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Power Ball Energy Bites

January 9 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Power Ball Energy Bites Ideal for on-the-go breakfasts or between meal snacks, these tasty little no-bake energy bites pack a nutritious punch of protein, potassium, and other nutrients. If you dont have protein powder for this recipe, you can just leave it out. If the texture is too moist, add a bit more oats or walnuts to the mixture. Power Ball Energy Bites Ideal for on-the-go breakfasts or between meal snacks, these tasty little no-bake energy bites pack a nutritious punch of protein, potassium, and other nutrients. - 3/­­4 cup old-fashioned oats - 1/­­2 cup toasted walnuts - 2 tablespoons vegan protein powder (I use Sun Warrior vanilla) - 2 tbsp cocoa powder - 1 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 ripe banana, cut into chunks - 2 tablespoons almond butter - 1/­­4 cup maple syrup - 1/­­2 cup dried cranberries - 2 tablespoons ground flaxseeds - 1 cup shredded toasted coconut, ground - In a food processor, combine oats, walnuts, protein powder, cocoa powder, and cinnamon. Pulse until well mixed. Add the banana, almond butter, and maple syrup. Pulse until combined. Add the cranberries and flaxseeds, and pulse until combined. - Shape the mixture into 1-inch balls. If the balls are too soft, refrigerate or freeze them for an hour. Roll the balls in the ground coconut. - Transfer to a platter and refrigerate until firm, about 1 hour. Store tightly covered in the refrigerator. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Zsu Dever.      The post Power Ball Energy Bites appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products!

January 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products!Meatless Monday supports Goyas Can Do program, which donates food to Feed America every time someone purchases Goya products in stores. Since so many of Goyas products are vegetarian and packed with protein, food bloggers accepted the challenge to come up with meat-free recipes for Meatless Monday using Goyas featured Can Do products. Here are some of our favorite contributions from last year! Mango & Tomato: Vegan Laska with Zucchini, Peppers and Mushrooms Robin Asbell: Jamaican Rice and Gullah Peas C It Nutritionally: 5-Ingredient Curried Butternut Squash Soup Healing Tomato: Vegan Dumplings Soup with Pigeon Peas MomStart: Coconut Milk Veggie Curry Analidas Ethnic Spoon: Indonesian Coconut Turmeric Rice with Cashews Confessions of a Mother Runner: Spicy Thai Noodle Soup Life Currents: White Bean and Sweet Potato Taco Filling Show Me the Yummy: Roasted Carrot Soup Two Classy Chics: Creamy Cauliflower and Potato Soup Freckled Italian: Coconut Rice and Beans Dini Delivers: Coco Dalal Week99er: Double Chocolate Coconut Cupcakes with Coconut Creme Frosting Jersey Family Fun: Coconut Rice Bowls Food in Jars: Coconut and Cracked Brown Rice Pudding Cooking with Julie: Slow Cooker Red Lentil Coconut Curry Soup Make sure to follow Meatless Monday on social media to find out the next Goya Can Do featured product and to watch our live cooking demos with Goya! The post Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Resolving to Go Meatless Monday? Here Are Our Most Popular Recipes from 2017 to Start You Off!

December 19 2017 Meatless Monday 

Resolving to Go Meatless Monday? Here Are Our Most Popular Recipes from 2017 to Start You Off!The end of the year always marks a great opportunity to think about a fresh start, try something new, and make resolutions to change your lifestyle and eating habits. Why not do something that improves your health and also helps the environment? Meatless Monday is an easy way to make a small change to your daily life that also affects the health of the planet as well as the livelihoods of local industries and farmers. This past year has seen many people jump on the Meatless Monday bandwagon, from social media followers to celebrities, to restaurants, schools, and cities. Weve made it easy for you to join the movement by giving you a head start on the New Year. Here are the 10 most viewed Meatless Monday recipes of 2017. Try some today, and let us know what you think.   #1: Jamaican Jerk Tofu #2: Black Bean Meatless Balls and Zucchini Noodles #3: Cherry Tomato Pesto Penne #4: Banana Date Smoothie #5: Zucchini Tomato Curry #6: Easy Veggie Lo Mein #7: Bell Pepper Egg Rings #8: Lentil Burgers #9: Sweet Potato Mac and Cheese Bake #10: Spinach Lasagna The post Resolving to Go Meatless Monday? Here Are Our Most Popular Recipes from 2017 to Start You Off! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya

December 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya Satsuki Shibuya is an artist and spiritual thinker based in L.A. We are in awe of Satsuki’s intuitive watercolors, her constant willingness to go deeper, and her incredibly thoughtful approach to work and life as a whole. In this interview, Satsuki tells us about her morning, bedtime, and exercise routines, as well as love as a form of self-acceptance, what it’s like to see the energy of others, her unique approach to her life schedule, her mother’s universally wise beauty advice, the lifestyle change that helped clear up her skin, nourishment, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I find myself being right in-between, but veer on the side of things being more open and free within a loose schedule. It is dictated not so much by a 9-5 setting, but more dependent on what my body is communicating for the day. I’ve found that the more I am able to flow naturally, without resistance, better work is produced. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. My mornings are usually the same -- wake up sometime between 7 and 7:30am, wash up, meditate/­­journal/­­read for about an hour or some light gardening. Around 8:30am, start preparing breakfast for the household and eat while catching up on some articles online. By 10am, I am warming up to start the work day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Not a bedtime ritual, per se, but I do find my biological clock the happiest when I am in bed by midnight. Any later and I will wake up feeling groggy. Unfortunately, some of the best messages come through from the Universe around this time and find myself writing clear into the witching hour. -- We read that you have a unique approach to your work schedule. Can you tell us about it and why it works for you? Sure. It’s not so much as my work schedule, but life schedule as a whole. As I am quite sensitive to energies, especially from people, as much as I love being with others, I also need a lot of down time to recharge, otherwise, burn out. The best balance I’ve found thus far is to have a point system where each time I am interacting with another, depending on the intensity, receives a particular number of points. For example, going to a doctor’s appointment would be 1/­­2 a point since there is not much interaction, overloading of the sensory system, and is one-on-one contact, which doesn’t require too much processing of different energies. On the other hand, if I am scheduled to do a talk or to meet people at a large gathering, it would be 2-3 points. The points correlate with how many days it might take me to recover and recharge. 1/­­2 point would be half a day of recharging afterwards whereas 2-3 points would be two to three days of recharging necessary after the event. Then, I go week by week and figure out how many points are available for social interactions. If a week is only 3 points maximum, then that might mean 1 meeting and 1 doctor’s appointment (1/­­2 point + 2.5 points) and the rest would be downtime, meaning minimal outside interaction. Depending on where my entire being is (body, mind, soul), the weekly points, or I usually go monthly, will fluctuate. If I am getting over a cold, there may only be so many points available to a week, but if balanced, there may be more available. When I first started this system, it was more rigid, but now, relaxed as it has become second nature. This helps not only to keep a balance, but also to set boundaries in order to create space in my heart. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Something light, centered upon veggies and fruits with some grains. I usually opt for some gluten free toast, an avocado with hummus, and either dried or freshly cut fruit or miso soup with rice. Light and simple. Lunch – The heaviest meal of the day and usually containing either a plant-based or animal-based protein. It can be anything from a rice bowl to a large salad, but usually a variety of ingredients. Snack – I have a soft spot for chips or crunchy nibbles so like to have something around 3:30pm and/­­or a piece of fruit. Dinner – A medium sized meal, usually Japanese-based, but other times adventure elsewhere. Mostly veggies and some protein, usually not much carbs as it tends to make the digestive system a bit sluggish before going to sleep. Some tea afterwards while doing dishes is always a treat. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I am not able to partake in caffeine as it makes my heart pitter-patter like no other, but do love the smell of coffee or English Breakfast tea.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to have a horrible sweet tooth where if I did not have at least one thing sweet each day around tea time, whether cake or a sweet bean bun, I would be the crabbiest crab of the land! I’ve since stopped eating sugar (going on 4 years now) due to health reasons and thankful for the difference in my health -- it is night and day! -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I see a Naturopathic Doctor regularly and through her, work with supplements, herbs, and tinctures/­­tonics, which do truly help to keep my body in balance. Otherwise, on my own, I find meditation, working with crystals, burning incense specifically from Ry?an-ji temple in Kyoto, and spraying Aura Cleanser from Botanical Alchemy works wonders for my overall well being and energy. I do know this formula may be different for each individual due to our aura body make-up, but currently, this program seems to work best. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I wouldn’t say I’m a gym bunny, but do love the feeling of working with the body/­­mind simultaneously and yoga seems to fit the bill quite nicely. Still a long ways to go, but hoping to be able to integrate yoga into my morning preparations for the day. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I wish I could say I love to exercise, but in truth, it does take a lot of willpower to get myself to do physical activities. I’ve never been very competitive in nature and therefore sports did not appeal as a possible opportunity for exercise, but since meeting yoga, feel I’ve finally found something that speaks to my spirit. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I believe the internal comes through to the external in all aspects -- if our organs are taken care of, our skin clears, if our emotions are balanced, our smiles appear, and when our soul is nourished, our being glistens. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Simple seems to be the way my entire being prefers things, including skincare for face and body. I’ve been a huge advocate for natural skincare and use one that consists of face wash, toner, moisturizer, Balancing Oil for night time and eye cream. Sometimes spot cream for blemishes and face scrub/­­face pack a few times a week. For body, I use a 5-ingredient, shea butter bar soap. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? No sugar. This alone has cleared up my blemish-prone skin considerably. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Nothing much, except for beauty advice my mother has shared since I was young, “Invest in your skin, trim your hair often, and moisturize your elbows.” I continue to follow her advice. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? I try my best to keep a balance in my schedule, not overload it with activities and make time to tune into my higher self. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? To close my eyes and tune into my breath. Speak slower. Concentrate on one happening at a time. To hide away in the bathroom for a few minutes and catch my breath. Check-in internally and focus on my root chakra. Ground my energies into Mother Earth. Also, to understand that nothing is permanent and the stressful situation, too, shall pass. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Eat shiitake mushrooms, drink a hot tea of lemon with manuka honey, down some bio-available vitamin C, up the liquids including broths, and consciously raise my energy. Also, lots of sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Work/­­life balance is key to my well-being. I continue to let go of rules that I have placed upon myself in order to feel complete in the world and instead, tune into what makes me feel whole. Saying yes to what resonates and no to the things that do not fulfill my spirit. My approach is to tune into my intuition and let it be the guide towards where I need to go next. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself. The simple answer to this is love. Not so much the cliché love we think of, but of accepting oneself for where we are currently and not force ourselves to be someone we are not. With acceptance, comes letting go and by letting go, we are able to fill in our space with a being entirely made up of our true selves. When this can be done, we are able to share love with ourselves and in turn, share love with others. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? To not worry about success in terms of monetary gain, but of spiritual awareness. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Allowing the lack of inspiration and procrastination to take me where I may go. Not to try and stop it, but to experience it fully and understand where it is originating. I don’t necessarily think it is a bad thing -- sometimes we need rest to appreciate our next step. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a painter? After being on hiatus for a year and a half due to an unexplainable illness, I received a message to paint. After reconnecting back to my childhood self, of sensing and seeing beyond the physical realm, leaning into this part of my being opened up new ways of communicating beyond and through this, the message came through. -- Intuition plays a key role in your watercolor work. Why do you find it to be crucial to your approach? The medium has shown the necessity of letting go, trusting the process and understanding that there is more than what we can see in the physical realm. By approaching my work intuitively, it becomes almost meditative, channeling energies beyond and appearing as is, without any manipulation. -- Can you tell us a bit about the energy readings that you do? When did you discover that you have the ability to feel an individual’s soul energy and aura? It was by accident. I’ve always been able to read others’ energies and since young, would do so to the detriment of my own health. I found myself at the doctor’s office, when often, every other week, to which many times, no illness could be found. During my year and a half of being ill, I began to understand what I was sensing since young and honing in, began to receive messages in code. After deciphering many of these messages in my journal, I decided to share my internal self with my mother, who was in the dark about this internal world, to which she was extremely shocked. It took her a good week, after speaking with many of her friends who have known me since I was born, to figure out that she was actually the only one  not recognizing this ‘other self’. After coming full circle with my mother, during a gathering consisting of elder buddhist practitioners, which I attend with my mother from time to time, I shared my spiritual insights with the group. A woman sitting next to me whom I met for the first time that day, asked if I could read her energy. I’d never explicitly read another’s energy before and did not know what to expect, but agreed as I, too, was curious as to what would come forth. I saw images, colors, movie-like scenes, shapes, sensed emotions, all flashing, happening and shared, as if a translator, all I was seeing, experiencing simultaneously to her. After finishing, she looked at me and said, “How do you know all these things about me?” To which I said, “I don’t know. I just said what I saw.” Since then, I’ve done many energy readings and now have a better understanding of what happens during a session. I liken it to a translation of the other’s energy, subconscious, and higher self; sometimes beyond. What is important to note, though, is that all the things I see, sense, and share are things the individual already knows, whether consciously or subconsciously. I just bring it to the forefront and at times, help word it in a way so that the message can understood in the best possible way. -- Besides being a painter, you also write poetry, play music and make books. Do you feel that all these disciplines are interconnected for you, or do you treat them as separate entities? Yes, they are all interconnected, all coming from the same source, just expressed differently. I would say painting is the most direct form of expressing what I experience internally, without translation. The next being words -- a way of describing what I am experiencing. Music being another translation, although not as intuitive as painting or writing. Books are my passion and feel it is a way to leave energies in this world even after passing onto the other side. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love watching Japanese comedy shows and dramas, while eating chips. In an ideal world, though, instead of chips, I would be eating a fruit tart. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Untethered Soul by Michael A. Singer Song/­­Album – All Things Must Pass by Rourourourous Movie – Laputa by Studio Ghibli Piece of Art – Any of the older pieces created by Agnes Martin -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Rice in Manhattan Beach -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? For carry-on: - a comfortable eye mask - slippers and socks - pressure point bands - iphone for listening to music and audio books - bottled water purchased after passing through security For suitcase: - jeans - sneakers - flat shoes that are a bit more dressy, but still comfortable - small travel pillow as I have a sensitive neck - food stuffs for my dietary needs (I have a many food allergies) - book, journal, pencil case - tshirts, long shirts, under shirts, and extra underwear - a warm top - and anything that allows me to be comfortable while still feeling in line with my own style - slippers for usage in room - warm socks as my feet tend to get cold - pajamas - room wear - pyrex for heating up my own food - liquid dish soap for washing dishes/­­utensils - one set of semi-dress up clothes, in-case  -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Rei Kawakubo. Artwork by Satsuki Shibuya. Photos by Sisilia Piring and Women With Superpowers /­­ Tasya Van Ree + Nitsa Citrine. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Satsuki Shibuya appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Black Bean Brownie Bites

December 8 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Black Bean Brownie Bites The moment I placed these brownies in the oven, I started whining like a disgruntled teenager because Luise had persuaded me to only sweeten them with dates and mix a whole can of black beans into the batter. “They are going to taste like sh*t” might have been the carefully formulated phrase I used. Baking brownies was my idea to start with and I usually don’t complain about healthy desserts, but I was tired that day and my mind was set on the caramel-tasting brownies from the bakery across the street. More than the flavor, it was their texture I wanted to recreate. The crusty top and caramel fudge center that you only can achieve with sugar, butter and flour. I knew these would be far from that. And in my mind that was all Luise’s fault. The whining escalated into a discussion (aka argument) and by the time the timer on my phone rang, things were, well, kind of tense between us. I cut off a corner piece of the baked brownie and quickly realized that they weren’t as awful as I had expected. Of course when Luise asked me, I did what any 36-year old teenager would do and grunted: “They were okay I guess”. In reality, they were actually pretty good. They didn’t have that crusty texture or typical sugar taste but they were still sweet, gooey but not heavy, chocolatey, energy packed and rich. I added frosting to make them a little more sassy - using dates as sweetener and avocado and coconut oil for an ultra lush and creamy consistency. They turned out really beautiful and jam-packed with good stuff. Rather than a dessert, I’d say that this is more like an energy bar-style brownie, and I found myself sneaking back to the fridge several times that day for another bite. We’re sharing the recipe and some notes below. But first, check out this little video from our youtube channel where we demonstrate how to make them. Since that first batch of brownies, there have been at least six more batches. A few vegan attempts and various flavor and texture variations. I have gathered a few notes that might come useful in case you want to give them a try. - We use very soft fresh dates that we buy in card board boxes and they are pretty affordable compared to loose weight or medjool dates. Sizes differ so use a scale if you want to be exact. - If you can’t find fresh dates you can use dried dates that you soak in water for a couple of hours. Drain the water before mixing. However, I wouldn’t use dried dates for the frosting as they need the dates to be super soft to achieve a smooth consistency. Try maple syrup instead. - If you arent used to sugar free desserts, you can add a couple of tablespoons maple syrup, honey or sugar to the batter. We have tried this recipe both with and without additional sweetening and they taste good both ways. It all depends on what you are used to and your expectations are. - We use a quite mild olive oil and it works really well with the chocolate flavor (not strong at all). However, if you don’t like olive oil, you can use, coconut oil, rapeseed oil or butter instead. - We have also tried a vegan, egg-free version using aquafaba (chickpea water) that we are sharing at the bottom of the recipe. We also tried making aquafaba using black bean water (because it’s a rest product of the beans in the recipe). It didn’t firm up as much when whisked but it did work as a binder. However, it looked kinda gross and added more bean flavor so we decided to stick with chickpea water instead. - We add coffee to the frosting to disguise the avocado flavor. If you dont like coffee, you can use almond butter or peanut butter instead to give it a flavor twist. - Sea salt flakes are great on top and we love the salt + chocolate combo, but desiccated coconut would also look good. - If you are allergic to nuts, you can mix toasted sunflower seeds into a flour and use instead of almond flour. And use pumpkin seeds instead of walnuts. Black Bean Brownie Bites with Chocolate Avocado Frosting Makes 24 bites These taste sweet but not overly so, see notes above if you prefer to make them sweeter. Vegan version below. 20 soft dates (approx 230 g /­­ 8 oz) 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 185 g cooked black beans (rinsed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml olive oil or other neutral oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml plant milk or regular milk 3 eggs 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g oat flour (or same amount rolled oats, mixed into a flour) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g almond flour 6 tbsp cacao powder 1 tsp baking powder 1 pinch salt 1 handful crushed walnuts (optional) Chocolate Avocado Frosting 6-8 soft dates 3 tbsp coconut oil 2-3 tbsp strong coffee 3 tbsp cacao powder 1 avocado Sprinkle with Sea salt Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F. Pit the dates and add them to a food processor along with the rinsed black beans. Mix on high speed. Add oil, milk and eggs (leave out if you are vegan) and mix until smooth. Add almond flour and oat flour (you can make oat flour from rolled oats by simply blending them in a food processor or grinding them in a mortle and pester), cacao powder, baking powder and salt and pulse until everything is mixed. Stir in walnuts (and whipped aquafaba if you are making the vegan version). Place a baking paper in a 28 x 20 cm /­­ 11 x 8 inch rectangular baking dish and bake for 30 minutes. Remove the brownies from the oven once they are firm to touch and leave until completely cool. Make the frosting by mixing all the ingredients in a food processor until completely smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors, adding more dates (or maple syrup if you want it sweeter) and more cacao powder if you want it richer. Spread the frosting over the brownies, sprinkle with sea salt flakes and cut into bite-size pieces. Store in the fridge. To make them vegan: Use 3 tbsp more oat flour. Leave out the eggs and whisk 1/­­3 cup aquafaba (chickpea water) into soft peaks that you stir into the mixed batter together with the walnuts. The vegan version needs approx 45-50 minutes in the oven and will come out slightly stickier but firms up once it cools.

Simply Sweet Elegance At Simply Raw Bakery

November 13 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Simply Raw Bakery is simply a delight for anyone with a healthy sweet tooth and a taste for aesthetic splendor. Located on the winding cobbled streets at the heart of Viennas historic inner center, the restaurants stylish exterior blends in with the citys effortless old-style elegant appeal. On late summer days, youre sure to see locals happily sipping coffee over a leisurely lunch while basking in the sun. Yet upon closer examination, youll see that these lunch-goers have quite a different palate than the stereotypical Viennese meat-heavy tastes (think Wienerschnitzels and sausage-filled gulasch stews). Simply Raw brings full flavor to the table with the use of only vegan, gluten-free, organic, and raw wholesome ingredients. The bakery was born from a collaboration of a mother-daughter pair whose original expertise was in textile company management and graphic design, respectively. The artistic backbone of this family affair oozes from the pores of the restaurants interior. From the vintage cozy couches to the overhanging crystal chandelier to the modern piano jazz jams to the glamorous presentation of the plant-based charming creations on dainty china plates, Simply Raw feels like youve stepped into an alternate era of sweet elegance. Most importantly, the attention to artful […] The post Simply Sweet Elegance At Simply Raw Bakery appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

New York City Mayor Announces Meatless Monday School Program to Tackle Climate Change and Obesity

October 30 2017 Meatless Monday 

This week, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that 15 public schools will offer Meatless Monday as part of a pilot program, with the potential to expand throughout the school system. Every Monday, students in the pilot will enjoy breakfast and lunch menus featuring meatless meals. De Blasio also added a personal commitment to start the practice at Gracie Mansion, his official residence ...we are now going to be instituting Meatless Mondays as well...Were starting a new habit and Im looking forward to it. New York joins a growing group of cities that are reducing meat consumption, with recent Meatless Monday proclamations issued in Pittsburgh, Sacramento, and Vancouver, B.C. Global leaders, including Argentinian President Mauricio Macri and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, have also committed to practicing Meatless Monday. Cutting back a little on meat will help make our city healthier and our planet stronger for generations to come, said de Blasio. He added that both the obesity and climate change crises can be meaningfully addressed by adopting a more plant-based diet. According to research from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, scientific adviser to the Meatless Monday campaign, livestock production is a major driver of climate change, contributing to nearly 15 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. Based on predictions, if upward trends of meat and dairy consumption continue, global mean temperature rise will more than likely exceed 2 degrees Celsius, the level that scientists agree we must stay below to avoid the most catastrophic climate change scenarios. In addition to reducing climate impact, diets that favor plant-based instead of animal protein can lower the risk of chronic preventable diseases like cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity. Sid Lerner, founder of The Monday Campaigns and the Meatless Monday movement, said, Were thrilled that NYC schools will participate in Meatless Monday to introduce kids to delicious plant-based options that can create healthy eating habits for life. Congratulations to the mayor for his leadership in taking Meatless Monday into the future, for our health and the health of the planet. The Meatless Monday movement has been integrated into schools, restaurants, hospitals, college campuses, corporations, and communities. Free resources to start Meatless Monday are at www.meatlessmonday.com/­­start-a-campaign. Want to get involved? Contact us today! The post New York City Mayor Announces Meatless Monday School Program to Tackle Climate Change and Obesity appeared first on Meatless Monday.

strawberry jam recipe | homemade low sugar strawberry jam

October 23 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

strawberry jam recipe | homemade low sugar strawberry jamstrawberry jam recipe | homemade low sugar strawberry jam with step by step photo and video recipe. the recipe of strawberry jam is quite simple and is prepared by heating the flesh and juice of strawberry. the mixture is heated with sugar and water till it releases its pectin and forms a jelly shape. it is later stored in air tight container for later use. Continue reading strawberry jam recipe | homemade low sugar strawberry jam at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese

Slow Food and Meatless Monday: Cooking Up a Better Future

September 18 2017 Meatless Monday 

Slow Food and Meatless Monday: Cooking Up a Better Future Get ready for a countrywide Meatless Monday! Next week, on September 25, Meatless Monday and Slow Food USA are teaming up for the Cook Up a Better Future campaign. Restaurants and chefs across the nation will create and serve delicious, plant-based meals putting three unsung ingredients in the spotlight. In the combined efforts of promoting biodiversity in food, reducing meat consumption, and fighting climate change, Cook Up a Better Future seeks to bring diners to the table for a great movement for food and the environment. The three ingredients featured – Sea Island Red Peas, Carolina Gold Rice, and Sea Island Benne Seeds, all from Anson Mills are from Slow Foods Ark of Taste, a global catalog of foods facing extinction. Participating Chef Jay Lippin of Crabtrees Kittle House Restaurant & Inn in Chappaqua, New York explains the mission behind Cook Up a Better Future:     Remember to visit one of these restaurants next Monday, September 25 to celebrate global biodiversity and great food! Here are the restaurants and chefs Cooking Up a Better Future: Arizona Orme School, Patti Marrs, Mayer, Arizona California Arcade Cafe, Richard Lewis, Gilroy, California Assaggiare Mendocino, Julia Conway, Fort Bragg, California Deckmans en el Mogor, Drew Deckman, San Ysidro, California GEO Academy at Grant High School, Brenda Ruiz, Sacramento, California Jackson Nunes Consulting, Lesa Jackson Nunes, Menlo Park, California Joni Sare Chef Services, Joni Sare, Cupertino, California Magpie, Edward Roehr, Sacramento, California Savory Cafe, Juan Barajas, Woodland, California Colorado The Living Farm Cafe, Mike Gillespie, Paonia, Colorado Mountain Harvest Festival – Disco Soup, Jim Brett, Hotchkiss, Colorado Florida Nutwood, Steven Rojas, Winter Haven, Florida Table & Tap, David Rashty, Punta Gorda, Florida Georgia Miller Union, Steven Satterfield, Atlanta, Georgia Your Resident Gourmet, Jennifer Hill Booker, Lilburn, Georgia Hawaii Mud Hen Water, Ed Kenney, Honolulu, Hawaii Indiana Late Harvest Kitchen, Meredith Iacocca, Indianapolis, Indiana Illinois Elsa M. Jacobson, farmers market manager/­­recipe taster, Chicago, Illinois JCR, James Rorhbacher, Chicago, Illinois White Oak Gourmet, Thomas Leavitt, Long Grove, Illinois Michigan City Food, Phillip Jones, Detroit, Michigan Granor Farm, Abra Berens, Three Oaks, Michigan Missouri Feast in the Forest Teaching Kitchen, Penelope Beache, St. James, Missouri Good Fortune, Ryan McDonald, St. Louis, Missouri Square1 Project, Logan Ely, St. Louis, Missouri New Jersey Atlantic City Rescue Mission, Dara Heston, Sweetwater, New Jersey New York Crabtrees Kittle House Restaurant & Inn, Jay Lippin, Chappaqua, New York North Carolina Catch, Keith Rhodes, Wilmington, North Carolina South Carolina Wild Olive Cucina Italiana, Carmine Peluso, John’s Island, South Carolina The post Slow Food and Meatless Monday: Cooking Up a Better Future appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Cauliflower Gratin – Creamy, Spiced, No Bake

September 6 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Cauliflower Gratin – Creamy, Spiced, No BakeVegan Cauliflower Gratin – Creamy, Spiced Cauliflower Casserole. No Bake Skillet Gratin or Bake with a garlic breadcrumb topping. Vegan Soy-free Recipe, Can be gluten-free and nut-free.  It is hot out here this week. It is also pretty ashy and humid with the many wildfires around (hope everyone is keeping safe) and difficult to heat up the house to bake. I made this gratin in a skillet for days like this and tested it out in the oven as well. The cream sauce is very versatile. I like Kashmiri garam masala(in my second book), Baharat(in my second book (Pre-order Now, starts shipping in 2 Weeks!!), Berbere or Jamaican Curry Blend in this cauliflower and the creamy sauce combination. You know me. Add spices of choice or just herbs. The gratin is sprinkled generously with toasty breadcrumbs which have garlic and pepper flakes for a smoky heat. This crunchy garlicky topping is a must! Amazing, Creamy and ready within 25 Minutes! Add other vegetables for variation.Continue reading: Vegan Cauliflower Gratin – Creamy, Spiced, No BakeThe post Vegan Cauliflower Gratin – Creamy, Spiced, No Bake appeared first on Vegan Richa.

No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars

September 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars It’s been difficult for me to contain my excitement about these Blueberry Coconut Bars ever since I nailed the recipe a few weeks ago. They check all the boxes: easy/­­no-bake, gluten-free, vegan, refined sugar-free/­­not too sweet, fun to put together, and so so delicious. It’s the perfect recipe for those wanting to hold on to summer with all their might. These bars are made up of three complementary layers: there’s a crumbly, no-bake ‘shortbread’ crust, followed by a rich coconut creme layer, which is then topped with a juicy, no-cook blueberry chia jam. The combination is truly heavenly, especially since this is a lighter dessert that won’t weigh you down. You can see all the steps of the cooking process in the video we made above (P.S. We have a Youtube channel with lots of cooking videos, you can subscribe here). These bars are a definite, universal crowd pleaser – absolutely all the friends and family that have tasted them genuinely loved them. They would be the perfect, easy yet impressive dessert to bring to a gathering. Or just make the bars for yourself/­­your family for the week ahead, they’ll keep well in the refrigerator. Hope you’ll give these a try :) No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars   Print Serves: 16 square bars Ingredients for the blueberry chia jam 3 cups frozen blueberries - thawed (do not use fresh, non-frozen blueberries for this recipe) juice of 1 small lemon 3 tablespoons maple syrup 3 tablespoons chia seeds 3 tablespoons chia meal (ground chia seeds) for the shortbread ¾ cup gluten-free rolled oats 12 Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes ¾ cup coconut flour ¼ cup melted coconut oil 1 tablespoon lemon juice pinch of sea salt for the coconut creme 1 can full fat Thai coconut milk - refrigerated overnight to separate fat from water ½ cup unsweetened dried shredded coconut 2 tablespoons maple syrup splash of vanilla extract Instructions to make the blueberry chia jam Thoroughly mix all the ingredients in a medium bowl. Cover and refrigerate for a few hours or overnight, until the chia seeds have bloomed and the mixture resembles a jam-like consistency. Mash the berries partially with a potato masher, leaving plenty of them whole. to make the shortbread Put the oats in a food processor and grind them into a flour. Drain the dates and add them to the food processor, along with the rest of the ingredients. Process until you have a well-combined dough that sticks together when pressed between your fingers. Prepare an 8 x 8 baking dish by lining it with parchment paper, extending the paper up the sides of the dish. Press the shortbread into the bottom of the dish in an even layer. Set aside. to make the coconut creme Scoop the separated coconut fat from the top of the can of coconut milk into a food processor (use the leftover coconut water in smoothies, soups, porridges or lattes). Add the shredded coconut, maple syrup and vanilla extract to the food processor and process until well combined. Be careful not to over-process, as the coconut fat can separate and curdle. to assemble the bars Spread the coconut creme over the shortbread in a thin, even layer. Take the blueberry jam our of the refrigerator and spread it on top of the coconut creme in another even layer. Place the dish into the refrigerator for a few hours or overnight, for the shortbread and coconut layer to set. Once the shortbread and the coconut layer have set, lift out the bar from the dish onto a cutting board, using the extended edges of the parchment paper. Cut into 16 squares or any size/­­shape of choice. Keep refrigerated. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Multigrain Pear Ginger Cakes with Macadamia Whipped Cream Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits -- Ice Cream Sunday Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder Rose and Lavender Parfait and a Breakfast with Friends .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower

September 5 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower Now that we are back doing more frequent recipe posts again, we also wanted to throw some super simple, everyday type dinners into the mix. Family style! The hands-down easiest dish that I (David) know (and make when I’m alone with the kids and have max 10 minutes to prepare dinner) is to cook a package of fresh gnocchi, mix a store-bought pesto with mashed avocado, add a little extra lemon and olive oil and just stir everything together with some canned chickpeas and cherry tomatoes on top. Its a lazy dinner but the kids devour it, its super easy and most importantly QUICK. Today’s recipe is a riff on that. We are fully aware that you hardly need yet another recipe for spaghetti al pesto. But we have got a few twists that turn this simple Italian classic into a rather nutrition packed meal. And a really tasty one as well. Although our version is so far from the original that we probably never will be allowed back into our beloved Italy again ... - Try chickpea (or lentil) pasta. These new-style pastas made on chickpea or lentil flour taste good, have surprisingly pleasant texture and are more protein packed than regular pasta. If you want to use ordinary pasta, we’d recommend adding some cooked chickpeas to the dish as well. They taste great tossed with pesto. - Add avocado to your pesto. It will be much creamier, fluffier, richer and rounder. It will also be more fat, but it’s the gooood fat. If you want to make it lighter, replace half of the oil in the pesto with water. Also, use half basil and half baby spinach for a more affordable and nutrient packed pesto. - Make it vegan by adding nutritional yeast to your pesto and make a quick nut dust instead of parmesan. - Add roasted vegetables. Pesto pasta is good, but adding roasted vegetables is simply better. You get more flavors and something to actually chew on (because we all slurp spaghetti, right!?). It takes like 5 minutes to prepare one tray of roasted vegetables (oven time obviously not included), so if you have 5 minutes to spare, do it. Also, if you are smart, you’ll roast a second tray of vegetables simultaneously and you are halfway through dinner prep for tomorrow. We went with roasted cauliflower and zucchini coins this time because it was what we had at home and we know that the kids love ’em. Broccoli or parsnip or carrots would of course be just as good. - If you are not vegan and want to make a luxury version of this, try serving it with some torn burrata cheese on top. Vegan Pesto Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower & Cheesy Nut Dust Serves 4 We’ve kept this dish vegan but if you are not vegan you probably don’t have nutritional yeast at home and in that case you can just grate vegetarian parmesan or pecorino instead. The obvious shortcut here is to buy a pesto, mix it with avocado and follow the rest of the recipe. Roasted veggies 1 cauliflower 1 zucchini 2 tbsp olive oil sea salt Cheesy Nut Dust and Vegan Pesto 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70 g almonds 1 tbsp nutritional yeast 1 large handful basil 1 large handful spinach 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice a few pinches salt 1 small avocado (use half if you have a large and serve the rest on the side) chickpea pasta or pasta of choice, for 4 persons To serve  Lettuce or baby spinach cherry tomatoes, quartered Set the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F. Break the cauliflower into small florets and chop the stem inte bite-size pieces. Slice the zucchini. Toss cauliflower and zucchini with a little oil and salt and spread out on a baking sheet. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until soft and golden. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to instructions on the package (reserve a little bit of pasta water when draining) and start making cheesy nut dust and pesto. Add almonds, 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast and a large pinch sea salt to a food processor. Pulse on high speed until all nuts are mixed/­­pulverized into coarse sand/­­dust. Place half of the cheesy nut dust in a small bowl and leave the rest in the food processor for the pesto. Add 1 more teaspoon nutritional yeast, basil, spinach, olive oil, lemon juice and a little more salt. Mix until smooth, taste and adjust. This is your basic vegan pesto. Now add avocado and pulse for an even creamier pesto, you might want to add a little more lemon and olive oil at this point. Toss half of the pesto with the cooked pasta and a little bit of pasta water (add chickpeas, if using regular pasta). Arrange the pasta on four plates, add roasted cauliflower, zucchini slices, lettuce, tomatoes and a few dollops pesto on top. Sprinkle with cheesy nut dust and a little olive oil. Enjoy! ************ PS - Here are a few other things that we have been up to recently! Some of you might remember my trip to Turkey, meeting displaced Syrian families last year? Echo and UN’s World Food Programme have made this little video from my trip and from our home here in Stockholm. I talk a bit about how similar our priorities are even though our situations are vastly different. And the importance of the support these families get from WFP to gain a sense of normality again. I don’t like hearing my own voice and I had an eye infection when we filmed this but there are lots of cute kids in the footage and the topic is very close to my heart. You can watch it here. We have also shared a week’s worth of family friendly recipes in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine which is out now (in the UK). The feature is photographed by Simon Bajada.  And we recently shot a Fridge Raider feature talking about a few of our favorite ingredients in the latest issue of Olive Magazine. Also out now (in the UK). Aaaand, we have also worked on a campaign for Swedish organic brand Kung Markatta with recipes, tips and videos focused on reducing food waste at home (only in Swedish though).  Phew, looking at it like this, I now realize why this summer felt so intense ;)

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam

August 19 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam Earlier this year we were in New York to launch Green Kitchen at Home. We had a blast doing a live cooking session at Food52, teaching a cooking class and had a book signing in a tiny but packed little store in Greenwich Village. But what I really wanted to talk about today was our night off. When we tucked baby Noah (formerly known as Gabriel) to sleep in his stroller and headed to ABCV for dinner. Side note: You should know that for being a food writing couple, Luise and I very rarely go out and eat at proper restaurants. With kids, it’s just easier to do takeaway or pick places where it’s okay that they climb, run and crash. Also, fancy restaurants make me feel awkward. But we had an epic evening at ABCV. We tried the tasting menu of which I can’t even remember half of the dishes. But I know that there were simple crudités with lots of spreads, some kind of soft beet carpaccio/­­tartare with a little bit of sting to it, a whole roasted cauliflower with turmeric tahini dressing(!), avocado lettuce cups, roasted shiitake and a couple of desserts. And what made the evening even better was that Noah slept through almost the entire dinner (thank you jetlag!). We have been talking about that beet carpaccio (and the cauliflower with tahini turmeric dressing) a few times since we got back. And when Luise recently spotted a recipe for roasted beets and sesame labneh in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine, we started talking about it again. Looking through our recipe archive, it is pretty obvious that we’ve got a love for beets. They are sweet and mildly earthy, have an awesome color, can grow in our harsh Swedish climate and are cheap! What’s not to love? So a couple of days ago, we picked up a few bunches of beets, started cooking and here we are. With some kind of beetroot tartare (mixed minced beets), dollops of sesame labneh and a few suggestions on what can be used to scoop it into your mouth, apart from crackers. And as a last minute contribution, we are also offering a less fancy way of serving this, inside a rye waffle toast (yup, you might want to scroll down to it right away). This recipe is great as a starter, at a buffet table or a party. It’s pretty and impressive, creamy and delicious with plenty of flavor from fresh dill and mint and a little sting from horseradish. Since we love yogurt just as much as we love beetroots, we invited labneh (yogurt’s fancy cousin) to the party. We totally stole the idea to mix tahini into labneh from that Jamie Mag article. You should too. You need at least two hours to let the yogurt drain into labneh cheese but I’m still going to claim that this is an easy recipe - only a few ingredients and apart from draining the yogurt, it’s all pretty quick.  I imagine that a quick cheat version could be accomplished by simply using thick yogurt without draining it and buying pre-cooked beetroots. I can’t promise that it will be as good, but it’ll at least be quick and effortless. http:/­­/­­www.greenkitchenstories.com/­­wp-content/­­uploads/­­2017/­­08/­­Labneh_­drip.mp4 Okay, I can hear Isac trying to teach baby Noah how to roar like a lion with the only result that little brother cries like a baby. So I better post this now before major chaos is breaking out. No proofreading needed because yolo. Enjoy the recipe and check out info below re Amsterdam. Ciao! Beet Tartar & Sesame Labneh Serves 4 Recipe is inspired by a recipe from Jamie Magazine, Aug 2017 and a dinner we had a ABCV NYC. Sesame labneh 2 cups /­­ 500 g Greek or Turkish Yogurt 1/­­2 tsp salt 2 tbsp tahini 1 tbsp olive oil Beet Tartare  1/­­2 kg /­­ 1 lb  beetroots 2 tbsp capers juice from 1/­­2 lemon 1 tsp horseradish (or mustard) 1 handful fresh dill 1 handful fresh mint leaves salt & pepper Topping 1 handful pistachio nuts, finely chopped fresh dill, chopped fresh mint leaves, chopped 2 tbsp capers, halved lemon slices olive oil Serve with rye bread crisps, tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices Start by making the labneh. Add salt to the yogurt and stir until smooth. Wrap the yogurt in a cheese cloth or other clean thin cloth and tie it over a bowl for about 2 hours or more to allow liquid to be drained (meanwhile, cook the beetroots). You can leave it for 24-36 hours if you prefer a thicker labneh but 2 hours and a gentle squeeze (to get rid of some extra liquid) works fine. Stir in tahini, transfer to a serving bowl and top with a little bit of olive oil. Peel the beetroots, divide them in quarters and cook in salted water for approx 20 mins min or until tender. When ready, let cool and then transfer them to a food processor along with capers, lemon juice, horseradish, fresh dill, mint and seasoning. Pulse a few times until the beetroot has the consistency of course grits. Not too much though or you will end up with a sauce. You can also dice them finely. Arrange the beet tartare on a large serving plate. Fold in large dollops of sesame labneh and top with pistachio, fresh herbs, capers and lemon slices. Add a drizzle of olive oil and serve with crackers or thin rye bread crisps (thin rye bread pieces toasted in a pan or the oven for a couple of minutes), tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices to scoop with. Beet & Labneh Rye Waffle Toast We made this Waffled rye bread toast with the leftovers.  It’s a family favorite and we’ve got another recipe and the whole story behind this method in our latest book. Here are some quick instructions: Simply smudge labneh on two pieces of dark rye bread, add some spinach, fresh dill and mint and a thick layer of beet tartar. Brush a hot waffle iron with butter or coconut oil, combine the two slices and place inside the waffle iron, pressing together lightly. When you’re bread has got a nice and brown waffle pattern, the toast is ready. Cut the waffle toast in half and eat it while it’s hot. **************************** AMSTERDAM & ANTWERP - 7-9 September Green Kitchen at Home is being released in Dutch next week and to kick things off, we are coming to Amsterdam and Antwerp for a couple of press events, signings, dinners and talks. We will have a little talk, signing and dinner at the bookstore ‘t Stad Leest in Antwerp at 19.30 pm on 7 September. Tickets can be booked here. We are having a little talk + Q&A and a book signing at Limon in Amsterdam on 9 September between 10.30-11-30. There will be nibbles from the book served and we will end with a book signing. There will also be a lunch afterwards (between 12.00-14.00) and we will try to move around so we get the chance to chat with all of you. You can either buy tickets for both the talk and lunch, just the talk or just the lunch. Follow this link to read more about it in Dutch: Greenkitchenbooks.nl  

Raspberry Thumbprint Cookies (Vegan, Gluten-Free)

December 12 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Here’s a holiday dessert that will keep everyone happy! This recipe from Simply Quinoa is vegan AND gluten-free, so it’s great for bringing to parties for guests who have various dietary restrictions. In this video, Simply Quinoa shares how to make soft, pillowy raspberry thumbprint cookies with only a few simple ingredients, including delicious homemade jam! And as mentioned, this recipe is totally customizable if you need to swap out any ingredients to better fit your preferences. Overall, a great cookie recipe to have on hand! Here’s how the magic happens: Read the full recipe here. The post Raspberry Thumbprint Cookies (Vegan, Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

November 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cannellini and Lentil Jamaican Curry – 1 Pot

November 11 2017 Vegan Richa 

Cannellini and Lentil Jamaican Curry – 1 PotCannellini and Lentil Jamaican Curry. 1 Pot 30 Minutes. Easy Coconut Curry with Jamaican Curry spices and beans and red lentils. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Recipe. 16+ gms of Protein.  This super flavorful curry came about when I wanted a hearty stew with lentils and chickpeas and of course spices. I was out of canned chickpeas (insert shocked emoji here) and lunch time was approaching in 30. I decided to shake off my urge to use berbere (seriously you need to make this blend), and used some of my Jamaican curry blend (new obsession begins).  This stew comes together very quickly. Just get everything out and ready to use. If you don’t have a Jamaican Blend, you can make your own. The onion caramelized, the spices cooked with it, then cook the lentils half way in a mix of coconut milk and water, add beans (add any cooked beans or chickpeas) and continue to simmer.  You can also add some veggies with the lentils. Add greens of choice, some lemon and cayenne and done. Serve as is, over rice, or with toasty bread. Amazing flavor and so satisfying! Continue reading: Cannellini and Lentil Jamaican Curry – 1 PotThe post Cannellini and Lentil Jamaican Curry – 1 Pot appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh

October 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Ally Walsh is a model and co-founder of Los Angeles-based organic coffee company, Canyon Coffee. Though we’ve never met, we love Ally’s easy-going approach to wellness, her beautiful instagram, and what her and her partner are doing over at Canyon. It’s an all-around girl crush :) In this interview, Ally tells us about her transition from a vegetarian diet to a feel-good, intuitive diet, the tonic she always takes before bed, the books she’s found to be instrumental to her well-being, exercise, beauty, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I love routine, but that probably has a lot do to with the fact that my schedule is constantly changing! I really enjoy my morning routine, waking up early and making coffee at home. But its always nice to switch things up and come back to that. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning.  I definitely try to ease into my morning. I used to grab my phone first thing when I woke up--now I keep it out of the bedroom. Instead, the first thing I do when I wake up (on a good day!) is sit upright and do a 20 minute meditation. To me, theres no better way to start off the day. Meditation is always followed by some Canyon Coffee. At home, I typically make a pour-over, which is another little opportunity to be mindful as I start my day. On a day off its so nice to sit outside on the porch with some friends and read and have coffee together. We get the New York Times delivered to our house on Sunday mornings and I could spend the whole day reading and relaxing outside in the sun. Its honestly one of my favorites things to do. If I’m shooting though, or out of town for a job, most days start early and end late. The schedule for modeling is often last minute--I sometimes dont know my schedule until the day or night before. In contrast, its nice to have Canyon, where I make my own schedule. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I make a glass of calm/­­magnesium before bed every night! I take that with me wherever I go--security always pull me aside at the airport to ask about what this white powder is ha :) Aside from magnesium, Ill sometimes make a warm tonic with some ashwaganda. And reading always helps me to fall asleep. I guess I wouldn’t call it a ritual, but I do love watching a show or movie before sleep, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast: I have a cup of black coffee and almond butter or avocado toast with gluten-free bread every morning. Im a creature of habit... I have my favorite go-tos, and Im happy eating them every day. If I have to work super early sometimes i like to make overnight chia seed oatmeal. Ill mix in some oats, chia seeds, almond milk, maca and flax seeds, and then in the morning top it off with some fruit and almond butter. Lunch:  Usually a salad with quinoa, avocado, kimchi, roasted seasonal vegetables, seeds, lemon and different oils like grapeseed, olive, and white wine vinegar. I would also be very happy with just roasted kabocha squash and pesto :) Snack: Cashews, pumpkin seeds, Dates and almond butter, green juice, avocado toast, and currently addicted to Honey Mamas Chocolate! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Well, it kind of comes with starting a coffee company ;) Some people are surprised to learn, though, that I only drink one cup of black coffee in the morning! Thats pretty much it. I cant do too much caffeine. Only on rare occasions, like when Im on vacation, will I have an afternoon espresso or cortado. I was in Copenhagen and Stockholm recently, and fell in love with oatmilk cortados! Definitely pushed my caffeine limit there! -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I honestly don’t! I love raw chocolate, but Im really sensitive to sugar! So Im kind of weird in that I really dont love sweets. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? In addition to magnesium at night (for sleep), Ill take ashwaganda at any time of the day for my adrenals, and probiotics daily. I feel such a difference when I take b12, too. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Yes. Yoga has been such an important practice to me, for years. I usually go to a class a couple times a week. I intersperse that with hiking in the Santa Monica mountains and walks on the beach. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I actually look forward to exercise. I dont really partake in any forms of exercise that arent enjoyable. For example, Ive never really gotten into spinning or boot camp-style workouts. I love getting out in nature for hikes, and I find an hour-and-a-half in the yoga studio to be very meditative. After a long work day, I really look forward to being able to do something nice for my body. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really think the most beautiful people are those that feel confident in their skin and are who they want to be--not what society expects them to be. Someone thats naturally comfortable in any setting. As a model, so much emphasis is put on the external, and thats important for a photograph or video. But in person, beauty really does come from within. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I think the most important thing for healthy skin is to eat and drink clean. Especially drinking lots of water. As for products, I use the most natural that I can find. I love Earth tu Face, True Botanicals, Osea and Linne! I use oils for moisturizing and just use water to wash my face in the morning. I love using Bodha and CAP Beauty rose water spray, too. Ill try to do a face mask once a week from Wildcare while taking a bath! Its very relaxing :) -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water! I also think getting a good night of sleep is just as important! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Stay hydrated. My mom is 59 & has the most beautiful skin – not one wrinklel! And she swears by drinking lots of water! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Im trying to get better at this, but acupuncture has been a life saver! Its a place to relax and reset. I see Maria at Elysia Life Care and she is life-changing! I think getting into a regular routine of acupuncture and meditation can help so much with stress. After having a consistent routine with both, you start to notice things that used to stress you or make you upset no longer have the same power or effect on you. You can laugh it off, or just observe it and not be affected by it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going on a walk always helps. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Lycopene vitamin C packets, lots of ginger and tea tree oil (usually just put it in my water!) -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This has been a learning process for me, how to balance everything. Modeling, Canyon Coffee, relationship with my partner, my friends, and time for myself. Especially with starting a company with your partner, that start-up grind can be all-consuming because theres always more work you can do! So weve had to learn how to turn off- and make sure to make time for a date night! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? My goal is to maintain a state of love (as opposed to state of stress, or lack, or anger, etc.). I was lucky to learn from a qi gong master named George Falcon for a couple years before he passed, and I feel like his teachings provided me with tools to help stay in this mindset throughout the stressors and obstacles of daily life. One of the big ones is to take responsibility for our actions and state of being. Its easy for us to blame, to say he, she, or it made me feel this way. But really its our decision. Of course, we sometimes fall out of that consciousness of love. When Im not feeling well, my first step is to take a break. To meditate, listen to a recorded guided meditation of George, go on a walk or a hike. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Ive made different changes throughout my life that have been substantial in terms of my wellness. I stopped eating meat when I was 19, then introduced fish (mainly salmon!) back in years later. Acupuncture has perhaps been the most substantial in helping me maintain balance and wellness. All of these changes or decisions are really informed by just listening to my body. You can get caught up in the mindset and identity of, say, Im vegan. But its important to check in with yourself and ask, Am I feeling good? Is this helping live a balanced and vibrant life? If not, then its important to make a change! -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So many books! If I had to pick two, Id say Anatomy of the Spirit by Caroline Myss and Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert. Anatomy really opened me to the power of our bodies to heal and self-nourishment. It helped me connect my mental and spiritual state to my health and well-being. Its a book you can go back to, re-read and continue to learn from over time. Big Magic was instrumental in motivating me to start Canyon Coffee. It made me feel like I had more to give, creatively, and pushed me to start something with a greater purpose. It brought clarity to the creative process for me, breaking it down in a way that makes it approachable and applicable to my own life. Its one of those books that really inspires you to follow your dreams, and what could be more important for self-nourishment? Knowlegde -- You run Canyon Coffee together with your boyfriend, Casey. What was your path to starting your own coffee company? Personally, I was feeling uninspired. I felt like I wasnt making the most of my creativity and talents. Ive always been grateful for my modeling career, but I had also always wanted to start something of my own, and I was feeling that itch. Casey and I had both fallen in love with coffee over the years... through making it at home together and visiting coffee shops in our travels and around LA. Casey actually started working in the coffee industry, and we became friends with a roaster, James. Eventually, our passion for it grew to the point that we had the thought: why not start our own company? It really was a natural culmination. The moment we decided we wanted to do it, we just never looked back. -- What is your process when choosing beans for Canyon Coffee? Are there certain growing practices, flavor profiles, or geographical locations that are important to you? The universal practice of tasting different beans is called cupping. It involves preparing small roasted samples of different beans exactly the same way and trying them at the same time. For Canyon, our parameters narrow down our options. We usually decide on a country first, and then see what organic, seasonal beans grown at high altitudes are available through the network of importers near us in California. Then we order samples, cup, and choose the bean that smells and tastes best to us. High altitude is important because the elevation makes the coffee plant grow slower and put more energy into producing cherries. The slow growth results in cherries (and coffee beans) that are much more flavorful and vibrant. To start Canyon, we focused on Latin American coffees and wanted to find amazing-tasting beans in the chocolatey /­­ caramel flavor profile. We went with beans from Guatemala and Colombia first, because theyre known for these flavor profiles and they have great infrastructure for small coffee producers to process and export their beans. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love going to the movies :) And a nice dinner out before or after. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit .. anything from Krishnamurti & Ram Dass Song/­­Album – Paul Simon – Graceland, Feist – Let it Die, Lord Huron – Lonesome Dreams Movie – Beginners Piece of Art – Robert Lango Men In the Cities, Alfred Stieglitz’ Portraits of Georgia OKeeffe -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Gjusta/­­ Gjelina, Honey Hi, Amara Kitchen, Pace, Botanica, Necco, Destroyer, Erewhon -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Im actually in the process of moving out of my house right now! Were taking advantage of the end of our lease to do some traveling and try out living in some new neighborhoods. As a result, Im having to put a lot of my stuff in storage. Its been really nice to get rid of a lot of things and simplify to the essentials. But as far as traveling goes, I always have with me.. – new book and magazines – headphones – Jesse Kamm pants – Nikes – journal – Bodha rose water spray – probiotics – magnesium and ashwaganda  – sparkling water – ursa major rings – eye mask – almond butter packets -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily LAmi of Bodha, and Lacy Phillips at Free & Native! Both these women are a constant inspiration! You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. Lunch – Beans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

dry gulab jamun recipe | dry jamun with milk powder | dry kala jamun

September 29 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

dry gulab jamun recipe | dry jamun with milk powder | dry kala jamundry gulab jamun recipe | dry gulab jamun with milk powder with step by step photo and video recipe. perhaps one of the recent innvovative and appreciated indian sweet recipe served dry with sugar crystals. most commonly dry gulab jamun recipe is found in the feast of religious or special occasions as it is easy to serve and consume. further it is also common practice to serve warm dry jamun with cold vanilla ice cream. Continue reading dry gulab jamun recipe | dry jamun with milk powder | dry kala jamun at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet

September 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

I’m writing from a hotel in Orlando, where we’ve been waiting out hurricane Irma. Man did we dodge the bullet with this one. Our home is on a tiny island off the West Coast of Florida, and originally the storm’s projected path fell right over the island as a very powerful category 4. So powerful that we were getting ready to say goodbye to our house. Due to some extremely fortunate weather circumstances, our home only got hit with a category 1 storm and the island did not flood. There’s no power or cell reception, the streets are a mess, the bridge to the island has a large boat jammed against it, and everything is closed, but we still have a house! Hope everyone is staying as safe as possible this hurricane season. This is an extra cozy, late summer meal that I made last week when we were trying to figure out exactly what to do as the hurricane was approaching. It’s great for weekdays and tastes amazing, even in times of total uncertainty :) Eggplants are at their absolute tastiest right now, so this is a friendly reminder to take advantage of late summer produce while it’s abundant. There’s something about cutting eggplant into large wedges that makes it taste entirely different than roasted halves or whole roasted eggplant. That shape just speaks of comfort, sort of like huge oven fries. Here it’s sprinkled with za’atar and served with delicious and warming herbed pistachio millet, quick pickled onion, as well as a classic, creamy tahini sauce. Hope you’ll give this one a try! P.S. We just heard that our power is back on, so I’m off to pack up and finally go home. Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the quick pickled red onion half of a red onion - thinly sliced apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon coconut sugar (optional) for the herbed pistachio millet 1 cup millet - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1½ teaspoons turmeric sea salt - to taste 1 cup mixed chopped herbs like dill, parsley, cilantro, basil, mint ⅓ cup pistachios - chopped for the eggplant wedges 2 medium eggplants - sliced into wedges 1 tablespoon coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper zaatar for the tahini sauce 1/­­4 cup tahini 1 teaspoon maple syrup or honey ½ teaspoon sriracha (optional) pinch of sea salt freshly squeezed juice of 1 lemon 1/­­4 cup purified water Instructions to make the quick pickled red onion Place the sliced onion in a small bowl and generously drizzle it with apple cider vinegar. Add the coconut sugar, if using, and toss to coat. Let marinate while cooking the millet and roasting the eggplants. to make the herbed pistachio millet Drain the millet and thoroughly rinse it in a strainer. Warm the oil over medium heat in a medium pot, add cumin seeds and toast for 1-2 minutes, until fragrant. Add turmeric and stir it around for a minute. Add the millet and toast, stirring, for a few minutes. Add 2 cups of purified water and salt. Increase the heat to a medium high and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer the millet for 15-20 minutes, covered, but stirring occasionally. Let the millet cool a bit and stir in the herbs and pistachios. to roast the eggplant wedges Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the eggplant on a the baking sheet. Drizzle with the coconut oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and mix to coat. Roast for 20 minutes, then flip the wedges and roast for another 15 minutes until soft and golden on both sides. Let cool a bit and sprinkle with zaatar when serving. to make the tahini sauce Combine the tahini, maple syrup, sriracha (if using), salt and lemon juice in a small bowl, mix until smooth. Add water gradually, while mixing, until you achieve a smooth sauce consistency. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Flatbread Pizza Raw Pad Thai with Baby Bok Choy and White Crab Mushrooms Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tomato Jam

September 6 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This tomato jam packs both sweet and savory flavors and is made with juicy summer tomatoes and a hint of thyme.

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso

September 6 2017 My New Roots 

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso I have to start by saying how incredibly moved I was by the comments on the last post, and the emails I received from you guys - a deep, heartfelt thank you. I knew that opening myself up would spark a lot of conversation, but I never imagined the impact it would have, not only in regards to the incredible outpouring of support, but for sharing your own stories and struggles. Time and time again I am reminded of the power in vulnerability and open communication. I feel truly blessed to have a community of conscious and loving readers, and that we can all share our journey with one another. That is what makes us stronger, and certainly healthier human beings in every sense of the word. Before I dig deeper into what Ive been doing to eat for balancing my hormones, Id like to just follow-up with the topic of orthorexia. Many of you expressed surprise at my struggles, thinking that because I do what I do, I must have had it all together. The truth is I thought that I did have it all together for a very long time, and creating My New Roots has been the most powerful catalyst in my healing. For the last decade, Ive felt very grounded in my choices and excited to celebrate them with you. But like I mentioned in the last post, the experience of changing my diet has brought back many of the challenges, dark thoughts and feelings that I had convinced myself were gone forever. Putting new restrictions on myself made me to put food into good and bad categories. This probably doesnt sound so terrible, but like I said before, this is a slippery slope into full-blown disordered eating for me. I see now that there is an incredibly fine line between caring about what I eat and caring too much. I believe that my relationship to food is something that I may have to keep in check for the rest of my life, or at least as long as I choose to use it as a tool to become a healthier person (so, like, forever). In the last four months of tuning into what I need right now, and eating more consciously, Ive really experienced a positive difference in how I feel, which is the biggest reward anyone could ask for! But Ive also had bad days where I wasnt prepared, and suddenly being at a wedding or a birthday party, or out for dinner with friends without much to eat in the good category, wasnt so rad. My blood sugar would crash, Id feel desperate, totally out of control and the voices would come back. What Ive learned from these experiences is that I need to be as prepared as possible in these situations, but if I can’t, I simply have to let go. I cannot control everything and I cannot always be prepared, but that in order to move forward, I have to maintain flexibility, and stop being so darn hard on myself! I firmly believe that there is more strength in being fluid and forgiving, than rigid and judgmental. I am just a person, after all. Since many of you were curious about the connection between food and hormone balance, Id like to discuss it in more detail, and share what Ive been doing to keep these miraculous chemicals in check, and keep them working for me, not against me! Upping my fat and protein intake – but especially fat Fats are an essential part of a healthy, well-balanced diet, and they are especially important for hormone balance. Fats actually create the structural components of hormones, and cholesterol specifically is responsible for our reproductive hormones; estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. The type of fat you choose however, is critical to achieving a positive effect, as the ones you consume become the building blocks for your hormones. Saturated fats like coconut oil, butter and ghee, and monounsaturated fats like olive oil, nuts, eggs, and avocados are excellent choices and should be consumed responsibly every day. Cut back on or eliminate corn, canola, sunflower, safflower and soybean oils, and replace them with the aforementioned instead. Ive also increased my protein intake, and consciously replacing more high-carbohydrate foods with more protein-rich foods such as tempeh, hemp, sprouts, activated nuts, eggs, and quality protein powder has really made a difference in stabilizing my energy levels and appetite. Getting enough protein on a vegetarian diet is totally possible, but I find that if Im not really paying attention, I can dip below the ideal 45 grams a day. Loosely (not obsessively) keeping track of my daily intake of protein has helped me feel my best. Keeping my blood sugar stable It may seem totally unrelated, but blood sugar and hormones are in fact inextricably linked. One of the main functions of the endocrine system (the system that creates and transports hormones in your body) is delivering glucose to your brain, muscles, and heart. So if anything in that process isnt working properly, than mismanaged blood sugar is the inevitable result. But whats worse is that it creates a cascade effect whereby none of the other parts of your endocrine system will work either. Sheesh! Walking the line between high and low blood sugar is something that Ive really been focusing on lately, and its working well, but it is an ongoing process that takes some getting used to. Including more fat and protein in my diet has been a game-changer for me, since those macronutrients digest slower than carbohydrates - even the complex ones from things like sweet potatoes, quinoa, and chickpeas. I try to eat a large and protein-rich breakfast within an hour of waking up (after the lemon water, of course!). Lunch is where I get the majority of my calories since that is when I need the most energy. I like eating roasted vegetables, avocado, eggs, and sprouted pseudo-grains like quinoa and buckwheat. I snack in between meals when Im hungry, but instead of reaching for a slice of rye bread or a rice cake, Ill have veggies with a high-fat dip, or a handful of my Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola. Dinner is mostly grain-free these days and I stick to salads, soups and stews. I go to bed no longer than four hours after dinner so that Im not hungry right before I hit the pillow. Then I like to have a break of about 14 hours between dinner and breakfast the next day, as my digestion does well on the rhythm of intermittent fasting. Eating more vegetables (and less bread a.k.a. DUH) I almost always had a couple slices of rye bread at lunch. Not that there is anything wrong with doing so, but Ill admit to feeling pretty foggy-headed afterwards. And because it filled me up so much, I had less room for veggies. Now Im prepping raw and cooked vegetables ahead of time and keeping them on hand specifically for my big lunches. Some favourites to roast in the oven are cauliflower, sweet potato, pumpkin, red onion, zucchini, tomatoes, and broccoli. Ive also started cutting up a big plate of veggie sticks in the early afternoon, before I even get hungry, so that it is there and waiting for me - no excuses. Right before diving in I douse it in freshly squeezed lemon juice, Maldon salt and Aleppo pepper. Its honestly delicious. I dont have to tell you that vegetables are full of filling fiber, replenishing phytonutrients, and yes, protein. Especially dem green ones. Eat more plants. Habits + meal prep I think this was the other big hurdle for me when it came to changing things up with my eating habits. I knew that if I was going to start eating food differently, Id have to start preparing food differently too - and a lot more often. I already spend a lot of time in the kitchen (obvi) and I love it, but I am also a person who likes to spend her non-work hours away from the cutting board. Eating this way admittedly does take more time, and makes it more challenging to eat out, or just grab something on the go. Coming to terms with this was challenging, but Ive realized that I have to dedicate more time to my diet if I want to be successful. No matter how you slice it, meal preparation is a very big part of sticking to your goals, whatever they may be. Of course there are times when its just not possible to do, and divergent days are fine, but the majority of your food youre should fall into the category that helps you feel your best, however you define that. Instead of prepping one day a week, which I know a lot of people like to do, I actually prefer to pepper it throughout the week in a way that is a little more fluid for me. If the Life-Changing Loaf of Bread is in the oven for instance, Ill chop up a bunch of veggies, and put them in too. If Im washing greens for a salad, Ill do all of them so that theyre ready to chuck into a smoothie on a whim. Lee from Americas Fat Balls have also been a super snack these days. And like I mentioned before, having fresh veggies washed and sliced up for afternoon cravings is very helpful. I can prepare two or three days worth at a time and keep them in the fridge. Mindset Instead of looking at food in terms of good and bad which I think is a dangerously judgemental way to categorize what were eating, I like to say yes to certain things, and the others fall into the not-right-now basket. For instance, I love brown rice to the ends of the earth and back, but Im not eating it right now since it doesnt make me feel all that great. And just because Im not eating brown rice these days doesnt mean I’ll never eat it again! This leaves room for flexibility and creates a far more sustainable way to look at ones diet. Isn’t it relieving to know that if you are out for dinner and there’s only rice for example, that you could potentially eat it and not beat yourself up? Ahhhh…did you feel that?! What a relief, eh? Tomorrow you’ll get back on the horse, no big deal at all. Making changes should be fun, and keep those labels for tin cans! You’re a fluid being, ever-changing, so make space for that in your meal planning too. Self-care routine, stress-reduction, exercise, and sleep I used to see self-care as something that only people with time have. Well, after totally hitting the wall a while ago, I realized that it just has to be a priority, respected as a part of a holistic approach to health, and something to actually schedule in the calendar. Staying active, sleeping, and treating myself to some yummy stress-reducing activities like spending time in nature, bodywork, and cooking (go figure) keeps me feeling happy and relaxed. Squelching stress doesnt happen by accident: it is truly a daily practice and something to be mindful of. Listen to yourself. How can this moment be juicier and more relaxing? Its fun to love yourself! Keeping stress levels low means that your body will be relaxed and not producing hormones that should only be reserved for emergency situations. Cortisol is a stress hormone released by the adrenal glands. Every time we experience a stressful situation we secrete this hormone into the blood stream so that our bodies can deal with the stressor at hand. Although cortisol is our friend in acute situations, our systems arent designed to be pumping it out round the clock as we juggle and struggle with backlogged emails, fussy kids, and traffic jams. This is why chronic stress is so detrimental to our bodies: prolonged, elevated cortisol levels wreak all kinds of wrong inside of us, raising our blood pressure, causing unwanted weight gain, exhaustion, anxiety, impaired brain function, and weakening the immune response. All the more reason to take self-care seriously, and do the things you love more often. Its actually healthy. Sleeping 7-9 hours a night is another non-negotiable. Getting enough sleep helps us to control our cortisol production, balance our blood sugar, and put us back in line with our natural circadian rhythm. Turning screens off an hour before bedtime will help signal to your body that it is in fact, night time. Create a relaxed, cozy environment and spend the last hour before bed reading, stretching, or meditating. I still struggle with this one, as I love looking at Instagram right before turning out the light, but Im becoming more mindful and doing my best. Required Reading There are a few really amazing books out there that I recommend every woman reads, whether or not you’re seeking advice on a particular health issue. Understanding our bodies and cycles is the first step in helping ourselves become healthier, stronger, more connected women. Woman Code by Alisa Vitti has been hugely educational and supportive for me. Her book is a guide to figuring out what the heck is going on inside you, and how to correct it through diet and lifestyle. I appreciate her easy-to-understand language and humour in this book, because let’s face it: nothing is very funny when you’re hormones are raging! The Complete Natural Medicine Guide to Women’s Health by Dr. Sat Dharam Kaur has been and continues to be another excellent resource for me. This book is more of an all-round toolkit for lifelong health and healing, than specifically about hormone balance. I love the holistic approach to all conditions, and inspiring programs to get us back in touch with our natural cycles in connection to the earth. The third book I recommend is Hormone Balance by Carolyn Dean. Dean is a naturopathic doctor that utilizes both traditional and alternative solutions to help readers rebalance their hormone levels. Her writing is engaging and inspiring, and this book is full of ways for women to achieve greater overall health. Oh man, I havent even talked about the tacos yet! So. I got the idea for these this past summer when I was chopping up tempeh to replace ground beef with in a tomato sauce for pasta. It turned out so meaty, satisfying, and delish that I thought I could perhaps take that same idea, spice it up a little differently, and serve them in a taco. Woot! I knew that grilled veggies and red cabbage would help cut the richness, but that I would also need a boss sauce to put them over the top. During one of my retreats I made a raw queso in our cooking class and everyone went wild for it. It seemed like a natural fit! Topped with some lime, avo, pickled red onions, and cilantro these were the best tacos Ive ever had. Ever. Ever. And Ive had a lot of tacos. I know some of you are going to ask about the corn tortillas and probably remind me that corn is a “grain”. Yes, I am aware of that, and I’ll remind you that I am not grain-free, just cutting way back. I stick mostly to pseudo-grains and make sure they are soaked prior to cooking, and enjoy a treat like this once in a while. I only purchase tortillas made with sprouted corn, or from corn that has been nixtalmized (that topic is a whole other blog post!). I buy my corn tortillas from Hija de Sanchez here in Copenhagen. Their tortillas are made fresh daily using nixtamalized corn imported from Mexico, so they taste unbelievably good. Of course taco fillings are important to a good taco, but the tortilla quality should not be overlooked! It makes the dish. Go find the good ones.     Print recipe     Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso Serves 3-4 Tempeh Taco Meat 250g /­­ 8.8oz organic, non-GMO tempeh 1 medium red onion 4 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chipotle or smoked hot paprika, to taste 2 Tbsp. tamari 2-5 Tbsp. water, as needed Grilled vegetables 1 medium zucchini 1 medium red onion 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin a couple pinches of cayenne, if desired 12 small corn tortillas (try to find organic, non-GMO if possible) 1 batch Raw Cashew Queso, recipe below Optional add-ins: 1 ripe avocado 1 small bunch cilantro pickled red onion or thinly sliced red onion shredded red cabbage tossed with a little salt and lime juice limes for serving hot sauce Cooking and assembly: 1. Start by making the Raw Cashew Queso (see recipe below). 2. Heat your grill or barbecue to medium-high. If not using a grill, simply cook everything in a skillet on the stove. 3. Finely chop or crumble tempeh into whatever size appeals to you (mine were rather small to mimic ground beef). Set aside. Mince red onion and garlic. Set aside. 4. Soak wooden skewers in water while you prepare the vegetables, or longer if you remember. If using metal skewers, skip this step. 5. Wash and cut the zucchini and onion into rings, the peppers into chunks. Place in a large bowl and toss with the salt and spices. 6. Skewer the vegetables so that their largest surface will lay flat on the grill (see photo). Alternate veggies until youve used them all. Place on the grill and cook until stating to char on the underside, anywhere from 5-10 minutes, depending on your cooking method. Flip and cook on the other side. 7. While the vegetables are grilling, cook the tempeh. H eat your cooking oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and a few pinches of salt. Cook until starting to brown, about 7-10 minutes. Add garlic and cook for another minute until fragrant. Add crumbled tempeh, cumin, chipotle, and stir well to incorporate. Pour in the tamari, followed by a couple tablespoons of water. Stir well and add water as needed - youre after a moist mixture. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Cook for a total of 10 minutes. The mixture should be golden brown, hot and delicious! 8. Warm the tortilla shells on the grill or in a pan over medium-high heat. 9. Spoon the desired amount of tempeh into each tortilla shell. Followed by the roasted veggies, avocado, cabbage, cilantro and pour on the Raw Cashew Queso. Enjoy! Raw Cashew Queso Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g cashews, soaked for 4-8 hours or overnight 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. salt 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2-3 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste 1/­­2 clove garlic 1 small piece fresh turmeric ground cayenne, to taste 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water Directions: 1. Drain and rinse the cashews. 2. Put all ingredients, except water, in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend, adding water one tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. If you want a thick cream, use less water, for a thinner sauce, use more. (You will not achieve a perfectly smooth sauce with a food processor, but it is still delicious!). Before I go I just want to reiterate how wonderful it felt to be met with such open arms after the last post. I wish I could write back to every single one of you who shared their story with me, and everyone else here, but I simply couldnt get to them all. I am moved beyond words that so many of you felt open and supported in this space too, and I will urge you to seek out help if you need it. And if you know someone who you think may struggle with disordered eating, reach out and help them in a loving, and non-judgmental way. We are all in this together. In love and light, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   *   * http:/­­/­­www.goldencircleretreats.com/­­portugal/­­index.html Dear friends! I am thrilled to share the location for my next wellness retreat in magical Comporta, Portugal, November 5-11, 2017. Join Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I at Sublime Comporta for seven days of luxurious living, divinely delicious meals, inspiring cooking classes and nutrition seminars, yoga, Pilates, meditation, and breath work. Come press the reset button with me! Ride horses on the beach, dance under the stars, and cozy up by the fire. This will be a week to remember. I cant wait to see you there! Click here for more info and tickets. The post Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso appeared first on My New Roots.

Breakfast Peanut Butter Pizza with Jam and Fruit

September 4 2017 VegKitchen 

Breakfast Peanut Butter Pizza with Jam and Fruit Peanut butter pizza is a fun and easy way to start the day -- even an busy school or work day morning. Pizza crust spread with peanut butter and then covered with bananas and other fruit and spoonfuls of jam make a filling breakfast treat in one fell swoop, rather than making a separate breakfast for […] The post Breakfast Peanut Butter Pizza with Jam and Fruit appeared first on VegKitchen.

donut recipe | chocolate donut recipe | eggless chocolate doughnut

August 10 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

donut recipe | chocolate donut recipe | eggless chocolate doughnutdonut recipe | chocolate donut recipe | chocolate doughnut recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. it is typically prepared with all purpose flour or maida dough which is fermented using yeast or baking powder. the fermented dough is later shaped to ring shape with a hole in a centre and later deep fried till golden brown. further it is glazed with cream, jam, chocolate syrup, sugar icing or even with fruit syrup. Continue reading donut recipe | chocolate donut recipe | eggless chocolate doughnut at Hebbar's Kitchen.


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