. Bake for 22-24 mins, or until a toothpick comes out clean. 6. Cool on wire racks for 10 mins, then flip the pans over the remove the cake.  Remove the parchment paper.  Let them fully cool. Graham Cookie Layer INGREDIENTS - 3/­­4 cup all purpose flour - 3/­­4 cup whole wheat flour - 2 tbsp dark brown sugar - 1/­­8 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon - 1/­­2 tsp baking powder - 1/­­4 cup vegetable shortening - 1/­­4 cup maple syrup - 2 tbsp soy milk METHOD 1. Mix together dry ingredients. Cut in vegetable shortening with a pastry cutter to the size of small peas.  2. Add syrup and soy milk and bring together into a ball. Add a tiny splash more soy milk if needed. 3. Divide dough into two equal pieces. Roll and trim each into a 10 circle on a piece of parchment paper, using the cake pan as a guide. Dont worry, you can trim it more after it is baked.  4. Place each piece of parchment/­­dough circle on a baking sheet. Place in the fridge to cool for 30 mins. 5. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake one the middle and upper rack for 10 mins, rotating and switching the racks after 5 mins. Cookies should dry on the top and only very, very lightly brown. Do not over bake. 6. Remove from pans (parchment and all) to a cooling rack. When cooled, trim as needed with a small sharp knife using the cake pan as a guide.  Marshmallow (from Plantified) INGREDIENTS - 3/­­4 cup salt free aquafaba - 1/­­2 tsp xanthan gum - 1 tbsp vanilla extract - 1 1/­­2 cups sugar - 2 tsp agar powder - 2 tbsp glucose syrup - 1/­­3 cup water METHOD 1. In a large bowl, whisk aquafaba and xanthan gum to stiff peaks with a hand mixer. Whisk in vanilla. Set aside. 2. Bring the sugar, agar, glucose, and water to boiling in a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to 250 F, stirring regularly/­­constantly to keep the mixture from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Be patient. The sugar will quickly jump in temperature, plateau, then rise again. Resist cranking the heat to hurry the process along. 3. Slowly stream the hot sugar mixture into the aquafaba, constantly whipping it in with the hand mixer. When the sugar mixture is fully incorporated, keep whipping the mixture until it returns to room temperature (more or less--the bottom of the bowl should not feel warm). You can do all this with a stand mixer, but I find that the sugar mixture likes to get caught up around the top of the beater, so using a hand mixer is better).  Ganache INGREDIENTS - 1/­­2 cup light coconut milk - 200g bittersweet vegan chocolate chips - 2 tbsp margarine METHOD 1. Heat coconut milk to bubbling in a small saucepan over medium heat.  2. Remove from heat and add chocolate chips and margarine.  Stir until everything is melted and smooth.  Set aside to cool completely.  TO MAKE THE CAKE! 1. Bake and cool the cake. Level the top of the cake, if necessary (i.e. make sure it is flat and not domed).  2. Bake and cool the graham cookie layer. Trim to fit on top of the cake (you can do this while the cookie is still slightly warm if you want).  3. Place one of the cake layers on a serving platter. Spread 3/­­4 cup of raspberry jelly on top. Place one of the graham cookies on top of the jam.  4. Repeat step 3 with the remaining cake, jelly, and graham cookie, and set aside. 5. Make the marshmallow. The marshmallow will set fairly quickly, so be prepared. Spread 7/­­8 of the marshmallow on top of the cake/­­jam/­­cookie layer in your serving platter. Put the second cake/­­jam/­­cookie layer on top of the marshmallow (making sure the cookie side is down and the cake layer on top). Gently press down and use an icing spatula to smooth the sides. Use the remaining 1/­­8 of the marshmallow to aid in this endeavour.  6. Let the marshmallow fully set. I like to put the cake in a cool place for this step because it makes the ganache step easier. 7. Make the ganache and let cool to room temperature. 8. Spread a thin layer of ganache over the entire cake, like you would a crumb coat of butter cream. Set aside in a cool place (the fridge) to set. 9. Use the remaining ganache to cover the cake. Set aside in a cool place to set.

Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products!

January 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products!Meatless Monday supports Goyas Can Do program, which donates food to Feed America every time someone purchases Goya products in stores. Since so many of Goyas products are vegetarian and packed with protein, food bloggers accepted the challenge to come up with meat-free recipes for Meatless Monday using Goyas featured Can Do products. Here are some of our favorite contributions from last year! Mango & Tomato: Vegan Laska with Zucchini, Peppers and Mushrooms Robin Asbell: Jamaican Rice and Gullah Peas C It Nutritionally: 5-Ingredient Curried Butternut Squash Soup Healing Tomato: Vegan Dumplings Soup with Pigeon Peas MomStart: Coconut Milk Veggie Curry Analidas Ethnic Spoon: Indonesian Coconut Turmeric Rice with Cashews Confessions of a Mother Runner: Spicy Thai Noodle Soup Life Currents: White Bean and Sweet Potato Taco Filling Show Me the Yummy: Roasted Carrot Soup Two Classy Chics: Creamy Cauliflower and Potato Soup Freckled Italian: Coconut Rice and Beans Dini Delivers: Coco Dalal Week99er: Double Chocolate Coconut Cupcakes with Coconut Creme Frosting Jersey Family Fun: Coconut Rice Bowls Food in Jars: Coconut and Cracked Brown Rice Pudding Cooking with Julie: Slow Cooker Red Lentil Coconut Curry Soup Make sure to follow Meatless Monday on social media to find out the next Goya Can Do featured product and to watch our live cooking demos with Goya! The post Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya

December 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Satsuki Shibuya is an artist and spiritual thinker based in L.A. We are in awe of Satsuki’s intuitive watercolors, her constant willingness to go deeper, and her incredibly thoughtful approach to work and life as a whole. In this interview, Satsuki tells us about her morning, bedtime, and exercise routines, as well as love as a form of self-acceptance, what it’s like to see the energy of others, her unique approach to her life schedule, her mother’s universally wise beauty advice, the lifestyle change that helped clear up her skin, nourishment, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I find myself being right in-between, but veer on the side of things being more open and free within a loose schedule. It is dictated not so much by a 9-5 setting, but more dependent on what my body is communicating for the day. I’ve found that the more I am able to flow naturally, without resistance, better work is produced. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. My mornings are usually the same -- wake up sometime between 7 and 7:30am, wash up, meditate/­­journal/­­read for about an hour or some light gardening. Around 8:30am, start preparing breakfast for the household and eat while catching up on some articles online. By 10am, I am warming up to start the work day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Not a bedtime ritual, per se, but I do find my biological clock the happiest when I am in bed by midnight. Any later and I will wake up feeling groggy. Unfortunately, some of the best messages come through from the Universe around this time and find myself writing clear into the witching hour. -- We read that you have a unique approach to your work schedule. Can you tell us about it and why it works for you? Sure. It’s not so much as my work schedule, but life schedule as a whole. As I am quite sensitive to energies, especially from people, as much as I love being with others, I also need a lot of down time to recharge, otherwise, burn out. The best balance I’ve found thus far is to have a point system where each time I am interacting with another, depending on the intensity, receives a particular number of points. For example, going to a doctor’s appointment would be 1/­­2 a point since there is not much interaction, overloading of the sensory system, and is one-on-one contact, which doesn’t require too much processing of different energies. On the other hand, if I am scheduled to do a talk or to meet people at a large gathering, it would be 2-3 points. The points correlate with how many days it might take me to recover and recharge. 1/­­2 point would be half a day of recharging afterwards whereas 2-3 points would be two to three days of recharging necessary after the event. Then, I go week by week and figure out how many points are available for social interactions. If a week is only 3 points maximum, then that might mean 1 meeting and 1 doctor’s appointment (1/­­2 point + 2.5 points) and the rest would be downtime, meaning minimal outside interaction. Depending on where my entire being is (body, mind, soul), the weekly points, or I usually go monthly, will fluctuate. If I am getting over a cold, there may only be so many points available to a week, but if balanced, there may be more available. When I first started this system, it was more rigid, but now, relaxed as it has become second nature. This helps not only to keep a balance, but also to set boundaries in order to create space in my heart. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Something light, centered upon veggies and fruits with some grains. I usually opt for some gluten free toast, an avocado with hummus, and either dried or freshly cut fruit or miso soup with rice. Light and simple. Lunch – The heaviest meal of the day and usually containing either a plant-based or animal-based protein. It can be anything from a rice bowl to a large salad, but usually a variety of ingredients. Snack – I have a soft spot for chips or crunchy nibbles so like to have something around 3:30pm and/­­or a piece of fruit. Dinner – A medium sized meal, usually Japanese-based, but other times adventure elsewhere. Mostly veggies and some protein, usually not much carbs as it tends to make the digestive system a bit sluggish before going to sleep. Some tea afterwards while doing dishes is always a treat. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I am not able to partake in caffeine as it makes my heart pitter-patter like no other, but do love the smell of coffee or English Breakfast tea.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to have a horrible sweet tooth where if I did not have at least one thing sweet each day around tea time, whether cake or a sweet bean bun, I would be the crabbiest crab of the land! I’ve since stopped eating sugar (going on 4 years now) due to health reasons and thankful for the difference in my health -- it is night and day! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I see a Naturopathic Doctor regularly and through her, work with supplements, herbs, and tinctures/­­tonics, which do truly help to keep my body in balance. Otherwise, on my own, I find meditation, working with crystals, burning incense specifically from Ry?an-ji temple in Kyoto, and spraying Aura Cleanser from Botanical Alchemy works wonders for my overall well being and energy. I do know this formula may be different for each individual due to our aura body make-up, but currently, this program seems to work best. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I wouldn’t say I’m a gym bunny, but do love the feeling of working with the body/­­mind simultaneously and yoga seems to fit the bill quite nicely. Still a long ways to go, but hoping to be able to integrate yoga into my morning preparations for the day. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I wish I could say I love to exercise, but in truth, it does take a lot of willpower to get myself to do physical activities. I’ve never been very competitive in nature and therefore sports did not appeal as a possible opportunity for exercise, but since meeting yoga, feel I’ve finally found something that speaks to my spirit. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I believe the internal comes through to the external in all aspects -- if our organs are taken care of, our skin clears, if our emotions are balanced, our smiles appear, and when our soul is nourished, our being glistens. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Simple seems to be the way my entire being prefers things, including skincare for face and body. I’ve been a huge advocate for natural skincare and use one that consists of face wash, toner, moisturizer, Balancing Oil for night time and eye cream. Sometimes spot cream for blemishes and face scrub/­­face pack a few times a week. For body, I use a 5-ingredient, shea butter bar soap. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? No sugar. This alone has cleared up my blemish-prone skin considerably. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Nothing much, except for beauty advice my mother has shared since I was young, “Invest in your skin, trim your hair often, and moisturize your elbows.” I continue to follow her advice. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? I try my best to keep a balance in my schedule, not overload it with activities and make time to tune into my higher self. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? To close my eyes and tune into my breath. Speak slower. Concentrate on one happening at a time. To hide away in the bathroom for a few minutes and catch my breath. Check-in internally and focus on my root chakra. Ground my energies into Mother Earth. Also, to understand that nothing is permanent and the stressful situation, too, shall pass. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Eat shiitake mushrooms, drink a hot tea of lemon with manuka honey, down some bio-available vitamin C, up the liquids including broths, and consciously raise my energy. Also, lots of sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Work/­­life balance is key to my well-being. I continue to let go of rules that I have placed upon myself in order to feel complete in the world and instead, tune into what makes me feel whole. Saying yes to what resonates and no to the things that do not fulfill my spirit. My approach is to tune into my intuition and let it be the guide towards where I need to go next. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself. The simple answer to this is love. Not so much the cliché love we think of, but of accepting oneself for where we are currently and not force ourselves to be someone we are not. With acceptance, comes letting go and by letting go, we are able to fill in our space with a being entirely made up of our true selves. When this can be done, we are able to share love with ourselves and in turn, share love with others. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? To not worry about success in terms of monetary gain, but of spiritual awareness. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Allowing the lack of inspiration and procrastination to take me where I may go. Not to try and stop it, but to experience it fully and understand where it is originating. I don’t necessarily think it is a bad thing -- sometimes we need rest to appreciate our next step. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a painter? After being on hiatus for a year and a half due to an unexplainable illness, I received a message to paint. After reconnecting back to my childhood self, of sensing and seeing beyond the physical realm, leaning into this part of my being opened up new ways of communicating beyond and through this, the message came through. -- Intuition plays a key role in your watercolor work. Why do you find it to be crucial to your approach? The medium has shown the necessity of letting go, trusting the process and understanding that there is more than what we can see in the physical realm. By approaching my work intuitively, it becomes almost meditative, channeling energies beyond and appearing as is, without any manipulation. -- Can you tell us a bit about the energy readings that you do? When did you discover that you have the ability to feel an individual’s soul energy and aura? It was by accident. I’ve always been able to read others’ energies and since young, would do so to the detriment of my own health. I found myself at the doctor’s office, when often, every other week, to which many times, no illness could be found. During my year and a half of being ill, I began to understand what I was sensing since young and honing in, began to receive messages in code. After deciphering many of these messages in my journal, I decided to share my internal self with my mother, who was in the dark about this internal world, to which she was extremely shocked. It took her a good week, after speaking with many of her friends who have known me since I was born, to figure out that she was actually the only one  not recognizing this ‘other self’. After coming full circle with my mother, during a gathering consisting of elder buddhist practitioners, which I attend with my mother from time to time, I shared my spiritual insights with the group. A woman sitting next to me whom I met for the first time that day, asked if I could read her energy. I’d never explicitly read another’s energy before and did not know what to expect, but agreed as I, too, was curious as to what would come forth. I saw images, colors, movie-like scenes, shapes, sensed emotions, all flashing, happening and shared, as if a translator, all I was seeing, experiencing simultaneously to her. After finishing, she looked at me and said, “How do you know all these things about me?” To which I said, “I don’t know. I just said what I saw.” Since then, I’ve done many energy readings and now have a better understanding of what happens during a session. I liken it to a translation of the other’s energy, subconscious, and higher self; sometimes beyond. What is important to note, though, is that all the things I see, sense, and share are things the individual already knows, whether consciously or subconsciously. I just bring it to the forefront and at times, help word it in a way so that the message can understood in the best possible way. -- Besides being a painter, you also write poetry, play music and make books. Do you feel that all these disciplines are interconnected for you, or do you treat them as separate entities? Yes, they are all interconnected, all coming from the same source, just expressed differently. I would say painting is the most direct form of expressing what I experience internally, without translation. The next being words -- a way of describing what I am experiencing. Music being another translation, although not as intuitive as painting or writing. Books are my passion and feel it is a way to leave energies in this world even after passing onto the other side. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love watching Japanese comedy shows and dramas, while eating chips. In an ideal world, though, instead of chips, I would be eating a fruit tart. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Untethered Soul by Michael A. Singer Song/­­Album – All Things Must Pass by Rourourourous Movie – Laputa by Studio Ghibli Piece of Art – Any of the older pieces created by Agnes Martin -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Rice in Manhattan Beach -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? For carry-on: - a comfortable eye mask - slippers and socks - pressure point bands - iphone for listening to music and audio books - bottled water purchased after passing through security For suitcase: - jeans - sneakers - flat shoes that are a bit more dressy, but still comfortable - small travel pillow as I have a sensitive neck - food stuffs for my dietary needs (I have a many food allergies) - book, journal, pencil case - tshirts, long shirts, under shirts, and extra underwear - a warm top - and anything that allows me to be comfortable while still feeling in line with my own style - slippers for usage in room - warm socks as my feet tend to get cold - pajamas - room wear - pyrex for heating up my own food - liquid dish soap for washing dishes/­­utensils - one set of semi-dress up clothes, in-case  -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Rei Kawakubo. Artwork by Satsuki Shibuya. Photos by Sisilia Piring and Women With Superpowers /­­ Tasya Van Ree + Nitsa Citrine. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Black Bean Brownie Bites

December 8 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Black Bean Brownie Bites The moment I placed these brownies in the oven, I started whining like a disgruntled teenager because Luise had persuaded me to only sweeten them with dates and mix a whole can of black beans into the batter. “They are going to taste like sh*t” might have been the carefully formulated phrase I used. Baking brownies was my idea to start with and I usually don’t complain about healthy desserts, but I was tired that day and my mind was set on the caramel-tasting brownies from the bakery across the street. More than the flavor, it was their texture I wanted to recreate. The crusty top and caramel fudge center that you only can achieve with sugar, butter and flour. I knew these would be far from that. And in my mind that was all Luise’s fault. The whining escalated into a discussion (aka argument) and by the time the timer on my phone rang, things were, well, kind of tense between us. I cut off a corner piece of the baked brownie and quickly realized that they weren’t as awful as I had expected. Of course when Luise asked me, I did what any 36-year old teenager would do and grunted: “They were okay I guess”. In reality, they were actually pretty good. They didn’t have that crusty texture or typical sugar taste but they were still sweet, gooey but not heavy, chocolatey, energy packed and rich. I added frosting to make them a little more sassy - using dates as sweetener and avocado and coconut oil for an ultra lush and creamy consistency. They turned out really beautiful and jam-packed with good stuff. Rather than a dessert, I’d say that this is more like an energy bar-style brownie, and I found myself sneaking back to the fridge several times that day for another bite. We’re sharing the recipe and some notes below. But first, check out this little video from our youtube channel where we demonstrate how to make them. Since that first batch of brownies, there have been at least six more batches. A few vegan attempts and various flavor and texture variations. I have gathered a few notes that might come useful in case you want to give them a try. - We use very soft fresh dates that we buy in card board boxes and they are pretty affordable compared to loose weight or medjool dates. Sizes differ so use a scale if you want to be exact. - If you can’t find fresh dates you can use dried dates that you soak in water for a couple of hours. Drain the water before mixing. However, I wouldn’t use dried dates for the frosting as they need the dates to be super soft to achieve a smooth consistency. Try maple syrup instead. - If you arent used to sugar free desserts, you can add a couple of tablespoons maple syrup, honey or sugar to the batter. We have tried this recipe both with and without additional sweetening and they taste good both ways. It all depends on what you are used to and your expectations are. - We use a quite mild olive oil and it works really well with the chocolate flavor (not strong at all). However, if you don’t like olive oil, you can use, coconut oil, rapeseed oil or butter instead. - We have also tried a vegan, egg-free version using aquafaba (chickpea water) that we are sharing at the bottom of the recipe. We also tried making aquafaba using black bean water (because it’s a rest product of the beans in the recipe). It didn’t firm up as much when whisked but it did work as a binder. However, it looked kinda gross and added more bean flavor so we decided to stick with chickpea water instead. - We add coffee to the frosting to disguise the avocado flavor. If you dont like coffee, you can use almond butter or peanut butter instead to give it a flavor twist. - Sea salt flakes are great on top and we love the salt + chocolate combo, but desiccated coconut would also look good. - If you are allergic to nuts, you can mix toasted sunflower seeds into a flour and use instead of almond flour. And use pumpkin seeds instead of walnuts. Black Bean Brownie Bites with Chocolate Avocado Frosting Makes 24 bites These taste sweet but not overly so, see notes above if you prefer to make them sweeter. Vegan version below. 20 soft dates (approx 230 g /­­ 8 oz) 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 185 g cooked black beans (rinsed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml olive oil or other neutral oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml plant milk or regular milk 3 eggs 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g oat flour (or same amount rolled oats, mixed into a flour) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g almond flour 6 tbsp cacao powder 1 tsp baking powder 1 pinch salt 1 handful crushed walnuts (optional) Chocolate Avocado Frosting 6-8 soft dates 3 tbsp coconut oil 2-3 tbsp strong coffee 3 tbsp cacao powder 1 avocado Sprinkle with Sea salt Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F. Pit the dates and add them to a food processor along with the rinsed black beans. Mix on high speed. Add oil, milk and eggs (leave out if you are vegan) and mix until smooth. Add almond flour and oat flour (you can make oat flour from rolled oats by simply blending them in a food processor or grinding them in a mortle and pester), cacao powder, baking powder and salt and pulse until everything is mixed. Stir in walnuts (and whipped aquafaba if you are making the vegan version). Place a baking paper in a 28 x 20 cm /­­ 11 x 8 inch rectangular baking dish and bake for 30 minutes. Remove the brownies from the oven once they are firm to touch and leave until completely cool. Make the frosting by mixing all the ingredients in a food processor until completely smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors, adding more dates (or maple syrup if you want it sweeter) and more cacao powder if you want it richer. Spread the frosting over the brownies, sprinkle with sea salt flakes and cut into bite-size pieces. Store in the fridge. To make them vegan: Use 3 tbsp more oat flour. Leave out the eggs and whisk 1/­­3 cup aquafaba (chickpea water) into soft peaks that you stir into the mixed batter together with the walnuts. The vegan version needs approx 45-50 minutes in the oven and will come out slightly stickier but firms up once it cools.

Simply Sweet Elegance At Simply Raw Bakery

November 13 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Simply Raw Bakery is simply a delight for anyone with a healthy sweet tooth and a taste for aesthetic splendor. Located on the winding cobbled streets at the heart of Viennas historic inner center, the restaurants stylish exterior blends in with the citys effortless old-style elegant appeal. On late summer days, youre sure to see locals happily sipping coffee over a leisurely lunch while basking in the sun. Yet upon closer examination, youll see that these lunch-goers have quite a different palate than the stereotypical Viennese meat-heavy tastes (think Wienerschnitzels and sausage-filled gulasch stews). Simply Raw brings full flavor to the table with the use of only vegan, gluten-free, organic, and raw wholesome ingredients. The bakery was born from a collaboration of a mother-daughter pair whose original expertise was in textile company management and graphic design, respectively. The artistic backbone of this family affair oozes from the pores of the restaurants interior. From the vintage cozy couches to the overhanging crystal chandelier to the modern piano jazz jams to the glamorous presentation of the plant-based charming creations on dainty china plates, Simply Raw feels like youve stepped into an alternate era of sweet elegance. Most importantly, the attention to artful […] The post Simply Sweet Elegance At Simply Raw Bakery appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

New York City Mayor Announces Meatless Monday School Program to Tackle Climate Change and Obesity

October 30 2017 Meatless Monday 

This week, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that 15 public schools will offer Meatless Monday as part of a pilot program, with the potential to expand throughout the school system. Every Monday, students in the pilot will enjoy breakfast and lunch menus featuring meatless meals. De Blasio also added a personal commitment to start the practice at Gracie Mansion, his official residence ...we are now going to be instituting Meatless Mondays as well...Were starting a new habit and Im looking forward to it. New York joins a growing group of cities that are reducing meat consumption, with recent Meatless Monday proclamations issued in Pittsburgh, Sacramento, and Vancouver, B.C. Global leaders, including Argentinian President Mauricio Macri and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, have also committed to practicing Meatless Monday. Cutting back a little on meat will help make our city healthier and our planet stronger for generations to come, said de Blasio. He added that both the obesity and climate change crises can be meaningfully addressed by adopting a more plant-based diet. According to research from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, scientific adviser to the Meatless Monday campaign, livestock production is a major driver of climate change, contributing to nearly 15 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. Based on predictions, if upward trends of meat and dairy consumption continue, global mean temperature rise will more than likely exceed 2 degrees Celsius, the level that scientists agree we must stay below to avoid the most catastrophic climate change scenarios. In addition to reducing climate impact, diets that favor plant-based instead of animal protein can lower the risk of chronic preventable diseases like cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity. Sid Lerner, founder of The Monday Campaigns and the Meatless Monday movement, said, Were thrilled that NYC schools will participate in Meatless Monday to introduce kids to delicious plant-based options that can create healthy eating habits for life. Congratulations to the mayor for his leadership in taking Meatless Monday into the future, for our health and the health of the planet. The Meatless Monday movement has been integrated into schools, restaurants, hospitals, college campuses, corporations, and communities. Free resources to start Meatless Monday are at www.meatlessmonday.com/­­start-a-campaign. Want to get involved? Contact us today! The post New York City Mayor Announces Meatless Monday School Program to Tackle Climate Change and Obesity appeared first on Meatless Monday.

strawberry jam recipe | homemade low sugar strawberry jam

October 23 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

strawberry jam recipe | homemade low sugar strawberry jamstrawberry jam recipe | homemade low sugar strawberry jam with step by step photo and video recipe. the recipe of strawberry jam is quite simple and is prepared by heating the flesh and juice of strawberry. the mixture is heated with sugar and water till it releases its pectin and forms a jelly shape. it is later stored in air tight container for later use. Continue reading strawberry jam recipe | homemade low sugar strawberry jam at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese


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