italian - vegetarian recipes

italian vegetarian recipes

Full of Veggies Minestrone Soup

October 13 2018 VegKitchen 

Full of Veggies Minestrone Soup Time to gather round the table with some minestrone! I love to cook this Italian soup with seasonal vegetables--you can cook it winter or summer. For me, it often marks the end of the summer with all the fresh vegetables that are available. Its a thick soup with seasonal vegetables and pasta, but--if you prefer--you can replace the pasta with rice. This minestrone soup is also a great way to make your children eat their vegetables. I always add frozen edamame to give it more protein, but replacing the edamame with legumes is another great option. Servings: 6  Ingredients 1 big zucchini 1 yellow squash 2 carrots 2 potatoes 1/­­2 cup frozen peas 1 cup edamame 1 can of diced tomatoes 1 onion 1 clove of garlic 1/­­4 cup fresh basil leaves 1 bay leaf salt and pepper olive oil 7 cups of vegetable broth 100 g pasta (broken fehttuchini or vermicelli) Preparation Peel and dice the zucchini, squash, carrots, & potato. Chop the onion and the garlic. In a large saucepan, sweat the chopped onion and chopped garlic in a drizzle of olive oil for a few minutes. Add the diced tomatoes and cook for about 5 minutes. Add […] The post Full of Veggies Minestrone Soup appeared first on VegKitchen.

Instant Pot Wild Rice Mushroom Soup Vegan

October 7 2018 Vegan Richa 

Instant Pot Wild Rice Mushroom Soup VeganVegan Wild Rice Mushroom Soup made in a Pressure Cooker. Instant Pot Mushroom soup. Creamy 1 Pot Winter meal. Vegan Glutenfree Soyfree Recipe Nutfree option.   Jump to Recipe Its getting cold out here and what better to start off fall than this super creamy mushroom wild rice soup. Creamy, hearty and so comforting. Mushrooms are sauteed to golden. Rice, herbs and spices are added and then comes the twist, some salsa and taco seasoning! Yes, it works together. Mix it up, close the lid and pressure cook. Once the pressure is released, add the vegan cream cheese or cashew cream for making it super creamy. And done. You can leave the taco seasoning and salsa out and add some italian herbs for the usual flavor profile. Whole process takes 10 minutes of active time and then you have to wait for bowl of hot creamy deliciousness. See sauce pan option in recipe notes section. Continue reading: Instant Pot Wild Rice Mushroom Soup VeganThe post Instant Pot Wild Rice Mushroom Soup Vegan appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Best Vegetarian Restaurants - Portland

September 27 2018 Oh My Veggies 

Portlands culinary trends are always changing. The city doesnt have much in terms of a signature dish, but there is a signature dining experience if you will. If youre into food carts and the pub grub experience, Portland is the place to be. There are a lot of Mexican, Asian, Italian, and European influences in almost all the menus in Portland. If youre looking to eat at one of the best vegetarian restaurants, Portland is definitely a top option. Farm Spirit If youre looking for a personalized culinary experience, Farm Spirit is one of the best vegetarian restaurants. Portland makes a fitting location for the restaurant that can make that happen. The menu has everything you could hope for, including a decent selection of both vegetarian and vegan dishes. The place is rather small and has a cozy ambiance, but since almost everyones eating at the bar, you never really feel alone. The plating resembles fine-dining more than the pub grub scene and the locally sourced ingredients are fresh every single day. Papa Gs Vegan Organic Deli It rains a lot in Portland, so you may get a craving for some comfort food to improve your mood. If thats the […]

Chickpea Flour Omelets

July 31 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chickpea Flour OmeletsInspired by the Indian chickpea pancakes, these chickpea flour omelets are amazingly versatile, depending on how you season them. You can add ingredients to cook within the omelet, as is done in an Italian frittata, or you can make a filling to fold inside, like a traditional French omelet. The omelets are also delicious topped with a spoonful of vegan hollandaise or cheesy sauce. Chickpea Flour Omelets Inspired by the Indian chickpea pancakes, these chickpea flour omelets are amazingly versatile, depending on how you season them. You can add ingredients to cook within the omelet, as is done in an Italian frittata, or you can make a filling to fold inside, like a traditional French omelet. The omelets are also delicious topped with a spoonful of vegan hollandaise or cheesy sauce. - 1 cup cold water - 1 cup chickpea flour - 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast - 1 tablespoon lemon juice or dry white wine - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon baking powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon mustard powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper - 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric - 1/­­2 cup finely chopped scallions ((green onions)) - 3 tablespoons minced fresh parsley or other fresh herb of choice - 4 teaspoons grapeseed oil or cooking oil spray - In a bowl, food processor, or blender, combine the water, chickpea flour, nutritional yeast, lemon juice, salt, garlic powder, baking powder, mustard powder, black pepper, and turmeric and whisk or blend until smooth. Stir in the scallions and parsley. Allow to stand and thicken for 5 to 10 minutes. The mixture should resemble pancake batter. If it is too thick, add a little more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the batter is pourable. - Add 1 teaspoon of oil to an 8-inch nonstick skillet or spray it with cooking spray. Heat over medium heat. When the skillet is hot, pour or ladle about 1/­­3 cup of the batter into the hot skillet and move the skillet to spread it evenly in the pan. Cover tightly and cook until the bottom is lightly browned and there are little holes on top, about 4 minutes. Carefully loosen it with a very thin spatula. Flip and cook for another 3 minutes. Transfer the omelet to an ovenproof platter, cover, and keep warm in the oven while you cook the remaining omelets. Continue to made more omelets until all of the batter and filling are used. Serve hot. Loaded Frittata (Variation) Preheat the oven to 400°F. Add 1 cup total of the following ingredients (in any combination) to the omelet mixture: - Chopped pitted Kalamata olives - Soft, minced sun-dried tomatoes - Chopped roasted red bell pepper - Sautéed chopped spinach or thinly sliced zucchini - Sautéed sliced mushrooms - Shredded vegan cheese Transfer the omelet mixture to an oiled ovenproof skillet or pie plate and smooth it evenly into the pan. Bake for about 30 minutes or until firm and lightly browned along the edges. Remove from the oven and let sit for 5 to 10 minutes before serving. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson.     The post Chickpea Flour Omelets appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products!

January 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products!Meatless Monday supports Goyas Can Do program, which donates food to Feed America every time someone purchases Goya products in stores. Since so many of Goyas products are vegetarian and packed with protein, food bloggers accepted the challenge to come up with meat-free recipes for Meatless Monday using Goyas featured Can Do products. Here are some of our favorite contributions from last year! Mango & Tomato: Vegan Laska with Zucchini, Peppers and Mushrooms Robin Asbell: Jamaican Rice and Gullah Peas C It Nutritionally: 5-Ingredient Curried Butternut Squash Soup Healing Tomato: Vegan Dumplings Soup with Pigeon Peas MomStart: Coconut Milk Veggie Curry Analidas Ethnic Spoon: Indonesian Coconut Turmeric Rice with Cashews Confessions of a Mother Runner: Spicy Thai Noodle Soup Life Currents: White Bean and Sweet Potato Taco Filling Show Me the Yummy: Roasted Carrot Soup Two Classy Chics: Creamy Cauliflower and Potato Soup Freckled Italian: Coconut Rice and Beans Dini Delivers: Coco Dalal Week99er: Double Chocolate Coconut Cupcakes with Coconut Creme Frosting Jersey Family Fun: Coconut Rice Bowls Food in Jars: Coconut and Cracked Brown Rice Pudding Cooking with Julie: Slow Cooker Red Lentil Coconut Curry Soup Make sure to follow Meatless Monday on social media to find out the next Goya Can Do featured product and to watch our live cooking demos with Goya! The post Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Lentil Moussaka

December 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Lentil Moussaka This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. As our new cookbook release date approaches and we enter a really busy season of our lives (more on that soon!), we count on hearty and sustainable meals like this lentil moussaka to see us through periods of tiredness or stress. If you are feeling any kind of holiday season-related pressure, it might just be the perfect, comforting dish for you, too. I love casserole-style dishes – they take some initial effort to put together, but afterwards they turn into a meal that just keeps on giving. This moussaka is definitely like that – the portion is big enough to have dinner or lunch taken care of for a solid few days, it keeps well and only gets better with age, can be eaten hot or cold, and can even be re-imagined as, say, a toast topping, if its initial layered charm ever wears off.  Moussaka is cooked in numerous countries in the Middle East and the Mediterranean, and the recipe varies from region to region, but it usually involves layers of ground meat, eggplant or potatoes, and a béchamel or egg custard blanket on top. In our vegan version, protein-rich lentils take place of the ground meat. Once they are cooked in a mixture of mushrooms, carrots, onion, herbs, and crushed tomatoes, and layered with silky roasted eggplant, it’s incredible how savory and satisfying they become. We went with mashed potatoes for the top layer, in place of the custard or béchamel, which takes this dish even further into the cozy and wintery meal territory. The mashed potato blanket also gets the most incredible, crispy, golden crust on top after some time in the oven, which makes the whole thing even more irresistible. I suggest roasting the eggplant, making the mashed potatoes, and maybe even cooking the lentils in advance, that way assembling the moussaka will feel like a breeze. All the ingredients in this recipe are very affordable and widely available, and it’s amazing that such a satisfying meal can be made with just lentils and veggies. I generally make sure to keep a big jar of French lentils in my pantry, because they are very versatile and perfect for adding substance to all kinds of plant-based meals. Lentils fall under the category of pulses, together with chickpeas, beans and dry peas, which are all perfect vehicles for sustainable and nourishing meals. We’ve been having a ton of fun working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on creating accessible recipes, centered around pulses, as part of their Half Cup Habit initiative. Try adding a half cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – they will up your whole healthy cooking game, I promise. For more of our pulses recipes, head here, as well as to the Half Cup Habit website. Enjoy :) Vegan Lentil Moussaka   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 3 medium-large eggplants - sliced in ½ inch thick rounds 4 tablespoons neutral coconut or olive oil - divided sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 cup dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of acv 4 medium Yukon gold potatoes - peeled and quartered 2 tablespoons olive oil or ghee, plus more for brushing the mashed potato layer 1 large yellow onion - chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1-2 celery ribs - sliced (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon each fresh or dried thyme, oregano and/­­or marjoram (optional) 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 lb baby bella or crimini mushrooms - sliced 1 28 oz can of box of crushed tomatoes 1 tablespoon tomato paste ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cinnamon (optional) ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg (optional) handful of toasted pine nuts (optional) chopped parsley and dill - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking sheets. Arrange the eggplant slices on the baking sheets in a single layer, oil with 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast for 20 minutes. Flip the slices and roast for another 15 minutes, until silky. Set aside. Lower the oven temperature to 375° F (190° C). While the eggplant is roasting, drain and rinse the lentils. Cover them with purified water in a medium pot, and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 10-15 minutes or until cooked, but not mushy. Add salt at the end. Drain over a colander and set aside. Place the potatoes in the same pot you used to cook the lentils, cover with purified water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until soft throughout. Add salt at the end, then drain, reserving ¼ cup of the cooking water. Return the potatoes to the same pot. Mash them with 2 tablespoons of olive oil or ghee, black pepper and ¼ cup of the reserved cooking water. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Continue to mash until smooth. Set aside. Warm the remaining 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, carrots, celery, if using, salt and pepper, red pepper flakes and oregano/­­thyme/­­marjoram, if using. Sauté for 7 minutes, until the vegetables soften up. Add the mushrooms and sauté for another 8 minutes, until the water released by the mushrooms evaporates and they begin to brown. Add garlic and stir around for another minute. Add the lentils, crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, smoked paprika, cinnamon and nutmeg, if using, to the pot with the mushrooms. Stir to combine, then cover and cook for 5 minutes for the flavors to incorporate. Arrange half of the eggplant slices on the bottom of a 9 x 9 baking dish. Top with half of the lentil mixture, followed by the remaining eggplant slices and lentils. Spoon the mashed potatoes on top, evening them out with a spoon into a smooth layer. Brush more olive oil/­­ghee over the potato layer and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the pine nuts and herbs, if using, and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans Roasted Pepper Lasagna Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Lentil Moussaka appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Hearty Italian Minestrone

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

The cannellini beans give this traditional Italian soup fiber and protein. An easy weeknight dinner that makes great leftovers, this hearty soup is a great way to eat your vegetables on a cold winter night. This recipe comes to us from Kristie Middleton‘s book, MeatLess: Transform the Way You Eat and Live--One Meal at a Time. Serves 4 to 6 - 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 1/­­2 medium yellow onion, diced - 1 clove garlic, minced - 1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes in juice - 2 carrots, chopped - 1 medium zucchini, chopped - 5 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 teaspoon salt - 1 teaspoon ground pepper - 1 cup alphabet, macaroni, or other pasta - 1/­­2 bunch kale, torn into bite-size pieces - 1 15-ounce can cannellini beans, rinsed, and drained - 2 tablespoons tomato paste - 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves or 1/­­2 teaspoon dried - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried - Chopped fresh basil or a sprig of parsleyfor garnish In a large stockpot, saute onion in olive oil on medium heat until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add garlic and continue to cook for another minute. Add tomatoes, carrots, zucchini, broth, salt, and pepper. Bring to boil. Add pasta and cook for 7 to 9 minutes until al dente. Stir in kale, beans, tomato paste, thyme, and basil. Simmer for 5 minutes more. Garnish with more chopped fresh basil or a sprig of parsley. PRO-TIP: Ladle soup into individual containers, allow to cool, seal containers, and freeze for up to three months for easy work lunches or quick homemade dinners! The post Hearty Italian Minestrone appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married!

November 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married! Hey guess what, we just got married! In a beautiful greenhouse in Rosendal’s Garden in Stockholm, surrounded by our closest family and friends (+ ALL their kids) and accompanied by live jazz music and gorgeous food. Even though I proposed to Luise in the back of a campervan on New Zealand almost three years ago, we pulled this wedding together - from idea to I do - in less than five weeks. With three young kids, constantly overflowing mailboxes and an unhealthy always-need-to-be-in-control tendency, we realized that if we don’t do a quick and spontaneous wedding we probably won’t get hitched until we are retired. So instead of our dream wedding going on for three days and nights in the Italian country side, we aimed for an informal and cosy autumn gathering in one of our favorite Stockholm locations. It turned out so much better than we could ever have hoped for and we are now officially mr and mrs. We let the chefs at Rosendal take care of all the food (which was a huge relief). Our only instructions for the lunch buffet (lunch is much easier if you want friends with kids to attend) was that we wanted hearty salads and food roughly in line with our own philosophy. Typically, we didn’t get any photos of the whole buffet table, but there were roasted vegetables, butter tossed potato and chanterelles, slaw with pickled mustard seeds, hummus, sourdough bread, sauerkraut, a goat’s cheese salad with shredded beets, herb sauces and lots and lots of cake. All seasonal and local, pretty decorated with fruit and flowers. And so good! Another salad that they prepared was made with roasted pumpkin, cavolo nero and buckwheat and we have recreated our own version of it here below. We never got the exact recipe from the chef so this is a pretty loose interpretation of how we remembered it (after a couple of glasses of champagne). We are sharing that today along with a few snaps that David’s sister took at the wedding. Forget everything I’ve previously stated about marriage. This was fun! And I feel damn fortunate to marry the most beautiful woman I know. Lots of love from us! The kids were more interested in the fireplace than the camera ... These two guys were so good! Send me an email if you need Chet Baker-style jazz musicians in Stockholm and I’ll forward their contact info.        This is a gorgeous and rustic recipe perfect for this season. It would also be ideal for Christmas, maybe with some cinnamon added to the dressing. One of the things we really love about this is that you don’t need to peel the pumpkin (which always is a hassle), just cut into wedges and you can even keep the seeds on. Some of the seeds might get a little burnt but the one hanging on to the slices add a nice crunch. We cover the pumpkin wedges in dressing both before and after roasting to give them a delicious coating. Roasted Pumpkin Salad with Cavolo Nero & Buckwheat Serves 4 1 Hokkaido squash, Kent pumpkin or other small winter squash/­­pumpkin variety 200 g /­­ 4 cups dinosaur kale (cavolo nero) or regular kale, thick stems removed  1 cup /­­ 250 ml /­­ 170 g raw buckwheat groats, rinsed Dressing 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil 3 tbsp maple syrup 1-2 lemons, juice + zest 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch fresh ginger, finely grated Sea salt & pepper To serve Pomegranate seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75 g toasted pumpkin seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 150 g feta cheese Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F fan mode. Divide the pumpkin in half and then cut it into wedges. Leave any seeds that are hanging on to the wedges and discard the rest. Stir together the dressing, taste and adjust the flavors. Pour about half of it in a bowl and toss the pumpkin slices in it (keep the remaining dressing in the bowl). Place on a baking tray and roast for about 25-30 minutes. We like it a little burnt towards the edges. When roasted, carefully loosen the wedges from the tray and brush them with the remaining dressing in the bowl. While the pumpkin is roasting, cook the buckwheat groats in 2 cups water for 7-8 minutes until soft but not mushy. Drain any remaining water and leave to cool off a bit. Add the remaining half of the dressing to a large bowl. Tear the kale leaves into smaller pieces, place in the bowl and use your hands to massage them until they soften up. Add the buckwheat to the bowl and toss so it’s all mixed. Arrange the kale and buckwheat on the tray (or a serving plate) together with the pumpkin wedges. Scatter with pomegranate seeds, pumpkin seeds and crumbled feta cheese. Enjoy! Wedding photos by Johanna Frenkel.

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast)

October 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) We went to Italy earlier this month and visited the Amalfi Coast and Rome. Having visited the Abruzzo region a few years ago, I continue to be amazed at how different Italy is from region to region. They are almost like separate, tiny countries. It was a great trip – we lucked out with the weather, all our extensive train, plane, bus and boat journeys went pretty smoothly, and we got to see so many breathtaking things. The only complaint we had is a classic one – not enough time there. Below are some photos from the trip, as well as some notes and suggestions that we hope will be useful to future travelers :) Amafli Coast Our first impression was that this is an amazingly beautiful area that’s been completely overrun by tourism. That being said, there are still ways to enjoy it less like a tourist and more like a visitor, and it’s honestly so breathtaking that it’s very worth the visit. We stayed in Vettica, a quiet village right next to Amalfi, in a tiny Airbnb with a big terrace overlooking the cliffs and the sea. For us, it was the best of both worlds. We saw close to no tourists in Vettica, and instead got to see how people lead their lives in such an amazing setting. We watched locals going to church, to the market, feeding their cats, and being completely unaffected by the copious amounts of stairs in their cliffside neighborhoods (we were out of breath every time). Yet Amalfi was close enough (still a 45 minute walk or a stressful bus ride, but totally doable) that we had access to the boats and buses that shuttle people to Capri, Positano, and other beautiful places on the coast. It was really nice to have some distance from Amalfi, because it’s incredibly crowded with tour groups on any given day, but you have to go through it to get pretty much anywhere on the coast. Capri Once we got to Capri, we were wishing that we could spend the night there. There’s so much to do and it’s so incredibly beautiful. Take the chairlift up to Monte Solaro, the highest peak, to see the insane panorama that opens up. Walk around both Capri and Anacapri. Capri is better for partying and Anacapri – for quiet walks on tiny streets. Visit the Church of San Michele in Anacapri to see the intricate, hand-painted floor. Eat torta caprese and caprese sandwiches in the spirit of true tourism :) A complete must is a visit to the Villa San Michele, a villa built by Axel Munthe, the Swedish physician and author. Munthe was a collector of classical artifacts, so the whole villa is tastefully decorated by objects from the antiquity, some of which were found right on site during the construction of the villa. There is a lush garden, a breathtaking panorama of the island and the sea, and every inch of the place is pristine and photogenic. Positano Although Positano is an incredibly beautiful town with stunning architecture, we concluded that we would have been better off having a second day in Capri instead of coming here. The reason: it is swamped with tourists and touristy shops in a way that feels quite forced and concentrated (Capri, though also very touristy, had a more spread out feel). Maybe we went to the wrong places? If you have more than four days on the Amalfi coast, which is all we had, we would still recommend coming here. It also largely depends on your goals for your travels, of course :) Ravello We went here mainly because the host of our favorite Russian travel show visited the town in one of the episodes, and it looked totally breathtaking. Ravello is a town very high in the mountains, and the bus ride up took us on some of the tightest serpentines we’ve ever seen. The views from the top are the pay off, and the air feels different – very much like the freshest mountain air. Another beautiful villa to visit is the Villa Cimbrone in Ravello, full of ancient structures, fountains, sculptures, a beautiful garden and yet another breathtaking panorama. Food We were surprised to learn that the region is actually not known for its food, and finding a good, authentic meal isn’t easy because large amounts of tourists equal large amounts of tourist trap restaurants. It is Italy however, where even bad food is decent. We did manage to find some gems, but Rome really took the prize over Amalfi in the culinary department. Here are a few favorites: Pizzeria Da Nino, Conca dei Marini A charming, small restaurant in the town neighboring Vettica, with home-cooked food and a super charming owner (Nino!) that greets you at the door and is easy to understand even when you don’t speak a word of Italian. Go for the fresh-made pasta. Al Pesce d’Oro, Vettica A restaurant at a bed and breakfast in Vettica with good pizza. We went for the zucchini and squash blossom one and were pleasantly surprised at how solid and tasty it was. Da Ferdinando, Positano An outdoor restaurant right on the beach in Positano, with a really fun atmosphere and tasty dishes. La Vecchia Cantina, Ravello When visiting Ravello, lunch presented itself as a problem, because we didn’t research anything beforehand. We wandered off the central square and into this restaurant, and ended up having a pretty solid meal with very nice service. Bar Ferraro, Anacapri Went here when visiting Capri to try the mandatory torta caprese. It was very good, and so were the little frozen ricotta shortbread cookies. Rome We are so completely in love with Rome. We only had three days there, which is nothing! It was hard to cover everything we wanted, but we tried our best. We stayed in a really cool Airbnb near Campo de Fiori, which is a centrally located square that’s busy at all times of the day. Luckily, our actual location was on a very quiet, narrow street, so it was the best of both worlds. We visited the main historic sites (the Forum, Colosseum, Pantheon etc.), as well as the Jewish Ghetto, Trastevere, Testaccio and Monti. Below are some favorites. Sites The obvious: the Forum, the Colosseum, Ponte Sant’Angelo, Piazza del Popolo, Piazza Navona, the Pantheon. Even though the Pantheon was incredibly crowded, it was still super impressive. This inscription on Raphael’s burial is still in my mind: ‘Here lies Raphael, by whom nature herself feared to be outdone while he lived, and when he died, feared that she herself would die.‘ Wow. Churches: Santa Maria del Popolo, Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, San Luigi dei Francesi, Santa Maria in Trastevere, it’s endless really :) Food La Montecarlo A really fun place that serves Roman-style thin crust pizza and more, crowded with locals at any given time. They casually line each new customer’s table with white paper in place of a tablecloth, and write out the check on the paper at the end of the meal, from memory. The service is fast and efficient. We liked the super thin-crusted pizza (endless topping options), the pesto pasta and mushroom pasta, and of course, the arancini (fried rice balls served as an app). Roscioli If you’ve ever watched any food & travel shows about Rome, chances are Roscioli was featured as a mecca for everything delicious in the center of the city. Roscioli has a whole cluster of eateries right near Campo de Fiori: a deli/­­restaurant, a cafe with a coffee counter and bite-sized pastries, a bakery, and a full-on pizza restaurant called Emma. The coffee at the cafe is excellent. At the bakery, get any of the delicious by-the-slice pizzas that they are putting out all day, as well as the bread. We liked the bread so much, we smuggled a loaf home in our luggage. If you go to Emma, definitely try the pizza, since it’s the specialty there, and apparently a whole lot of effort went into developing the pizza dough recipe. If you go to the restaurant/­­deli, Katie Parla has some great advice on navigating the menu there. Antico Forno Cordella (or Urbani) If you find yourself in the Jewish Ghetto in the morning or afternoon, stop in here for a slice of their delicious, thin and crispy pizza rossa. Pianostrada A fun dinner place with neat decor and a more modern, deconstructed take on Roman classics. Urbana 47 If you go to the Colosseum, you might as well stop here for lunch, as it’s about a 10 minute walk away. They focus on local and seasonal ingredients, and we really loved every pasta dish we ordered here. (Thank you Pauline for the recommendation!) Sant’Eustacchio il Caffe We really enjoyed sitting at an outside table here with a cappuccino and a cornetti (both very good), watching the morning world go by. Go here on your way to the Pantheon and/­­or Piazza Navona, both are super close. Don’t miss the church Sant’Eustachio that’s right there, with a beautifully sculpted deer head on the facade. Volpetti If you are in the mood to visit a serious deli, check out Volpetti in Testaccio. They carry an overwhelming amount of cheeses, meats, olives, marinated veggies, pizza by the slice, and fried snacks. They are also able to vacuum wrap anything you buy, so that you can put the stuff in your luggage with little fear of it being taken away at the airport. Sack Food Another really interesting delicatessen that carries really unusual cheeses and meats. If you are anything like us and gift food as travel gifts to your omnivore friends, this place is great. You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Travel Notes: Chicago Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Saveur Magazine Best Food Blog Awards, Golubka in Special Interest .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

This isnt the split-pea type of pea soup but instead is made with fresh or frozen English peas--those bright green orbs--and then topped with a decadent dollop of mascarpone cheese mixed with cream cheese, which is the Italian answer to cr?me fraiche or sour cream, but better! Mint and peas are good partners but you dont find mint soup too often. This recipes comes to us courtesy of Fabio Viviani and is featured in his book, Fabios 30-Minute Italian. Makes 4 servings - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 2 tablespoons butter - 3 cups green peas, thawed if frozen, 1/­­4 cup reserved for garnish - 2 shallots, finely chopped - 3 cups vegetable stock - 2 tablespoons cream cheese - 2 tablespoons heavy cream -  1/­­4 cup mascarpone cheese - Zest of 1 lemon -  1/­­4 cup chopped Italian parsley -  1/­­4 cup chopped mint - Salt and pepper  Preheat an oven to 400°F. Place olive oil, butter, peas and shallots on a sheet tray and roast in oven for 8 minutes. While in the oven, heat vegetable stock in a pot until right before boiling. Season stock with salt and pepper. Mix the cream cheese, heavy cream, and mascarpone in a stand mixer until combined and slightly loose--dont whip it too much. Add lemon zest and mix one more time to combine. Season with salt and set aside. When peas are done, add to stock and bring to a rapid boil. Reduce to a simmer, add parsley and mint, and cook for 5 minutes. Using a hand or stand blender, blend the soup until silky smooth. If too thick, add a touch of stock or water. Serve soup with a drizzle of the mascarpone mixture in the middle and the reserved fresh peas to garnish. From Fabios 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani; published by St. Martins Press. Copyright (C)2017 by Fabio Viviani. All Rights Reserved. Used with Permission. Page 52-53. Photo by Matt Armendariz. The post Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Blistered Sweet Pepper and Marinated Feta Salad with Arugula and Quinoa

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

Quinoa is a superstar. With no gluten yet high in protein, its a perfect grain. Its also sneaky, making sure it touches just about every ingredient in the salad so that with every forkful you get a sprinkling or more of quinoa. Hey! it says, You cant ignore me! And who would want to? Here it blends perfectly with honey, dill, fruity olive oil, briny olives, sweet cherry tomatoes, earthy roasted peppers, and creamy, crumbly feta cheese. This recipes comes to us courtesy of Fabio Viviani and is featured in his book, Fabios 30-Minute Italian.  Makes 4 servings - 1 cup red quinoa - 1 pound red bell peppers, sliced thin - 1 pound yellow bell peppers, sliced thin - 1/­­4 cup honey - 1/­­3 cup olive oil - 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved - 4 ounces crumbled feta cheese - 3 tablespoons chopped dill - 1/­­4 cup chopped Italian parsley - 1/­­4 cup chopped Kalamata olives - 1/­­2 cup arugula - Salt and pepper - Olive oil Bring a large pot of water, 2 to 3 quarts, to a boil and add a touch of salt. Pour in quinoa and boil for 6 to 8 minutes. Turn off the heat and let sit for 3 minutes, then drain. While quinoa is cooking, heat a sauté pan on high heat. Add peppers to the pan and cook for 1 minutes. Toss and cook for another minute. Turn off the heat and add a touch of olive oil. Season with salt and pepper and toss for 30 seconds. Let sit in the pan for 2 minutes, and then transfer to a plate to cool. Mix the honey and olive oil in a large bowl. Add the tomatoes, feta, dill, parsley, and olives. Toss to combine. Once peppers have cooled to close to room temperature, add to the large bowl along with the arugula and quinoa. Season with salt and pepper and an additional drizzle of olive oil to bring everything together. From Fabios 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani; published by St. Martins Press. Copyright (C)2017 by Fabio Viviani. All Rights Reserved. Used with Permission. Page 32-33. Photo by Matt Armendariz. The post Blistered Sweet Pepper and Marinated Feta Salad with Arugula and Quinoa appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Kale & Mushroom Tortilla

October 15 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Kale & Mushroom Tortilla I tried to write this post late last night after all kids had been tucked to bed. I was sitting down in our couch with my laptop on my knee and a bar of dark chocolate, a jar of salted almonds and a glass of water within reach. I was ready to do this. The next thing I remember is Isac’s hand pulling my hair three hours later. A dream had woken him up and he wanted me to come sleep next to him. I took a quick look at my computer and realized I had written zero words. So, new try today. This time I’m sitting at an outside cafe in broad daylight so I’ll hopefully not fall asleep here. Today’s recipe is an autumnal approach on tortilla. You know that potato and egg cake that is sold on the counter in literally every corner shop, cafe and tapas bar in Spain. It’s a great snack and super popular with our kids whenever we are in Barcelona so we have started making it at home as well. It’s easy to get lost in the Spanish tortilla vs Italian frittata discussion. When I previewed the first version of this recipe on Instagram, I already received some comments that “this isn’t a Spanish tortilla”. Well of course not. It’s a Swedish tortilla. Seriously though, I realize that we have bent this recipe quite far - adding kale and mushrooms to it and changing the cooking method a bit - but it is still tastes like a tortilla to me. It’s more potato based than a frittata and slightly firmer so that it can be cut out into triangles, eaten with your hands either warm or cold. We finish it off in the oven rather than flipping it (which apparently is the Italian way of doing it rather than the Spanish) but it’s just because we are lazy and it works so well. And semantics aside, the most important part is that it tastes really good. It also has a rather short ingredient list and has become another one of our last minute dinner solutions. First time we made this autumn version was a few weeks ago after I had scored a huge bag of funnel chanterelles at the market. After having made this stew on the first night and a version of this sandwich for lunch the day after, the bag was still half full. So we added them to a dinner tortilla. Just adding a few more vegetables to a simple tortilla turns it into dinner rather than just a snack. Especially if served with a side salad. These mushrooms are cheaper than chanterelles and usually easier to find in the forest. But if you can’t find them, just use regular chanterelles or any another mushroom. Here are a few tips and tricks that we use when making tortilla. o Don’t bother peeling the potatoes. If you use fresh and scrubbed potatoes, keeping the peal on. Not only does it save time, but also makes your tortilla more rustic. Dicing the potatoes instead of slicing it also helps making it more rustic. o Traditionally in a tortilla, the onion is first sautéed for 20 minutes and then the potatoes are fried in LOTS of olive oil for another 20-30 minutes but we prefer precooking the diced potatoes in water instead (while the onion is sautéing). It saves time and we can reduce the amount of oil. If you have precooked potatoes leftover in the fridge, they are perfect for this dish. o We make this with butter instead of olive oil because it’s more heat resistant and it brings out the best flavor in mushrooms. But you can of course use any oil of preference. o Fry the mushrooms on a low/­­medium heat. Don’t crowd the pan and always listen for the sizzle. If you cant hear them sizzling, the temperature is too low. o Luise has developed an intolerance against garlic (especially raw) so we have kept it out of this recipe, but I bet it could be good along with the mushrooms and kale. o If you don’t like kale, try it with spinach. Or use the same method with another range of vegetables. o Feta cheese is also really good in this combination. Just crumble it into the egg mixture. or before placing it in the oven. o We finish the tortilla in the oven because it’s easier, but you can flip it by sliding the half-cooked frittata onto a plate. It will still be some liquid in the middle so you need to be careful doing this. Than you place the saucepan over the frittata (and plate) and simply flip it upside down while holding the plate as a lid so it falls down into the sauce pan. And then fry it for a few more minutes on that side. Kale & Mushroom Tortilla Makes approx 8 serving 1 onion  350 g /­­ 2 1/­­2 cups firm potatoes, diced 5 tbsp butter or oil 2 cups /­­ 100 g Funnel chanterelles (or any other mushroom) 2 leaves /­­ 30 g kale, stems removed 1 large handful fresh parsley  6-8 eggs (depending on the size) salt and pepper Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Add water to a medium size saucepan and bring to a boil. Peel and chop the onions. Scrub and dice the potatoes into 1-2 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch cubes. Heat 1 tbsp butter in an ovenproof frying pan. Sauté the onions on low heat for about 10-15 minutes until soft, translucent and smells sweet, stir occasionally. Meanwhile add the potatoes to the boiling salted water and cook for about 13-15 minutes on medium heat, they should be almost done. Drain the cooking water and add the potatoes to the saucepan with onions, along with one more tablespoon butter. Sauté for a few minutes more to give the potatoes some flavor and color. Pour the onion and potatoes into a separate bowl and put the saucepan back on the heat. Clean the mushrooms, slice them into desired size and add to the pan along with a knob of butter. Fry the mushrooms on low/­­medium heat (you should here them sizzling without burning) for 5-6 minutes or until they have released some moisture and started caramelizing. Rinse the kale, chop finely and add it to the pan along with fresh parsley. Let wilt down for a few minutes. Salt generously and then pour into the bowl with potatoes. Wipe the saucepan clean and put it back on the heat along with a knob of butter. Beat the eggs with salt and pepper. Pour the vegetables into the egg mixture and then tip it into the warm saucepan (it’s essential that the pan is warm and buttered. Let it fry for about two minutes (preferably with a lid or a plate on top) and then place the pan in the oven (without lid) and switch on the broiler. After about 10 minutes it should be firm, golden and ready. Wait a few minutes for it to cool down and then run a spatula around the edges to make sure it comes off easily. Cut into triangles and serve with a side salad. It can also be stored in the fridge for a couple of days. PS! Look at these two photos of Luise and Noah, taken exactly one year apart.

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese

September 26 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese Italian pickled mixed vegetables, called giardiniera, can be quite tart, so its best to drain and rinse before using. You can make this mac and cheese without the gardiniera or with the addition of cooked vegetables, frozen, thawed green peas, or marinated artichoke hearts. You can also make this ahead and then cover and pop it in the oven to reheat.   Giardiniera Mac and Cheese - 8 to 12 ounces fiore pasta or other bite-sized pasta shape - 2 1/­­2 cups giardiniera vegetables, drained and coarsely chopped - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­3 cup panko crumbs - 1 1/­­2 cups unsweetened almond milk - 1/­­3 cup raw cashew pieces, soaked and drained - 2 tablespoons cornstarch or tapioca flour - 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast flakes - 1 tablespoon mellow white miso - 1 heaped tablespoon tomato paste - 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar or lemon juice - 3/­­4 teaspoon mustard powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 small clove minced garlic - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste - Cook the pasta in a pot of boiling salted water until it is al dente. About 3 minutes before the pasta is done cooking, stir in the giardiniera. Drain and leave in the strainer. - Heat the oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat. Add the panko crumbs, stirring to coat with the oil. Cook, stirring for a few minutes until the crumbs are toasted. Remove from the heat and set aside. - In a blender, combine all of the remaining ingredients and blend until smooth and creamy. Pour the sauce into the pot in which the pasta was cooked and cook stirring, over medium-high heat, until the sauce is hot, bubbly, and thickened, about 4 minutes. Add the pasta and vegetables to the sauce, stirring gently to combine and heat through. Transfer to a casserole dish and sprinkle with the reserved panko. Serve hot. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. The post Giardiniera Mac and Cheese appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower

September 5 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower Now that we are back doing more frequent recipe posts again, we also wanted to throw some super simple, everyday type dinners into the mix. Family style! The hands-down easiest dish that I (David) know (and make when I’m alone with the kids and have max 10 minutes to prepare dinner) is to cook a package of fresh gnocchi, mix a store-bought pesto with mashed avocado, add a little extra lemon and olive oil and just stir everything together with some canned chickpeas and cherry tomatoes on top. Its a lazy dinner but the kids devour it, its super easy and most importantly QUICK. Today’s recipe is a riff on that. We are fully aware that you hardly need yet another recipe for spaghetti al pesto. But we have got a few twists that turn this simple Italian classic into a rather nutrition packed meal. And a really tasty one as well. Although our version is so far from the original that we probably never will be allowed back into our beloved Italy again ... - Try chickpea (or lentil) pasta. These new-style pastas made on chickpea or lentil flour taste good, have surprisingly pleasant texture and are more protein packed than regular pasta. If you want to use ordinary pasta, we’d recommend adding some cooked chickpeas to the dish as well. They taste great tossed with pesto. - Add avocado to your pesto. It will be much creamier, fluffier, richer and rounder. It will also be more fat, but it’s the gooood fat. If you want to make it lighter, replace half of the oil in the pesto with water. Also, use half basil and half baby spinach for a more affordable and nutrient packed pesto. - Make it vegan by adding nutritional yeast to your pesto and make a quick nut dust instead of parmesan. - Add roasted vegetables. Pesto pasta is good, but adding roasted vegetables is simply better. You get more flavors and something to actually chew on (because we all slurp spaghetti, right!?). It takes like 5 minutes to prepare one tray of roasted vegetables (oven time obviously not included), so if you have 5 minutes to spare, do it. Also, if you are smart, you’ll roast a second tray of vegetables simultaneously and you are halfway through dinner prep for tomorrow. We went with roasted cauliflower and zucchini coins this time because it was what we had at home and we know that the kids love ’em. Broccoli or parsnip or carrots would of course be just as good. - If you are not vegan and want to make a luxury version of this, try serving it with some torn burrata cheese on top. Vegan Pesto Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower & Cheesy Nut Dust Serves 4 We’ve kept this dish vegan but if you are not vegan you probably don’t have nutritional yeast at home and in that case you can just grate vegetarian parmesan or pecorino instead. The obvious shortcut here is to buy a pesto, mix it with avocado and follow the rest of the recipe. Roasted veggies 1 cauliflower 1 zucchini 2 tbsp olive oil sea salt Cheesy Nut Dust and Vegan Pesto 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70 g almonds 1 tbsp nutritional yeast 1 large handful basil 1 large handful spinach 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice a few pinches salt 1 small avocado (use half if you have a large and serve the rest on the side) chickpea pasta or pasta of choice, for 4 persons To serve  Lettuce or baby spinach cherry tomatoes, quartered Set the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F. Break the cauliflower into small florets and chop the stem inte bite-size pieces. Slice the zucchini. Toss cauliflower and zucchini with a little oil and salt and spread out on a baking sheet. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until soft and golden. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to instructions on the package (reserve a little bit of pasta water when draining) and start making cheesy nut dust and pesto. Add almonds, 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast and a large pinch sea salt to a food processor. Pulse on high speed until all nuts are mixed/­­pulverized into coarse sand/­­dust. Place half of the cheesy nut dust in a small bowl and leave the rest in the food processor for the pesto. Add 1 more teaspoon nutritional yeast, basil, spinach, olive oil, lemon juice and a little more salt. Mix until smooth, taste and adjust. This is your basic vegan pesto. Now add avocado and pulse for an even creamier pesto, you might want to add a little more lemon and olive oil at this point. Toss half of the pesto with the cooked pasta and a little bit of pasta water (add chickpeas, if using regular pasta). Arrange the pasta on four plates, add roasted cauliflower, zucchini slices, lettuce, tomatoes and a few dollops pesto on top. Sprinkle with cheesy nut dust and a little olive oil. Enjoy! ************ PS - Here are a few other things that we have been up to recently! Some of you might remember my trip to Turkey, meeting displaced Syrian families last year? Echo and UN’s World Food Programme have made this little video from my trip and from our home here in Stockholm. I talk a bit about how similar our priorities are even though our situations are vastly different. And the importance of the support these families get from WFP to gain a sense of normality again. I don’t like hearing my own voice and I had an eye infection when we filmed this but there are lots of cute kids in the footage and the topic is very close to my heart. You can watch it here. We have also shared a week’s worth of family friendly recipes in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine which is out now (in the UK). The feature is photographed by Simon Bajada.  And we recently shot a Fridge Raider feature talking about a few of our favorite ingredients in the latest issue of Olive Magazine. Also out now (in the UK). Aaaand, we have also worked on a campaign for Swedish organic brand Kung Markatta with recipes, tips and videos focused on reducing food waste at home (only in Swedish though).  Phew, looking at it like this, I now realize why this summer felt so intense ;)

Air Fried Tofu Italian Style

March 19 2018 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Air Fried Tofu Italian Style I’ve had an air fryer for well over a year and even started a Facebook group, FatFree Vegan Air Fryers, to share cooking ideas. I’ve posted several air fryer recipes, but I’ve never taken the opportunity to write about the air fryer in depth, to review the different air fryers, describe how they work, give formulas for converting “regular” recipes for the air fryer, etc. And there’s a reason for that: I don’t think air fryers are really necessary. And if you don’t have one, you can still make this air fried tofu because Ive included oven directions at the end of the recipe.(...) Read the rest of Air Fried Tofu Italian Style (1,544 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2018. | Permalink | 47 comments Post tags: Air Fryer, Gluten-free, Ridiculously Easy, Soy, Weight Watchers Points The post Air Fried Tofu Italian Style appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Holiday Gift Ideas from Meatless Monday!

December 18 2017 Meatless Monday 

Holiday Gift Ideas from Meatless Monday!This holiday season, let Meatless Monday help you make your gift-giving a little bit easier. If you know someone who has been resolving to eat healthier or give something back to the planet, here are a few items to help them get started. Books: Reducetarian by Brian Kateman Perfect for someone who is hungry to find out more about why its a good idea to reduce meat consumption. Reducetarian contains over 70 essays by a group of experts and influential thinkers (including Meatless Monday founder Sid Lerner) who offer up several reasons why eating a more plant-based diet will save our health and the health of the planet. It also includes 40 meatless and reduced-meat recipes by Pat Crocker. MeatLess by Kristie Middleton As a senior food policy director at The Human Society of the United States, Middleton offers her expertise on reducing the amount of animal products you consume whether you are a passionate meat-lover or vegan-curious. MeatLess includes recipes, tips, swaps, and guidance on how to eat less meat and more plants. The Plant-Powered Diet by Sharon Palmer Palmers book encourages the shift towards plant-based meals by putting produce at the center of the plate. She shares a wealth of information about the benefits of whole grains, healthy fats, balanced nutrition, and seasoning with herbs and spices. Her book also debunks many common myths, asserting that its possible to get healthy food on the road and adequate protein from meatless meals. What the Fork Are You Eating? by Stefanie Sacks Long-time Meatless Monday friend Stephanie Sacks identifies the most offensive ingredients in our food and shows how we can cut (or at least minimize) them from our diets. The book is an overview of whats really in your food and contains an action plan with 50 delicious recipes. How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition by Mark Bittman Mark Bittmans original How to Cook Everything Vegetarian was such a hit the first time around that the award-winning food writer decided it was time for an update. This fall, Bittman released a new edition which includes new recipes and information about the benefits of reducing meat consumption. 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani The Top Chef Fan Favorite released a new cookbook this past spring that includes simple, meat-free meals with an Italian spin. If you know someone who wants to try Meatless Monday but is short on time, 30-Minute Italian is a great pick! PNW Veg by Kim O’Donnel As the author of two previously published vegetarian cookbooks, Kim ODonnel became curious about the bounty in her own backyard, the Pacific Northwest. While not a strict vegetarian herself, she was excited to find that it wasnt just easy to eat vegetarian in the land of the geoduck and the Dungeness crab, it was extraordinary. 28-Day Plant-Powered Health Reboot by Jessica Jones, MS, RD, CDE and Wendy Lopez, MS, RD Written by Registered Dietitians Jessica Jones and Wendy Lopez of the blog Food Heaven Made Easy, this new cookbook has four weeks of breakfasts, lunches, and dinners that are all purely plant-based. Made with health - and not dieting - in mind, Jones and Lopez outline a completely customizable menu of meals that put the focus on rebooting the body with balanced meals without animal proteins. Bowls of Goodness: Vibrant Vegetarian Recipes Full of Nourishment by Nina Olsson Food blogger Nina Olsson (Nourish Atelier) released Bowls of Goodness this year, a celebration of simple, delicious, and undeniably healthy meals in bowls, all of which are vegetarian. In addition to giving bowls a boost, Bowls of Goodness acknowledges the history of bowls tracing back to our most ancient human ancestors. And what better food to put in bowls than the healthiest, prettiest produce and grains? Love Thy Legumes by Sonali Suratkar Nutritionist and Johns Hopkins graduate Sonali Suratkar is using her first cookbook to celebrate legumes and educate people on how they may improve blood sugar, assist in weight loss, and ease the digestive system. With tons of recipes and beautiful pictures, Suratkar is sure to entice any reader curious about one of the healthiest plant-based food varieties! Read It Before You Eat It: Taking You from Label to Table by Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN If you ever wanted to take a registered dietary nutritionist with you when you went food shopping, this is the only book youll need. Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN provides easy-to-understand information about deciphering food labels and balancing your daily meals. When you go shopping for Meatless Monday, take this book with you to ensure that you only cook with the best ingredients. Delivery Services: Veestro While Veestro is a big hit with vegans and vegetarians, its hugely popular with people who still eat meat, making them an ideal delivery service for Meatless Monday. Introduce your friends and family to Veestro with a gift card so they can taste a new kind of fast dinner! HelloFresh Another health-focused delivery service with a vegetarian plan, HelloFresh is also offering gift cards so busy families looking for a plant-based change for dinner can try a meal before making a commitment to a subscription. GrubHub Do you know a takeout addict? Sometimes its great to have a prepared meal delivered fast. GrubHub provides easy delivery from vegetarian restaurants (and restaurants with vegetarian offerings). With a gift card, you can say Dinners on me on Meatless Monday. The post Holiday Gift Ideas from Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Crispy Fried Cauliflower Wingz

December 5 2017 Vegan Dad 

Crispy Fried Cauliflower Wingz This recipe is perfect for your upcoming holiday party! Or tuck it away until the Super Bowl. An indulgence, to be sure, but you deserve it. Ive been meaning to work up a recipe like this since the cauliflower wings craze hit the interwebs a while ago, but I never got around to it. These are crispy and flavourful, and remain so even when they are no longer hot. The boys doused theirs in Buffalo hot sauce, while the rest of us stuck to a sweet BBQ sauce. Delicious!  INGREDIENTS - 1 large head of cauliflower, cut into florets Brine - 2 cups cold water - 1 tsp garlic powder - 2 tsp onion powder - 2 tsp smoked or seasoned salt - 2 tsp paprika - 1 tsp poultry spice Batter - 2 cups all purpose flour - 1 cup panko crumbs - 1/­­2 cup chickpea flour - 1/­­2 cup tapioca flour/­­starch - 1 tbsp each: onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, Italian seasoning - 1 tsp white pepper - 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar - 3 cups plain soy milk (more if needed) METHOD 1. The day before: mix together the brine ingredients (I use a blender). Pour into a large freezer bag, then add the cauliflower florets. If your cauliflower is very large, you can make a 1.5 recipe of the brine.  2. Remove as much air a possible so the brine is making maximum contact with the brine. Refrigerate for at least 12 hours, rotating the bag as needed for even brining.  3. The Day of: drain cauliflower in a colander. Heat oil in a deep fryer to 350 degrees. 4. While cauliflower is draining, whisk together the dry ingredients for the batter (i.e. flour to white pepper).  5. Dredge the cauliflower in the flour mixture in batches until coated. Shake off all excess and place on a baking sheet. 6. In a separate bowl, whisk together vinegar and soy milk. Add enough of the soy mixture to the remaining flour mixture to make a thickish batter. Add more soy milk if needed. 7. Add some pieces of cauliflower to the batter. Turn to coat. Leave the cauliflower in the batter for a few minutes to allow the batter to soak into the dredging flour. 8. Shake off excess batter and transfer to a cooking tray or plate.  9. Fry in oil, 3-4 minutes per side, until deep golden brown. Make sure your oil is not too hot or the outside will burn before the cauliflower is cooked. 10. Drain on paper towels and serve while still hot. NOTE 1: while one batch is frying, add another to the batter so it can soak. Repeat. NOTE 2: add more soy milk to the batter, if needed. The dredging flour will thicken the batter a bit, so just thin it down again. 

masala pasta recipe | indian style pasta | indian pasta recipes

November 21 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

masala pasta recipe | indian style pasta | indian pasta recipesmasala pasta recipe | indian style pasta | indian pasta recipes with step by step photo and video recipe. a unique and fusion recipe between 2 popular cuisine i.e indian cuisine and italian cuisine. basically a desi or spicy twist to the authentic italian pasta recipe to meet the taste buds of spice lovers. it is an ideal lunch box/­­breakfast recipe and can also be treated as kids recipe too. Continue reading masala pasta recipe | indian style pasta | indian pasta recipes at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Grilled Philly Cheese Mushroom Sandwich

November 6 2017 Meatless Monday 

Philly may be famous for their cheesesteaks, but if a craving hits and you want to keep it meatless, this mushroom sandwich can be just as satisfying! Often found proudly parading as a meatless burger, Portabellas are widely considered the “meatiest” mushroom. This recipe comes to us from our friends at The Mushroom Council. Serves 4. - 4 large Portabella mushrooms, sliced - 1 large red onion, sliced - 2 bell peppers, core and seeds removed, quartered - 2 tablespoons canola oil - 1 teaspoon grilled steak seasoning - 4 Italian rolls, split length wise, toasted - 8 slices provolone or American cheese or 4 ounces processed cheese spread Heat grill to medium, about 365°. Brush both sides of mushrooms, onions and bell peppers with oil and season with steak seasoning. Place on grill and close cover, cook 5 minutes on each side. Remove onions and peppers from grill, thinly slice as desired. Place on aluminum foil and return to grill to keep warm. Remove mushrooms and thinly slice. Lightly toast bun on grill. Remove peppers, onions and mushrooms and combine. Place cheese on each split roll, top mushroom mixture. Turn grill off and place sandwiches on grill with lid closed, 5 minutes or until cheese is fully melted. Cut in half and serve immediately. The post Grilled Philly Cheese Mushroom Sandwich appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chef Fabio Viviani Does Meatless Monday Italian-Style

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chef Fabio Viviani Does Meatless Monday Italian-StyleMany people were introduced to Chef Fabio Viviani when he was a contestant on the Emmy-winning Bravo competition series Top Chef. His career began years before he became a Fan Favorite and has only flourished in the years since. This spring, Viviani released his latest cookbook, Fabios 30-Minute Italian: Over 100 Fabulous, Quick and Easy Recipes. As a friend and supporter of Meatless Monday he includes many meat-free recipes that are simple enough to make for the first dinner of the week. Anyone familiar with Viviani knows that he isnt merely a chef. Since gaining popularity on Top Chef, he has capitalized on his entrepreneurial spirit and sense of humor to bring his cuisine to as many people as possible, especially home cooks. While cultivating a successful career as a businessman, frequent television guest, and author, he has always focused on recipes that are attainable for anyone aspiring to cook at home (but perhaps a little intimidated by complicated recipes). In February, he launched his YouTube cooking show, Fabios Kitchen, which features several meat-free recipes that are designed to be easy to make in little time. He says: When my wife and I had our son Gage, our lives became really busy. I needed to learn how to make delicious food at home in a shorter amount of time. I wrote this cookbook to teach others how they can make meals in under 30 minutes. As a chef, I like cooking with meat but I also really like cooking with vegetables - its all about how you season the ingredients! The dishes were using for Meatless Monday are packed with flavor - and best of all theyre meat free! Meatless Monday is happy to bring some of Vivianis delicious vegetarian recipes from Fabios 30-Minute Italian to your table. Here are a few of them: Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing Blistered Sweet Pepper and Marinated Feta Salad with Arugula and Quinoa Fabios 30-Minute Italian is available to purchase on Amazon. The post Chef Fabio Viviani Does Meatless Monday Italian-Style appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

You can add just about anything you fancy to risotto, which makes it a creative cooks dream. This recipe relies on four different kinds of mushroom (you could use different mushrooms or only cook two or three types as long as the amounts stay the same) and if you forget about the risotto part of the recipe, youre left with an exotic mushroom dish. This recipes comes to us courtesy of Fabio Viviani and is featured in his book, Fabios 30-Minute Italian. Makes 4 servings - 8 tablespoons butter, divided in half - 1 large onion, finely chopped -  1/­­2 cup torn cremini mushrooms -  1/­­4 cup torn oyster mushrooms -  1/­­2 cup torn shiitake mushrooms -  1/­­4 cup sliced button mushrooms -  1/­­2 cup Arborio rice - 1 cup dry white wine - 5 cups vegetable stock -  1/­­2 cup grated Grana Padano - 2 teaspoons white balsamic vinegar -  1/­­4 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes -  1/­­2 cup Italian parsley leaves - Salt and pepper  Melt the butter in 2 heavy saucepans on medium high. Gently saute the oinons in one until softened, about 3 minutes. In the other, cook the mushrooms until caramelized, about 6-8 minutes. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Turn off mushroom pan. Stir in the rice to the onions and cook, stirring all the time, for about 2 minutes until the mix becomes translucent. Add the wine and cook for around 6-7 minutes until the wine is absorbed. Season with salt and pepper. Add 2 cups of the stock to the pan and simmer gently until the stock is absorbed, stirring every minute or so to prevent sticking! Gradually add more stock, a ladleful at a time, until the rice is tender, about 15-18 minutes. Adjust seasoning in the risotto with salt and pepper and add the mushrooms. Turn heat to low and stir in cheese. In a small bowl, combine the vinegar, sun-dried tomatoes and parsley. Use this as a garnish on top of risotto when served. From Fabios 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani; published by St. Martins Press. Copyright (C)2017 by Fabio Viviani. All Rights Reserved. Used with Permission. Page 114-115. Photo by Matt Armendariz. The post Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla

October 15 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla I tried to write this post late last night after all kids had been tucked to bed. I was sitting in our couch with my laptop on my knee and a bar of dark chocolate, a jar of salted almonds and a glass of water within reach. I was ready to do this. The next thing I remember is Isac’s hand pulling my hair three hours later. A dream had woken him up and he wanted me to come sleep next to him. I took a quick look at my computer and realized I had written zero words. So, new try today. This time I’m sitting at an outside cafe in broad daylight so I’ll hopefully not fall asleep here. Today’s recipe is an autumnal approach on tortilla. You know that potato and egg cake that is sold on the counter of literally every corner shop, cafe and tapas bar in Spain. It’s a great snack and super popular with our kids whenever we are in Barcelona so we have started making it at home as well. It’s easy to get lost in the Spanish tortilla vs Italian frittata discussion. When I previewed the first version of this recipe on Instagram, I already received some comments that “this isn’t a Spanish tortilla”. Well of course not. It’s a Swedish tortilla. Seriously though, I realize that we have bent this recipe quite far - adding kale and mushrooms to it and changing the cooking method a bit - but it is still tastes like a tortilla to me. It’s more potato based than a frittata and slightly firmer so that it can be cut out into triangles and eaten with your hands either warm or cold. We finish it in the oven rather than flipping it (which apparently is more common for a frittata) but it’s just because we are lazy and it’s the easiest method. And semantics aside, the most important part is that it tastes really good, has a short ingredient list and has quickly become one of our favorite last minute dinner solutions. First time we made this autumn version was a few weeks ago after I had scored a huge bag of funnel chanterelles at the market. After having made this stew on the first night and a version of this sandwich for lunch the day after, their were still mushrooms left in the bag. So we added them to a dinner tortilla. It’s amazing how you can turn a simple tortilla into a dinner just by adding some more vegetables to it. Especially if you also serve it with a side salad. These particular mushrooms are cheaper than chanterelles and usually easier to find in large quantities in the forest. But if you can’t find them, just use regular chanterelles or any another mushroom. Here are a few tips and tricks that we use when making tortilla. o Don’t bother peeling the potatoes. If you use fresh and scrubbed potatoes, keeping the peal on not only saves time, but also makes your tortilla more rustic looking. Dicing the potatoes instead of slicing it also improves the rustic look. o Traditionally in a tortilla, the onion is first sautéed for 15 minutes and then the potatoes are fried in LOTS of olive oil for another 20-30 minutes but we prefer precooking the diced potatoes in water instead (while the onion is sautéing). It saves time and calls for less oil. If you have precooked potatoes leftover in the fridge, they are perfect for this dish. o We actually prefer making this with butter instead of olive oil because it’s more heat resistant and it brings out the best flavor in mushrooms. But you can of course use any oil of preference. o Fry the mushrooms on a low/­­medium heat. Don’t crowd the pan and always listen for the sizzle. If you cant hear them sizzling, the temperature is too low. o Luise has developed an intolerance against garlic (especially raw) so we have kept it out of this recipe, but I bet it could be good along with the mushrooms and kale. o If you don’t like kale, try it with spinach. Or use the same method with other vegetables. o Feta cheese is also really good in this combination. Just crumble it into the egg mixture. o We finish the tortilla in the oven because it’s easier, but you can flip it by sliding the half-cooked frittata onto a plate. It will still be some liquid in the middle so you need to be careful doing this. Than you place the saucepan over the frittata (and plate) and simply flip it upside down while holding the plate as a lid so it falls down into the sauce pan. And then fry it for a few more minutes on that side. Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla Makes approx 8 slices 1 onion  350 g /­­ 2 1/­­2 cups firm potatoes, diced 5 tbsp butter or oil 2 cups /­­ 100 g Funnel chanterelles (or any other mushroom) 2 leaves /­­ 30 g kale, stems removed 1 large handful fresh parsley  6-8 eggs (depending on the size) salt and pepper Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Add water to a medium size saucepan along with salt and bring to a boil. Peel and chop the onions. Scrub and dice the potatoes into 1-2 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch cubes. Heat 1 tbsp butter in an ovenproof frying pan. Sauté the onions on low heat for about 10-15 minutes until soft and translucent, stir occasionally. Meanwhile add the potatoes to the boiling water and cook for about 13-15 minutes on medium heat, they should be just done. Drain the cooking water and add the potatoes to the saucepan with onions, along with one more tablespoon butter and a little salt. Sauté for a few minutes more to give the potatoes some flavor and color. Pour the onion and potatoes into a separate bowl and put the saucepan back on the heat. Clean the mushrooms, slice them into desired size and add to the pan along with a knob of butter. Fry the mushrooms on low/­­medium heat for 5-6 minutes or until they have released some moisture and started caramelizing. Rinse the kale, chop finely and add it to the pan along with fresh parsley. Let wilt down for a few minutes. Add salt and then pour into the bowl with potatoes. Wipe the saucepan clean and put it back on the heat along with a knob of butter. Crack the eggs in a bowl, add salt and pepper and whisk. Pour the vegetables into the egg mixture and then tip it into the warm saucepan (it’s essential that the pan is warm and buttered for the tortilla not to stick to it). Let it fry for about two minutes (preferably with a lid or a plate on top) and then place the pan in the oven (without lid) and switch on the broiler. After about 10 minutes it should be firm, golden and ready. Wait a few minutes for it to cool down and then run a spatula around the edges to make sure it comes off easily. Cut into triangles and serve with a side salad. It can also be stored in the fridge for a couple of days. PS! Look at these two photos of Luise and Noah, taken exactly one year apart.

Mixed Mushroom Soup

October 9 2017 Meatless Monday 

This mixed mushroom soup, or “zuppa di funghi misti,” as the Italians would say, is perfect for the fall season. The aromas and flavors provided by shallots, garlic, red wine and thyme excellently compliment the mushrooms’ earthiness. We love that this gourmet recipe is also perfect for home cooks! This recipe comes to us from Alicia Walter of Eataly’s La Scuola. - 4 cups mixed mushrooms, cut into 1/­­4-inch pieces, stems and scraps reserved - 5 cups water - 2 tablespoons butter or olive oil - 1 ounce dried porcini mushrooms - 1/­­4 cup shallots, cut into small dice - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 sprigs thyme, leaves picked from stem and chopped - Pinch red chili flakes - 1 bunch kale, stems removed and chopped into 1-inch pieces - 2 tablespoons tomato paste - 1 cup red wine - Extra virgin olive oil - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 loaf rustic bread, sliced and grilled Prepare a mushroom stock by adding the reserved mushroom scraps and dried porcini mushrooms to a large stockpot filled with 5 cups of water. Simmer over low heat for at least 30 minutes and then strain. You should have 4 cups of stock. In a small stockpot, heat the olive oil until almost smoking. Add the mushrooms in one layer, working in batches if necessary. Once the mushrooms have been browned on one side, sprinkle with salt, add in a small spoonful of butter or oil and continue to cook until the mushrooms are browned on all sides. Remove the mushrooms from the pan with a slotted spoon and reserve. Reduce the heat and add the shallots, garlic, thyme, red chili flakes and a pinch of salt. Add more olive oil if necessary. Cook until the shallots are soft. Add the tomato paste and cook until the color changes from bright red to brick red. Add in the red wine and boil until the alcohol has cooked off. Finally, add the kale and an additional pinch of salt. Sauté until soft. Slowly pour in the strained mushroom stock and simmer for ten minutes. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place a quarter of the reserved mushrooms into a shallow bowl. Ladle the broth over the mushrooms. Top with a piece of grilled bread drizzled with olive oil and rubbed with garlic if desired. Enjoy immediately. The post Mixed Mushroom Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Slow Food and Meatless Monday: Cooking Up a Better Future

September 18 2017 Meatless Monday 

Slow Food and Meatless Monday: Cooking Up a Better Future Get ready for a countrywide Meatless Monday! Next week, on September 25, Meatless Monday and Slow Food USA are teaming up for the Cook Up a Better Future campaign. Restaurants and chefs across the nation will create and serve delicious, plant-based meals putting three unsung ingredients in the spotlight. In the combined efforts of promoting biodiversity in food, reducing meat consumption, and fighting climate change, Cook Up a Better Future seeks to bring diners to the table for a great movement for food and the environment. The three ingredients featured – Sea Island Red Peas, Carolina Gold Rice, and Sea Island Benne Seeds, all from Anson Mills are from Slow Foods Ark of Taste, a global catalog of foods facing extinction. Participating Chef Jay Lippin of Crabtrees Kittle House Restaurant & Inn in Chappaqua, New York explains the mission behind Cook Up a Better Future:     Remember to visit one of these restaurants next Monday, September 25 to celebrate global biodiversity and great food! Here are the restaurants and chefs Cooking Up a Better Future: Arizona Orme School, Patti Marrs, Mayer, Arizona California Arcade Cafe, Richard Lewis, Gilroy, California Assaggiare Mendocino, Julia Conway, Fort Bragg, California Deckmans en el Mogor, Drew Deckman, San Ysidro, California GEO Academy at Grant High School, Brenda Ruiz, Sacramento, California Jackson Nunes Consulting, Lesa Jackson Nunes, Menlo Park, California Joni Sare Chef Services, Joni Sare, Cupertino, California Magpie, Edward Roehr, Sacramento, California Savory Cafe, Juan Barajas, Woodland, California Colorado The Living Farm Cafe, Mike Gillespie, Paonia, Colorado Mountain Harvest Festival – Disco Soup, Jim Brett, Hotchkiss, Colorado Florida Nutwood, Steven Rojas, Winter Haven, Florida Table & Tap, David Rashty, Punta Gorda, Florida Georgia Miller Union, Steven Satterfield, Atlanta, Georgia Your Resident Gourmet, Jennifer Hill Booker, Lilburn, Georgia Hawaii Mud Hen Water, Ed Kenney, Honolulu, Hawaii Indiana Late Harvest Kitchen, Meredith Iacocca, Indianapolis, Indiana Illinois Elsa M. Jacobson, farmers market manager/­­recipe taster, Chicago, Illinois JCR, James Rorhbacher, Chicago, Illinois White Oak Gourmet, Thomas Leavitt, Long Grove, Illinois Michigan City Food, Phillip Jones, Detroit, Michigan Granor Farm, Abra Berens, Three Oaks, Michigan Missouri Feast in the Forest Teaching Kitchen, Penelope Beache, St. James, Missouri Good Fortune, Ryan McDonald, St. Louis, Missouri Square1 Project, Logan Ely, St. Louis, Missouri New Jersey Atlantic City Rescue Mission, Dara Heston, Sweetwater, New Jersey New York Crabtrees Kittle House Restaurant & Inn, Jay Lippin, Chappaqua, New York North Carolina Catch, Keith Rhodes, Wilmington, North Carolina South Carolina Wild Olive Cucina Italiana, Carmine Peluso, John’s Island, South Carolina The post Slow Food and Meatless Monday: Cooking Up a Better Future appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meatless Monday Interviews Michelle Cardulla

September 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Interviews Michelle Cardulla As a citizen of Rochester, artist and educator Michelle Cardulla is an active part of the Meatless Monday cause in Upstate New York. She provides cooking classes and outings for kids as well as recipes for them to take home to their parents, sometimes teaming up with Super Bowl champ Roland Big Ro Williams. We spoke to Michelle about how her efforts are making a difference in Upstate New York and how she hopes to spread even more awareness of Meatless Monday and make Rochester a Meatless Monday city. Meatless Monday: What made you choose the vegetarian lifestyle? Michelle Cardulla: Well, it was actually because of an ex-boyfriend, embarrassing to say. I didn’t eat a lot of meat, but I’m half Colombian, half Italian so there was always meat around, such as chorizo and foods like that. But I love to cook and he was vegan, so I immediately switched. Then I realized that this is better food and the whole concept about Meatless Monday is that it’s good for you, it’s good for the planet and good for the animals. So it happened instantly, and now I’m just hooked and crazy about it. How do you feel about being a vegetarian in upstate New York? We do have several places that offer vegan food that also have meat. But you find out that chefs really love the chance to make vegetarian and vegan dishes if you go a little early or call ahead and request it. There’s one place that we go to with friends, and we call the chef a day in advance and say, “Just cook us whatever you want.” He loves the challenge. All chefs are kind of into it if you give them a little bit of a heads up and aren’t demanding. You also work a lot with kids. How do kids respond to Meatless Monday, or meatless as a rule? We know that kids don’t like rules, but they will do something that might be cool and different and experimental. Is that how you sell it to them? I try to never treat it like a rule. For example, when Im doing an art project with them, instead of Hold the paper the hamburger way I say “the veggie burger way,” and they laugh. So I make it something fun and they ask, “Veggie burger, what do you mean?” I said, “Well I’m a vegetarian so I hold it the veggie burger way.” It’s a win-win, and it’s always positive. Then the food has to taste great. No ones going to say, “I want steamed broccoli.” It’s got to be good. First it has to taste good, then it’s vegetarian or vegan, not the other way around. Otherwise you’ve lost the kids. And involving them in the cooking is probably really fun, because then it’s not just food, it’s a project. Exactly. I did a cooking class a few years ago and we made burritos, which are very easy to make with meatless crumbles and vegan cheese. Everyone got to make their own. Then I told them that there was no meat and no dairy in their burritos and they were shocked. They were quite young, so they’re learning the words Meatless Monday, vegetarian, vegan at an early age and having a great experience. We have a Kinderfarmin event where we take them on a field trip with a picnic and they get to pet animals. I mean, food, animals - you got them! They’ll never forget that. So you just talked about how easy it is to sell kids on Meatless Monday. What about their parents? You know, I don’t really deal with the parents that much. But I try to send them home with little things like a little recipe. Adults are a little bit tougher than the kids because they’re stuck on what they want. You’ve worked with Roland Big Ro Williams, and I think one of the most effective things in the vegetarian scene is having powerful, successful athletes proudly proclaim their vegetarianism or veganism. Has working with athletes such as Big Ro made a difference in this? He’s a hero! He’s a guy who won the Super Bowl. He gets up there and does his speeches, saying “Miss Michelle’s over there cooking up vegan food and I’m a vegan.” That is worth a million dollars. When celebrities say it, when athletes say it, people want to emulate them. They want to be like them. So the more celebrity and sports people saying that they’re vegan, the better. Especially the people with big muscles showing that they’re vegan! What’s your ideal goal for Meatless Monday in Rochester by the end of 2017? First of all, I’d like to make it a Meatless Monday city. I think we can do that because I think I can talk the mayor into supporting it. I also want to get the restaurants involved and continue my programs with kids. Keep on spreading the word and building awareness of Meatless Monday. I want everybody to know what Meatless Monday is. This interview has been edited and condensed. The post Meatless Monday Interviews Michelle Cardulla appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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