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interesting vegetarian recipes

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast)

October 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) We went to Italy earlier this month and visited the Amalfi Coast and Rome. Having visited the Abruzzo region a few years ago, I continue to be amazed at how different Italy is from region to region. They are almost like separate, tiny countries. It was a great trip – we lucked out with the weather, all our extensive train, plane, bus and boat journeys went pretty smoothly, and we got to see so many breathtaking things. The only complaint we had is a classic one – not enough time there. Below are some photos from the trip, as well as some notes and suggestions that we hope will be useful to future travelers :) Amafli Coast Our first impression was that this is an amazingly beautiful area that’s been completely overrun by tourism. That being said, there are still ways to enjoy it less like a tourist and more like a visitor, and it’s honestly so breathtaking that it’s very worth the visit. We stayed in Vettica, a quiet village right next to Amalfi, in a tiny Airbnb with a big terrace overlooking the cliffs and the sea. For us, it was the best of both worlds. We saw close to no tourists in Vettica, and instead got to see how people lead their lives in such an amazing setting. We watched locals going to church, to the market, feeding their cats, and being completely unaffected by the copious amounts of stairs in their cliffside neighborhoods (we were out of breath every time). Yet Amalfi was close enough (still a 45 minute walk or a stressful bus ride, but totally doable) that we had access to the boats and buses that shuttle people to Capri, Positano, and other beautiful places on the coast. It was really nice to have some distance from Amalfi, because it’s incredibly crowded with tour groups on any given day, but you have to go through it to get pretty much anywhere on the coast. Capri Once we got to Capri, we were wishing that we could spend the night there. There’s so much to do and it’s so incredibly beautiful. Take the chairlift up to Monte Solaro, the highest peak, to see the insane panorama that opens up. Walk around both Capri and Anacapri. Capri is better for partying and Anacapri – for quiet walks on tiny streets. Visit the Church of San Michele in Anacapri to see the intricate, hand-painted floor. Eat torta caprese and caprese sandwiches in the spirit of true tourism :) A complete must is a visit to the Villa San Michele, a villa built by Axel Munthe, the Swedish physician and author. Munthe was a collector of classical artifacts, so the whole villa is tastefully decorated by objects from the antiquity, some of which were found right on site during the construction of the villa. There is a lush garden, a breathtaking panorama of the island and the sea, and every inch of the place is pristine and photogenic. Positano Although Positano is an incredibly beautiful town with stunning architecture, we concluded that we would have been better off having a second day in Capri instead of coming here. The reason: it is swamped with tourists and touristy shops in a way that feels quite forced and concentrated (Capri, though also very touristy, had a more spread out feel). Maybe we went to the wrong places? If you have more than four days on the Amalfi coast, which is all we had, we would still recommend coming here. It also largely depends on your goals for your travels, of course :) Ravello We went here mainly because the host of our favorite Russian travel show visited the town in one of the episodes, and it looked totally breathtaking. Ravello is a town very high in the mountains, and the bus ride up took us on some of the tightest serpentines we’ve ever seen. The views from the top are the pay off, and the air feels different – very much like the freshest mountain air. Another beautiful villa to visit is the Villa Cimbrone in Ravello, full of ancient structures, fountains, sculptures, a beautiful garden and yet another breathtaking panorama. Food We were surprised to learn that the region is actually not known for its food, and finding a good, authentic meal isn’t easy because large amounts of tourists equal large amounts of tourist trap restaurants. It is Italy however, where even bad food is decent. We did manage to find some gems, but Rome really took the prize over Amalfi in the culinary department. Here are a few favorites: Pizzeria Da Nino, Conca dei Marini A charming, small restaurant in the town neighboring Vettica, with home-cooked food and a super charming owner (Nino!) that greets you at the door and is easy to understand even when you don’t speak a word of Italian. Go for the fresh-made pasta. Al Pesce d’Oro, Vettica A restaurant at a bed and breakfast in Vettica with good pizza. We went for the zucchini and squash blossom one and were pleasantly surprised at how solid and tasty it was. Da Ferdinando, Positano An outdoor restaurant right on the beach in Positano, with a really fun atmosphere and tasty dishes. La Vecchia Cantina, Ravello When visiting Ravello, lunch presented itself as a problem, because we didn’t research anything beforehand. We wandered off the central square and into this restaurant, and ended up having a pretty solid meal with very nice service. Bar Ferraro, Anacapri Went here when visiting Capri to try the mandatory torta caprese. It was very good, and so were the little frozen ricotta shortbread cookies. Rome We are so completely in love with Rome. We only had three days there, which is nothing! It was hard to cover everything we wanted, but we tried our best. We stayed in a really cool Airbnb near Campo de Fiori, which is a centrally located square that’s busy at all times of the day. Luckily, our actual location was on a very quiet, narrow street, so it was the best of both worlds. We visited the main historic sites (the Forum, Colosseum, Pantheon etc.), as well as the Jewish Ghetto, Trastevere, Testaccio and Monti. Below are some favorites. Sites The obvious: the Forum, the Colosseum, Ponte Sant’Angelo, Piazza del Popolo, Piazza Navona, the Pantheon. Even though the Pantheon was incredibly crowded, it was still super impressive. This inscription on Raphael’s burial is still in my mind: ‘Here lies Raphael, by whom nature herself feared to be outdone while he lived, and when he died, feared that she herself would die.‘ Wow. Churches: Santa Maria del Popolo, Santa Maria Sopra Minerva, San Luigi dei Francesi, Santa Maria in Trastevere, it’s endless really :) Food La Montecarlo A really fun place that serves Roman-style thin crust pizza and more, crowded with locals at any given time. They casually line each new customer’s table with white paper in place of a tablecloth, and write out the check on the paper at the end of the meal, from memory. The service is fast and efficient. We liked the super thin-crusted pizza (endless topping options), the pesto pasta and mushroom pasta, and of course, the arancini (fried rice balls served as an app). Roscioli If you’ve ever watched any food & travel shows about Rome, chances are Roscioli was featured as a mecca for everything delicious in the center of the city. Roscioli has a whole cluster of eateries right near Campo de Fiori: a deli/­­restaurant, a cafe with a coffee counter and bite-sized pastries, a bakery, and a full-on pizza restaurant called Emma. The coffee at the cafe is excellent. At the bakery, get any of the delicious by-the-slice pizzas that they are putting out all day, as well as the bread. We liked the bread so much, we smuggled a loaf home in our luggage. If you go to Emma, definitely try the pizza, since it’s the specialty there, and apparently a whole lot of effort went into developing the pizza dough recipe. If you go to the restaurant/­­deli, Katie Parla has some great advice on navigating the menu there. Antico Forno Cordella (or Urbani) If you find yourself in the Jewish Ghetto in the morning or afternoon, stop in here for a slice of their delicious, thin and crispy pizza rossa. Pianostrada A fun dinner place with neat decor and a more modern, deconstructed take on Roman classics. Urbana 47 If you go to the Colosseum, you might as well stop here for lunch, as it’s about a 10 minute walk away. They focus on local and seasonal ingredients, and we really loved every pasta dish we ordered here. (Thank you Pauline for the recommendation!) Sant’Eustacchio il Caffe We really enjoyed sitting at an outside table here with a cappuccino and a cornetti (both very good), watching the morning world go by. Go here on your way to the Pantheon and/­­or Piazza Navona, both are super close. Don’t miss the church Sant’Eustachio that’s right there, with a beautifully sculpted deer head on the facade. Volpetti If you are in the mood to visit a serious deli, check out Volpetti in Testaccio. They carry an overwhelming amount of cheeses, meats, olives, marinated veggies, pizza by the slice, and fried snacks. They are also able to vacuum wrap anything you buy, so that you can put the stuff in your luggage with little fear of it being taken away at the airport. Sack Food Another really interesting delicatessen that carries really unusual cheeses and meats. If you are anything like us and gift food as travel gifts to your omnivore friends, this place is great. You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Travel Notes: Chicago Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Saveur Magazine Best Food Blog Awards, Golubka in Special Interest .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Travel Notes: Italy (Rome and the Amalfi Coast) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mango Papaya Smoothie Bowl

July 24 2017 VegKitchen 

Mango Papaya Smoothie Bowl If youre new to smoothie bowls, youll soon understand their their appeal. This one combines two juicy tropical fruits, mango and papaya. Add-ins are the best part of smoothie bowls, making them a little more interesting, better-looking, and possibly more filling too (depending on said toppings)? Speaking of toppings, choose as many or as few […] The post Mango Papaya Smoothie Bowl appeared first on VegKitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Strawberry Cardamom Milk

June 4 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Cardamom Milk I didn’t grow up drinking strawberry milk and thus have no nostalgic connection to it, nor did I have any particular interest in making it, until I ended up with way too many strawberries this past spring. I might sound like a broken record to some of you, but for a bit of context, it’s worth mentioning (once again) that this year’s strawberry season yielded the craziest, dreamiest berries I’ve ever eaten in Florida or anywhere else in the world. I couldn’t stay away from the strawberry farm until my freezer could no longer fit the copious amounts of strawberries I was freezing. We consumed bowls and bowls of fresh strawberries with breakfast, lunch and dinner, but I also cooked with them a bunch (see some of the results here and here). I kind of ran out of recipe ideas towards the end there, so I decided to give this whole strawberry milk deal a try. Boy was I wrong to wait this long, this stuff is heaven. Refreshing, delicious and totally worth the little bit of effort. The method here is a bit more intentional than just blending some strawberries with milk, and yields a truly special little drink. I think spices are extremely important in cooking but especially in plant-based cooking, where building flavor is a bit more of a challenge. A dash of spice can really elevate a dish to the next level, and that’s where the cardamom comes in. The magical, slightly spicy and citrusy flavor of cardamom goes so well with the syrupy macerated strawberries and makes this milk that much more interesting. If you don’t have any cardamom though, this drink will still be delicious without it. There is a step-by-step video above, which shows you how to make almond milk as well as how to flavor it with strawberries. Consider giving this recipe a whirl some day soon when you get your hands on some jammy berries. Enjoy your Sunday :) Strawberry Cardamom Milk   Print Serves: about 3½ cups Ingredients for the almond milk 1 cup raw almonds - soaked in purified water overnight 3 cups purified water for the strawberry cardamom milk about 3 cups sliced strawberries ⅓ cup raw sugar 3 cups unsweetened almond milk 5 cardamom pods - green shells removed, seeds ground in a mortar and pestle Instructions to make the almond milk Drain and rinse the almonds. Place them in a blender along with the water and blend on high speed until completely broken down. Working in batches, strain the milk into a bowl through a nut milk bag. Discard the strained pulp or save for future use in granola, baking, etc. Transfer the milk to a clean bottle or jar and keep refrigerated for up to 3 days. to make the strawberry milk Place the strawberries in a medium bowl and pour the sugar over them. Toss and let macerate until the strawberries yield their syrupy juice, for at least 1 hour or overnight (the longer the better). Puree the strawberries together with their syrup in an upright blender until smooth. Strain the puree through a fine mesh strainer for the silkiest strawberry milk, this step is optional. Combine the almond milk, strawberry puree and freshly ground cardamom in an upright blender and blend until well combined and frothy. Pour the milk into a bottle or jar and chill very well the refrigerator. Enjoy cold. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Tahini Hot Chocolate Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Spiced Hot Chocolate and a Cookbook of Our Own .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry Cardamom Milk appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday

May 15 2017 Meatless Monday 

Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday   The global travels of Master Chef Jean-Christian Jury inspired him to write the ultimate kitchen companion on vegan cooking, Vegan: The Cookbook. It features 450 delicious recipes from more than 150 countries. But before Jean-Christian delved into the world of vegan cuisine, he received a startling wakeup call - a heart failure, twice. Years of running several restaurants at the same time, 16-hour work days and a poor diet had finally caught up with the French-born chef. After a few months of recovery, he visited a detox center that specialized in healthy food, fresh smoothies and juices. This enlightening experience transformed his diet and lifestyle. Interestingly, this is the same idea behind Meatless Monday - eating plant-based foods to improve your health. By choosing not to eat meat just one day a week, you reduce your risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity and cancer.   Vegan: The Cookbook - for vegans, non-vegans and omnivores Jean-Christian promotes vegan foods, cooked with fresh ingredients, as a way to keep healthy, age gracefully and prevent many common diseases. His new cookbook offers recipes to satisfy all tastes, representing the cuisines of France, Greece, Italy, Vietnam, China and India. In addition, he explores less familiar fare, such as flavorful dishes from Timor and Papua New Guinea. There is no reason why vegan food cant be as delicious as non-plant-based cuisine. International Master Chef Jean-Christian Jury In 2007, Jean-Christian Jury opened his first vegan restaurant, La Mano Verde, in Berlin, Germany. He received an award for Best Vegan Restaurant on the Planet and was listed as one of Germanys 500 Best Restaurants (Der Feinschmecker 2015-2016).   Expert Guidance, Step by Step For his new cookbook, Jean-Christian specifically crafted his recipes for accuracy and ease of use. He intentionally selected ingredients that are readily available and provides simple step-by-step instructions as well as prep time and cooking time. To help you plan your meal, his book is neatly organized into chapters that cover Starters, Salads, Soups, Main Courses, Grains and Beans, Pasta and Noodles, and Desserts.   Get a Taste of Jean-Christian Jurys New Recipes To whet your appetite, heres a delectable sampler of five recipes found in the Vegan: The Cookbook. Go on and pick your favorite. At Meatless Monday, heres the one we cant wait to try.   Five-Spice Stir-Fried Soba Noodles The post Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spice Up ‘Fat Tuesday’ with a Meatless Mardi Gras Makeover

February 27 2017 Meatless Monday 

Spice Up ‘Fat Tuesday’ with a Meatless Mardi Gras Makeover New Orleans, Louisiana is famous - and infamous - for good times, good music and good food. Revelers come from the four corners of the world to take part in the annual Mardi Gras celebration - a spectacular event with parades, street floats, lavish costumes and evening balls. Mardi Gras literally translates to Fat Tuesday. This takes place on the day before Ash Wednesday, which marks the beginning of Lent. Traditionally, Fat Tuesday meant feasting and finishing all the rich, fatty foods before the 40-day religious observance. Interestingly, the word carnival is derived from the Latin word carnelevarium, which means to take away or remove meat. This makes sense because many people choose to give up meat during Lent. Not surprisingly, were okay with that. In fact, many of the classic Cajun and Creole dishes can be made without meat, yet still deliver all the zesty, mouth-watering flavors of the Crescent City. From red beans and rice to gumbo to étouffée, spice up your Monday and strut your stuff with these meatless Mardi Gras recipes.   Easy Red Beans and Rice, from Watching What I Eat Vegetarian Gumbo Made in One Pan, from Healing Tomato Portabella Etouffee, from Apron Strings Creole Vegan Jambalaya, from Jackie Newgent Saffron Baked Beignets, from A Kitchen Hoor’s Adventures The post Spice Up ‘Fat Tuesday’ with a Meatless Mardi Gras Makeover appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Hibiscus Ginger Latte

January 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Ginger Latte Hibiscus is a powerful tropical flower with a long list of health benefits (anti-inflammatory, digestive aid, metabolism-boosting, helps with cholesterol level and blood pressure maintenance). It also happens to produce the most brilliant, ruby red-colored tea with a prominent tart flavor. I’ve always found pure hibiscus tea to be a little too sour for my taste, but came up with this latte in a recent attempt to get more of its stunning color into my morning routine, and now I’m completely hooked. The creaminess of the almond milk helps offset the harshness of the hibiscus, and the ginger adds a nice note of warmth and complexity, making this latte a great winter drink. The green tea is optional here, but a great addition when you need a little help waking up in the morning or as a mid-afternoon boost. And I swear I feel like I’m getting color therapy when drinking this latte – the fluffy, pink foam is so soothing to look at, I’m in a complete state of peace by the time I’ve taken my last sip. We have some weekend links for you after the jump, have a great Sunday :) - The Cookbook Deal – I’ve been so excited for this podcast, in which Jessica Murnane documents a whole year of her life while making her first cookbook. I loved the first two episodes, and although that might have something to do with the fact that I’ve now gone through the book-making process twice, I think anyone can enjoy it because Jessica is such a great and charming storyteller. And if you are thinking of writing a cookbook, you should definitely give this one a listen. - This Hibiscus Mask from S.W. Basics - Andrea Gentl’s Photo Essay From Her Time in the Andes – breathtaking - Feedback, NY, Down the Aisle – interesting people interviewed about their grocery shopping routines. So far I’ve enjoyed interviews with Julia Turshen, Hannah and Landon Metz, Kenny Anderson. - The Matriarch Behind Beyoncé and Solange - On The Rocks – crystals explained on Garance Doré Hibiscus Ginger Latte   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 tablespoon dried hibiscus flowers 1 piece ginger - shredded 1 green tea bag 1½ cups hot water 1½ cup unsweetened almond milk or other milk of choice 1 tablespoon honey/­­any other sweetener of choice, or to taste (optional) Instructions Combine hibiscus, ginger, green tea and water in a teapot or a large mug, keep covered while steeping. Remove the green tea bag after 2-4 minutes of steeping. Let the hibiscus steep for another 15-20 minutes. Warm up the milk if you prefer a hot latte. Pour the tea into a blender through a strainer. Add the milk and honey to the blender and blend until frothy and smooth. This latte also tastes great iced. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Elderflower Lemonade Black Sesame Cappuccino Spiced Hot Chocolate and a Cookbook of Our Own Quick Persimmon Eggnog .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hibiscus Ginger Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy

January 8 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy It’s interesting how motivating the tiniest tips from people you care about or respect can be. I was recently on a short flight and read the autobiography of a certain Soviet-era singer, whose music I grew up with. It was a thin, throwaway paperback that I read back to back during the flight, but something about her positivity really made an impression on me. This singer is almost eighty years old, but looks great and has stayed incredibly active, and the book is studded with small, often old-school tips of how she believes she’s managed to keep up her health. She walks everywhere she goes, covering large distances on foot in Saint Petersburg, Russia, and her two drinks of choice are carrot juice in the morning and chamomile tea at night. Sure enough, I’ve been noticing myself drinking both of those with more frequency and taking longer walks whenever possible. And it doesn’t matter to me how silly of a motivation that was, if it helps me get from point A to point B in taking more care of myself, I’m all in. So here’s the carrot-based tonic I’ve been inspired to drink more often. Since I don’t love pure carrot juice, I doctor it up with ginger, turmeric, lemon and honey, which makes it a true remedy and a preventative for winter colds and flu. It’s delicious – potent, refreshing, spicy and sinus-clearing, and a little goes a long way – I like having a shot or a small glass at a time. Some weekend links after the jump, stay warm this Sunday :)   Yvon Chouinard of Patagonia on the How I Built This Podcast (scroll down a few) Mark Bittman on Changing the Food Industry and Living Dangerously – on Tim Ferriss’s podcast Ron Finley, Gangsta Gardener Amy Revier, Weaving Worlds Beyond Words   Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy   Print Serves: 1 large glass Ingredients 8-10 large carrots - peeled if not organic 1 piece ginger or more - peeled if not organic 1 piece fresh turmeric root - peeled if not organic 1 lemon 1 teaspoon raw honey Instructions Run the carrots, ginger, turmeric and lemon through a juicer. Pour juice into a blender, add the honey and blend until the honey is incorporated. Enjoy. Notes 1. I like to use organic lemons for this juice, so that I can run the peel through the juicer and get its oils and benefits into the tonic. 2. I generally use a bit more than 1 of ginger for this amount of juice, but I like things really fiery. If you are the same way, add some more ginger. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Jujube Ginger Tea Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Ring in the New Year with a Heaping Bowl of Hoppin’ John

December 26 2016 Meatless Monday 

Ring in the New Year with a Heaping Bowl of Hoppin’ John   Looking to start New Years with an extra helping of good luck? Then leave the champagne on ice and simmer up a family-size pot of our meatless version of Hoppin John. According to Southern folklore, each of the key ingredients in this hearty, savory dish relates to a symbol of prosperity. The black-eyed peas represent coins. The collard greens are paper money. And the traditional cornbread on the side stands for gold. And it gets even more interesting. As it turns out, a bowl of leftover Hoppin John is called Skippin Jenny, which is supposed to bring even more hope, luck and prosperity. So best of luck and Happy New Year from all of us at Meatless Monday. Try our Vegetarian Hoppin’ John recipe! The post Ring in the New Year with a Heaping Bowl of Hoppin’ John appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale

November 20 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale We’ve got a little upgrade on classic creamy butternut squash soup for you today. This one still has plenty of butternut squash for its creaminess and ochre hues, but with the addition of leeks, pear and cranberries. Leeks contribute a savoriness, while the pear gives a bit of sweetness, and the cranberries bring a subtle sour note. There’s also an addition of fennel seed, for its subtle anise flavor and digestive aid properties (useful during a big holiday meal). When cooked in coconut milk and pureed together, the vegetables make for a delicious whole, more interesting in flavor than your classic butternut soup, but still very familiar, comforting and soul-warming. This soup would make for a great starter to a Thanksgiving/­­holiday meal, guaranteed to be a crowd pleaser. There are some links after the jump, enjoy your Sunday :) How the Brain Powers Placebos, False Memories and Healing The New York Times interviews Frank Ocean Let It Go 30 Minute Yoga Routine – been loving this super slow, super relaxing yoga routine with Tara Stiles lately Zadie Smith’s Brexit Diary Ana Kra¹: Ikebana Albums – a book I’d love to own Millennials are Drinking The World’s Coffee Supply Dry Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the soup 2 tablespoons olive oil or neutral coconut oil 2 leeks, white and light green parts only - sliced 1 tablespoon fennel seeds 1 medium butternut squash or 2 honey nut squash - cubed 1 pear - cored and cubed 1 cup cranberries - thawed if frozen 1 13.5oz can light Thai coconut milk - optionally reserve some for garnish ¾ cup water sea salt freshly ground black pepper for the crispy kale 1 small bunch kale - leaves torn into bite-sized pieces 1-2 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon maple syrup 1-2 tablespoons nutritional yeast sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions to make the soup Heat oil in a medium pot over medium high heat. Add leeks and cook for 3 minutes until tender. Add fennel, squash, pear and cranberries. Stir to coat with oil and fennel. Add coconut milk and water and bring to a boil. Lower to a simmer and let cook, covered, for 15 minutes or until vegetables are cooked through and tender. Transfer soup to a blender and puree, seasoning with salt and pepper. You might have to do this in batches, depending on the size of your blender. Serve garnished with reserved coconut milk (optional) and crispy kale (recipe below). to make the crispy kale Preheat oven to 400°F (200° C). Place kale onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Drizzle with olive oil and maple syrup, add nutritional yeast, salt and pepper and mix thoroughly with your hands. Place into the oven for 7-9 minutes, until crispy. Kale can burn very fast, so take care not to burn and watch it closely. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi Pear Cranberry Chai Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage

November 6 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage This past week, we posted a recipe for a Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower, which was pictured served with this very nourishing and super tasty Celeriac and Parsnip mash. We promised to come back with the mash recipe this weekend, so here it is. I grew up on mashed potatoes – my mom probably made them twice a week or more, which is quite standard for a Russian household, where potatoes somehow make it into every meal every day. I love mashed potatoes to this day and can easily put away a good portion, which I think is true for a lot of people due to the dish’s comfort food status. I remember discovering that other roots could be eaten as a mash upon moving to the U.S. – I was at one of my first Thanksgiving dinners and was quite impressed with the mashed sweet potato option that was offered. Slowly, I came around to the idea at home, and now, whenever I have a craving but don’t feel like being weighed down by the inevitably large portion of mashed potatoes I will consume, I make something similar with other, more nutritious and lighter roots. This celeriac and parsnip mash is my absolute favorite version for that scenario. Each of the pale roots are known for their unique, characteristic flavors, which combine well in this mash and become quite complementary with that earthy sweetness they both have going on. This is mash elevated – lighter and more nourishing than mashed potatoes and more interesting in flavor than mashed sweet potato, but still starchy, creamy and very comforting. This stuff is great to have on your holiday table to surprise your guests with something new, yet familiar, or just make a batch of it to have alongside your meals for the week, to get more nutritious wintery roots in your diet. Frying up sage leaves until they are crispy is an easy trick for fancying up a modest looking autumn dish like this one, and the chip-like sage itself is surprisingly delicious. There are some weekend links after the jump, have a cozy Sunday ;) How to Master the Art of Getting Noticed – Austin Kleon’s advice to aspiring artists Salad for President – always so much good stuff on this website, like Leif Hedendal cooking salad at the David Ireland House, Yuri Shimojo’s home and Japanese Crudité Recipe, Laila Gohar’s food as installation art and more The Woman Code Cleanse Review – just read Alisa Vitti’s The Woman Code (and loved it), and was very excited to read about Dana’s experience of the gentle four-day cleanse proposed in the book Noël Graupner – new instagram crush, plant-based private chef with an Ayurvedic tradition background and great photography skills Street Vendors of Hanoi, Photographed from Above – amazing Jade Rolling – have you tried it? I saw a lady doing this on the subway recently (weird setting for that), and it looked really relaxing. Three New Cookbooks, for Health’s Sake – so many health-centered cookbooks coming out nowadays, and these three look great (two of them are from our publisher!) I have a copy Dandelion and Quince and it’s a beauty. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 large or 2 medium celeriacs - peeled and roughly chopped 2-3 parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped sea salt 1 large red onion - peeled and sliced into 8 wedges 1-2 garlic heads - separated into cloves (no need to peel the cloves) coconut oil - to taste freshly ground black pepper any plant milk or cooking water from boiling the roots - to taste ghee or olive oil - to taste 1 small bunch sage - leaves smoked paprika - for garnish (optional) olive oil - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven 400° F (200° C). Bring celeriac and parsnips to a boil in a large pot of water. Reduce heat to a strong simmer and cook vegetables for 10-15 minutes, until soft throughout, adding salt towards the end. Place onion and garlic onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Add coconut oil, salt, pepper and mix well. Bake for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, garlic should be done but the onions might need more time - in this case, remove garlic from oven and finish baking the onion until completely soft and caramelized. Slip garlic cloves out of their shells. Drain the boiled vegetables, reserving some of the cooking liquid if youll be using it in place of plant milk. Place vegetables into a large bowl together with the roasted garlic and mash with a potato masher to your desired consistency. Place roasted onion and ½ cup plant milk/­­cooking water into a blender and blend until smooth. Add blended onion to the mashed vegetables, adding more liquid if needed to achieve your desired consistency. Add ghee or olive oil to taste. Alternatively, mix all the vegetables in a food processor together with the plant milk/­­cooking liquid, which will make for a smoother, less textured puree. Heat 2-3 tablespoons coconut oil in a medium pan on medium heat. Add well-dried sage leaves to the pan along with salt and pepper and fry, stirring, for a couple of minutes until crispy. Mix the oil left over from frying the sage into the mash. Optionally, mix in some of the crispy sage into the mash as well. Garnish mash with crispy sage, smoked paprika and olive oil, and serve. Notes You can use just celeriac or just parsnips for this mash as well. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries Raw Rainbow Lasagne with Heirloom Tomatoes, Mushrooms, and Castelvetra... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca

October 12 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca This weekend, we are off to a log cabin in the Appalachian Mountains with the whole family. Our kitchen is finally being taken apart in preparation for renovations, so we’re getting away from the dust and craziness for a week while the space gets stripped. The cabin is in a pretty remote and quiet place, and the leaves are turning – all great reasons to chill, hike, meditate, and get some much needed sleep. I’ve already packed up all the ingredients for this mocha to bring on the trip, since it’s been my favorite thing to drink in the mornings, and I can’t wait to sit on the cabin porch, sipping on this cozy herbal coffee. The base for this drink is roasted chicory root, a common coffee substitute, which gives it the deep flavor and rich color. In the U.S., chicory coffee is known as New Orleans style coffee, where it became popular during the Civil War, when the importing of coffee was stalled due to blockades. Chicory is also very common throughout Europe, and I grew up in a culture, where it was highly regarded as a medicinal plant and foraged in the summer for making herbal tea. Chicory is easy to distinguish in the wild due to its bright blue flowers (pick some if it grows around you!) and is related to dandelion, so you can use Dandy Blend here if you can’t get your hands on pure chicory (Dandy Blend includes both dandelion and chicory roots). It contains no caffeine, is rich in vitamin C and has the highest concentration of inulin of all plants. When roasted and ground, chicory miraculously resembles the flavor and depth of coffee. These days, I mostly try to stay away from caffeine, so coming up with drinks that will provide some of that much-needed comfort in the morning, minus the jitters, makes me quite happy. I add raw cacao and maca powders here for an energy boost, which also contribute more wealth to the flavor and take this drink into the ‘mocha’ territory. I’m in love with this cozy sip and find myself craving it throughout the day. It’s great hot and equally as good chilled, after some time in the fridge, or even iced. We’ve accumulated quite a few interesting links, which we are sharing today. We will be back with our weekend link roundups, along with all kinds of other good stuff very soon ;) Enjoy. Inside Glossier – I find this beauty company’s no-makeup makeup strategy and image quite fascinating and inspiring, so I found this in depth article and interview with their founder very interesting How I Built This – I listen to podcasts almost every day in the kitchen, and get very excited when a new, high-quality one comes out. This one is by NPR and has a series of interviews with successful entrepreneurs about how they started their businesses. So far they’ve interviewed creators of Instagram, Vice, Spanx and more. Reluctance NY – love cool bakery instagrams like this one Sans Ceuticals Journal – a natural beauty company with a journal full of clever, health-centric recipes like lacto pickles, Buddhist lunch, vegan butter, Bloodlesss Mary, vegan berry Eton Mess and much more How the Sugar Industry Shifted Blame to Fat – this is crazy!!! Navigating the Beauty Supplement Aisle Interview with Jacqui Lewis – Vedic meditation teacher Lauren Spencer King – studio and short interview, love the photos here Eat This Food – refreshingly unique food blog design Behind the Scenes with Solange + love her new, perfectly pastel videos, one, two Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 teaspoon roasted and ground chicory root 2 soft Medjool dates - pitted 1⅓ cup boiling water 1 cup unsweetened almond milk or other plant milk 1 tablespoon raw cacao powder 2 teaspoons maca powder ½ tablespoon mesquite powder (optional) seeds of ½ vanilla bean (optional) 1 teaspoon coconut oil - if drinking hot (optional) Instructions Place chicory into a strainer or a tea bag and combine with dates in a heat-proof vessel. Pour boiling water over them and leave for 10 minutes to steep. Combine chicory coffee, dates, almond milk, cacao, maca, mesquite, vanilla, and coconut oil, if using, in an upright blender. Blend until smooth and frothy. Serve warm, chilled or over ice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Black Sesame Cappuccino Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart Sprouted Almond Romesco Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower and Blistered T... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Santana Apple Cake

September 26 2016 seitan is my motor 

Every year during spring and summer I put myself on an apple fast. I don’t eat them anymore because all of a sudden I think they are the most boring fruit in the whole world. In spring there’s rhubarb that suddenly seems so much more interesting. And then summer starts and brings fantastic berries andRead more The post Santana Apple Cake appeared first on seitan is my motor.

A Summer of Ice Cream

September 3 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

A Summer of Ice Cream Somehow, we’ve reached the weekend that is considered by many to be the last hurrah of summer. It always goes by in a blink, and every year, the blink seems like the fastest one yet. Though very sentimental, I also can’t help but feel some excitement toward the cooler temperatures, fall produce and general coziness to come. At the beginning of this summer, we gave ourselves a challenge to come up with a new ice cream to post here every Sunday. We are happy to have fulfilled the plan, and the result consists of twelve original ice cream recipes that we are very proud of (+1 recipe from an author we love). Sometimes, I really love setting difficult-but-realistic goals for myself that I know will make me grow, whether personally or professionally – this one made me grow in both ways. Some weeks, it was definitely challenging to think up yet another frozen treat, but mostly, it was very rewarding and quite fun. I generally find myself having a more lighthearted approach, when it comes to ice cream recipe development, as opposed to the more serious savory recipes. The abundance of summer produce made the process of coming up with new flavors quite fluid, and I worked with what was available. Below, a round up of our summer of ice cream. It’s neat to see it all lined up chronologically, starting with rhubarb in the early summer, followed by strawberries, peaches, very light sorbets for the hottest of days, tropical milkshakes, and my youngest daughter’s birthday cake. We are currently brainstorming ideas for a similar weekend series to run during the colder months of the year, and would love to hear from you on what kind of recipes you’d like to see (snacks? sandwiches? soups? It doesn’t have to start with an S!). Have a lovely weekend :) Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt – Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker. All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. Ive always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet – Aside from eating them just as they are, nothing showcases seasonal fresh berries more than homemade sorbet. This one is from Emmas beautiful cookbook, My Darling Lemon Thyme - Recipes from My Real Food Kitchen. One of the things I adore about Emmas cooking style is her love of fresh herbs. Just like her, I often include herbs in sweet dishes, its a little trick to turn many ordinary desserts into a completely unique and memorable treat. The inclusion of Thai basil in this recipe is genius and makes this creamy sorbet even more refreshing, aromatic and summery. Its also hard to believe that this intense crimson colour comes just from strawberries - a real show stopper. Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits – My go-to vegan lavender ice cream recipe with the addition of rich and decadent chocolate-tahini bits. It has a creamy, luxurious texture, which combines so well with the refreshing flavors of lavender and chewy, bittersweet pieces of chocolate. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream – Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. Theres that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Green Smoothie Pops – A green smoothie on a stick that can be easily eaten for breakfast on a very hot day, or as an extra nutritious dessert, on any day. Papaya Lime Sundae – Papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime - both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins - desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup. Pi?a Colada Milkshake – A recreation of my favorite beachside cocktail in non-alcoholic, vegan milkshake form. Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles – These lemonade popsicles, with a bit of zing from ginger, have been in my beat-the-heat arsenal for many summers now - a dessert for the toastiest of days, requiring minimal effort. The lemonade can also be had in its original, un-frozen state, and is an incredibly refreshing, summery drink. Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso and Caramel and Chocolate – These vegan tahini ice cream bars, covered with a generous drizzle of miso caramel and chocolate, very distantly remind me of Snickers ice cream bars, which I used to love, but these particular ones are much more healthful and interesting in flavor. Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core –  A recreation of my favorite Ben & Jerrys ice cream flavor, made vegan and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods, and complete with a decadent chocolate core. Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream – A classic ice cream flavor in milkshake form. Its creamy, with little hard specs of cacao nibs, invigorating with the addition of fresh mint, and topped with a chickpea-based vegan whipped cream. Pistachio and Raspberry Fields Ice Cream Cake – Paloma’s birthday cake, named for her obsession with the Beatles. Pistachio and raspberry complement each other perfectly here, the pistachio flavor being nutty and earthy, while the raspberry becomes its perfect, juicy and fruity pair. The cacao buckwheat crust adds just the right hint of chocolate and crunch to the mix. Berry Creamsicles with White Chocolate Drizzle – These beauties are a breeze to make, requiring no ice cream maker, and are colored lilac with all of summers sweetest, sun-ripened berries. The white chocolate drizzle, made with cacao butter and cashews, adds a nice, extra bit of texture to the creamy berry base, but the creamsicles are great on their own as well, in case you dont want to bother with the drizzle. The post A Summer of Ice Cream appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London

June 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London We love yogurt in our family*. The unsweetened, thick, creamy and tangy kind. We enjoy yogurt for breakfast (with fruit) and sometimes dessert (with dates + chocolate + nuts). We top our soups with yogurt, we add it to smoothies and ice pops and we also dress our salads with it (Isac likes to dress himself with it as well). Yogurt works remarkably well both with sweet and savory flavors. And yet, the thought of making a yogurt bowl with savory toppings instead of sweet, had never struck us before. But as we were playing around with this crunchy cucumber and melon salad with spiced chickpeas, we (and with we, I humbly mean ME, MYSELF and I - as in, not David) had the simple idea to put them on a bed of yogurt instead of doing the usual yogurt dressing. In theory, it’s more or less the same thing but in reality it’s so much better. The warm, rich and spicy chickpeas on a bed of cold, thick and tangy yogurt, with the addition of a fresh salad with lots of crunch. It’s simple but yet so very good. And quick too. I’m sure there are plenty of savory yogurt bowls all over internet, but now they are also in our kitchen. *David and Isac are actually intolerant to dairy but yogurt is their weak spot. We buy oat yogurt for them but David often chooses a day of stomach ache just to enjoy a bowl of plain yogurt. And Isac has literally been caught with his hand in the yogurt jar more than once. Coconut yogurt has a fantastic taste and consistency but is simply too expensive to enjoy more than as an occasional treat (very keen on giving Ashley’s versions a try though!). Hey hey hey, wait a sec. This is David acting as proofreader today and I just noted Luise’s attempt at hijacking my idea. This recipe = my idea. Just wanted to make that clear. I’ll give the word back to her now. The salad is super quick as you just need to chop everything up. We found that crunchy vegetables like cucumber, celery, sturdy roman lettuce and radishes work really well here, with the avocado and melon adding softness and sweetness. The yogurt is, well, just yogurt. It needs to be quite thick to hold up the topping - our preference is Greek yogurt but choose whatever you prefer. The only thing that needs a little more preparation and heat are the spiced chickpeas. Even if the ingredient list looks long, it’s simply spices, oil and chickpeas and the result tastes way better than just using plain chickpeas. They have a rich, spicy and slightly nutty flavor which works so well with the freshness from the yogurt and the crunchy and sweet salad. VARIATIONS There are plenty of ways to vary this recipe and we’re going to leave you with a few ideas. - Whisk some creamy goat’s cheese into the yogurt. It will dissolve, become smooth and give the yogurt a more mature flavor. - If you don’t have all the spices at home for the chickpeas, use what you find. A bread spice mix works great along with a little cayenne. A turmeric or curry version would be interesting too. - You can skip the salad and pour the yogurt into small sealable jars with spiced chickpeas on top. Store them in the fridge for a quick snack. - Vegans can of course use a vegan yogurt option or simply settle for the salad with warm chickpeas stirred through. - Roasting the chickpeas in the oven together with eggplant or pumpkin could be amazing on top of the yogurt as well. Let us know if you have any other favorite variations on savory yogurt bowls and we can include them in this list. Savory Yogurt Bowl with Spicy Chickpeas & Cucumber Salad Serves 4, or 2 very hungry persons Cucumber & Melon Salad 1 cucumber 1 small (or 1/­­2 regular) melon (we used Piel de Sapo but honeydew would also work) 1 spring onion 2 celery stalks 10-15 fresh mint leaves 1 avocado 6 radishes 1/­­2 roman lettuce 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil Spiced warm chickpeas 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 1 tbsp sesame seeds 2 tsp fennel seeds  1 tsp coriander seeds 1 tsp cardamom seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika powder 1/­­4 cup – 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed For serving 2 cups plain full-fat Greek yogurt  For the cucumber & melon salad:  Wash all produce. Cut cucumber and melon in large bite-size pieces. Trim and finely slice spring onion, celery and mint leaves. Cut the avocado in half and remove the stone, then cut into cubes. Trim the radishes and thinly slice them. And chop the roman lettuce. Place all prepared ingredients in a mixing bowl, squeeze over lemon juice, drizzle with olive oil and a little salt, give it a good toss and set aside. For the spiced warm chickpeas:  Add all seeds and spices (except for the ground spices) to a dry skillet, heat gently for a couple of minutes while stirring. When the spices starts to pop and smell fragrant, they’re done. Pour into a mortar and give them a few bashes with the pestle (alternatively on a cutting board and use the back of a chef’s knife). Transfer the seeds and spices back to the skillet. Now add oil (start with the lesser amount and add more later on if it looks dry), ground spices  and chickpeas and heat on low temperature for 2-3 minutes. Stir to combine. When the chickpeas are warm and covered in spices and seeds, remove from the heat. Dollop the yogurt into four bowls. Use the back of a spoon to smooth it out. Arrange the salad on one side of the yogurt and the spiced warm chickpea on the other side. Drizzle a little extra oil on top. Enjoy immediately while the chickpeas are still warm. ********* LONDON + BATH In all my excitement over a simple bowl of yogurt, I almost forgot to mention that we are coming to London and Bath next week for a couple of book events. We’re very excited and can’t wait to meet some of you! We’re having a supper club at Grace Belgravia on Monday 5 June, 7-10 pm. More info here. We’ll do talk and Q&A at Whole Foods Market in Kensington on Wednesday 7 June, 6.30 pm. More info and tickets here. We’ll also do a talk and cooking demo at Topping & Company Booksellers in Bath on Friday 9 June, 7.30 pm. More info and tickets here. Finally, we’re having a hands on cooking class at Bertinet Kitchen in Bath on Saturday 10 June, 10 am. Tickets here (only one left). Big love!

Sorghum Breakfast Bowl

May 10 2017 VegKitchen 

Sorghum Breakfast Bowl Sorghum is one more healthful, hearty ancient grain thats making a big comeback, like what happened with quinoa, farro, and einkorn. Because of sorghum’s small size, mild flavor, and interesting texture, its a perfect grain for a warm cereal. This sorghum breakfast bowl is sure to please. Despite its incredibly good-for-you nutrition profile, sorghum is a bit […] The post Sorghum Breakfast Bowl appeared first on VegKitchen.

The Kitchen Renovation

February 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

The Kitchen Renovation Vintage European bistro chairs found on Craigslist, kitchen table passed down to my husband from his grandmother. We’ve been living in our home for fifteen years now and up until this fall, we had never put a hammer or paintbrush to anything in the house except for Paloma’s baby room, right before she was born. We inherited some classic 90s Florida detailing from the previous owners – dust-attracting, shaggy red and white carpeting, stucco walls, green laminate countertops and a low-hanging ceiling in the kitchen. Just like many other families I know, we are quite food-oriented and tend to crowd in the kitchen, since that’s where most of the action happens. It’s also where I work, where I come up with recipes for this site and for my cookbooks, so it’s fair to say that I spend most of my life in this space. We recently completed a long, laborious kitchen renovation that spilled out into the living room, and I cannot describe how much my heart sings when I come downstairs every morning and see this kitchen that finally feels so entirely mine. It took us a decade and a half to gather up the courage and the funds to do this, and these past few months have brought some of the most trying times for us as a family, but it finally feels like it was worth it and I’m so excited to share some snaps of Golubka Kitchen HQ with you. We took a documentary approach to these photos, and instead of shooting everything in one day, the photos were taken over a week, on cloudy days and on sunny days, in the morning and in the evening. There are different aspects of the kitchen that shine on different days, and we really wanted to capture that. ‘Farmhouse’ kitchen sink from Ikea, faucet from Ebay. Our house has three stories – garage on the first floor, open kitchen and living room on the second, and bedrooms on the third. We renovated the kitchen, the living room floor, ceiling, and fireplace (yes, we have a fireplace in Florida and we use it, too), and both staircases leading up and down to the kitchen and living room. The most expensive part of the whole renovation was the removal of the old hanging ceiling in the kitchen, together with all the electrical work involved. We decided on the cabinets and countertops quickly, but the easy decisions ended there. It took me so incredibly long to settle on a cohesive look for the kitchen. As a notoriously undecisive Libra, I endlessly kept changing my mind about the wall treatment, the tile, the light fixtures, the shelves, the faucet, cabinet pulls, etc. I do love those clean, white kitchens with minimal everything, but in the end I decided that in order to stay true to my heart, I had to go with something a little more feminine and detail-oriented, with a hint of the Downton Abbey kitchen. The old kitchen had endless cabinets on the walls, some of which always ended up a mess, while others weren’t utilized at all, so I knew I wanted exposed shelves. I’m super happy with that decision – I love having my dishes and jars within arm’s reach and at eye level, since it allows me to be more organized and minimal. Many people wonder whether dust is an issue with open shelves, and I’ve found that it’s not any more of an issue than anywhere else in the house. I also use all the objects on the shelves quite frequently, which doesn’t allow too much dust to accumulate. The shelves are made of very beautiful and sturdy wood reclaimed from an old barn in Kentucky, which we found at Barn Works. I finished the wood myself without the use of a wood stain. The floating shelf arrangement was made possible with the heavy duty brackets from Shelfology, which secure the shelves to the wall very safely and seamlessly. Tadelakt Moroccan Plaster with Benjamin Moore ‘White Stone’ color pigment Industrial brass rod with copper hooks from Etsy, vintage Brazilian copper utensils with wooden handles found on Craigslist. During the initial planning stage, I was certain that I wanted a subway tile backsplash, but was simultaneously seeing and liking backsplashes made with Moroccan, Spanish and Mexican patterned tiles. I agonized over my choice between the two until I discovered Tadelakt, the Moroccan plaster, and there was no turning back. I knew I wanted grey shaker kitchen cabinets, but the plaster treatment also presented the possibility of grey walls. I’ve always been attracted to grey rooms, to me they just speak of serenity, so I was pretty happy with this opportunity. Finding someone who would apply the plaster masterfully but for a fair price, and getting the job completed was probably one of the most nerve-racking parts of the renovation. We did find someone brilliant, and it ended up worth the stress, because I am completely in love with my new walls. The material is so warm, textural and interesting, and it totally ties the whole kitchen together. As much as I loved the idea of a patterned tile floor, I was still torn between its beauty/­­practicality and the homey feel of hardwood floors, which I wanted to have in the living room. I finally settled on the idea of combining the two, and as a result, the tile follows the line of the kitchen cabinets in the shape of an inverted ‘Z,’ while we can still enjoy the warmth of the hardwood floors in the sitting area and into the living room. The tile is from the Cement Tile Shop, which offers an overwhelming array of the most beautiful, authentic patterns. Of course I found settling on one to be a near impossible task. I went from multicolored to black and white, to pastel, to monochrome tiles dozens of times before landing on the Fountaine Antique pattern with a custom border. As for the hardwood floor, I’d always dreamt of an old-fashioned herringbone pattern in real wood, which proved to be really difficult to find within the United States. The one company that carried thick oak planks in a herringbone pattern didn’t have enough to cover our floor at first, but they later ended up finding one extra box tucked away in a different warehouse. I’m so glad that they did because I’m completely over the moon about how the floors turned out. It’s worth mentioning that the old kitchen floor was white tile that showed off every spec of dust that landed on it, and the living room floors had white plush carpeting, and I am so happy to finally be rid of both. We found the best contractor, Don, who left us endlessly impressed, together with his talented and considerate team. He truly cared about every step of the process and saved us so many times with his expert advice and creative input. The most standout showcase of the team’s work is the spacious drawer pantry they built out of vintage fruit crates from Schiller’s Salvage. My idea was realized even better than I had envisioned – the crates were originally too long and the crew manually disassembled, shortened and rebuilt them, then positioned them on smoothly sliding tracks. The countertop over the crates is made of old barn oak and finished by me in the same way as the floating shelves. The whole piece, on top of being unique and beautiful, is the most functional and spacious storage space in the whole kitchen. Quartz countertops from the Home Depot in ‘Snowy Ibiza’ Antique Spanish hutch from the 1800s, a lucky Craigslist find, brought to the U.S. from Madrid Vintage ceramic and brass cabinet pulls from Ebay and Etsy Vintage ceramic door knob from eBay, ‘Pink Shadow’ Sherwin Williams paint on the door. Custom built computer shelf made by Algis from old barn wood. My favorite thing about the vintage French chandelier that I found on Etsy are the rainbows it sends onto the walls in the evenings. Fireplace brick wall made with 100 year old sliced brick from Craigslist, arranged beautifully by Algis. Stairs leading up to the third floor with the bedrooms. Since both of the staircases connect to the kitchen and living room, we realized that we had to redo them as well, so that they wouldn’t be an eyesore within the new renovation. My husband and I set out to do the whole thing ourselves to save some cash, but in hindsight, I wouldn’t wish this type of adventure upon my worst enemy. All the stairs were covered with red carpeting, and the railings were painted an ugly orange-ish brown. The original plan was to remove the old carpet and to cover the existing stairs with new wood planks. To our surprise, however, we discovered a beautiful pine under the carpeting and decided to restore the original stairs along with stripping and re-finishing the railing. It took me two and a half months to complete this part of the project alone. Stairs leading up to the kitchen/­­living room from the garage. Ceramic tile from Spain with weathered grey hues, uneven borders, satin finish. This kitchen renovation wouldn’t have been possible without the help and generosity of Cement Tile Shop, Shelfology, Barn Works, Schiller’s Salvage, and Floor and Decor. My eternal gratitude goes out to Don and the team for your incredible care and craftsmanship in everything you do, Algis for the amazing job with the tile, plaster, fireplace and shelf, Vadim for the impeccable hardwood installation, and Dale for the immense help with the tile and stairs. Resources Contractor – Don Violette at V & P Construction and Maintenance Kitchen Tile – Cement Tile Shop Shelves – Shelfology for the floating shelf brackets, Barn Works for the reclaimed lumber Vintage Fruit Crates – Schiller’s Architectural and Design Salvage Hardwood Floors – Floor and Decor Kitchen Cabinets – Floor and Decor Countertops – Home Depot, quartz in ‘Snowy Ibiza’ Accessory Resources – in photo captions If you happen to be looking for some incredibly talented craftsmen for your renovation in the Tampa Bay area, please reach out to me and I will be happy to connect you. The post The Kitchen Renovation appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Kathy Freston Dishes on New Cookbook — The Book of Veganish

January 16 2017 Meatless Monday 

Kathy Freston Dishes on New Cookbook — The Book of Veganish Kathy Freston is a writer and plant-based diet advocate. Her latest book is The Book of Veganish, which is packed with plant-based recipes and interesting facts about eating less meat. We chatted with her to learn more about her remarkable new book.   You were interviewed on the Oprah Winfrey Show in 2011, the same show where Oprah announced she would be implementing Meatless Monday in the Harpo cafeteria. The word veganish popped up a few times during the interview. Is this a concept youve been thinking about for a while? Yes, I think when most people hear the word vegan, and if they grew up like me eating chicken, hamburger and steak, they think vegan is so restrictive. Like oh my god, all my favorite foods are going away. Ill never be able to eat cheese fries again. Veganish takes the pressure off to be absolute. Theres this joy and relief to explore other food choices.   The whole feel of your book is so fun and hip. Was it put together with millennials in mind? Absolutely. Young adults are the ones who have the world in their hands. They want to make a difference. And eating less meat is one of the most focused ways to have a meaningful life - for the environment, for animals and for your own human health and your family. The book is meant to be happy! To be fun and inspiring. I love that most of the book is young adults weighing in. Theyre young fresh voices. You really get a sense of this growing community.   Lets talk about the recipes. What was your goal in putting this collection together? Robin Robertson is the chef who wrote the recipes. Shes all about comfort food, speed and taste. For me, protein was the most important thing. Even though protein intake is not a problem in vegan diets, most people are still obsessed with it. So our goal was to get as much protein as possible and to get the veggies so they tasted good and werent boring. And Robin rocked it! You can make everything in 10 to 20 minutes using simple ingredients you have around the house.   We love that so many of the recipes are one pot meals. Apparently millennials arent even eating as much cereal these days because of the clean up! Right. Whats nice is that a lot of the recipes are one-dish meals and are also great for leftovers. You can pack them and take them to the office or to class the next day.   What recipes would you suggest for newbies? Either someone new to veganism, or someone who wants to introduce their friends or family to meatless eating via Meatless Monday? The mac and cheese is so comforting. And I love the tacos, theyre really meaty. Theres also a great burrito with tons of protein and some spinach or kale. Its just really hearty!   Sounds like Mexican food is where its at! Thanks for chatting, we cant wait to cook up these dishes! The post Kathy Freston Dishes on New Cookbook — The Book of Veganish appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Best Vegan Recipes 2016

January 2 2017 Vegan Richa 

Best Vegan Recipes 2016Best Vegan Recipes 2016. Top Recipes of the year from the blog. Amazing Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Healthy Recipes. 16 Popular Posts. Another year went by. Interesting, enlightening, many emotions and motivation are a few words that come to mind that barely cover all of what has been 2016.  Onwards into 2017 with hope, love, peace and motivation.  And as always great food! Thank you for loving so many of the recipes and thank you for being here. Happy New Year Everyone! Continue reading: Best Vegan Recipes 2016The post Best Vegan Recipes 2016 appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Dresden Stollen (Raisin Stollen)

December 18 2016 seitan is my motor 

Recently there was an interesting studio discussion on the radio. There were a couple of experts discussion marzipan. They were talking about traditional ingredients and methods of marzipan production. It was absolutely amazing. People were calling in, asking questions or sharing their methods and tricks. They sounded so respectful towards these old methods and recipes.Read more The post Dresden Stollen (Raisin Stollen) appeared first on seitan is my motor.

Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese

November 17 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese To those who shared a little about someone special in your life in our last post, thank you. Reading every single one of your notes was an amazing experience, and we are so happy to have created a small space for nurturing a little love and appreciation. Chances are, most of us don’t express our gratitude enough – I know I don’t – yet it’s so important to our individual and collective wellbeing, not to mention it just feels so good and so right. I’m going to start doing that more, right now, by thanking you for coming to this page and cooking from it, you are awesome. And there’s still a chance for you to enter that copper mug giveaway and talk about someone, anyone who makes a positive difference in your life here. This salad is another idea for you to consider for brightening up your holiday table with some seasonal vegetables. It’s easy and parts of it can be prepared ahead of time, and there’s almond cheese! Lentils and beets do so well with marination – both are quite neutral and earthy in taste, and make an excellent canvas for whatever flavors you choose to infuse them with. In this case, they are marinated in a number of warming and piquant spices, along with garlic, parsley and oil. The marinade is transformative, taking the beets and lentils to the territory of being completely irresistible. They are great served on a bed of massaged kale or any other greens you fancy. I steamed the beets here, because of the healthfulness of the method and for that velvety texture that steaming creates, but you can also roast or boil them for this salad. You can easily prepare the marinated beets and lentils the night before, giving the flavors a chance to develop overnight, and having the major component of the salad ready for assembly. Same goes for the almond cheese. I took all the recipes for almond cheese that I’ve experimented with throughout the years and put them together to create the simplest, quickest version that still tastes cheesy and amazing, and that’s the recipe you see here. Its creaminess definitely adds to this salad, as does the sprinkling of bright, bursting pomegranate kernels. And if you are able to eat regular cheese and aren’t up to making this almond one, some nice sheep’s feta or many other crumbly cheeses of your choice would work well here, too. This salad has a nice balance of the qualities I aim to check off in my recipes – easy but sophisticated, interesting in flavor, nutritious and visually stunning, and I hope you’ll consider it :) Our Holiday Menu so far - M A I N Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower S I D E Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage D E S S E R T Apple Pumpkin Pie with Salted Pecan Caramel D R I N K Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules Pear Cranberry Chai Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the salad 1/­­2 tablespoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon coriander seeds 2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon sweet or smoked paprika 2 tablespoons olive oil 4 garlic cloves - minced 1 lemon - juice 6-8 small beets - quartered, steamed, roasted or boiled until silky soft and peeled 1 cup cooked French lentils about 2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley 1 bunch kale - leaves torn into bite-sized pieces 1 tablespoon olive oil small pinch of sea salt kernels from ½ pomegranate almond cheese (recipe below) for the almond cheese 1 cup almonds - soaked overnight, skins optionally removed for a whiter color 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 teaspoon raw honey 1-2 tablespoons nutritional yeast pinch of sea salt Instructions to make the salad Toss cumin and coriander seeds in a small frying pan over medium heat for 2-3 minutes, until fragrant. Grind in a mortar and pestle. Combine ground spices, salt, paprika, olive oil, garlic and juice of 1 lemon. Place cooked beets and lentils into a bowl and sprinkle with parsley. Pour the marinade over and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours or overnight. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. Place torn kale into a large bowl, add olive oil and a small pinch of salt and massage with your hands until tender. Add marinated beets/­­lentils to the bowl, along with pomegranate kernels and toss. Serve garnished with almond cheese. to make the almond cheese Combine all ingredients in a high-speed blender or food processor until smooth. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Raw Kale Chips Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... Shaved Brussels Sprout, Pomegranate and Lentil Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Syrian Yogurt Soup + More Than Food

October 17 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Syrian Yogurt Soup + More Than Food The recipe for this soup is at the end of this post, but we hope that you will take the time to read this text as well. It is slightly longer but way more important than our usual posts. Let’s start from the beginning. The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) and the European Commission asked if we would be interested in meeting Syrian refugees living in and outside of camps in Turkey to bring home some of their stories, learn how modern food aid is working and explore the different aspects of food. It was doubtless the most meaningful request we have ever received and something we really wanted to do. Timing wise it wasn’t perfect. I had to leave Luise alone with the kids while she was 36 weeks pregnant, but she gave her blessing. So a few weeks ago, I went on this mission. I flew to Istanbul, Turkey on an early flight and then on to a domestic flight to Hatay, a few miles from the Syrian border. During my days there, I visited a refugee camp to see how it works and talk to some of the people living there. I got to know the WFP staff and was amazed by their compassion. I was also invited home to a few Syrian families living outside of camps. Their situation is often a lot more difficult than inside the camps, as they have more costs and less support but the families were incredibly friendly and inviting. We talked, drank tea, cooked together and shared food. If you follow me on instagram, you might already have read the stories of some of the people I met. I have included the story from one of the families in this post, and I have also recreated one of the dishes that I learnt to cook together with them. It is very easy to look away from the horrible situation that is going on in Syria. But I hope that by reading these stories that do have bright moments in the midst of all the darkness, you will get a better understanding and openness towards the millions of Syrian people that have been forced from their homes and don’t wish anything more than being able to return to them one day. It was a very emotional trip and it affected me a lot deeper than I was prepared for. I am still trying to figure out what to comes next. Obviously, we want to continue working with recipe development and food photography as it is something we love doing. But it’s my hope and intention that we also will continue working more actively with human aid and support this cause any way we can in the future. Enough about this. Here is Suad. (1/­­5) I had everything before the war. My husband and I were the owners of a supermarket in Aleppo. We lived in a large and beautiful two-story house in a rural area. All my furniture was new - nothing was second hand - and we had many rooms. There was a big courtyard outside our house where the children played and rode their bicycles. ***** This is the story of Suad. She is Syrian and fled from her home together with her family when the conflict came to her town, 4 years ago. Suad is nine months pregnant and lives with her husband, their two sons Ahmed (10 years) and Muhammed (6 years) and their daughter Nurulhuda (12 years) in a small one-bedroom apartment in a rundown building in the old town of Antakya in Turkey, close to the Syrian border. Her parents and sisters live in an apartment one floor up. Her husband now works as a tailor so they can pay the rent. Even though they have lost everything, Suad is not broken. Her strength and pride really got to me. They cant afford decorating their home but have instead made paper and textile decorations and drawings that are covering the walls inside, making it less a lodging and more of a home. I had the honour to be welcomed into her home and I spent a day together with her and her family, listening to their story, drinking many cups of tea, going to the supermarket and preparing a dinner together. (2/­­5) Back in Aleppo, we renovated our kitchen entirely when we got married. It looked very nice. It was a big, bright kitchen with a large marble countertop. The kitchen was the colour of cappuccino and some of the cabinets had glass doors. I used to place some of my finest colourful vases and glasses there, so you could see them through the glass. ***** I was invited into Suads kitchen to assist her in dinner preparations. There were no marble countertops. And no glass doors. But she still placed her best looking glasses and plates on the shelf above the sink, hiding the rest behind a curtain her husband had sewn. Due to the small space, we did all chopping and preparations while sitting on the living room rug. The family laughed at my difficulties sitting with my legs crossed on the floor doing the chopping and they kept telling me that the tomatoes needed to be more finely chopped for the tabbouleh. Her mother also pointed out that I had very thorough knife skills (meaning slow). (3/­­5) My mother-in-law taught me most of these recipes in Aleppo, as she was living in our house. And cooking this reminds me of our life there. Now, my mother lives in the same house as us, so I am actually passing these recipes on to her and my daughter as well. Food means sharing to me - with my neighbours, friends and family. Before the conflict, we were a couple of families that took turns inviting each other over. We baked sweets, cooked food, ate and sang together. Now, the most important thing is to make sure my children arent hungry, but we still share food with our neighbours, even if it just is a small plate or the smell of our cooking. When we first arrived, we didnt have any money to buy ingredients and therefore we had to eat whatever food was provided for us. But after we were approved for the e-food card we were able to buy our own ingredients, so now I can cook food that reminds me of home. ***** We prepared a Syrian version of Tabbouleh with cucumber, tomatoes, lemon, lettuce, fresh parsley, fresh and dried mint, pomegranate syrup, tomato paste and a finely textured bulgur. We also did a delicious yogurt, rice and mint soup called Lebeniyye, a fried eggplant dish with tomato sauce called Mutabbaqa and a vegetarian version of Kepse, which is a flavorful long-grain rice dish topped with toasted almonds and walnuts instead of meat. (4/­­5) Me being a man, a stranger in their house and also a foreigner, I was aware that my visit would be an awkward situation and a difficult environment for everyone to be relaxed in. And the first hours of conversation were quite honestly very polite and trembling. But something happened when we started cooking. Once we gathered around the ingredients and Suad started explaining the dishes we were making, she suddenly began smiling. In the complete sadness of their situation, food definitely brings out a spark of joy. It connected us. In-between exchanging chopping boards and mincing vegetables, they suddenly started asking me questions about how we eat in my country, how my kitchen looks and how we take care of the elderly in our families in Europe (her father gave me a disapproving mutter, when hearing my response). We started sharing photos of our children and all of a sudden, we werent strangers anymore. We finished preparing the last recipe just as it got dark outside. Nurulhuda placed all the food on a large tray on the rug in the living room. Suad invited her children, parents, all her sisters and even the driver of our car to join. And with one spoon each, we all shared from the same plates. It is a very intimate way of eating, sitting on the floor, dipping our spoons into the same bowls of soup. They also ended the meal with a traditional Arabic saying: Now that we have shared bread and salt, we are like relatives. (5/­­5) My story is the story of every Syrian ***** The Syria conflict is the worlds largest humanitarian crisis since World War II. There are currently over 2,7 million Syrian refugees living in Turkey. Only about 10% are living in refugee camps and have guaranteed access to food, shelter and basic needs. The rest are living off-camps - in small apartments, basements, garages and even caves. If you found this story interesting, please also read Emira’s story. And the story of Semira, who works as a Field Monitor Assistant for WFP. I have also written about the E-cards that WFP have developed with help from the European Commission to support refugees and give them the ability to shop and choose food themselves. The trip was part of a initiative that WFP call More Than Food. Pauline and Rens will also be going on similar trips. Here is a short video that explains the project and the E-card a bit more. Thank you for following along! Lebaniyye - Syrian Yogurt Soup Serves 4  I was particularly intrigued by Suad’s Yogurt Soup as I had never tried anything similar before. I have now been cooking it a few times since I returned. Warm yogurt might sound awkward but I found its tanginess really tasty when combined with the mint and rice. Suad served it more as a starter (traditionally I believe it is served with meatballs) but I have taken the liberty to add a bit more topping to make it even more nourishing and flavourful. Suad also cooked the rice and yogurt together from the start but I found that if you dont stay focused and stir continuously, there is a risk that the yogurt will curdle. So I instead cook the rice until its almost done before slowly stirring in the yogurt mixture. Make sure to check the cooking time for the rice. Our rice cooks in 30-35 minutes, but some are pre-steamed which would half the cooking time for the soup. Yogurt Soup 1 cup /­­ 200 g wholegrain rice or brown rice 5 cups /­­ 1,25 liter vegetable stock (or water) 1 garlic clove, grated or finely chopped 4 cups /­­ 1 liter full fat yogurt (we use Turkish yogurt) 1 egg 1 tbsp cornstarch 1 tbsp dried mint 1 tsp salt black pepper   Garlic & Chili Oil 1/­­4 cup olive oil 2 garlic cloves 2 tsp chili flakes    To serve 2 cups /­­  500 ml cooked puy lentils (or chickpeas) 1 large handful fresh spinach 1 large handful fresh mint 1 large handful fresh parsley Rinse the rice and add it to a large, thick-bottomed sauce pan along with vegetable stock and garlic. Bring to a boil and then turn the heat down slightly until it simmers. Meanwhile, add yogurt and egg to a mixing bowl and whisk rapidly until combined and smooth. After the rice has cooked for about 20 minutes, add the cornstarch to the yogurt and then use a soup spoon to ladle some of the warm stock into the yogurt mixture while using your other hand to stir (this is to slowly heat the yogurt and prevent it from curdle when mixed with the rest of the stock and rice). Then pour the yogurt mixture slowly back into the large saucepan with rice and stock while stirring. Add mint, salt and black pepper. Keep the heat on low/­­medium, so it just barely simmers and keep stirring slowly but frequently. When the rice is cooked through and the soup has thickened slightly, it is ready. Taste and adjust the flavours to your liking (I find that it needs quite a bit of salt to balance the tanginess). Remove from the heat and prepare the Garlic & Chili Oil. Heat oil in a small sauce pan on low/­­medium heat. When warm, add garlic and chili flakes, let sauté for about 45 seconds and then remove from the heat. Let steep while you ladle the soup into bowls and chop the spinach and herbs. Top the soup with a generous scoop of lentils, chopped fresh spinach, mint, parsley and a drizzle of the Garlic & Chili Oil.

Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette

September 29 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette This post was created in partnership with Infinity Jars. Having recently finished a cookbook manuscript with the backbone of seasonality, I turn to seasons more than ever when coming up with recipes. It’s hard not to sound like a broken record when talking about the topic, but I find just as much romance as I do practicality in eating what grows at any given time of the year. I grew up in a place, where the season completely dictated what we ate, which at times led to scarcity and deprivation, but made the periods of abundance that much sweeter. Nowadays, I fall back on that feeling, having made peace with waiting a year for the sweetest summer tomato or the plumpest fig. Of course, I will also buy boxed tomatoes for stews and roast up well-traveled California cherry tomatoes when a craving hits out of season – frankly I’m grateful for such options, having experienced what it’s like to have no options during my Soviet childhood. But I also know that the wait for the real deal will be well worth it in the end, so why not embrace it? Another thing I’m constantly encouraged by, when it comes to cooking with nature’s rhythms, is how well a lot of a given season’s ingredients fit together. Let’s take this bowl as an example. I started with the fig – the ultimate fruit of indulgence in the late summer and early fall. Figs are jammy and sweet, especially when broiled, and make easy friends with dense sweet potato and buttery eggplant. Sturdy-leafed kale, known to do well in the cold, together with a hearty grain and lentils make a nice bed for the vegetables. Sage is an evergreen and can be harvested well into the fall months, and coincidentally has that intoxicating, deep, piney flavor that pairs so well with autumn produce. It’s all quite seamless and effortless – the ingredients fit together as if they have been sharing a place under the sun, which, theoretically speaking, is true. This bowl is the opposite of boring, full of those complementary flavors and a variety of textures, from chewy kale and grains, velvety eggplant and sweet potato, to juicy figs and crunchy hazelnuts. It’s a complete meal, and, like any bowl is highly customizable. The hazelnut vinaigrette here is quite special – an interesting twist on a classic dressing, with the addition of well-toasted hazelnuts and sage. It keeps well in the refrigerator, and will improve any one of your bowls or salads. I would very much like to hear your thoughts on cooking with the seasons – do you follow them? do you find it helpful to have them as a guide? or do you find it overwhelming? Whatever it is, I would love to open a conversation. Infinity Jars sent me a variety of their airtight and lightproof ultraviolet glass jars, and I have nothing but great things to say about them. I’m kind of a stickler for storing ingredients in glass whenever possible, and keep a lot of uncommonly refrigerated things in the fridge, from matcha to tamari, to certain nuts and spices. It makes a lot of sense to me to take care of my ingredients and try to preserve their freshness as log as possible, especially for those pricier items. Infinity Jars go above and beyond when it comes to keeping things in top shape – the glass is thick and pigmented to block any harmful UV light, and the seal is scent-proof and airtight. I’ve transferred my loose leaf teas and a few spice mixes, along with some homemade lotions and oils to their screw-top jars. I’ve also been using their oil bottle for basil oil and dressings like the vinaigrette here, all to impressive results. The jars are so pretty too, I love having the uniform black glass on my shelves. Infinity Jars is offering GK readers 15% off all orders, just use code GOLUBKAKITCHEN at checkout until October 28th, 2016 :) Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the salad 1 medium sweet potato - cubed 1 medium eggplant - sliced into ½-inch rounds, halved if large 2 tablespoons neutral coconut or untoasted sesame oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 8-12 fresh figs - cut in half 1 tablespoon chopped sage leaves 1 bunch kale - stems removed, leaves chopped 1 tablespoon olive oil 1½ cup cooked faro, freekeh or other grain of choice 1½ cup cooked puy lentils or other legumes of choice ¼ cup toasted hazelnuts for the hazelnut vinaigrette ¼ cup toasted hazelnuts - divided 5 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar ½ tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon maple syrup a few sage leaves (optional) ⅓ cup olive oil Instructions to make the salad Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Place cubed sweet potato and sliced eggplant into a large bowl, drizzle with oil, add salt, pepper and paprika. Toss to coat and arrange on one or two baking trays - the trays shouldnt be too crowded. Roast for 20 minutes, then mix and roast for another 15 minutes, until soft and golden. Remove from the oven and set aside. Turn on the broiler to high. Broil figs for 4-5 minutes. Remove from the oven and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon chopped sage. Broil for another 1-2 minutes, until caramelized and golden brown at edges. Remove from the oven and set aside. Place chopped kale into a large bowl, add 1 tablespoon olive oil and a pinch of salt, and massage until darkened and wilted. Add cooked farro and lentils to the bowl with kale, top with roasted sweet potato and eggplant. Distribute between bowls, top with figs, drizzle with hazelnut vinaigrette, and garnish with toasted hazelnuts. to make the hazelnut vinaigrette Combine hazelnuts, lemon juice, balsamic vinegar, mustard, maple syrup and sage leaves, if using, in an upright blender. Blend until smooth. Slowly pour olive oil into the mixture, with the motor running on slow, to emulsify. 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Infinity Jars, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Garden Juice Metabolism Boosting Everything Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Purple Kale, Aubergine & Blackberry Salad

September 7 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Purple Kale, Aubergine & Blackberry Salad At first, it was a coincidence. When we looked at the vegetables we had brought home from the market this weekend, many of them just happened to have purple, violet and dark lavender tones. We talked about how that huge bunch of purple kale could make a beautiful salad base together with the rainbow chard, mint flowers and purple sugar snaps. It was at that point my obsessive side took over. “Let’s ONLY DO purple ingredients!” I shouted into Luise’s ear. She turned her head towards me with that hesitant look she always has when I get one of my “brilliant” ideas: “Ok, slow down now, let’s talk about the flavours first”. Of course I didn’t hear her as I was already writing a list with all the purplish ingredients I could think of: “aubergine, purple cauliflower, plums, figs, olives, blackberries, grapes, beetroot, red onion, …”. Some recipes are born out of genius flavour combinations or new preparation methods, this one simply started out as a colour. Luise did however quickly gain back control and started shifting focus to the flavour and combination of vegetables as well. In the end, I think we managed to combine both flavour, colour and texture in a great way. We roasted aubergine and purple spring onion in warm spices until soft and sweet. Massaged the kale with a flavourful dill, mint, lemon and honey dressing to round off its flavour and make it less sturdy. Cooked black lentils were added as a filler, along with rich and creamy avocado (even though it’s more black than purple - and green inside!). Hazelnuts are not purple at all but they added a nice crunch to the texture. Juicy blackberries made a perfect topping. The result was beautiful, a true harvest salad. Maybe not as purple as I originally imagined it (basically because most vegetables loose their colour when they are cut/­­baked/­­cooked), but still with lovely deep hues and so many interesting flavours - a mix of herby, sweet and tangy. When the salad was assembled it still felt like we missed a creamy element, so we tried the honey roasted feta that we had seen on New York Times Cooking last week. It was perfect. Burnt and caramelised on the outside and almost melted on the inside. It completely ruined the dark purple theme but flavour- and texture wise, it was worth the sacrifice. You’ll notice that I smudged it in mashed blackberries as a poor attempt to camouflage it.   We should perhaps add that this wasn’t our kids favourite dish. They picked out the blackberries, avocado and feta cheese from the salad, leaving the raw kale to us. I guess purple isn’t their colour… Purple Kale & Blackberry Salad with Roasted Honey Feta Vegans can just skip the feta cheese or replace it with hummus. And replace honey with maple syrup. Baked vegetables 1 aubergine /­­ eggplant 4 spring onions or 2 red onions 2-4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp ground cumin 1 pinch ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1 handful hazelnuts Cooked lentils 1/­­2 cup uncooked lentils (we used black lentils) 1 1/­­2 cup water 1 pinch sea salt Dressing 1/­­3 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 tsp honey or more to taste sea salt & pepper 1 large handful mixed fresh dill, parsley and mint Other salad ingredients 4 stalks curly kale, green or purple 4 stalks rainbow chard or spinach 2 avocadoes 1 small handful snap peas 1 punnet fresh blackberries, halved Roasted feta with honey (from NYT) 1 block feta cheese, patted dry 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp honey Start by preparing the baked vegetables. Preheat the oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wash and cut the aubergine into large cubes and trim and slice the onions, then place in a mixing bowl. Stir together oil and spices in a small bowl, pour the oil mixture over the aubergine and onions and toss to combine. Transfer to a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes or until very soft and golden, check every now and then to prevent from burning, the baking time depends on the size of the vegetables. Add the hazelnuts halfway through. Meanwhile, cook the lentils in a saucepan with the water for 15 minutes or until tender and can be mashed easily between two fingers. Add sea salt towards the end of the cooking time. Drain any excess water and leave to cool. Prepare the dressing by mixing oil, lemon juice, honey, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Chop the herbs finely and add to the oil mixture. Taste and adjust to your liking. Remove the stems from the kale and coarsely chop the leaves. Finely slice the chard. Place all in a large mixing bowl, add 2 tbsp of the dressing and massage for a couple of minutes until soft. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Mix the lentils with the remaining dressing and pour them over the kale and chard mixture. Cut the avocado into cubes, slice the snap peas and roughly chop the hazelnuts. Add to the salad bowl together with the roasted  aubergine, onions and hazelnuts. Toss slightly to combine and then scatter blackberries on top. If you like to serve the salad with the baked feta cheese, follow the instructions below. Keep the oven at 400°F /­­ 200°C. Place the feta cheese in a small ovenproof dish covered with baking paper and cover with oil. Bake in the oven for about 8 minutes, until soft but not melted. Melt the honey. Remove the cheese from the oven and turn the heat to broiler. With a baking brush, paint the cheese with the melted honey. Place back in the oven and broil until the top starts to brown. Use a spatula to immediately and carefully transfer the cheese to the salad, or serve it on the side.

Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Giveaway)

August 31 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Giveaway) Hey friends, this is Masha. I usually do the photos and editing around here, but I am now venturing into doing some full posts as well. Today I’m excited to share some photos I took this past weekend in magical Woodstock, NY and its surrounding areas, along with a dish my boyfriend and I cooked there from Kristin Donnely’s beautiful new cookbook, Modern Potluck. True to its title, the book offers plenty of original, make-ahead recipes for gatherings, where contribution in the form of food is encouraged, along with useful potluck prep tips. Despite this wonderful theme, however, the recipes are very appealing to make and eat at home just as well. The book is not vegan or vegetarian (perfect for omnivores), but offers plenty of vegetarian, vegan, dairy-free and gluten-free options. Some of the recipes that caught our eye include Potato Salad with Fennel and Pickly Things, Miso and Molasses Baked Beans, Samosa-Filling Stuffed Poblanos, Vegetarian Borscht Salad, and Vegan Caprese Salad. All the photography is done by Yossi, who is one of our favorite food photographers in this whole wide world. We are giving away a copy of the book too, so read on for the giveaway details. I live in NYC, and my man and I have been thinking about getting away from the city to explore Upstate New York for a while. We finally got it together on one of the last weekends of summer and had the most incredible time. Woodstock exceeded all my expectations – I knew it would be nice, but didn’t expect it to be as breathtaking as it was, and now I daydream about one day moving there. The whole town seems to be woven into the woods, and this time of year, the forest is thick with green leaves and sweet summer air, accompanied by bird and cricket songs, scurrying chipmunks, and majestic deer. At night, it’s dark enough to see the Milky Way, of which we are very deprived in the city. We rented this Airbnb – a cottage built by the owner, an artist, and secluded in the woods, right off his main property. The place was amazing, from the layout and tree-filtered light streaming through the windows all day, to all the well-considered, hand-crafted details. The kitchen was very well equipped for all the cooking we did, and there is an outside grill, as well as a fire pit. It’s technically in the town of Saugerties, but very close to the main stretch in Woodstock, The Big Deep and Opus 40. Big Deep  A popular swimming hole in the area. You leave your car in an unpaved parking lot in the woods and follow a short trail to the water. We were there right around golden hour and I felt like I was in a fairy tale – the water was clear and refreshing, with sunrays streaming through the surrounding tall trees. As we witnessed, it can get crowded at the immediate entrance off the trail, but if you walk away from the main area a bit, you can find plenty of quieter, semi-private spots for taking a dip. Opus 40 A huge environmental sculpture, built by sculptor Harvey Fite over the course of 37 years in an abandoned bluestone quarry. Fite originally planned out the space as an outdoor sculpture gallery, and had a 40 year plan for finishing it, but died on the 37th year of completion. The structure is composed of curving steps, levels, passageways and water pools, and the entire thing is built without cement, inspired by ancient Mayan building techniques, and using old quarrymen’s tools. Everything about Opus 40 is incredibly impressive, and the whole time, I felt like I was walking around an alien-built playground. It’s also a great spot for eating lunch – there are plenty of places to sit down and enjoy the view. Kaaterskill Falls A 260 ft waterfall, one of the highest in New York. We overheard someone talking about it at a cafe and decided to check it out, and so glad we did. It’s a drive away from Woodstock, around 20 minutes, up a serpentine road and into the Catskills. The amazing thing about this waterfall is that there are trails leading to both the crest of the waterfall, where it first begins to drop, and the bottom, where it makes a nicely-sized pool, and you can swim in both places. As in, you can stand under a waterfall (!) and you can swim in river pools, in water which will be dropping hundreds of feet after it brushes past you. Insane. This was the last thing we did before heading back to the city, and it was the perfect closing to our trip. Some food-related places we liked: Kingston Farmer’s Market There are plenty of farmers markets in the area, but we only got to try out this one. A very nice, medium-sized farmer’s market with a good number of produce stands. The August produce was absolutely beautiful – heirloom tomatoes the size of a baby’s head, jewel-colored eggplants, ground cherries, peaches, shiso leaf (!), purslane, etc, etc. Open Saturdays 9am-2pm. Bread Alone We buy this company’s bread in NYC and were interested in visiting one of their home stores, since the company originated in the Catskills. This location sells many different varieties of their bread, a ton of pastries, coffee (Irving Farm) and sandwiches. Good for breakfast and lunch. Shindig Good burgers (they do have a brown rice and beet veggie burger for the veggie-inclined) and sandwiches (veggie melt), but I liked the watermelon gazpacho special I got the most. The cocktails are also fun, generously sized, and unique – their booze of choice seems to be soju and sake. Provisions Went here for lunch. A modern deli that bakes its own bread, pickles their own veggies and uses local produce. Lots of interesting sandwich options and a few salads. Sunflower Natural Foods Market A very well stocked local health food store. Fruition Chocolate  A local bean to bar chocolate company that offers a variety of chocolate bars for all tastes. They even sell a 100% cacao bar! Vinnie’s Farm Market A crazy place we stopped at on the way back from Kaaterskill Falls. A family-owned produce stand and store with a TON of homemade canned goods, from pickles to jams to hot pepper spreads, pastries and bread, homemade butter, farm eggs and milk. The amount of product they have is almost overwhelming, and the whole place feels like a step back in time. Since the cottage we rented was so cozy, we had no problem staying in for dinner and cooking with all the amazing produce we got at the farmer’s market. I’d been flipping through Modern Potluck the week prior, and was really attracted to the cover recipe for Spice-Roasted Carrots Over Lentils, which seemed perfectly simple, and like a good accompaniment to the grilled pizza we were planning on making in Woodstock. We loved the dish, it was a breeze to make and had all the elements I love in a side dish – substance from lentils and carrots, sweetness from dates, complexity from the spices and a fresh finish from the herbs. I imagine that bringing a platter of these lentils to a potluck would definitely earn you a status of a famous cook among your friends. Giveaway: For a chance to win a copy of Modern Potluck, leave a comment with your favorite potluck dish and a working email until Wednesday, September 7th, 2016. Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck   Print Serves: 8-16 Ingredients for the carrots 3 pounds real baby carrots or other small carrots - scrubbed if organic, peeled if not 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon paprika 1 teaspoon ground cumin salt and freshly ground black pepper ½ cup tender fresh herb leaves - cilantro/­­dill/­­tarragon/­­mint/­­basil - roughly chopped, plus more for garnish ¼ cup finely sliced pitted medjool dates, dried figs or prunes for the lentils 1 pound dried black beluga or french green lentils salt and freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 large onion - quartered lengthwise, peeled and thinly sliced crosswise 1 tablespoon minced garlic (about 2 large cloves) 1 teaspoon ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground cumin ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves - roughly chopped plain yogurt or cashew cream for serving (optional) Instructions prepare the carrots Preheat oven to 425°F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper. In a large bowl, toss the carrots with olive oil, coriander, paprika and cumin, and season generously with salt and pepper. Spread the carrots out on the baking sheets. Roast, rotating the baking sheets halfway through and shaking the carrots, for 20 to 30 minutes, until the carrots are nicely browned and tender. Let the carrots cool slightly, then transfer to a large bowl and toss with the herbs and dates. prepare the lentils In a medium saucepan, cover the lentils with water by 2 inches and bring to a boil. Simmer over medium heat until tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Drain the lentils, reserving ½ cup of the cooking liquid and season with salt. In a deep skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onion and season generously with salt. Cook, stirring frequently until lightly browned, about 15 minutes. Add the garlic, coriander, cumin, and cinnamon, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the lentils and reserved cooking liquid, and cook until heated through, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the lemon juice and the cilantro. Arrange the lentils on a platter and top with the carrots. Garnish with more herb leaves and dollops of yogurt/­­cashew cream and serve warm or at room temperature. potluck prep The lentils and roasted carrots, without the herbs and dates, can be refrigerated separately, overnight; bring to room temperature before serving. Bring the dish to the potluck already assembled with the vegetables on top of the lentils, then garnish with yogurt/­­cashew cream and herbs just before serving. Notes I halved the recipe for two people, but giving you a whole one here as per the book. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Market Berry Salad and a New York Weekend Pineapple and Mango Tart Raw Zucchini Spaghetti with Marinara Sauce Summer Market Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Giveaway) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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