italian - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Wheat dosa recipe | instant wheat flour dosa | godhuma dosa or godhi dose

19 Irresistible Vegan Macaroni and Cheese Recipes

Curried Tofu Hash with Cilantro Fried Rice

Vegan Gravy – 1 Pot Mushroom Free with Fluffy Mashed Potatoes










italian vegetarian recipes

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married!

November 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married! Hey guess what, we just got married! In a beautiful greenhouse in Rosendal’s Garden in Stockholm, surrounded by our closest family and friends (+ ALL their kids) and accompanied by live jazz music and gorgeous food. Even though I proposed to Luise in the back of a campervan on New Zealand almost three years ago, we pulled this wedding together - from idea to I do - in less than five weeks. With three young kids, constantly overflowing mailboxes and an unhealthy always-need-to-be-in-control tendency, we realized that if we don’t do a quick and spontaneous wedding we probably won’t get hitched until we are retired. So instead of our dream wedding going on for three days and nights in the Italian country side, we aimed for an informal and cosy autumn gathering in one of our favorite Stockholm locations. It turned out so much better than we could ever have hoped for and we are now officially mr and mrs. We let the chefs at Rosendal take care of all the food (which was a huge relief). Our only instructions for the lunch buffet (lunch is much easier if you want friends with kids to attend) was that we wanted hearty salads and food roughly in line with our own philosophy. Typically, we didn’t get any photos of the whole buffet table, but there were roasted vegetables, butter tossed potato and chanterelles, slaw with pickled mustard seeds, hummus, sourdough bread, sauerkraut, a goat’s cheese salad with shredded beets, herb sauces and lots and lots of cake. All seasonal and local, pretty decorated with fruit and flowers. And so good! Another salad that they prepared was made with roasted pumpkin, cavolo nero and buckwheat and we have recreated our own version of it here below. We never got the exact recipe from the chef so this is a pretty loose interpretation of how we remembered it (after a couple of glasses of champagne). We are sharing that today along with a few snaps that David’s sister took at the wedding. Forget everything I’ve previously stated about marriage. This was fun! And I feel damn fortunate to marry the most beautiful woman I know. Lots of love from us! The kids were more interested in the fireplace than the camera ... These two guys were so good! Send me an email if you need Chet Baker-style jazz musicians in Stockholm and I’ll forward their contact info.        This is a gorgeous and rustic recipe perfect for this season. It would also be ideal for Christmas, maybe with some cinnamon added to the dressing. One of the things we really love about this is that you don’t need to peel the pumpkin (which always is a hassle), just cut into wedges and you can even keep the seeds on. Some of the seeds might get a little burnt but the one hanging on to the slices add a nice crunch. We cover the pumpkin wedges in dressing both before and after roasting to give them a delicious coating. Roasted Pumpkin Salad with Cavolo Nero & Buckwheat Serves 4 1 Hokkaido squash, Kent pumpkin or other small winter squash/­­pumpkin variety 200 g /­­ 4 cups dinosaur kale (cavolo nero) or regular kale, thick stems removed  1 cup /­­ 250 ml /­­ 170 g raw buckwheat groats, rinsed Dressing 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil 3 tbsp maple syrup 1-2 lemons, juice + zest 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch fresh ginger, finely grated Sea salt & pepper To serve Pomegranate seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75 g toasted pumpkin seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 150 g feta cheese Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F fan mode. Divide the pumpkin in half and then cut it into wedges. Leave any seeds that are hanging on to the wedges and discard the rest. Stir together the dressing, taste and adjust the flavors. Pour about half of it in a bowl and toss the pumpkin slices in it (keep the remaining dressing in the bowl). Place on a baking tray and roast for about 25-30 minutes. We like it a little burnt towards the edges. When roasted, carefully loosen the wedges from the tray and brush them with the remaining dressing in the bowl. While the pumpkin is roasting, cook the buckwheat groats in 2 cups water for 7-8 minutes until soft but not mushy. Drain any remaining water and leave to cool off a bit. Add the remaining half of the dressing to a large bowl. Tear the kale leaves into smaller pieces, place in the bowl and use your hands to massage them until they soften up. Add the buckwheat to the bowl and toss so it’s all mixed. Arrange the kale and buckwheat on the tray (or a serving plate) together with the pumpkin wedges. Scatter with pomegranate seeds, pumpkin seeds and crumbled feta cheese. Enjoy! Wedding photos by Johanna Frenkel.

Grilled Philly Cheese Mushroom Sandwich

November 6 2017 Meatless Monday 

Philly may be famous for their cheesesteaks, but if a craving hits and you want to keep it meatless, this mushroom sandwich can be just as satisfying! Often found proudly parading as a meatless burger, Portabellas are widely considered the “meatiest” mushroom. This recipe comes to us from our friends at The Mushroom Council. Serves 4. - 4 large Portabella mushrooms, sliced - 1 large red onion, sliced - 2 bell peppers, core and seeds removed, quartered - 2 tablespoons canola oil - 1 teaspoon grilled steak seasoning - 4 Italian rolls, split length wise, toasted - 8 slices provolone or American cheese or 4 ounces processed cheese spread Heat grill to medium, about 365°. Brush both sides of mushrooms, onions and bell peppers with oil and season with steak seasoning. Place on grill and close cover, cook 5 minutes on each side. Remove onions and peppers from grill, thinly slice as desired. Place on aluminum foil and return to grill to keep warm. Remove mushrooms and thinly slice. Lightly toast bun on grill. Remove peppers, onions and mushrooms and combine. Place cheese on each split roll, top mushroom mixture. Turn grill off and place sandwiches on grill with lid closed, 5 minutes or until cheese is fully melted. Cut in half and serve immediately. The post Grilled Philly Cheese Mushroom Sandwich appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast)

October 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) We went to Italy earlier this month and visited the Amalfi Coast and Rome. Having visited the Abruzzo region a few years ago, I continue to be amazed at how different Italy is from region to region. They are almost like separate, tiny countries. It was a great trip – we lucked out with the weather, all our extensive train, plane, bus and boat journeys went pretty smoothly, and we got to see so many breathtaking things. The only complaint we had is a classic one – not enough time there. Below are some photos from the trip, as well as some notes and suggestions that we hope will be useful to future travelers :) Amafli Coast Our first impression was that this is an amazingly beautiful area that’s been completely overrun by tourism. That being said, there are still ways to enjoy it less like a tourist and more like a visitor, and it’s honestly so breathtaking that it’s very worth the visit. We stayed in Vettica, a quiet village right next to Amalfi, in a tiny Airbnb with a big terrace overlooking the cliffs and the sea. For us, it was the best of both worlds. We saw close to no tourists in Vettica, and instead got to see how people lead their lives in such an amazing setting. We watched locals going to church, to the market, feeding their cats, and being completely unaffected by the copious amounts of stairs in their cliffside neighborhoods (we were out of breath every time). Yet Amalfi was close enough (still a 45 minute walk or a stressful bus ride, but totally doable) that we had access to the boats and buses that shuttle people to Capri, Positano, and other beautiful places on the coast. It was really nice to have some distance from Amalfi, because it’s incredibly crowded with tour groups on any given day, but you have to go through it to get pretty much anywhere on the coast. Capri Once we got to Capri, we were wishing that we could spend the night there. There’s so much to do and it’s so incredibly beautiful. Take the chairlift up to Monte Solaro, the highest peak, to see the insane panorama that opens up. Walk around both Capri and Anacapri. Capri is better for partying and Anacapri – for quiet walks on tiny streets. Visit the Church of San Michele in Anacapri to see the intricate, hand-painted floor. Eat torta caprese and caprese sandwiches in the spirit of true tourism :) A complete must is a visit to the Villa San Michele, a villa built by Axel Munthe, the Swedish physician and author. Munthe was a collector of classical artifacts, so the whole villa is tastefully decorated by objects from the antiquity, some of which were found right on site during the construction of the villa. There is a lush garden, a breathtaking panorama of the island and the sea, and every inch of the place is pristine and photogenic. Positano Although Positano is an incredibly beautiful town with stunning architecture, we concluded that we would have been better off having a second day in Capri instead of coming here. The reason: it is swamped with tourists and touristy shops in a way that feels quite forced and concentrated (Capri, though also very touristy, had a more spread out feel). Maybe we went to the wrong places? If you have more than four days on the Amalfi coast, which is all we had, we would still recommend coming here. It also largely depends on your goals for your travels, of course :) Ravello We went here mainly because the host of our favorite Russian travel show visited the town in one of the episodes, and it looked totally breathtaking. Ravello is a town very high in the mountains, and the bus ride up took us on some of the tightest serpentines we’ve ever seen. The views from the top are the pay off, and the air feels different – very much like the freshest mountain air. Another beautiful villa to visit is the Villa Cimbrone in Ravello, full of ancient structures, fountains, sculptures, a beautiful garden and yet another breathtaking panorama. Food We were surprised to learn that the region is actually not known for its food, and finding a good, authentic meal isn’t easy because large amounts of tourists equal large amounts of tourist trap restaurants. It is Italy however, where even bad food is decent. We did manage to find some gems, but Rome really took the prize over Amalfi in the culinary department. Here are a few favorites: Pizzeria Da Nino, Conca dei Marini A charming, small restaurant in the town neighboring Vettica, with home-cooked food and a super charming owner (Nino!) that greets you at the door and is easy to understand even when you don’t speak a word of Italian. Go for the fresh-made pasta. Al Pesce d’Oro, Vettica A restaurant at a bed and breakfast in Vettica with good pizza. We went for the zucchini and squash blossom one and were pleasantly surprised at how solid and tasty it was. Da Ferdinando, Positano An outdoor restaurant right on the beach in Positano, with a really fun atmosphere and tasty dishes. La Vecchia Cantina, Ravello When visiting Ravello, lunch presented itself as a problem, because we didn’t research anything beforehand. We wandered off the central square and into this restaurant, and ended up having a pretty solid meal with very nice service. Bar Ferraro, Anacapri Went here when visiting Capri to try the mandatory torta caprese. It was very good, and so were the little frozen ricotta shortbread cookies. Rome We are so completely in love with Rome. We only had three days there, which is nothing! It was hard to cover everything we wanted, but we tried our best. We stayed in a really cool Airbnb near Campo de Fiori, which is a centrally located square that’s busy at all times of the day. Luckily, our actual location was on a very quiet, narrow street, so it was the best of both worlds. We visited the main historic sites (the Forum, Colosseum, Pantheon etc.), as well as the Jewish Ghetto, Trastevere, Testaccio and Monti. Below are some favorites. Sites The obvious: the Forum, the Colosseum, Ponte Sant’Angelo, Piazza del Popolo, Piazza Navona, the Pantheon. Even though the Pantheon was incredibly crowded, it was still super impressive. This inscription on Raphael’s burial is still in my mind: ‘Here lies Raphael, by whom nature herself feared to be outdone while he lived, and when he died, feared that she herself would die.‘ Wow. Churches: Santa Maria del Popolo, Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, San Luigi dei Francesi, Santa Maria in Trastevere, it’s endless really :) Food La Montecarlo A really fun place that serves Roman-style thin crust pizza and more, crowded with locals at any given time. They casually line each new customer’s table with white paper in place of a tablecloth, and write out the check on the paper at the end of the meal, from memory. The service is fast and efficient. We liked the super thin-crusted pizza (endless topping options), the pesto pasta and mushroom pasta, and of course, the arancini (fried rice balls served as an app). Roscioli If you’ve ever watched any food & travel shows about Rome, chances are Roscioli was featured as a mecca for everything delicious in the center of the city. Roscioli has a whole cluster of eateries right near Campo de Fiori: a deli/­­restaurant, a cafe with a coffee counter and bite-sized pastries, a bakery, and a full-on pizza restaurant called Emma. The coffee at the cafe is excellent. At the bakery, get any of the delicious by-the-slice pizzas that they are putting out all day, as well as the bread. We liked the bread so much, we smuggled a loaf home in our luggage. If you go to Emma, definitely try the pizza, since it’s the specialty there, and apparently a whole lot of effort went into developing the pizza dough recipe. If you go to the restaurant/­­deli, Katie Parla has some great advice on navigating the menu there. Antico Forno Cordella (or Urbani) If you find yourself in the Jewish Ghetto in the morning or afternoon, stop in here for a slice of their delicious, thin and crispy pizza rossa. Pianostrada A fun dinner place with neat decor and a more modern, deconstructed take on Roman classics. Urbana 47 If you go to the Colosseum, you might as well stop here for lunch, as it’s about a 10 minute walk away. They focus on local and seasonal ingredients, and we really loved every pasta dish we ordered here. (Thank you Pauline for the recommendation!) Sant’Eustacchio il Caffe We really enjoyed sitting at an outside table here with a cappuccino and a cornetti (both very good), watching the morning world go by. Go here on your way to the Pantheon and/­­or Piazza Navona, both are super close. Don’t miss the church Sant’Eustachio that’s right there, with a beautifully sculpted deer head on the facade. Volpetti If you are in the mood to visit a serious deli, check out Volpetti in Testaccio. They carry an overwhelming amount of cheeses, meats, olives, marinated veggies, pizza by the slice, and fried snacks. They are also able to vacuum wrap anything you buy, so that you can put the stuff in your luggage with little fear of it being taken away at the airport. Sack Food Another really interesting delicatessen that carries really unusual cheeses and meats. If you are anything like us and gift food as travel gifts to your omnivore friends, this place is great. You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Travel Notes: Chicago Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Saveur Magazine Best Food Blog Awards, Golubka in Special Interest .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chef Fabio Viviani Does Meatless Monday Italian-Style

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chef Fabio Viviani Does Meatless Monday Italian-StyleMany people were introduced to Chef Fabio Viviani when he was a contestant on the Emmy-winning Bravo competition series Top Chef. His career began years before he became a Fan Favorite and has only flourished in the years since. This spring, Viviani released his latest cookbook, Fabios 30-Minute Italian: Over 100 Fabulous, Quick and Easy Recipes. As a friend and supporter of Meatless Monday he includes many meat-free recipes that are simple enough to make for the first dinner of the week. Anyone familiar with Viviani knows that he isnt merely a chef. Since gaining popularity on Top Chef, he has capitalized on his entrepreneurial spirit and sense of humor to bring his cuisine to as many people as possible, especially home cooks. While cultivating a successful career as a businessman, frequent television guest, and author, he has always focused on recipes that are attainable for anyone aspiring to cook at home (but perhaps a little intimidated by complicated recipes). In February, he launched his YouTube cooking show, Fabios Kitchen, which features several meat-free recipes that are designed to be easy to make in little time. He says: When my wife and I had our son Gage, our lives became really busy. I needed to learn how to make delicious food at home in a shorter amount of time. I wrote this cookbook to teach others how they can make meals in under 30 minutes. As a chef, I like cooking with meat but I also really like cooking with vegetables - its all about how you season the ingredients! The dishes were using for Meatless Monday are packed with flavor - and best of all theyre meat free! Meatless Monday is happy to bring some of Vivianis delicious vegetarian recipes from Fabios 30-Minute Italian to your table. Here are a few of them: Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing Blistered Sweet Pepper and Marinated Feta Salad with Arugula and Quinoa Fabios 30-Minute Italian is available to purchase on Amazon. The post Chef Fabio Viviani Does Meatless Monday Italian-Style appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

You can add just about anything you fancy to risotto, which makes it a creative cooks dream. This recipe relies on four different kinds of mushroom (you could use different mushrooms or only cook two or three types as long as the amounts stay the same) and if you forget about the risotto part of the recipe, youre left with an exotic mushroom dish. This recipes comes to us courtesy of Fabio Viviani and is featured in his book, Fabios 30-Minute Italian. Makes 4 servings - 8 tablespoons butter, divided in half - 1 large onion, finely chopped -  1/­­2 cup torn cremini mushrooms -  1/­­4 cup torn oyster mushrooms -  1/­­2 cup torn shiitake mushrooms -  1/­­4 cup sliced button mushrooms -  1/­­2 cup Arborio rice - 1 cup dry white wine - 5 cups vegetable stock -  1/­­2 cup grated Grana Padano - 2 teaspoons white balsamic vinegar -  1/­­4 cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes -  1/­­2 cup Italian parsley leaves - Salt and pepper  Melt the butter in 2 heavy saucepans on medium high. Gently saute the oinons in one until softened, about 3 minutes. In the other, cook the mushrooms until caramelized, about 6-8 minutes. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Turn off mushroom pan. Stir in the rice to the onions and cook, stirring all the time, for about 2 minutes until the mix becomes translucent. Add the wine and cook for around 6-7 minutes until the wine is absorbed. Season with salt and pepper. Add 2 cups of the stock to the pan and simmer gently until the stock is absorbed, stirring every minute or so to prevent sticking! Gradually add more stock, a ladleful at a time, until the rice is tender, about 15-18 minutes. Adjust seasoning in the risotto with salt and pepper and add the mushrooms. Turn heat to low and stir in cheese. In a small bowl, combine the vinegar, sun-dried tomatoes and parsley. Use this as a garnish on top of risotto when served. From Fabios 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani; published by St. Martins Press. Copyright (C)2017 by Fabio Viviani. All Rights Reserved. Used with Permission. Page 114-115. Photo by Matt Armendariz. The post Four-Mushroom Risotto with Parsley Salad and Sun-Dried Tomatoes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla

October 15 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla I tried to write this post late last night after all kids had been tucked to bed. I was sitting in our couch with my laptop on my knee and a bar of dark chocolate, a jar of salted almonds and a glass of water within reach. I was ready to do this. The next thing I remember is Isac’s hand pulling my hair three hours later. A dream had woken him up and he wanted me to come sleep next to him. I took a quick look at my computer and realized I had written zero words. So, new try today. This time I’m sitting at an outside cafe in broad daylight so I’ll hopefully not fall asleep here. Today’s recipe is an autumnal approach on tortilla. You know that potato and egg cake that is sold on the counter of literally every corner shop, cafe and tapas bar in Spain. It’s a great snack and super popular with our kids whenever we are in Barcelona so we have started making it at home as well. It’s easy to get lost in the Spanish tortilla vs Italian frittata discussion. When I previewed the first version of this recipe on Instagram, I already received some comments that “this isn’t a Spanish tortilla”. Well of course not. It’s a Swedish tortilla. Seriously though, I realize that we have bent this recipe quite far - adding kale and mushrooms to it and changing the cooking method a bit - but it is still tastes like a tortilla to me. It’s more potato based than a frittata and slightly firmer so that it can be cut out into triangles and eaten with your hands either warm or cold. We finish it in the oven rather than flipping it (which apparently is more common for a frittata) but it’s just because we are lazy and it’s the easiest method. And semantics aside, the most important part is that it tastes really good, has a short ingredient list and has quickly become one of our favorite last minute dinner solutions. First time we made this autumn version was a few weeks ago after I had scored a huge bag of funnel chanterelles at the market. After having made this stew on the first night and a version of this sandwich for lunch the day after, their were still mushrooms left in the bag. So we added them to a dinner tortilla. It’s amazing how you can turn a simple tortilla into a dinner just by adding some more vegetables to it. Especially if you also serve it with a side salad. These particular mushrooms are cheaper than chanterelles and usually easier to find in large quantities in the forest. But if you can’t find them, just use regular chanterelles or any another mushroom. Here are a few tips and tricks that we use when making tortilla. o Don’t bother peeling the potatoes. If you use fresh and scrubbed potatoes, keeping the peal on not only saves time, but also makes your tortilla more rustic looking. Dicing the potatoes instead of slicing it also improves the rustic look. o Traditionally in a tortilla, the onion is first sautéed for 15 minutes and then the potatoes are fried in LOTS of olive oil for another 20-30 minutes but we prefer precooking the diced potatoes in water instead (while the onion is sautéing). It saves time and calls for less oil. If you have precooked potatoes leftover in the fridge, they are perfect for this dish. o We actually prefer making this with butter instead of olive oil because it’s more heat resistant and it brings out the best flavor in mushrooms. But you can of course use any oil of preference. o Fry the mushrooms on a low/­­medium heat. Don’t crowd the pan and always listen for the sizzle. If you cant hear them sizzling, the temperature is too low. o Luise has developed an intolerance against garlic (especially raw) so we have kept it out of this recipe, but I bet it could be good along with the mushrooms and kale. o If you don’t like kale, try it with spinach. Or use the same method with other vegetables. o Feta cheese is also really good in this combination. Just crumble it into the egg mixture. o We finish the tortilla in the oven because it’s easier, but you can flip it by sliding the half-cooked frittata onto a plate. It will still be some liquid in the middle so you need to be careful doing this. Than you place the saucepan over the frittata (and plate) and simply flip it upside down while holding the plate as a lid so it falls down into the sauce pan. And then fry it for a few more minutes on that side. Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla Makes approx 8 slices 1 onion  350 g /­­ 2 1/­­2 cups firm potatoes, diced 5 tbsp butter or oil 2 cups /­­ 100 g Funnel chanterelles (or any other mushroom) 2 leaves /­­ 30 g kale, stems removed 1 large handful fresh parsley  6-8 eggs (depending on the size) salt and pepper Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Add water to a medium size saucepan along with salt and bring to a boil. Peel and chop the onions. Scrub and dice the potatoes into 1-2 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch cubes. Heat 1 tbsp butter in an ovenproof frying pan. Sauté the onions on low heat for about 10-15 minutes until soft and translucent, stir occasionally. Meanwhile add the potatoes to the boiling water and cook for about 13-15 minutes on medium heat, they should be just done. Drain the cooking water and add the potatoes to the saucepan with onions, along with one more tablespoon butter and a little salt. Sauté for a few minutes more to give the potatoes some flavor and color. Pour the onion and potatoes into a separate bowl and put the saucepan back on the heat. Clean the mushrooms, slice them into desired size and add to the pan along with a knob of butter. Fry the mushrooms on low/­­medium heat for 5-6 minutes or until they have released some moisture and started caramelizing. Rinse the kale, chop finely and add it to the pan along with fresh parsley. Let wilt down for a few minutes. Add salt and then pour into the bowl with potatoes. Wipe the saucepan clean and put it back on the heat along with a knob of butter. Crack the eggs in a bowl, add salt and pepper and whisk. Pour the vegetables into the egg mixture and then tip it into the warm saucepan (it’s essential that the pan is warm and buttered for the tortilla not to stick to it). Let it fry for about two minutes (preferably with a lid or a plate on top) and then place the pan in the oven (without lid) and switch on the broiler. After about 10 minutes it should be firm, golden and ready. Wait a few minutes for it to cool down and then run a spatula around the edges to make sure it comes off easily. Cut into triangles and serve with a side salad. It can also be stored in the fridge for a couple of days. PS! Look at these two photos of Luise and Noah, taken exactly one year apart.

Mixed Mushroom Soup

October 9 2017 Meatless Monday 

This mixed mushroom soup, or “zuppa di funghi misti,” as the Italians would say, is perfect for the fall season. The aromas and flavors provided by shallots, garlic, red wine and thyme excellently compliment the mushrooms’ earthiness. We love that this gourmet recipe is also perfect for home cooks! This recipe comes to us from Alicia Walter of Eataly’s La Scuola. - 4 cups mixed mushrooms, cut into 1/­­4-inch pieces, stems and scraps reserved - 5 cups water - 2 tablespoons butter or olive oil - 1 ounce dried porcini mushrooms - 1/­­4 cup shallots, cut into small dice - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 sprigs thyme, leaves picked from stem and chopped - Pinch red chili flakes - 1 bunch kale, stems removed and chopped into 1-inch pieces - 2 tablespoons tomato paste - 1 cup red wine - Extra virgin olive oil - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 loaf rustic bread, sliced and grilled Prepare a mushroom stock by adding the reserved mushroom scraps and dried porcini mushrooms to a large stockpot filled with 5 cups of water. Simmer over low heat for at least 30 minutes and then strain. You should have 4 cups of stock. In a small stockpot, heat the olive oil until almost smoking. Add the mushrooms in one layer, working in batches if necessary. Once the mushrooms have been browned on one side, sprinkle with salt, add in a small spoonful of butter or oil and continue to cook until the mushrooms are browned on all sides. Remove the mushrooms from the pan with a slotted spoon and reserve. Reduce the heat and add the shallots, garlic, thyme, red chili flakes and a pinch of salt. Add more olive oil if necessary. Cook until the shallots are soft. Add the tomato paste and cook until the color changes from bright red to brick red. Add in the red wine and boil until the alcohol has cooked off. Finally, add the kale and an additional pinch of salt. Sauté until soft. Slowly pour in the strained mushroom stock and simmer for ten minutes. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place a quarter of the reserved mushrooms into a shallow bowl. Ladle the broth over the mushrooms. Top with a piece of grilled bread drizzled with olive oil and rubbed with garlic if desired. Enjoy immediately. The post Mixed Mushroom Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Slow Food and Meatless Monday: Cooking Up a Better Future

September 18 2017 Meatless Monday 

Slow Food and Meatless Monday: Cooking Up a Better Future Get ready for a countrywide Meatless Monday! Next week, on September 25, Meatless Monday and Slow Food USA are teaming up for the Cook Up a Better Future campaign. Restaurants and chefs across the nation will create and serve delicious, plant-based meals putting three unsung ingredients in the spotlight. In the combined efforts of promoting biodiversity in food, reducing meat consumption, and fighting climate change, Cook Up a Better Future seeks to bring diners to the table for a great movement for food and the environment. The three ingredients featured – Sea Island Red Peas, Carolina Gold Rice, and Sea Island Benne Seeds, all from Anson Mills are from Slow Foods Ark of Taste, a global catalog of foods facing extinction. Participating Chef Jay Lippin of Crabtrees Kittle House Restaurant & Inn in Chappaqua, New York explains the mission behind Cook Up a Better Future:     Remember to visit one of these restaurants next Monday, September 25 to celebrate global biodiversity and great food! Here are the restaurants and chefs Cooking Up a Better Future: Arizona Orme School, Patti Marrs, Mayer, Arizona California Arcade Cafe, Richard Lewis, Gilroy, California Assaggiare Mendocino, Julia Conway, Fort Bragg, California Deckmans en el Mogor, Drew Deckman, San Ysidro, California GEO Academy at Grant High School, Brenda Ruiz, Sacramento, California Jackson Nunes Consulting, Lesa Jackson Nunes, Menlo Park, California Joni Sare Chef Services, Joni Sare, Cupertino, California Magpie, Edward Roehr, Sacramento, California Savory Cafe, Juan Barajas, Woodland, California Colorado The Living Farm Cafe, Mike Gillespie, Paonia, Colorado Mountain Harvest Festival – Disco Soup, Jim Brett, Hotchkiss, Colorado Florida Nutwood, Steven Rojas, Winter Haven, Florida Table & Tap, David Rashty, Punta Gorda, Florida Georgia Miller Union, Steven Satterfield, Atlanta, Georgia Your Resident Gourmet, Jennifer Hill Booker, Lilburn, Georgia Hawaii Mud Hen Water, Ed Kenney, Honolulu, Hawaii Indiana Late Harvest Kitchen, Meredith Iacocca, Indianapolis, Indiana Illinois Elsa M. Jacobson, farmers market manager/­­recipe taster, Chicago, Illinois JCR, James Rorhbacher, Chicago, Illinois White Oak Gourmet, Thomas Leavitt, Long Grove, Illinois Michigan City Food, Phillip Jones, Detroit, Michigan Granor Farm, Abra Berens, Three Oaks, Michigan Missouri Feast in the Forest Teaching Kitchen, Penelope Beache, St. James, Missouri Good Fortune, Ryan McDonald, St. Louis, Missouri Square1 Project, Logan Ely, St. Louis, Missouri New Jersey Atlantic City Rescue Mission, Dara Heston, Sweetwater, New Jersey New York Crabtrees Kittle House Restaurant & Inn, Jay Lippin, Chappaqua, New York North Carolina Catch, Keith Rhodes, Wilmington, North Carolina South Carolina Wild Olive Cucina Italiana, Carmine Peluso, John’s Island, South Carolina The post Slow Food and Meatless Monday: Cooking Up a Better Future appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meatless Monday Interviews Michelle Cardulla

September 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Interviews Michelle Cardulla As a citizen of Rochester, artist and educator Michelle Cardulla is an active part of the Meatless Monday cause in Upstate New York. She provides cooking classes and outings for kids as well as recipes for them to take home to their parents, sometimes teaming up with Super Bowl champ Roland Big Ro Williams. We spoke to Michelle about how her efforts are making a difference in Upstate New York and how she hopes to spread even more awareness of Meatless Monday and make Rochester a Meatless Monday city. Meatless Monday: What made you choose the vegetarian lifestyle? Michelle Cardulla: Well, it was actually because of an ex-boyfriend, embarrassing to say. I didn’t eat a lot of meat, but I’m half Colombian, half Italian so there was always meat around, such as chorizo and foods like that. But I love to cook and he was vegan, so I immediately switched. Then I realized that this is better food and the whole concept about Meatless Monday is that it’s good for you, it’s good for the planet and good for the animals. So it happened instantly, and now I’m just hooked and crazy about it. How do you feel about being a vegetarian in upstate New York? We do have several places that offer vegan food that also have meat. But you find out that chefs really love the chance to make vegetarian and vegan dishes if you go a little early or call ahead and request it. There’s one place that we go to with friends, and we call the chef a day in advance and say, “Just cook us whatever you want.” He loves the challenge. All chefs are kind of into it if you give them a little bit of a heads up and aren’t demanding. You also work a lot with kids. How do kids respond to Meatless Monday, or meatless as a rule? We know that kids don’t like rules, but they will do something that might be cool and different and experimental. Is that how you sell it to them? I try to never treat it like a rule. For example, when Im doing an art project with them, instead of Hold the paper the hamburger way I say “the veggie burger way,” and they laugh. So I make it something fun and they ask, “Veggie burger, what do you mean?” I said, “Well I’m a vegetarian so I hold it the veggie burger way.” It’s a win-win, and it’s always positive. Then the food has to taste great. No ones going to say, “I want steamed broccoli.” It’s got to be good. First it has to taste good, then it’s vegetarian or vegan, not the other way around. Otherwise you’ve lost the kids. And involving them in the cooking is probably really fun, because then it’s not just food, it’s a project. Exactly. I did a cooking class a few years ago and we made burritos, which are very easy to make with meatless crumbles and vegan cheese. Everyone got to make their own. Then I told them that there was no meat and no dairy in their burritos and they were shocked. They were quite young, so they’re learning the words Meatless Monday, vegetarian, vegan at an early age and having a great experience. We have a Kinderfarmin event where we take them on a field trip with a picnic and they get to pet animals. I mean, food, animals - you got them! They’ll never forget that. So you just talked about how easy it is to sell kids on Meatless Monday. What about their parents? You know, I don’t really deal with the parents that much. But I try to send them home with little things like a little recipe. Adults are a little bit tougher than the kids because they’re stuck on what they want. You’ve worked with Roland Big Ro Williams, and I think one of the most effective things in the vegetarian scene is having powerful, successful athletes proudly proclaim their vegetarianism or veganism. Has working with athletes such as Big Ro made a difference in this? He’s a hero! He’s a guy who won the Super Bowl. He gets up there and does his speeches, saying “Miss Michelle’s over there cooking up vegan food and I’m a vegan.” That is worth a million dollars. When celebrities say it, when athletes say it, people want to emulate them. They want to be like them. So the more celebrity and sports people saying that they’re vegan, the better. Especially the people with big muscles showing that they’re vegan! What’s your ideal goal for Meatless Monday in Rochester by the end of 2017? First of all, I’d like to make it a Meatless Monday city. I think we can do that because I think I can talk the mayor into supporting it. I also want to get the restaurants involved and continue my programs with kids. Keep on spreading the word and building awareness of Meatless Monday. I want everybody to know what Meatless Monday is. This interview has been edited and condensed. The post Meatless Monday Interviews Michelle Cardulla appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Watermelon Panzanella

August 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Watermelon Panzanella Hey friends, this is Masha checking in with my (now annual) Woodstock, NY trip photos and a really good watermelon panzanella recipe that we cooked while there. My boyfriend and I went to Woodstock for the first time last summer and were completely enamored by its lush nature, chill swimming spots, and friendly small town vibe. We couldn’t wait to repeat the experience this year, and ended up staying at the same cottage in the woods for a weekend, which is perfect as far as we’re concerned. For our Saturday night dinner, we repeated the routine of shopping at Kingston Farmer’s Market in the morning and cooking dinner with all the bounty we found there at night. We made grilled pizzas and watermelon panzanella, and enjoyed the sweetest local blueberries together with Fruition chocolate for dessert. The panzanella turned out so lovely, and I couldn’t help but think how perfect it would be for any type of summer gathering or potluck. The inclusion of watermelon is a bit unexpected for panzanella, but it works so well in place of tomatoes and makes the salad extra cooling and hydrating. It’s also a pretty satisfying dish since it’s a bread salad, so it could be served as the prominent or only side at any summery event. I hope you’ll give it a try while August is in full swing! Below is a list of a few new-for-us places we visited and liked in Woodstock and around, but make sure to check out this post from last year for a more extensive list of things to do, if you’re looking to visit the area. Food Cucina – a modern Italian restaurant located in a beautiful farmhouse, serving dishes made with local and seasonal ingredients. I highly recommend getting a table on their wraparound porch, it’s stunning. Oriole 9 – a breakfast and lunch restaurant with an inspired menu and great specials. The coconut tofu hash was really good. Kimchee Harvest – sold at the Kingston Farmer’s Market on Saturdays. Really tasty kimchi made with unique ingredients. They have cucumber kimchi and rhubarb kimchi! I highly recommend getting the rhubarb one. Stuff to Do /­­ Visit High Falls Waterfall – a big waterfall with excellent swimming a bit downstream from the main fall, as well as cliff jumping. Zaborski Emporium – a huge, four story warehouse full of chaotically organized ‘architectural salvage.’ You kind of have to see it to believe it. A very impressive place to visit, especially if you are looking for a vintage door, sink, bathtub, stove, dishes, furniture and sooo much more. Candlestock – a shop full of every kind of candle and candle accessory imaginable. I’m especially into their beeswax candles. Tinker Toys – the coolest toy shop I’ve ever been too. Little to none of that bright-colored plastic, but a ton of educational games and toys for every age. It made shopping for Paloma’s birthday present a breeze. Watermelon Panzanella   Print Serves: 4-6 as a side Ingredients half of a small red onion - thinly sliced 2½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar - divided about 6 slices of crusty, whole grain sourdough bread - torn into bite-sized pieces 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 2 large garlic cloves - minced 1/­­2 teaspoon salt quarter of a medium-large watermelon - cubed 1 English cucumber - sliced into half-moons 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard handful of sprouts or microgreens handful of torn basil Instructions Place the onion into a small bowl and drizzle 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar over it. Set aside. Place the bread onto a covered baking tray, drizzle with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and sprinkle with the minced garlic and salt. Toast in the oven for 10-15 minutes, until the edges are golden. Combine the watermelon, cucumber and toasted bread in a large bowl. Whisk the remaining 1 1/­­2 tablespoons of the apple cider vinegar together with the Dijon mustard in a small bowl. Add the remaining 1/­­4 cup olive oil, whisking it until smooth. Pour the dressing over the salad and mix very well. Serve right away, garnished with sprouts/­­microgreens and basil. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Lemon Plum Salad with a Poppy Seed Dressing Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Spiced and Seeded Multigrain Loaf & A Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Watermelon Panzanella appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

5 Leafy Greens You Should Use More Often

July 26 2017 VegKitchen 

5 Leafy Greens You Should Use More Often Kale has been the rock star of the greens world for a while now, and while it is a good thing, eating a lot of it can grow old pretty quickly. Sure, theres spinach and arugula, both versatile and tasty; and bok choy has become a staple on supermarket shelves. But to stay motivated to […] The post 5 Leafy Greens You Should Use More Often appeared first on VegKitchen.

Grilling on Meatless Monday

July 3 2017 Meatless Monday 

Grilling on Meatless MondayIts that time of year again, when we fire up the grill and take our dinners outside! Usually, meat is in the spotlight for a cookout, but if youre looking for a lighter spread for the hot weather, seek out the produce section! Many seasonal vegetables turn out great after some time on the grill - sometimes they even produce some unexpected flavors! This Monday, for the July 4th holiday weekend, follow these tips for great vegetables on the grill! Think outside the box. When it comes to grilling vegetables, you cant go wrong with the usual suspects - peppers, eggplant, onions, and zucchini. But many more vegetables - and fruits - are delicious after being grilled. Try artichokes and romaine lettuce or avocados and cucumbers! Experiment with seasonings. While the combination of olive oil, salt, and pepper is a classic way to bring out the flavor of grilled veggies, seasonings provide flavor options from around the globe! You can go as mild, savory, or spicy as you want with Caribbean-style jerk seasoning, Italian seasoning, Mexican-style, Indian-style… be creative! Use stand-ins for meat. Sometimes people will still miss burgers and hot dogs despite the best veggie platter, but those cravings can still be satisfied with meatless options. Swap out burgers for portabella mushrooms, or use vegetarian versions of hot dogs, meat crumbles, and bacon to add a savory flavor. Grilling firm tofu or tempeh will not only provide protein but also absorb the flavor from the veggies and smoke. Download our Meatless Monday Burger Cookbook for even more ideas. Try different delivery systems. Veggies are great on their own, but they can be even better when served as part of a meal. Grilled veggies are perfect for tacos - fajitas, anyone? - and dont rule out grilling pizza! Try skewers for shish kabobs or throw grilled veggies in a salad. Dont forget dessert! Vegetables dont own the grilling game. Several fruits take on great new flavors after being grilled when the heat makes them caramelize. Pineapples and stone fruits, like peaches, plums and apricots, are perfect for grilling. But less expected choices like watermelons, grapes, apples, strawberries, and bananas also work great on the grill. Just be careful - fruits will cook a lot faster, so keep an eye on them and let them rest a bit before eating! The post Grilling on Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate

June 11 2017 My New Roots 

Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate When I was in high school, the cool thing to do at lunch was eschew the basement cafeteria (obvi), leave the grounds altogether, and go to the local coffee shop. This made us feel like adults or something, sitting on plush velvet sofas, gossiping about so-and-sos new haircut, and whose older brother wed make out with while sipping a beverage that cost at least an hours worth of babysitting. Of course none of us really liked coffee, so we would blow our money on Italian sodas, fruity teas, and smoothies. When the warmer months rolled around, sandwich boards everywhere would announce that our very favourite, coffee-free drink was back in town: the Frozen Hot Chocolate. Now, if you have never lived in North America, the name and entire concept of this beverage Im sure eludes you. Isnt it an oxymoron, frozen hot chocolate? Yes, I suppose it is, but then I also suppose that is the point - to confuse you enough that you want to buy one. There is a famous restaurant in New York City that first came up with this drink, and although Ive never had the original, plenty of franchised cafes have made their own versions of what it essentially, a frothy chocolate milkshake. In the past few weeks the weather here in Copenhagen has warmed up and Ive finally been in the mood for cool, blended drinks again. But instead of using frozen bananas and other blood sugar-spiking fruits, Ive been experimenting more and more with frozen veggies instead. The results are surprisingly delicious and Im thrilled to have a few new veg-centric smoothies on lock. This is just one of them. The surprise ingredient in my frozen hot chocolate is...wait for it...cauliflower. Now this may sound totally weird, but please trust me, its delicious. Not even in a compromising way. The first sips are pure chocolate paradise, followed by a slight cruciferous waft, which then disappears again, conveniently, for those of us who perhaps dont like vegetables at all (Im looking specifically at my three-year-old son right now). All in all, this is one frosty, chocolate-y miracle of a drink for summer and Im making it every morning to celebrate liquid vegetables tasting like candy. Cauliflower Power Did you know that a cauliflower is actually a little head of thousands of compact flowers? Call me a hippie, but I like the idea of mowing down on a meadow. It makes me smile. Cauliflowers are white because they do not contain any carotene, the pigment found in things like carrots and broccoli, but what it lacks in vitamin A, it makes up for in potassium, folic acid, and vitamin C. And it may surprise you to learn that cauliflower is 25% protein and among the cancer-fighting cruciferous family that includes Brussels sprouts, cabbage and kale. Since this recipe calls for frozen cauliflower, I know some of you will be wondering if that changes the nutritional content in any way. Im happy to report that a recent study done on the freezing of cauliflower has shown its nutrients to be fairly stable after one-year freezer storage. Cauliflower in the study was blanched in near-boiling water for three minutes prior to freezing for one year. Numerous phytonutrients were evaluated in the study, including cauliflower’s sulfur-containing compounds. While nutrients levels were typically reduced after this year of freezer storage, loss of nutrients averaged about 15-35%. Although I always recommend eating fresh vegetables, there are some (fun!) applications that benefit from using the freezer. And its great to know that it doesnt pose too much a treat to those precious nutrients. Plus, frozen veggies (and fruits) can be lower cost, especially when the fresh version is out of season. If youre on a budget, frozen produce is a respectable way to get your plants in! The important part of this recipe is that you use frozen cauliflower, either purchased that way, or a head of cauliflower prepared ahead of time - washed, chopped into florets and frozen overnight. Similarly to how a frozen banana behaves in a blender, cauliflower too takes on a creamy-frothy consistency that works extremely well in this context. I also like to freeze the milk into cubes since this helps to keep the drink very cold and light. Dates sweeten the mixture, and you can scale these up or down depending on how hardcore you are. The cacao powder Ive used is raw, but you can also use regular cocoa powder in a pinch, or if youre on a budget. This recipe is a mere 4 ingredients, but if you feel like gettin fancy, by all means top that frozen hot chocolate with coconut cream (from a can of coconut milk, chilled in the fridge overnight) and some cacao nibs. You can also add some ingredients to the blend itself, like a handful of soaked cashews for extra richness, a scoop of protein powder (I like sprouted pea, sprouted brown rice or hemp), vanilla, or even fresh greens (spinach is very good at hiding in this too). The point of all this is to have fun and enjoy something that tastes like its pretty indulgent, but secretly good for you. Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate Serves 2-3 Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 250g frozen cauliflower florets 1/­­3 cup /­­ 100g pitted dates 6 Tbsp. raw cacao powder approx. 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350ml plant-based milk (I used oat milk) handful of ice cubes (made from either plant-milk ice or water) Optional ingredients: Pinch of vanilla powder coconut cream (from the top of a can of coconut milk)?cacao nibs handful soaked cashews protein powder Directions: 1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend on high until smooth. Add more liquid if necessary (mixture should be relatively thick). 2. Top with coconut cream and cacao nibs, if desired. Enjoy immediately. *   *   *   *   * You guys!!! I am so pumped to finally announce my upcoming wellness retreats this fall. We are going to two spectacular European locations: Ibiza, Spain and Comporta, Portugal. Both simple and luxurious, we have found the perfect settings to unwind, and press the reset button. Our Wild Heart High Spirit program combines inspiring cooking classes and nutrition workshops (lead by yours truly) with delicious movement classes, yoga, pilates and dance by Living Yolates that will both strengthen your body and open your heart. These seven days will nurture you on all levels of your being, help you realign with your internal guidance system, and ignite you on your journey towards greater health! Join us for this incredibly special, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, with Golden Circle Retreats. The post Secret Ingredient Frozen Hot Chocolate appeared first on My New Roots.

Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate

May 31 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate I’m so excited to talk bit about Heather Crosby’s new cookbook Pantry to Plate today. When I received my copy and took a scan from cover to cover, I was immediately blown away by the way this book kindly invites the reader to be both spontaneous and practical in the kitchen by working with the ingredients that are already on hand. With thirty clever recipe templates, Heather demonstrates how to improvise your way to delicious, plant-based meals. For example, Dense Veggies + Protein + Herbs + Binder + Spices = Vegan Meatballs (or Veggie Burgers)! The templates specify the required amount for each component, as well as which components are a must and which ones can be skipped altogether. In addition to the templates, the book is full of other useful tools that help make intuitive cooking a breeze: besides a regular recipe index, there is a cook by ingredient index, as well as mini-templates for creating flavor with aromatics, a whole bit on pairing spices, and a dressing and sauce section that has pretty much every staple sauce recipe you’ll ever need. If you don’t have a particular ingredient for a recipe, chances are you have something on hand that could act as a substitute, and there is a whole chart of interchangeable mix-and-match ingredients in the book to help you work through that. I’m quite terrible at sticking to recipes myself, since I always want to play, add, subtract and find alternative ingredients, so it’s as if this book was made for me. How Heather managed to define freestyle cooking in such clear, comprehensive terms, will remain a mystery to me :) Some more sections/­­recipes I’m most excited about: Coconut Yogurt, Dairy-Free Milks, Probiotic Cream Cheese, Veggie Fries, Cheesy Comfort Food, Hand Pies, Sneaky Brownies, Nice Cream. YUM! Onto the (not) meatballs. These Italian-style veggie meatballs come from the Veggie Burger section of the book and can be easily shaped into burgers or sliders, as Heather points out. They get their substance and ‘meatiness’ from lentils and portobello mushrooms, and a bit of sweetness from carrots and onions, while herbs like oregano, parsley and thyme, and spices like fennel and pepper give them that characteristic Italian flare. We enjoyed them two ways, the first day with zucchini noodles and pesto (pictured here), and the second day, a bit more traditionally, with real pasta and tomato sauce. Both were equally delicious. Heather also suggests to serve the meatballs in a sub roll, or even as an appetizer, along with some tasty sauce. Whether you live and breathe freestyle cooking, or you want to learn a bit more about being intuitive in the kitchen, check out Pantry to Plate, I have a feeling it will earn an important place on your bookshelf :) Italian Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate   Print Serves: 20 to 24 Meatballs or 5 to 6 Full-Sized Burgers Ingredients 2 tablespoons unrefined coconut oil, grapeseed oil, or avocado oil 2 cups (260 g) diced carrots 1 cup (70 g) chopped portobello mushrooms 1 cup (160 g) diced yellow onion 2 cups (400 g) cooked green, brown, or French green lentils (roughly 3/­­4 cup/­­140 g dry) 2 tablespoons water 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme 3 garlic cloves, minced 2 teaspoons ground psyllium husk 2 teaspoons rough-chopped fennel seed 1 teaspoon fresh-cracked black pepper 1 teaspoon sea salt, plus more to taste 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika Instructions In a skillet heated to medium, add 1 tablespoon of the oil and sauté the carrots for 20 minutes, until easily pierced with a fork but firm, not mushy. Add the mushrooms and onion and sauté over medium heat for 5 to 10 minutes, until softened and browning a bit. Transfer to a food processor with the remaining ingredients. Pulse together 30 to 35 times, until just broken up and sticky with texture and bits of color intact. Taste--if needed, season with more salt or seasonings. Pulse or stir to incorporate. Form 1 1/­­2 -inch (4 cm) meatballs with your hands. Heat a skillet to medium and add the remaining oil. Slow-cook the meatballs, rotating often, for 10 to 15 minutes, until browned on all sides. Serve warm. Notes Recipe from YumUniverse Pantry to Plate (C) Heather Crosby, 2017. Photographs copyright (C) Heather Crosby, 2017. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment. Available wherever books are sold. theexperimentpublishing.com 3.5.3226 You might also like... A Salad for the Weekdays Roasted Pepper Lasagna Melon Basil Summer Rolls Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

This isnt the split-pea type of pea soup but instead is made with fresh or frozen English peas--those bright green orbs--and then topped with a decadent dollop of mascarpone cheese mixed with cream cheese, which is the Italian answer to cr?me fraiche or sour cream, but better! Mint and peas are good partners but you dont find mint soup too often. This recipes comes to us courtesy of Fabio Viviani and is featured in his book, Fabios 30-Minute Italian. Makes 4 servings - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 2 tablespoons butter - 3 cups green peas, thawed if frozen, 1/­­4 cup reserved for garnish - 2 shallots, finely chopped - 3 cups vegetable stock - 2 tablespoons cream cheese - 2 tablespoons heavy cream -  1/­­4 cup mascarpone cheese - Zest of 1 lemon -  1/­­4 cup chopped Italian parsley -  1/­­4 cup chopped mint - Salt and pepper  Preheat an oven to 400°F. Place olive oil, butter, peas and shallots on a sheet tray and roast in oven for 8 minutes. While in the oven, heat vegetable stock in a pot until right before boiling. Season stock with salt and pepper. Mix the cream cheese, heavy cream, and mascarpone in a stand mixer until combined and slightly loose--dont whip it too much. Add lemon zest and mix one more time to combine. Season with salt and set aside. When peas are done, add to stock and bring to a rapid boil. Reduce to a simmer, add parsley and mint, and cook for 5 minutes. Using a hand or stand blender, blend the soup until silky smooth. If too thick, add a touch of stock or water. Serve soup with a drizzle of the mascarpone mixture in the middle and the reserved fresh peas to garnish. From Fabios 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani; published by St. Martins Press. Copyright (C)2017 by Fabio Viviani. All Rights Reserved. Used with Permission. Page 52-53. Photo by Matt Armendariz. The post Oven-Roasted Pea Soup with Mint and Mascarpone Dressing appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Blistered Sweet Pepper and Marinated Feta Salad with Arugula and Quinoa

October 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

Quinoa is a superstar. With no gluten yet high in protein, its a perfect grain. Its also sneaky, making sure it touches just about every ingredient in the salad so that with every forkful you get a sprinkling or more of quinoa. Hey! it says, You cant ignore me! And who would want to? Here it blends perfectly with honey, dill, fruity olive oil, briny olives, sweet cherry tomatoes, earthy roasted peppers, and creamy, crumbly feta cheese. This recipes comes to us courtesy of Fabio Viviani and is featured in his book, Fabios 30-Minute Italian.  Makes 4 servings - 1 cup red quinoa - 1 pound red bell peppers, sliced thin - 1 pound yellow bell peppers, sliced thin - 1/­­4 cup honey - 1/­­3 cup olive oil - 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved - 4 ounces crumbled feta cheese - 3 tablespoons chopped dill - 1/­­4 cup chopped Italian parsley - 1/­­4 cup chopped Kalamata olives - 1/­­2 cup arugula - Salt and pepper - Olive oil Bring a large pot of water, 2 to 3 quarts, to a boil and add a touch of salt. Pour in quinoa and boil for 6 to 8 minutes. Turn off the heat and let sit for 3 minutes, then drain. While quinoa is cooking, heat a sauté pan on high heat. Add peppers to the pan and cook for 1 minutes. Toss and cook for another minute. Turn off the heat and add a touch of olive oil. Season with salt and pepper and toss for 30 seconds. Let sit in the pan for 2 minutes, and then transfer to a plate to cool. Mix the honey and olive oil in a large bowl. Add the tomatoes, feta, dill, parsley, and olives. Toss to combine. Once peppers have cooled to close to room temperature, add to the large bowl along with the arugula and quinoa. Season with salt and pepper and an additional drizzle of olive oil to bring everything together. From Fabios 30-Minute Italian by Fabio Viviani; published by St. Martins Press. Copyright (C)2017 by Fabio Viviani. All Rights Reserved. Used with Permission. Page 32-33. Photo by Matt Armendariz. The post Blistered Sweet Pepper and Marinated Feta Salad with Arugula and Quinoa appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Kale & Mushroom Tortilla

October 15 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Kale & Mushroom Tortilla I tried to write this post late last night after all kids had been tucked to bed. I was sitting down in our couch with my laptop on my knee and a bar of dark chocolate, a jar of salted almonds and a glass of water within reach. I was ready to do this. The next thing I remember is Isac’s hand pulling my hair three hours later. A dream had woken him up and he wanted me to come sleep next to him. I took a quick look at my computer and realized I had written zero words. So, new try today. This time I’m sitting at an outside cafe in broad daylight so I’ll hopefully not fall asleep here. Today’s recipe is an autumnal approach on tortilla. You know that potato and egg cake that is sold on the counter in literally every corner shop, cafe and tapas bar in Spain. It’s a great snack and super popular with our kids whenever we are in Barcelona so we have started making it at home as well. It’s easy to get lost in the Spanish tortilla vs Italian frittata discussion. When I previewed the first version of this recipe on Instagram, I already received some comments that “this isn’t a Spanish tortilla”. Well of course not. It’s a Swedish tortilla. Seriously though, I realize that we have bent this recipe quite far - adding kale and mushrooms to it and changing the cooking method a bit - but it is still tastes like a tortilla to me. It’s more potato based than a frittata and slightly firmer so that it can be cut out into triangles, eaten with your hands either warm or cold. We finish it off in the oven rather than flipping it (which apparently is the Italian way of doing it rather than the Spanish) but it’s just because we are lazy and it works so well. And semantics aside, the most important part is that it tastes really good. It also has a rather short ingredient list and has become another one of our last minute dinner solutions. First time we made this autumn version was a few weeks ago after I had scored a huge bag of funnel chanterelles at the market. After having made this stew on the first night and a version of this sandwich for lunch the day after, the bag was still half full. So we added them to a dinner tortilla. Just adding a few more vegetables to a simple tortilla turns it into dinner rather than just a snack. Especially if served with a side salad. These mushrooms are cheaper than chanterelles and usually easier to find in the forest. But if you can’t find them, just use regular chanterelles or any another mushroom. Here are a few tips and tricks that we use when making tortilla. o Don’t bother peeling the potatoes. If you use fresh and scrubbed potatoes, keeping the peal on. Not only does it save time, but also makes your tortilla more rustic. Dicing the potatoes instead of slicing it also helps making it more rustic. o Traditionally in a tortilla, the onion is first sautéed for 20 minutes and then the potatoes are fried in LOTS of olive oil for another 20-30 minutes but we prefer precooking the diced potatoes in water instead (while the onion is sautéing). It saves time and we can reduce the amount of oil. If you have precooked potatoes leftover in the fridge, they are perfect for this dish. o We make this with butter instead of olive oil because it’s more heat resistant and it brings out the best flavor in mushrooms. But you can of course use any oil of preference. o Fry the mushrooms on a low/­­medium heat. Don’t crowd the pan and always listen for the sizzle. If you cant hear them sizzling, the temperature is too low. o Luise has developed an intolerance against garlic (especially raw) so we have kept it out of this recipe, but I bet it could be good along with the mushrooms and kale. o If you don’t like kale, try it with spinach. Or use the same method with another range of vegetables. o Feta cheese is also really good in this combination. Just crumble it into the egg mixture. or before placing it in the oven. o We finish the tortilla in the oven because it’s easier, but you can flip it by sliding the half-cooked frittata onto a plate. It will still be some liquid in the middle so you need to be careful doing this. Than you place the saucepan over the frittata (and plate) and simply flip it upside down while holding the plate as a lid so it falls down into the sauce pan. And then fry it for a few more minutes on that side. Kale & Mushroom Tortilla Makes approx 8 serving 1 onion  350 g /­­ 2 1/­­2 cups firm potatoes, diced 5 tbsp butter or oil 2 cups /­­ 100 g Funnel chanterelles (or any other mushroom) 2 leaves /­­ 30 g kale, stems removed 1 large handful fresh parsley  6-8 eggs (depending on the size) salt and pepper Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Add water to a medium size saucepan and bring to a boil. Peel and chop the onions. Scrub and dice the potatoes into 1-2 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch cubes. Heat 1 tbsp butter in an ovenproof frying pan. Sauté the onions on low heat for about 10-15 minutes until soft, translucent and smells sweet, stir occasionally. Meanwhile add the potatoes to the boiling salted water and cook for about 13-15 minutes on medium heat, they should be almost done. Drain the cooking water and add the potatoes to the saucepan with onions, along with one more tablespoon butter. Sauté for a few minutes more to give the potatoes some flavor and color. Pour the onion and potatoes into a separate bowl and put the saucepan back on the heat. Clean the mushrooms, slice them into desired size and add to the pan along with a knob of butter. Fry the mushrooms on low/­­medium heat (you should here them sizzling without burning) for 5-6 minutes or until they have released some moisture and started caramelizing. Rinse the kale, chop finely and add it to the pan along with fresh parsley. Let wilt down for a few minutes. Salt generously and then pour into the bowl with potatoes. Wipe the saucepan clean and put it back on the heat along with a knob of butter. Beat the eggs with salt and pepper. Pour the vegetables into the egg mixture and then tip it into the warm saucepan (it’s essential that the pan is warm and buttered. Let it fry for about two minutes (preferably with a lid or a plate on top) and then place the pan in the oven (without lid) and switch on the broiler. After about 10 minutes it should be firm, golden and ready. Wait a few minutes for it to cool down and then run a spatula around the edges to make sure it comes off easily. Cut into triangles and serve with a side salad. It can also be stored in the fridge for a couple of days. PS! Look at these two photos of Luise and Noah, taken exactly one year apart.

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese

September 26 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese Italian pickled mixed vegetables, called giardiniera, can be quite tart, so its best to drain and rinse before using. You can make this mac and cheese without the gardiniera or with the addition of cooked vegetables, frozen, thawed green peas, or marinated artichoke hearts. You can also make this ahead and then cover and pop it in the oven to reheat.   Giardiniera Mac and Cheese - 8 to 12 ounces fiore pasta or other bite-sized pasta shape - 2 1/­­2 cups giardiniera vegetables, drained and coarsely chopped - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­3 cup panko crumbs - 1 1/­­2 cups unsweetened almond milk - 1/­­3 cup raw cashew pieces, soaked and drained - 2 tablespoons cornstarch or tapioca flour - 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast flakes - 1 tablespoon mellow white miso - 1 heaped tablespoon tomato paste - 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar or lemon juice - 3/­­4 teaspoon mustard powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 small clove minced garlic - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste - Cook the pasta in a pot of boiling salted water until it is al dente. About 3 minutes before the pasta is done cooking, stir in the giardiniera. Drain and leave in the strainer. - Heat the oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat. Add the panko crumbs, stirring to coat with the oil. Cook, stirring for a few minutes until the crumbs are toasted. Remove from the heat and set aside. - In a blender, combine all of the remaining ingredients and blend until smooth and creamy. Pour the sauce into the pot in which the pasta was cooked and cook stirring, over medium-high heat, until the sauce is hot, bubbly, and thickened, about 4 minutes. Add the pasta and vegetables to the sauce, stirring gently to combine and heat through. Transfer to a casserole dish and sprinkle with the reserved panko. Serve hot. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. The post Giardiniera Mac and Cheese appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower

September 5 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower Now that we are back doing more frequent recipe posts again, we also wanted to throw some super simple, everyday type dinners into the mix. Family style! The hands-down easiest dish that I (David) know (and make when I’m alone with the kids and have max 10 minutes to prepare dinner) is to cook a package of fresh gnocchi, mix a store-bought pesto with mashed avocado, add a little extra lemon and olive oil and just stir everything together with some canned chickpeas and cherry tomatoes on top. Its a lazy dinner but the kids devour it, its super easy and most importantly QUICK. Today’s recipe is a riff on that. We are fully aware that you hardly need yet another recipe for spaghetti al pesto. But we have got a few twists that turn this simple Italian classic into a rather nutrition packed meal. And a really tasty one as well. Although our version is so far from the original that we probably never will be allowed back into our beloved Italy again ... - Try chickpea (or lentil) pasta. These new-style pastas made on chickpea or lentil flour taste good, have surprisingly pleasant texture and are more protein packed than regular pasta. If you want to use ordinary pasta, we’d recommend adding some cooked chickpeas to the dish as well. They taste great tossed with pesto. - Add avocado to your pesto. It will be much creamier, fluffier, richer and rounder. It will also be more fat, but it’s the gooood fat. If you want to make it lighter, replace half of the oil in the pesto with water. Also, use half basil and half baby spinach for a more affordable and nutrient packed pesto. - Make it vegan by adding nutritional yeast to your pesto and make a quick nut dust instead of parmesan. - Add roasted vegetables. Pesto pasta is good, but adding roasted vegetables is simply better. You get more flavors and something to actually chew on (because we all slurp spaghetti, right!?). It takes like 5 minutes to prepare one tray of roasted vegetables (oven time obviously not included), so if you have 5 minutes to spare, do it. Also, if you are smart, you’ll roast a second tray of vegetables simultaneously and you are halfway through dinner prep for tomorrow. We went with roasted cauliflower and zucchini coins this time because it was what we had at home and we know that the kids love ’em. Broccoli or parsnip or carrots would of course be just as good. - If you are not vegan and want to make a luxury version of this, try serving it with some torn burrata cheese on top. Vegan Pesto Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower & Cheesy Nut Dust Serves 4 We’ve kept this dish vegan but if you are not vegan you probably don’t have nutritional yeast at home and in that case you can just grate vegetarian parmesan or pecorino instead. The obvious shortcut here is to buy a pesto, mix it with avocado and follow the rest of the recipe. Roasted veggies 1 cauliflower 1 zucchini 2 tbsp olive oil sea salt Cheesy Nut Dust and Vegan Pesto 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70 g almonds 1 tbsp nutritional yeast 1 large handful basil 1 large handful spinach 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice a few pinches salt 1 small avocado (use half if you have a large and serve the rest on the side) chickpea pasta or pasta of choice, for 4 persons To serve  Lettuce or baby spinach cherry tomatoes, quartered Set the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F. Break the cauliflower into small florets and chop the stem inte bite-size pieces. Slice the zucchini. Toss cauliflower and zucchini with a little oil and salt and spread out on a baking sheet. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until soft and golden. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to instructions on the package (reserve a little bit of pasta water when draining) and start making cheesy nut dust and pesto. Add almonds, 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast and a large pinch sea salt to a food processor. Pulse on high speed until all nuts are mixed/­­pulverized into coarse sand/­­dust. Place half of the cheesy nut dust in a small bowl and leave the rest in the food processor for the pesto. Add 1 more teaspoon nutritional yeast, basil, spinach, olive oil, lemon juice and a little more salt. Mix until smooth, taste and adjust. This is your basic vegan pesto. Now add avocado and pulse for an even creamier pesto, you might want to add a little more lemon and olive oil at this point. Toss half of the pesto with the cooked pasta and a little bit of pasta water (add chickpeas, if using regular pasta). Arrange the pasta on four plates, add roasted cauliflower, zucchini slices, lettuce, tomatoes and a few dollops pesto on top. Sprinkle with cheesy nut dust and a little olive oil. Enjoy! ************ PS - Here are a few other things that we have been up to recently! Some of you might remember my trip to Turkey, meeting displaced Syrian families last year? Echo and UN’s World Food Programme have made this little video from my trip and from our home here in Stockholm. I talk a bit about how similar our priorities are even though our situations are vastly different. And the importance of the support these families get from WFP to gain a sense of normality again. I don’t like hearing my own voice and I had an eye infection when we filmed this but there are lots of cute kids in the footage and the topic is very close to my heart. You can watch it here. We have also shared a week’s worth of family friendly recipes in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine which is out now (in the UK). The feature is photographed by Simon Bajada.  And we recently shot a Fridge Raider feature talking about a few of our favorite ingredients in the latest issue of Olive Magazine. Also out now (in the UK). Aaaand, we have also worked on a campaign for Swedish organic brand Kung Markatta with recipes, tips and videos focused on reducing food waste at home (only in Swedish though).  Phew, looking at it like this, I now realize why this summer felt so intense ;)

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce

August 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce Hello! This is David & Luise. Remember us? During our almost eight years of blogging we have never left it silent for two months before. We’re going to do what we always do in these situations and blame the kids. Wether we miss a dentist appointment, forget to answer a text message, get a parking ticket or are two months late with a blog post, it’s always our kid’s fault. In this case however it’s actually somewhat true. We simply underestimated how much time and attention three kids on summer holiday takes. They have sooo much energy. I (David) have been thinking of ways to connect them (and with them I mean Isac) to the power grid so that they (he) could replace a nuclear power plant or two. And I could perhaps cash in a Nobel price for saving the world. Anyway, after a couple of weeks of feeling bad about not having a single second over to blog new recipes, we instead decided to give ourselves a summer break from it all. So we have been trying to keep up with our children’s pace (obviously impossible) and play on their rules (also impossible because they ignore rules) this summer. It’s been fun and much needed. But we are here now with plenty of new recipe ideas and projects. Lots of other things have happened during the summer. We almost bought ourselves a tiny smoothie bar in a park, we burnt pancakes from Green Kitchen at Home inside a jam-packed little book store in Bath and we have planned the release of the European languages next month, but we’ll find time to talk more about all that. For now, let’s just talk food. Before the summer and watermelon season is all over. This recipe has been going on repeat all summer. It’s actually a combination of two recipes which we recently realized work brilliantly together. A simple watermelon and halloumi salad and our Magic Green Sauce. We first got the idea to combine watermelon with halloumi from a recipe photo in a supermarket pamflett and from that combo, we’ve added some chickpeas, cherry toms and pumpkin seeds to make it less of a side and more of a meal. It’s a really nice combination. Rich and chewy halloumi, sweet and fresh watermelon, crunchy pumpkin seeds and a tangy, flavorful and slightly spicy sauce. If I wasn’t such a humble guy, I would say that it’s probably one of the best watermelon salads you’ll try this summer. Luckily, I’m super humble and will just say that it’s pretty good. A simple vegan option would be to replace the halloumi with marinated tofu. Just make sure to squeeze out the liquid before marinating it, so it soaks up all the flavor. Quinoa, black lentils or rice could also be a great addition if you want to make this salad more substantial. Here is a little salad assembling action by Luise. Technically, the Magic Green Sauce is just our take on Chimichuri with a more hippie name. We use lime juice instead of vinegar and have added a little avocado to give it the right balance between creamy and chunky and also a few drips maple syrup to round off the sharpness from the other flavors. The magic lies in its ability to transfer any simple dish into something flavorful. Apart from this salad, we also use it on scrambled eggs, as a dip for raw crudités, inside rye sandwiches and on top of shakshuka. We have made it with a number of different herb combinations and found that anything goes (but parsley, cilantro/­­coriander and mint is still a fav). Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Green Sauce Serves 4 Watermelon & Halloumi Salad 1 kg /­­ 2 lb watermelon 200 g /­­ 7 oz halloumi 150 g /­­ 1 cup good quality cherry tomatoes  1 can /­­ 200 g /­­ 1 cup cooked chickpeas  60 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup pumpkin seeds /­­ pepitas 2 large handfuls Mâche lettuce (or any tender lettuce) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 lime Salt Magic Green Sauce 1 large handful (30 g /­­ 1 tightly packed cup) mixed fresh herbs (we used parsley, cilantro and mint) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 120 ml olive oil Juice from 1 lime 1 tbsp capers 1 tsp maple syrup 1 clove garlic 1 small chili 1/­­2 avocado 1/­­2 tsp sea salt flakes Start by preparing the sauce. Add all sauce ingredients to a food processor and pulse a few times until coarsely mixed, check the flavor and consistency and add more salt, herbs or oil if needed. If you don’t have a food processor, finely chops herbs, capers, garlic and chili, mash the avocado and mix everything in a bowl together with olive oil, lime juice and maple syrup. Add salt to taste. Then set aside. Dice the watermelon and halloumi, quarter the tomatoes and rinse the chickpeas. Toast the pumpkin seeds on medium heat in a dry pan with a little salt until they begin to pop, then transfer them to a chopping board and chop coarsely. Add a little oil to the pan and fry the halloumi for a couple of minutes until golden on all sides. Arrange the lettuce in a bowl or on a serving platter. Add chickpeas, tomatoes, watermelon and halloumi. Squeeze over a little lime juice and drizzle with oil and toss until mixed. Top with pumpkin seeds and Magic Green Sauce, with extra in the side. Enjoy! ***************** PS! We are off to Rome now to celebrate that it was 10 years ago that my drunk feet tried to seduce dance Luise on a club by the Tiber while simultaneously using ALL my Italian pick up lines on her (took me approx 1 hour before I realized that she was Danish and not Italian!). We’re bringing all the kids this time and we’d really appreciate a comment if you know any good places to eat, fun playgrounds, outdoor pools or your favorite gelato bars. Grazie!

Sautéed Golden Tomatoes with Olives and Parsley

July 27 2017 VegKitchen 

Sautéed Golden Tomatoes with Olives and Parsley Now that I have a garden, though its theme is more overgrown than Italian, I’m finding a lot of inspiration from a wonderful cookbook titled My Italian Garden by Viana La Place. Its filled with simple, fresh vegetable recipes, most of which are vegetarian, and many of which are vegan or can be made so with minor […] The post Sautéed Golden Tomatoes with Olives and Parsley appeared first on VegKitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright

June 14 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright We’re so excited to introduce this new interview series today! It’s something that we’ve had in the works for a while, and we’re really happy to be kicking it off with such a special guest. Self-care has been a very prevalent topic in the wellness sphere lately, and it’s something that we’re both very passionate about, as evidenced by our love for nourishing foods :) We do, however, find that many articles on the subject can be quite generalized and anxiety-inducing, often leaving us with a feeling of not doing it right, or not doing enough. We became interested in digging a little deeper, in order to see what self-care looks like applied to real life, by real people we admire. We are fascinated by the quiet elegance of everyday routine and always searching for day-to-day inspiration, which we’ll strive to discover plenty of in the series. We hope you enjoy these in-depth conversations, and feel free to reach out with suggestions for future interview guests! Today’s dialogue is with Laura Wright, blogger and author of The First Mess Cookbook. Laura is a magician when it comes to approachable, plant-based cooking, and we look to her blog and cookbook almost every day for reliable, delicious recipes, as well as beautiful photography and an overall feeling of warmth and lightness. In this interview, Laura talks about her approach to self-nourishment, exercise, beauty, stress, fun, and much more. As expected, her self-care routine is full of wisdom and inspiration. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I get in moods where both are equally important. I stick to a certain rhythm with my early mornings and evenings though because I find it makes for better sleep and more productive days. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I wake up with the sun and take our dog out. Then, I drink a huge glass of water and make coffee, tea, matcha, or some sort of elixir. It’s usually coffee though. I read for a bit while I have my first morning beverage, or I’ll do a bit of journaling. After my partner leaves for work, I head out for a walk/­­run or do some form of exercise. Then, I fix up breakfast (usually a smoothie) and plan out what I’d like to accomplish that day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? This time of year, I do most of my gardening after dinner, and I find that really helps me wind down. Just being out there as the sun’s going down seems to send a good message to my brain that it’s time to relax. Also, limited screen exposure after dinner is key. I use the Saje Natural Wellness Sleep Well roller on the soles of my feet, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Either a smoothie with greens and healthy fats (avocado, almond butter, coconut etc) or steel-cut oatmeal with tons of toppings in the winter. Lunch – Usually whatever I’m working on suffices as lunch, but ideally a salad with a little bit of grains tossed in and some legumes/­­nuts/­­seeds for protein. Stuff on toast is a go-to lunch for me as well. Snack – Right now I’m really into plantain chips with guacamole. Dinner – This time of year, we grill almost all of our vegetables and serve them with a big salad or slaw, whatever protein we’ve got, and a little heap of fermented vegetables or sauerkraut. I’ve been making these amazing grilled veggie tacos with cassava flour tortillas lately too. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes! Coffee, matcha, black tea, green tea–I love it all in moderation. I can be sensitive to caffeine sometimes, so I try to limit myself to 2 caffeinated beverages a day, and always before 2 pm . -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I try to never skip breakfast because when I do, I need something sweet by the time 3 o’clock  hits. I find that consuming a good amount of healthy fat in the mornings helps me curb those cravings. Sometimes you just need a treat though. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? So many! I have this tray on my counter with all of these powders and tinctures that I sprinkle into my coffee/­­tea or other elixirs. For supplements, I take a probiotic, Vitamin D3, B12, and Omega 3 daily. With superfoods/­­powders etc: I like all of the mushroom powders these days (reishi, chaga, lion’s mane and cordyceps) because they help soothe my nerves as well as provide a focused mental energy of sorts. I put spirulina in every smoothie I make because it has so much going on nutritionally. I take ashwagandha and mucuna pruriens to help with stress management. I love all the Moon Juice Dusts, too (Spirit Dust is my go-to). -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I could count a hundred personal influences in the realm of self-care, but I think Jason Wachob’s Wellth is a good place to start for a lot of people thinking about the subject. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do! I’m always changing it up because I like variety. I like to run, hike, do weight and resistance routines, swim in the summertime, and yoga here and there too. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I really like it, but I find I need some convincing to get started. Getting to it early in the morning is the safest bet for me personally, just to have it ticked off the list before the day really starts. And thinking about the delicious smoothie I’m going to drink after always helps :) -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Getting a step tracker! I know that sounds weird. I work from home and sometimes I spend way too much time puttering on the computer or standing still in my kitchen. Now I head out for at least 13,000 steps a day in addition to my workouts. I sleep deeper and have so much more energy during the day. Plus our dog loves all the extra walks :) Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Feeling clear-minded, open, and confident in any situation. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? My skin is so sensitive so I have my routine down to a science. I love to dry brush before I hop in the shower. From there, I use this special oil-based soap from France, and then while my skin is still damp, I moisturize with coconut oil. For my face, I use a similar oil-based cleanser, rosewater and witch hazel toner, the Cell Serum from Living Libations and Tata Harper’s Clarifying Moisturizer. I’ve also been using Cocokind’s Chia Facial Oil at night along with their Full Brow Balm. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Tocotrienols! They make smoothies/­­hot drinks super creamy and my skin loves all that Vitamin E. Plus all the usuals like greens, proper hydration, and omega-rich foods like flax seeds. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? The only tip I have is to pay attention to what you’re eating and drinking! Your skin/­­hair/­­overall appearance is a direct reflection of what’s happening on the inside. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? I’m a lot better at knowing my limits these days. I can sense when I’m bordering on overcommitment, and I just shut it down and start saying no to stuff. I try to nourish my body well and carve out frequent pockets of time for quiet and stillness. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going outside, meditating, reading a good book, cooking a beautiful meal with no intention of posting it to Instagram :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I’ll eat lots of citrus and ginger and make a pot of vegetable broth with thyme, garlic, and shiitake mushrooms. I do immune tonics with mushroom powders too, drink lots of fluids, and take extra care to get a good night’s sleep and think positive. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Like I mentioned before, I’m a lot better at sensing when a project may not serve me/­­my career than I used to be. I think the work/­­life balance comes a lot more naturally now. When I was making my cookbook, it felt like I lived in that world, and I was eating a lot of takeout and just not looking after myself because I put that work first. When I start turning to certain shortcuts or I’m habitually depending on caffeine or working on the computer past my bedtime, I know it’s time to reset my outward glance. A reset usually means a day off with some gardening, intentionally simple meal prep, and creative pursuits that aren’t food related. Knowledge -- Your way of coming up with healthful, plant-based recipes that are unique and modern, but also doable and approachable is unprecedented in the food blog world. What is your process when it comes to developing recipes? That is very generous of you to say! I have a professional cooking background, but I also appreciate the comfort of ease and efficiency. Ultimately I want my recipes to bring some kind of enjoyment or sense of ease/­­relief in someone’s life. Those two goals are front of mind when I get to work on a certain recipe concept. The recipe will usually start out slightly chef-y (lots of ingredients, multiple cooking methods, longer prep time), and then slowly I edit it down to streamline and make it do-able for most lightly experienced cooks. I also read every food magazine/­­food media website I can to stay up to date on new cooking methods and ingredients. Fun & Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I work on my house! I like tinkering with the layout and picking up new pieces, plants, rugs etc. My favourite/­­ultimate “treat yourself” strategy though is booking a weekend (or longer) away somewhere with my partner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie to feed the soul: Book – Invincible Living by Guru Jagat Song/­­Album – The Master of None Season 2 soundtrack on Spotify. Italian disco, classic New Edition etc.! Movie – Win It All on Netflix (such a feel good movie, seriously) -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? –  A rosewater sprayer in TSA-approved size for a fresh/­­hydrating face mist –  Snacks (raw nuts, bars etc) –  Amazing Grass packets for when I need greens fast. –  Moisturizer –  Large scarf that doubles as a blanket –  A smoky quartz that I don’t leave home without. –  A hemp cloth and tiny container of oil-based soap because I always want to wash my face immediately after a flight, even a short one. –  Minimal clothing–usually neutral coloured basics that work well for a variety of situations. I tend to always buy clothing at my destination so I go light on it when I’m packing. –  Saje Peppermint Halo: I get back pain here and there and use this as a pain killer of sorts, both at home and away. It’s like rolling ice right onto the problem area! –  Bamboo utensils and metal straw for minimizing waste on the go. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Renee Bird! Based on this amazing post, I think she may be just the person for this series ;) All photos courtesy of Laura Wright The post Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Street Fair Corn from NYC Vegan

June 6 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Street Fair Corn from NYC VeganI love New York — and I REALLY love NYC Vegan, the fantastic new cookbook by Michael Suchman and Ethan Ciment aka the Vegan Mos.  It’s such a fun book, billed with personal anecdotes and stories about New York City.  Best of all, of course, are the wonderful recipes — all the great food New York is know for, made deliciously vegan.  One of my favorites is the Street Fair Corn (below) which I will be making regularly this summer. Kudos to Michael and Ethan for a job well done and for bringing New York City into our kitchens!  If you don’t own NYC Vegan, do yourself a favor and order a copy today. Street Fair Corn Summer in New York City means weekend street fairs. The fairs have no rides or games. Instead, avenues are closed to traffic for several blocks, where dozens of vendors sell food. One of the most popular foods is Mexican Street Corn--freshly grilled sweet corn coated in a mixture of cheese and spiced mayonnaise. We created a vegan version of this dish that tastes even better than the original. (From NYC Vegan, copyright (C) 2017 by Michael Suchman and Ethan Ciment. Used by permission. Photo by Jackie Sobon.) Serves 4 Ingredients - 1/­­4 cup nondairy mayonnaise - 1/­­4 cup nondairy sour cream - 1/­­4 cup nondairy parmesan, plus more for serving - 1/­­2 teaspoon chili powder, plus more for serving - 1 medium clove garlic, finely minced - 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh cilantro or Italian parsley - 4 ears sweet corn, shucked - 1 lime, cut into wedges Preparation - Heat a grill for direct-heat grilling, or heat a grill pan over high heat on the stove. While the grill is heating, in a medium mixing bowl, combine the mayonnaise, sour cream, nondairy parmesan, chili powder, garlic, and cilantro. Stir until completely combined. - Place the corn directly on the hot grill and cook, rotating occasionally, until cooked through and charred in spots on all sides, about 8 minutes total. - Remove the corn from the grill and transfer to a serving plate. Use a pastry or basting brush to generously coat each ear of corn with the mayonnaise mixture. Sprinkle with extra cheese and chili powder and serve immediately with lime wedges.     The post Street Fair Corn from NYC Vegan appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Italian Meatloaf

May 22 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Were you a meatloaf fan growing up? Not the singer, but the meat concoction that was oddly shaped to resemble a loaf of bread? There’s no denying that meatloaf was a staple comfort food….but it’s not even close to being vegan friendly. Never fear though…because where there’s a vegan, there’s a way. And Pastabased has proven that with this amazing Italian meatloaf recipe. It’s healthier than normal meatloaf, but still hearty and flavorful. Stuffed with a cheesy center and then smothered in red sauce! Here’s how you can replicate this classic dish yourself: Read the recipe in full here.   The post Vegan Italian Meatloaf appeared first on The Veggie Blog.


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