intensive - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Cucumber (Kheera) Raita

Nariyal Burfi (Coconut Fudge)

Tofu and Vegetable Stew

Apples and Carrot Soup










intensive vegetarian recipes

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford

December 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Trinity Mouzon Wofford is the founder of GOLDE Turmeric, a line of high-quality turmeric blends for golden milk, lattes, and more. We are in love with everything GOLDE, and were so excited to get a peek at its radiant founder’s wellness routine. In this interview, Trinity tells us about her rule-free approach to self-care, her path to self-acceptance, and the importance of giving the body exactly what it’s craving, as well as a Geisha-approved moisturizer that works wonders for her skin, her number one cold remedy that’s likely in your kitchen right now, exercise, beauty, stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think having some form of a routine is crucial to your mental health when you run a business from home. It’s been sort of tricky as of late because we’re in transition from our home in Upstate New York to moving back down to Brooklyn. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. On an ideal day, I’m up around 6:30am and checking my phone for email and GOLDE‘s social media. Following that, I’ll do a bit of stretching to loosen up, and then hop in the shower. After I’ve gotten ready, I’ll sit down to work and make a to-do list for the day -- this is crucial for me. I forget things and get really anxious about what I’m forgetting if I don’t bother to organize my thoughts and tasks in advance. I’ll usually dig into whatever those tasks are for an hour or so before pausing for breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My partner, Issey, and I always make sure to have a cut-off time for work, barring emergencies. Once that point rolls around (it varies day-by-day), I’m usually catching up on the news or my favorite blogs while Issey preps dinner. We’ll eat together and then usually end off binging some TV show. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Issey’s miso soup with tons of mushrooms and seaweed. He makes it completely from scratch using his mom’s recipe. Lunch – Lunch is usually whatever is leftover from dinner that week  -- lately its a lot of hearty stews. Snack – We’ll do a little crudite plate with raw veg from the farmer’s market: carrots, turnips, radishes, persian cucumbers. Always with some cheese and seed crackers. Sometimes also with wine. Dinner – Tibetan food from our favorite spot in Jackson Heights, Queens. It’s a lot of dumplings (momos), noodles, and warming soups. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I can’t, really. I love the taste of coffee, but it turns me into a shaking, anxious mess. I always start the day with a turmeric tonic made with one of our blends -- usually cacao or original because the matcha also makes me a bit hyper. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Yes, yes, yes. I try not to “keep it in check” so much as listen to it with a variety of foods. Sometimes it’s fruit or homemade popcorn with coconut sugar. Sometimes it’s half a box of Dots eaten while laying on the couch. Refined sugar is trash for your system, but so is getting too regimented with your foods. I keep it light (emotionally) and eat what I’m craving. When junk food isn’t off limits, you’re not going to crave it every day. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Well, turmeric, of course. It makes such a difference in my skin and immunity. Issey loves it for instant allergy relief. There are apparently over 10,000 medical studies on its effects on the body --it’s really incredible. We’re also huge proponents of ashwaghanda in our household. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Upstate New York is not exactly the land of boutique fitness, so it can be more challenging to get in a sweat on the regular. I focus mostly on stretching and going on walks/­­hikes on the weekend. I think I’ve probably gained a bit of weight since I’ve been up here because I’m not moving as much as I did in NYC, but I don’t really mind. It’s okay for your body to fluctuate with your circumstances, as long as you’re treating it with respect. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? It varies. I really like working out as a method to clear my head, so often I do look forward to it. But that said, I don’t really try to push myself too much. If you want to be a world-class athlete, then by all means, train 2+ hours a day. I’m just looking to keep my body and psyche in good health, so if I don’t feel like making it to my workout, I don’t feel the need to punish myself later. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I grew up black in a very white town, so I’ve had a lot of really emotional moments coming to terms with what beauty means for me. At the moment, I like to keep things really natural with my curls out and minimal makeup. It took a while to accept my looks for exactly what they are, so now I’m really openly embracing it. I feel more beautiful now than I did 5 years ago, mostly due to opening myself up to the concept that I’m perfectly fine just as I am. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I try to keep my routine relatively simple. I’ll wash my face with raw African black soap or something gentle like Cerave. I love Drunk Elephant products, and I apply their C-Firma and B-Hydra serums every day. They help a lot with keeping my skin clear and getting rid of dark marks. After that I’ll moisturize with raw shea butter, or a cream that has that. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Turmeric, again. Because it’s anti-inflammatory, I’ve found it to be really helpful in clearing up redness or breakouts. Besides that, I try not to get too bogged down with a ton of supplements. I focus mostly on eating a variety of plants every day. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Shea butter is amazing for my skin. My partner’s Japanese mother recently put me on to this cream called Secret de Maiko. It contains shea butter and a few other natural, organic ingredients. Apparently this is what young Geisha girls would use as a moisturizer/­­makeup base. This cream is better than pure shea butter because it won’t leave you greasy at all. I use it twice daily. It’s great for keeping your skin clear and calm. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Well, cannabis helps. I use a vaporizer pen so there’s no smoke-related health detriments/­­lingering smell. I really want to try the Hmbldt pen because I’m a sucker for sharp design. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? There’s going to stress sometimes. I try to deal in healthy ways like going for a walk to clear my head, or talking to a close friend about whatever I’m dealing with. But life isn’t perfect, so sometimes you just end up being a bit tense for a few days. I think that’s normal and natural -- I try not to fight it too much. You have to let yourself feel it so that you can process it and move past it. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic!! At my old job, everyone in the office knew about this because I would practically through bulbs of raw garlic at anyone who complained of illness. Nothing works better for immediately beating a bad cold. If I feel something coming on, I take 2-3 whole cloves (swallowed like horse pills) with a ton of water. That can save you in just a couple hours -- it’s crazy. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I really like to work, so what I consider to be a healthy work/­­life balance might not be the right approach for someone else. I genuinely enjoy spending my free time dreaming up new campaigns, product ideas, or designs for GOLDE. I guess that’s the benefit to doing your own thing -- it doesn’t always feel like work. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I’ve gotten a lot better with this with age. I try not to have any food or exercise rules. Being militant about your body is not self-care, and it can really easily spiral into disordered behavior that veers on the edge of “orthorexia.” I mostly just listen to my body and allow itself what it wants, whether that has to do with food, movement/­­exercise, socializing vs. indulging my natural introvert, etc. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I really think doing away with rules (re: food, etc.) has been the most important change I’ve made. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with avoiding gluten or dairy because it upsets your stomach or causes breakouts, but don’t complicate your life with structure that does not serve you. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Usually moments like these mean I need to re-focus myself. I’ll start by making to-do lists, and go from there. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting GOLDE? I was pre-med at NYU, with plans to practice holistic medicine. By my senior year of college, I wasn’t so sure about spending more time and money on schooling, and sort of fell into a marketing role at a tech startup. I really loved the creative aspects of marketing, and found that GOLDE was a way of combining my interests in sharp branding with making holistic health more accessible. The interest in turmeric actually came from my mom, who has Rheumatoid Arthritis. She noticed a huge difference in her overall levels of inflammation when she started incorporating it into her daily routine -- that’s when I started paying attention. -- How do you approach the sourcing of your ingredients for GOLDE? We actually just started sourcing all of our turmeric with a company called Diaspora Co. They focus 100% on supporting ethical and high-quality spice trade that empowers rather than disenfranchises the people of color who have been growing and ingesting medicinal plants like turmeric for generations. The turmeric that we’re going to be using is an heirloom variety with almost twice the typical amount of curcumin. It’s grown on a fourth-generation, family-owned farm in India, and farmers are paid 6X the standard commodity prices to ensure truly fair wages. We’re really excited to be featuring a product that’s not only incredibly high-quality, but also works to re-build lingering inequality left in the wake of colonialism. -- What’s your favorite way to use your wellness blend? I love to have it just with hot water and raw honey in the morning. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Heading to the Union Square Greenmarket is one of my favorite activities. When I’m in the city, I like to go every Monday morning when it’s not too crowded. It’s mostly just you and the chefs (or their assistants?) shopping for what they’ll be preparing that day. I also love infra red sauna. I go to Higher Dose in the East Village. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie Song/­­Album – Songs in the Key of Life – Stevie Wonder -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I am nowhere near as regimented as our dear Joan. Usually my suitcase is packed haphazardly with whatever clothing is clean and well-suited for the weather. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? More people of color, please! A few of my favorites: Diane Chang Yaminah Mayo Dr. Tiffany Lester Latonya Yvette Nikisha Brunson Alex Elle Lauren Ash Sana Javeri Kadri Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Issey Kobori and Nico Behnzukeh. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake

October 21 2017 My New Roots 

Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake Boil the kettle and make a cup of tea folks, this is going to be a big one! First of all, I have to begin this post by saying THANK YOU. My New Roots is officially 10 years old and I couldnt have done it without your support, enthusiasm, and full-on LOVE for this little blog. And especially after the last couple of posts when I really opened up about my recent struggles, I felt so supported, and saw that so many of you did as well. It reminded me of the strong community that this has become, and the power of people when they come together with a common goal of true wellness. If you had told me an entire decade ago that my deeply passionate, unabashedly nerdy, and nearly ignored internet musings would end up turning into a full-on career, brand, cookbooks, online classes, app, poster shop and retreat company I never, ever would have believed you. But reading my first post again, it’s just as relevant today as ever, eerily almost as if I had written it last week. I guess I had a strong vision in mind and just kept trucking, kept trusting, that it would resonate with someone. But here we are, a third of my life later, and it’s not just someone, but so many of you. And all of my dreams continue to be born and manifest because of you. That offhanded suggestion from an old boyfriend who thought I could use an outlet for all that health talk I kept spewing, was really onto something. Thanks, dude. Secondly...and this is really big news...I am moving back to Canada! Yes, after nine years of delicious life in Copenhagen, my old roots are pulling me home and I am so very ready. This whole thing has been in the works for a few months now, but I didnt really feel like putting it out there until it was real. Well lemme tell ya, when putting my familys life in 50 boxes and shoving them into a shipping container, shiz got real, real fast. What a crazy feeling it is, and totally overwhelming with all the emotions that relocating your entire life is. So, if things have been (and continue to be) quiet around here, its because Ive been sorting through all the details that an international move entails. I send my gratitude for your patience. The next chapter of my life will be completely different from the last, that is for sure. To change things up dramatically, my family and I will be living out of the city in fact, near-ish to Toronto, where I am originally from. I knew that I would end up living in the country at some point, but not so soon! It was more a when I retire kind of thing. But funny what happens when you have kids and they need s-p-a-c-e, your priorities seem to shift to accommodate the little ones. Plus, I feel the need to be on the ground again (Ive been living in a fourth-floor apartment for nine years now!), so we bought a house to get closer to earth in every sense, plant a garden, lay in the grass - our own grass - and enjoy the quiet and safety of a little community. Im really excited for everything that is to come, and feeling so grateful for the divine unfolding. But will I miss Copenhagen? Obvi. This city, and my home here, is where I have spent my entire adult life. The walls of my beloved kitchen that my husband and I built ourselves, have held space for two cookbooks, online classes, countless dinner parties, bleary-eyed breakfasts, and even the birth of our son for crying out loud! And although My New Roots began in Toronto, it flourished here and truly became something on Danish ground. The Scandinavian culture has had a profound influence on me, my aesthetic, and how I see the world now. Having Europe at my doorstep with all its history, architecture, fine arts, culture, and attitude has been an enormous privilege and deeply inspiring. And can we talk about the light? Oh the light! How my camera and I will miss the very special way the sun slants here. Its unlike anything Ive seen before. Anyway, I promise to keep you all posted as we leave one fabulous country for the next. I wont have a working kitchen for some months, but Ill stay as active as I can on Instagram so you can keep up with my kitchen renovations...I know youll want to see all that house porn. Tee hee. Okay, now for the main event. I MADE A CARROT CAKE. Successfully. It is delicious. I feel like I have finally achieved one of my biggest culinary goals ever, and its so appropriate that we celebrate ten years of this blog with a recipe that has challenged me for nearly as long. If you remember back to when I used to post giant layer cakes for my birthday, I ran into trouble in 2013, when I attempted three different versions, which all failed, and ended up making nut butter sandwiches instead. Since then, the headcount has continued to rise, yet some ridiculously stubborn part of me wont give up. In the past Ive almost always used spelt flour for baking, and if any of you have tried one of my famous layer cakes, youll know this has worked well. I was after the same crumb that you can achieve with wholegrain spelt, but wanted the cake to be gluten-free, so I started by using an all-purpose gluten-free flour. It was a total disaster. The cake turned out gummy and inedible, and the frosting, which I tried to make with cooked quinoa (dont ask) was just weird. The next route I tried was with almond flour, since Ive been eating a more low-grain diet for the past few months and I wanted the cake to reflect that. Before testing it out, I assumed that almond flour would make things really dense and heavy, but lo and behold it creates a crumb that is so fluffy, and really gives this feeling of deep satisfaction. Im obsessed. The only thing that I dont like about almond flour is the high price, and the fact that almonds are a very water-intensive crop to grow. But, this is a cake after all, therefore a special treat, therefore not something you have all the time. The initial carrot cake experiments with almond flour were good, but borderline too rich. Plus, since Id ditched the quinoa frosting idea and knew Id be taking the cashew road, I felt like a nut frosting on top of a nut cake was just, well, too nutty. To reconcile my relationship with coconut flour, I cut the dry ingredients with a tad to see what would happen. Not only was the cake just as good, but the texture was better and I liked the flavor the coconut flour provided. We are friends again. The Cashew Coconut frosting for this cake is what Canadians would affectionately call a twofer. Bahahaha! (I really do amuse myself). For everyone else out there, in long form, this refers to a two-for-one deal. You can make this recipe once, but have the frosting come out two ways depending on its temperature. Pretty groovy, eh? If you use the frosting right after making it, it will be loose and glossy, almost glaze-like. If you prefer a traditional-style frosting that is thicker and stiffer, all you need to do is put the mixture in the fridge overnight to achieve this consistency. I chose to go with the room temperature version since I hadnt really worked with it like that before. It provided a more even layer, but its also a little harder to control. Either way its delicious, so dont worry about making the wrong choice...there isnt one! The flavour is major: Im talking soooo cream cheese-like that even I was confused. If youre not feeling the chunky carrot cake vibes, please look away now, because the cake of my dreams is loaded with pineapple, walnuts, and bursting with warm spice and citrus zest. I went to town! Instead of using questionably-edible canned pineapple, I used the dried, unsweetened version from the health food store. This stuff ain’t cheap, but again, cake splurge. If you cant find pineapple like this, dates, raisins, dried figs or apricots would also be good, but Id skip the soaking step. Instead of walnuts you could use pecans, macadamias, or even pumpkin seeds. Altogether this carrot cake is moist, decadent, and satisfying with so many layers of flavour and texture that just wont quit. Ive learned a lot in the past decade, and this cake is an expression of that. Its something to be proud of, and something to share. Thanks for sticking by me while I worked out the kinks…now its time to celebrate all the things!     Print recipe     Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake Serves 10-12 Ingredients: 2/­­3 cup /­­ 60g dried, unsweetened pineapple, plus more for garnish if desired 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 200g lightly packed grated carrots (about 3 medium) 1 cup /­­ 100g walnuts, plus more for garnish if desired 3 cups /­­ 300g almond flour (not almond meal) 2/­­3 cup /­­ 100g coconut flour 1 1/­­2 tsp. baking soda 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 Tbsp. ground cinnamon 2 tsp. ground ginger 1 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp. ground nutmeg 1 cup /­­ 250ml eggs, at room temperature (about 4-5 large eggs) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml odourless coconut oil, melted 1 cup /­­ 250ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract zest of 1 orange and 1 lemon (try to find organic, if possible) Cashew Coconut Frosting: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 200g raw cashews, soaked for 4 hours 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml coconut cream from the top of a can of coconut milk 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Pour just-boiled water over the dried pineapple (do not soak the pineapple youre using for garnish). Preheat the oven to 325°F/­­160°C. Lightly grease two 7 /­­ 18cm spring form cake pans with coconut oil. 2. Wash carrots well and grate them on a box grater. Set aside. Roughly chop the walnuts. 3. In a large mixing bowl, combine the almond flour, coconut flour, baking soda, salt cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and nutmeg. 4. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, coconut oil, maple syrup, and vanilla extract. 5. Drain the soaked pineapple and squeeze with your hands to remove excess liquid. Roughly chop. 6. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry ingredients and stir to combine. Zest the orange and lemon into the bowl. Add the carrots, soaked pineapple, and chopped walnuts and fold to incorporate. 7. Spoon roughly half of the batter into one of the prepared cake pans, then add the remaining batter to the second one. Place in the oven in the middle rack and set the timer for 40 minutes. Cakes are ready when they are golden brown and pass the toothpick test (bake for longer if necessary, up to one hour - cover cake with aluminum foil if you need to bake for longer so that the top doesnt burn). Remove cakes from the oven and let cool completely. 8. While the cakes are baking, make the frosting. Drain and rinse the cashews. Add them to a high-speed blender along with the other ingredients (you can use a normal blender or food processor, but the frosting wont be as smooth). If the frosting is too thick, add more coconut cream or a teeny bit of water and blend again. Chill in the fridge (frosting can be made one day ahead if you want it to be thicker). 9. To frost and decorate, spread a generous amount of frosting over one half of the cake. Carefully lay the second half on top, and spread remaining frosting over the top and on the sides. Decorate with remaining dried pineapple and walnuts, if desired. Serve and enjoy! Cake will keep for 5 days, covered in the fridge. Who knows what the future holds - the world seems so crazy these days - but I do know that I still have steam in me to keep going with this heart project, if youre all still up for reading and cooking from it. Words cannot describe my gratitude for you, allowing me to pursue my biggest dreams and expose my shadowy bits as well. I hope you know how much I love you. I truly do. Here’s to another ten years… xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Okay friends, there are still a couple spaces left for the next Wild Heart High Spirit retreat in Portugal! Its this November 5-11, hosted at the ridiculously beautiful Sublime Comporta hotel (guys, Ive been there and this place is NEXT LEVEL). I will be teaching cooking classes outside in the organic garden (pictured above!) and giving nutrition seminars daily, with yoga and movement classes twice a day with my dear friend and deeply talented friend, Mikkala Marilyn Kissi of Living Yolates. The kitchen is exclusively making My New Roots recipes for the week, so we can all enjoy these meals without having to lift a finger. Enjoy your private pool, open spa, horseback riding on the beach, bonfire nights and dancing under the stars. Come and get inspired to live your best life! Well show you how. Click here for more info, and see you in magical Portugal! The post Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake appeared first on My New Roots.

Cheese Celebration for Vegans

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

Cheese Celebration for Vegans I got a package from Happy Cheeze - raw vegan cheese. I heard it is fantastic. Good ingredients and pure craftsmanship. Finally a product thats not from a factory. I was so excited when the package arrived. I tried: cream cheese spirulina chili cream cheese ramson soft cheese with herbs cashew camembert "happy white" cashew camembert "classic" cashew camembert "ramson" What makes theses varieties so special? They're raw, vegan and organic. They're handcrafted. The most special thing is that they are ripened. Which means they were added with fermented vegan cheese cultures. You can really taste that. Optics: The look of the food is just as important to me as the taste of it. The cheese has very nice packages. The soft cheese with herbs is decorated with herbs and looks very sweet. The cream cheese spirulina chili is gloriously blue which suprised me. Definitely an eyecatcher. The camembert is covered with mould, just like we know it from cow cheese. Inside it is a little bit darker but that doesn't bother. The soft cheese looks just like the goat cheese I know from the cheese counter. All different kinds of cheese can be served on a silver platter and they will suprise your guests. So thumbs up for the optics. Smell: The smell is very decent. It can't be compared to savoury cheese. A lot more enjoyable I think. In case you can store the cheese in the fridge without the package and you don't have to run away when you open the fridge again. Taste: I had to try the camembert at first because I was so interested about the taste with the mould. My expectations were very high. The "happy white" cheese tastes very good but it isn't as soft as an animal camembert is. I was very suprised by the spirulina chili cheese. I have tried a lot of different types of cream cheese before but this one tastes so fantastic. It has a sourly hot taste, very delicious. The rasmon cheese kinds are very delicious as well and not to intensive. It's very difficult to name a favourite out of all these different kinds. I really liked the soft cheese with herbs. Do you need this? I have tried to make cheese myself once. The manufacture is not that easy because it depends on the temperature and needs a lot of time. Who really wants to spend 6 weeks on making cheese. I could never be patient enough. The different cheese kinds cost from EUR 7,95 up to EUR 12,95 for 100-150g. Compared to animal cheese this cheese is a lot more expensive but I would definitely buy it. The cheese is worth every cent. In addition to it no one has to suffer for that cheese and it's a natural product. You can find the different types of cheese online or at a local organic store. For example at Boutique Vegan an online shop. Conclusion: The happy cheese is a good piece of handcraft and proves that small projects can have a big impact. They set new standards and you support a true initiative and expire true indulgence. Perfect for a dinner with the family. Thanks to Annika & Mudar for making this cheese. I hope your cheese is going to be known worldwide and lets everybodys hearts melt.

Essential Vegan Foods To Bring While Traveling

June 6 2016 Vegetarian Times 

Essential Vegan Foods To Bring While Traveling We asked best-selling cookbook author and passionate vegan chef Julie Morris to give us her best tips for traveling as a vegan. Were thrilled to partner with Julie on our exciting new online course, Go Vegan! 30 Days to a Plant-Based Lifestyle. This intensive, interactive course features vegan cooking skills, tips on getting proper nutrition and thriving on a vegan lifestyle, and more than 70 recipes for a vegan meal plan to get you started. Check it out now. TWV, or Traveling While Vegan, may not be a trending hashtag acronym yet, but at the rate of increasing popularity of a vegan diet, its only a matter of time before its a well-known term! Its a situation I understand well. I travel a good bit for my job, and remember the anxiety I faced during my early days as a vegan when it came time to hit the road. Although enjoying a vegan diet has always been easy within the security of my own kitchen, a different city (or country) doesnt always offer the same safety net of healthy plant-based options. Dont get me wrong -- theres a surprising amount of vegan food in the world to enjoy (hint: most of the time its not called vegan food, its just food ... that happens to be vegan!), but for the occasions when time or patience runs out, I rely on a few things that Ive actually brought with me. Packing a light, pared-down kit of key vegan foods while traveling can make all the difference in how you feel on a trip: You wont have to compromise your energy, health, or values. Over the years Ive refined my kit into a system that covers all the fundamental vegan bases in a hyper-condensed form.  So the next time you pack a suitcase, you consider bringing a small supply of these Plan B essential vegan foods: Energy Bars: As a condensed mini-meal, an energy bar can feel like its truly saving the day. Look for varieties that contain as many natural ingredients as possible, or for best results (and significant financial savings), make your own! Homemade energy bars are surprisingly easy to create using a food processor, and can be cut into bars and wrapped in plastic or parchment for single servings. Pack one for each day. Something Green: Fresh green foods are a foundation of any healthy diet, but can be surprisingly difficult to find when traveling to a new city. This is where green powders or tablets can be your best energizing friend! Made out of freeze-dried nutritious greens, such as kale, broccoli, wheatgrass, or spirulina, these superfoods are hyper-concentrated (a little goes a long way). You can bring spirulina tablets (a few for each day), or single-serve packets of your favorite green powder blend to add to a bottle of water. Something Protein: While its getting easier to find great-tasting vegan meals, not every restaurant offers a good nutritional balance. Traveling with vegan protein can help satisfy cravings and allow you to be more relaxed with other meals (bonus points if it includes vitamin B12). Bring a stash of vegan protein powder that you can shake inside of a water bottle for a quick smoothie. Or just make sure the energy bars you choose are high in protein - look for 10 grams or above. Crackers & Almond Butter: While its easy to grab the sweet stuff, packing a little something savory is good for both your taste buds and your health! A box of crackers can help satisfy an unruly stomach, while a little bit of nut butter makes this snack more nutritionally balanced with healthy fats and easy-to-digest protein. Look for crackers that are made of nutrient-dense whole grains and seeds (they will be the most satisfying), as well as single-serve pouches of nut butter that are perfect for packing. A Treat: TWV is an enjoyable and easy experience 99% of the time. On the rare occasion that its not quite as epic from a delicious standpoint (hello, airplane food), having a treat you can look forward to can be a complete game-changer in your mood! Keep a small stash of one of your favorite treats, such as a go-to chocolate bar, a bag of fruit gummies, or homemade cookies. This little pick-me-up is a great reward for sticking to your values.

Controversy Over Dietary Guidelines Continues

April 13 2015 Meatless Monday 

Controversy Over Dietary Guidelines Continues Michele Simon, President of Eat Drink Politics.com and author of Appetite for Profit: How the Food Industry Undermines Our Health and How to Fight Back, stopped by our office this week. Shes working with My Plate, My Planet, and other groups supporting the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, that call for eating less red meat and less processed meat for both environmental and health reasons. Here are some excerpts from what she had to say: On understanding the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee: Every five years, a scientific committee is formed - organized by the government but not government people - mostly academics and scientific experts - who come together and spend two years researching the latest science to update what we know now about how to eat right. And this is a very intensive process. They have public hearings, a comment period, they really do their homework. On why you should care: While its true that most Americans dont pay much attention to dietary advice from the government, the guidelines are still important as an education tool, and the government does put out many materials that come from these guidelines. For years it was the ‘Food Pyramid’, then it morphed into My Plate showing that you should fill half your plate with fruits & vegetables – which was a big accomplishment for the government to say that in the last revision. And just as important is how the government uses the guidelines as the basis for its food assistance program, which makes sense.   If the federal government is going to use our tax dollars for things like school meals, they should be based on some kind of federal guidelines. Thats really why this is so important. Its a federal policy-making tool, even though most people know it as the food pyramid or some government messaging that may not seem so relevant. On why the committees recommendations are getting so much attention: For the first time, the committee took up the issue of sustainability and from the get-go that caused some controversy. It shouldnt be so crazy that when were talking about health, the idea of where our food comes from should matter. But the meat industry is very threatened by the idea that we should be connecting the sources of our food supply to the dietary guidelines. So - no surprise to many of us – it turns out theres a direct connection between meat production and the environment. The committee actually went further and said eating more of a plant-based diet and less animal foods is whats best for the environment AND our health. Thats not rocket science. Science has told us this for decades. But the scientific committee is addressing this issue in a very thoughtful way. So in addition to the recommendation that the guidelines take into account sustainability, they also squarely landed on red meat and processed meat being unhealthy. Specifically on a health basis. Everyones up in arms over the sustainability piece because the meat industry wants to say thats not in the jurisdiction, or within the expertise of this committee. But whats squarely in their expertise is health. And they were very plain that a diet with too much red meat and processed meat is bad for your health. Its related to a number of poor health outcomes including heart disease, cancers, diabetes, etc. On what YOU can do: Were in a comment period right now and its really important that our voices get heard. Its not often that the federal government asks the public to tell them what you think. So, because theres such an obvious connection between the message of eat less meat and the Meatless Monday campaign, I think everyone that supports Meatless Monday should support the scientific recommendations, specifically to eat less red meat and processed meat and in general to support a plant-based diet for our health and the health of the environment. You can leave comments at DietaryGuidliness.gov. or go to MyPlateMyPlanet.org and use their talking points.  The more comments the government gets, the more support the Committees recommendations will have. On how she feels about Meatless Monday: I love Meatless Mondays because...as someone whos been an advocate for a plant-based diet for many years I feel like people tend to get put off, scared by messaging telling them to give up meat for the rest of their lives. Asking for just one day a week is hard to argue with...I make this argument with my vegan friends - youll save more animals getting more people to cut down on their meat consumption than you will getting fewer people to cut out their meat consumption. Do the math, thats what I say... And the evidence shows that Monday is the day people are most willing to pay more attention to their health. Plus, people do like to get caught up in something with their friends like, hey, were doing this together!   And providing resources & support – people need that. Because we have a society of meat-eaters. Its in the air. Its everywhere you go. And by creating a campaign that gives people the support they need to cut out meat that one day a week they can feel like theyre part of something great and its not complete deprivation which what people think a lot of people think a life without meat can be. Also, its just got a nice ring to it: Meatless Monday!  So, I just think its brilliant. We would like to thank Michele for taking the time to speak with us.  We will  keep you updated on her efforts to support the advisory committee’s recommendations. The post Controversy Over Dietary Guidelines Continues appeared first on Meatless Monday.

8 Health Benefits of Green Tea

August 10 2014 VegKitchen 

8 Health Benefits of Green TeaContributed by Kris Gunnars, originally printed on Authority Nutrition, adapted and reprinted with permission.  Green tea is one of the healthiest beverages on the planet. It is loaded with antioxidants and nutrients that have powerful effects on the body. This includes improved brain function, fat loss, a lower risk of cancer and many other  benefits. Here are 8 health benefits of green tea that have been confirmed in human research studies. 1. Green Tea Contains Various Bioactive Compounds That Can Improve Health Green tea is more than just green liquid. Many of the bioactive compounds in the tea leaves do make it into the final drink, which contains large amounts of important nutrients. It is loaded with polyphenols like flavonoids and catechins, which function as powerful antioxidants (1). These substances can reduce the formation of free radicals in the body, protecting cells and molecules from damage. These free radicals are known to play a role in aging and all sorts of diseases. One of the more powerful compounds in green tea is the antioxidant Epigallocatechin Gallate (EGCG), which has been studied to treat various diseases and may be one of the main reasons green tea has such powerful medicinal properties. Green tea also has small amounts of minerals that are important for health. Try to choose a higher quality brand of green tea, because some of the lower quality brands can contain excessive levels of fluoride (2). That being said, even if you choose a lower quality brand, the benefits still far outweigh any risk. Bottom Line: Green tea is loaded with bioactive compounds that can have various beneficial effects on health. 2. Compounds in Green Tea Can Improve Brain Function and Make You Smarter Green tea does more than just keep you awake, it can also make you smarter. The key active ingredient is caffeine, which is a known stimulant. It doesnt contain as much as coffee, but enough to produce a response without causing the jittery effects associated with too much caffeine. What caffeine does in the brain is to block an inhibitory neurotransmitter called Adenosine. This way, it actually increases the firing of neurons and the concentration of neurotransmitters like dopamine and norepinephrine (3, 4). Caffeine has been intensively studied before and consistently leads to improvements in various aspects of brain function, including improved mood, vigilance, reaction time and memory (5). However... green tea contains more than just caffeine. It also has the amino acid L-theanine, which is able to cross the blood-brain barrier (6). L-theanine increases the activity of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, which has anti-anxiety effects. It also increases dopamine and the production of alpha waves in the brain (7, 8, 9). Studies show that caffeine and L-theanine can have synergistic effects. The combination of the two is particularly potent at improving brain function (10). Because of the L-theanine and the smaller dose of caffeine, green tea can give you a much milder and different kind of buzz than coffee. Many people report having more stable energy and being much more productive when they drink green tea, compared to coffee. Bottom Line: Green tea contains less caffeine than coffee, but enough to produce an effect. It also contains the amino acid L-theanine, which can work synergistically with caffeine to improve brain function. 3. Green Tea Increases Fat Burning and Improves Physical Performance If you look at the ingredients list for any fat burning supplement, chances are that green tea will be on there.This is because green tea has been shown to increase fat burning and boost the metabolic rate, in human controlled trials (11, 12). In one study in 10 healthy men, green tea increased energy expenditure by 4% (13). Another study showed that fat oxidation was increased by 17%, indicating that green tea may selectively increase the burning of fat (14). However, Id like to point out that some studies on green tea dont show any increase in metabolism, so the effects may depend on the individual (15). Caffeine itself has also been shown to improve physical performance by mobilizing fatty acids from the fat tissues and making them available for use as energy (16, 17). In two separate review studies, caffeine has been shown to increase physical performance by 11-12%, on average (18, 19). Bottom Line: Green tea has been shown to boost the metabolic rate and increase fat burning in the short term, although not all studies agree. 4. Antioxidants in Green Tea May Lower Your Risk of Various Types of Cancer Cancer is caused by uncontrolled growth of cells. It is one of the worlds leading causes of death. It is well known that oxidative damage contributes to the development of cancer and that antioxidants can have a protective effect (20). Green tea is an excellent source of powerful antioxidants, so it makes perfect sense that it could reduce your risk of cancer, which it appears to do: - Breast cancer: A meta-analysis of observational studies found that whomen who drank the most green tea had a 22% lower risk of developing breast cancer, the most common cancer in women (21). - Prostate cancer: One study found that men drinking green tea had a 48% lower risk of developing prostate cancer, which is the most common cancer in men (22). - Colorectal cancer: A study of 69,710 Chinese women found that green tea drinkers had a 57% lower risk of colorectal cancer (23). Multiple other observational studies show that green tea drinkers are significantly less likely to get various types of cancer (24, 25, 26). It is important to keep in mind that it may be a bad idea to put milk in your tea, because it can reduce the antioxidant value (27). Bottom Line: Green tea has powerful antioxidants that may protect against cancer. Multiple studies show that green tea drinkers have a lower risk of various types of cancer. 5. Green Tea May Protect Your Brain in Old Age, Lowering Your Risk of Alzheimers and Parkinsons Not only can green tea improve brain function in the short term, it may also protect your brain in old age. Alzheimers disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease in humans and a leading cause of dementia. Parkinsons disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and involves the death of dopamine producing neurons in the brain. Multiple studies show that the catechin compounds in green tea can have various protective effects on neurons in test tubes and animal models, potentally lowering the risk of Alzheimers and Parkinsons (28, 29, 30). Bottom Line: The bioactive compounds in green tea can have various protective effects on neurons and may reduce the risk of both Alzheimers and Parkinsons, the two most common neurodegenerative disorders. 6. Green Tea Can Kill Bacteria, Which Improves Dental Health and Lowers Your Risk of Infection The catechins in green tea have other biological effects as well. Some studies show that they can kill bacteria and inhibit viruses like the influenza virus, potentially lowering your risk of infections (31, 32, 33, 34). Streptococcus mutans is the primary harmful bacteria in the mouth. It causes plaque formation and is a leading contributor to cavities and tooth decay. Studies show that the catechins in green tea can inhibit the growth of streptococcus mutans. Green tea consumption is associated with improved dental health and a lower risk of caries (35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40). Another awesome benefit of green tea... multiple studies show that it can reduce bad breath (41, 42). Bottom Line: The catechins in green tea may inhibit the growth of bacteria and some viruses. This can lower the risk of infections and lead to improvements in dental health, a lower risk of caries and reduced bad breath. 7. Green Tea May Lower Your Risk of Type II Diabetes Type II diabetes is a disease that has reached epidemic proportions in the past few decades and now afflicts about 300 million people worldwide. This disease involves having elevated blood sugar levels in the context of insulin resistance or an inability to produce insulin. Studies show that green tea can improve insulin sensitivity and reduce blood sugar levels (43, 44). One study in Japanese individuals found that those who drank the most green tea had a 42% lower risk of developing type II diabetes (45). According to a review of 7 studies with a total of 286,701 individuals, green tea drinkers had an 18% lower risk of becoming diabetic (46). Bottom Line: Some controlled trials show that green tea can cause mild reductions in blood sugar levels. It may also lower the risk of developing type II diabetes in the long term. 8. Green Tea May Reduce Your Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Cardiovascular diseases, including heart disease and stroke, are the biggest causes of death in the world (47). Studies show that green tea can improve some of the main risk factors for these diseases. This includes total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglycerides (48). Green tea also dramatically increases the antioxidant capability of the blood, which protects the LDL cholesterol particles from oxidation, which is one part of the pathway towards heart disease (49, 50, 51). Given the beneficial effects on risk factors, it is not surprising to see that green tea drinkers have up to a 31% lower risk of cardiovascular disease (52, 53, 54). Bottom Line: Green tea has been shown to lower total and LDL cholesterol, as well as protect the LDL particles from oxidation. Observational studies show that green tea drinkers have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. In order to feel better, lose weight and lower your risk of chronic diseases, you might want to consider making green tea a regular part of your life. This article was originally published on Authority Nutrition. - Here are lots more natural health topics on VegKitchens Nutrition page.  

New Study Reveals the Carbon Printof Meat-Eaters, Vegetarians & Vegans

August 4 2014 Meatless Monday 

New Study Reveals the Carbon Printof Meat-Eaters, Vegetarians & VegansClimate Week NYC is less than two months away. And as governments, businesses and individuals will gather to focus on ways to find low carbon solutions, one answer is right on our plate. Quite simply: eat less meat. According to a study from Oxford University, as reported by the Washington Post, the difference in environmental impact between a heavy meat eater (defined as someone who eats more than 3.5 ounces per day as many Americans do) versus a light meat eater is significant. Image Source: The Washington Post   And one of the leading factors impacting the environment is the industrialized meat industry. Slow Food neatly sums up the environmental impact of modern, commercial meat production in its just-released newsletter, Too Much At Steak. The quantities of manure that the animals produce are so excessive that they become pollutants. The feed is produced by intensive cropping methods, sometimes hundreds or thousands of miles away, using environmentally damaging mineral fertilizers and pesticides. Industrial livestock production pollutes water, soil, air with excess nutrients from manure and fertilizers and is a large contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. That consumers arent more aware of the problem isnt surprising, its a bit of an out of sight, out of mind issue for most of us. Its hard to imagine the cost of livestock production on the environment unless you live near a commercial feedlot. But if the effects of meat production on the environment arent in plain sight, it has been appearing a lot in the nations headlines, as food advocates, researchers and entrepreneurs have all taken notice of the issue and are doing their part to drive awareness. Beef itself is the priciest livestock out there, if youre looking at its environmental costs. commented Flatow during Whats The Real Cost of Your Steak. According to the USDA, there are 87.7–almost 88 million– head of cattle in the US. Feeding, raising, processing all those cows takes a huge amount of resources. The fact is, there is one head of cattle for every three Americans, and keeping this system going requires a lot of area to grow feed. In the US, 47% of the entire surface area is devoted to food production, points out Gidon Eshel, Research Professor, Environmental Science and Physics, Bard College. Foods that we consume directly like vegetables, fruits, nuts, takes just a few percent, 4-5% tops. All the rest, something like 42% of the entire surface area of the nation, is to feed livestock. Photo: Nico Piotto/­­Getty Images Looking at the issue in terms of its total cost, according to Mark Bittman, is crucial to coming to solutions. If we acknowledge how much burgers really cost us, he writes in The True Cost of a Burger“, listing some of costs as carbon generation, obesity, and risk associated with cardiovascular disease and mortality, we might either consume fewer, or force producers to pick up more of the charges or--ideally--both. The post New Study Reveals the Carbon Print of Meat-Eaters, Vegetarians & Vegans appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Bali Bliss Papaya Salad

May 6 2014 My New Roots 

Bali Bliss Papaya Salad Bali is bliss. Its not hard to believe weve already been here for a couple weeks, as Ive clearly sunken into a new, slower rhythm and just allowing the days to unfold at their languid pace. I havent been this relaxed in...well, I cant even remember when to be honest. It feels amazing to not have a schedule to follow, to not have any major deadlines looming, no calls to answer. Ive had to travel halfway across planet earth to find this solace, but I also dont mind being surrounded by tropical jungle, dazzling green rice fields, rivers, and volcanoes, and sparkling starry skies. Bali has a kind of beauty to it, unlike anything Ive ever experienced before. It is rich, mesmeric, mysterious. Everywhere you go, you are greeted with wafts of burning incense, floral offerings, and the sounds of flowing water. Spirituality and everyday life are intertwined, and god seems to be truly in the details. The food? As wonderful as it is to eat at restaurants (dont do much of that in Copenhagen), Ive actually been cooking a lot. Surprise! Weve rented a house with a rather makeshift, but functioning kitchen, and the one-burner hot plate and I have become well acquainted during my experiments with all of the local produce. My family and I head out around 7am to the morning market, and for pennies fill our bags with all sorts of unusual fruits and veggies, then head home to play with it all. The other groovy thing about where we are staying is the front yard full of fruit trees and coconut palms. There are papaya growing - no, bulging - off of their trunks. Fruit larger then my six-month-old baby (and hes a big boy). The housekeeper picked one for me upon my request and it sat ripening on my counter for a couple days until I knew it was time. Total. Bliss-fest. You couldnt take me to the fanciest restaurant and see me more excited than eating that silly, homegrown papaya. Truly. As much as papaya is perfect all on its own, the flavours around me beg to be enjoyed. This was a simple breakfast I tossed together with fresh ingredients I had just picked up at the market: kaffir lime, ginger, and freshly grated coconut (wow, nothing like it!). It is all together sweet, citric, spicy and rich - a delicious combination for starting your day on the right foot, or maybe an afternoon pick-me-up. Papaya Paradise Party Papaya are buttery, rich, satisfying, and a delicious taste of the tropics, but are available in most grocery stores throughout the year. Papayas contain a cornucopia of nutrients, its most unique being papain. Papain is a digestive enzyme that helps digest proteins, similar to the bromelain found in pineapple. If you take digestive supplements, yours will likely contain papain. Papaya is rich in antioxdants, such as carotenes, vitamin C and flavanoids, folic and pantothenic acid, as well as the minerals copper, potassium and magnesium. These nutrients all add up to major cardiovascular protection, due to their ability to prevent the oxidation of cholesterol. Papayas vitamins, minerals and antioxidants also provide immune support, promote digestive health, and protect against macular degeneration and rheumatoid arthritis. Much like bananas, papaya contains a substance called chitinase, which is associated with the latex-fruit allergy syndrome. If you have a latex allergy, you should avoid eating papaya (and banana too). If you cannot find kaffir limes, regular lime would be fine of course. Kaffir limes tend to be smaller, so if you are using regular lime, just one would likely be enough for the recipe below. And if you cant get yourself to a Balinese market and have someone grind your coconut for you this morning, no worries, just use shredded desiccated coconut in its place. You can even lightly toast it if your heart desires. The recipe for this salad is rather loose. Ive added some rough measurements, but the dressing here depends greatly on the size of your papaya, so just use the ingredients below as a guideline and make the dish to suit your taste. If you like a more citric flavour, go heavy on the limejuice; if you like it spicy, add more ginger, etc. I also drizzled in some local virgin coconut oil, which had the most incredible coconut taste, but this is entirely up to you. Keep in mind that the fat in the coconut and coconut oil will only help in absorbing the carotenes in the papaya.       Print recipe     Bali Bliss Papaya Salad Serves 2-4 Ingredients: 1 large papaya (mine was approx. 2lbs /­­ 1kg) 1/­­2 cup freshly grated or unsweetened desiccated coconut 1-2 organic limes 2-3 tsp. finely minced ginger, to taste pinch sea salt 2 tsp. honey, to taste (or any liquid sweetener) 1 Tbsp. virgin coconut oil, melted (optional) Directions: 1. Rinse the papaya well. Slice through the entire fruit lengthwise, the scoop out the seeds. Cut off both ends from each half. Stand one of the halves on its flat end and slice off the skin starting at the top and running down to the base. Repeat with other half. Next slice the papaya across into 1-inch sections, and then into 1-inch cubes. Place in a large bowl. 2. Rinse the lime and zest it with a microplane or box grater on the finest setting. Whisk together the ginger, lime zest, lime juice, honey, and salt. Add the coconut oil, if desired. Pour dressing over the papaya just before serving, add desiccated coconut, and fold gently to combine. Enjoy immediately. I served the salad with some sliced bananas on the side, and garnished with lime halves.  This salad is just a little warm-up here - I thought a slow work up to the more complicated and technique-intensive dishes I plan on making would be best. For now, its time to just relax and enjoy the simple and blissful flavours of Bali, unwind, breathe. Find a corner of your home to curl up with this dish, light a stick of incense and drift away on a papaya cloud...Ill meet you in paradise.

A Book Tour and a Full Heart

May 11 2015 My New Roots 

A Book Tour and a Full Heart Hi. Its been a while. I guess I should have expected that touring with my cookbook would be more than just totally life-affirming and amazing - turns out its quite a time-intensive thing, and in between gigs I find it difficult to much other than feed myself and rest! But I am not complaining, just explaining my absence. I could actually fill this entire post with my overflowing gratitude for everything thats happened in the past few weeks. But I think some pictures would help tell the story - I once heard that each one is worth a thousand words. I will take a brief moment however to say thank you. Everyone who has been a part of and engaged in this tour in some way has really put it all in perspective for me. Its so strange how most of what I do is completely solitary, and even when I put a post out into the world, I cannot see who is reading, where, or that they actually cook the recipes. In a way, I like it this way - less pressure and responsibility for little ol me, because if I were to actually comprehend the scope of this I may feel slightly overwhelmed. But this project, my cookbook, finally being out in the physical world and me along with it, has shown me that My New Roots is so much bigger than I could have imagined. Meeting so many of you at book signings, lectures, cooking demos, and connecting through conversation across a dinner table, hearing your stories, how this little blog has touched you or changed your life in some way, feels like a miracle to me. And I am so, so humbled. Ive received boundless inspiration through these connections, and proof that this isnt just some teeny project anymore, but a veritable force. Much like literal roots this has grown silently under the surface, going deep and lateral and gaining enough life force before breaking through to where it receives the light it needs to thrive. That is what this tour is: a surfacing and a confirmation that we are building a powerful community of healthy people. I feel like every drop of energy Ive put into My New Roots from the first day has just hit me like a spectacular tsunami of love. A question I was asked a lot on tour was about the food blogging community, and whether or not I think it is competitive. Without hesitating, I always said heck no!, because my experience is quite the opposite. Among my peers I feel nothing but support, camaraderie, and celebration for one anothers achievements. When I asked fellow bloggers to review the cookbook, of course they said yes, because that is how we roll. I am honoured to post their gorgeous photos below, and share their perspectives on my recipes. So if you havent received a copy of the book yet, you can try out a number of the dishes from their posts! Thank you to everyone who participated. You are such an inspiring and talented bunch of people, and I am proud to share the blogosphere with you. Laura at The First Mess took a stab at making my raw vegan version of the Ben & Jerry’s classic and well-loved Chunky Monkey, and definitely one-upped me by adding a swirl of date syrup for a ripple effect. Nice one, Laura. You rock. Get the recipe here. Sara of Sprouted Kitchen tested and wrote about one of my favourite recipes in the book, Sunflower Sesame Seed Brittle, and one that I made many times on tour for readers to taste! You can read her post here. Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme made my scrumptious Roasted Pumpkin on Black Rice with Tangerine Tahini Sauce. This sauce is boss, ya’ll. Pour it on everything! Check out the post and recipe here. Angela over at Oh She Glows made my scrumptious Banoffee Pie! A combination of banana, toffee, and coconut cream. Get the recipe here. Lane of Green Spirit Adventures made my Oyster Mushroom Bisque. Check out the recipe here. If you’re making recipes from the book and want to tag them, here’s what I’m using: #MNRcookbook And now for just a few highlights from the events in North America. Thank you again to everyone who helped put these together, and to all of you who came out to give me a high-five. It meant so much to me. A stunning dinner at Burdcok & Co. in Vancouver. The meal was all spring recipes from the cookbook. My interview and audio-only cooking demo – an interesting experience! – with the imcomparable Cherly McCay of CBC radio. Hear the program here, and skip to 35:45 to catch my segment. Enjoy! Barbara-Jo’s Books to Cooks hosted a My New Roots dinner right in the bookstore! A night to remember for sure. I did three televised cooking demos in Canada. Thanks to Global and CTV for their support! Book signing at the always inspiring Moon Juice in Los Angeles. I was high on green nut milk and all the love! Getting a tad silly with Jo and my Pi?a Colada Passionfruit Popsicles at Delish.com. I’ll post the video once it’s live. It’s a real hoot! Food52 invited me for lunch! I cooked my Ghee-Poached Radishes on Dandelion Greens with Smoked Sea Salt for lunch.  The Q&A and book signing at NeueHouse in NYC. Thanks to my gorgeous friend Pippa of Sous Style for the incredible night! Lastly, an interview at my all-time favourite station Heritage Radio Network in Bushwick, Brooklyn. And quite possibly the coolest recording studio of all time. I’ll post the podcast once it’s online!   So, I’m back in my kitchen now. A new blog post (a very rad one) is on the way and I know you’re going to love it. Stay tuned dear friends. xo, Sarah B

Our Guide to Halloween Treats

October 24 2014 Vegetarian Times 

Our Guide to Halloween Treats Halloween is that notoriously sweet time of year when children--and adults--have an excuse to eat all the candy they want. No wonder many health experts frown upon the sugar-intensive holiday. Equally scary? Some store-bought sweets are neither vegan nor vegetarian. Still, Halloween doesn’t have to be all spooks and no edible fun. Here’s to buy (or make!) worthy veg treats. Is It Vegetarian? Chewy bears and sour worms are probably the last place youd expect ?to find non-veg ingredients, right? But many gummies are made with gelatin. It gives them their distinctive chewy bite but is often sourced from animal bones, skin, or cartilage, says Vanessa Hughes, owner of A Real Treat Candy Boutique in Los Angeles. Hughes suggests seeking ?out chewy candies made with veg alternatives such as tapioca syrup, agar agar, or fruit pectin. Also watch out for red candies containing cochineal or carmine, a coloring agent gleaned from ground-up bugs, warns Julieanna Hever, MS, RD, author of The Complete Idiots ?Guide to Plant-Based Nutrition. Is It Vegan? Read labels carefully: Dairy can work its way into items via its derivatives such as milk solids, casein, or whey, says Hever. Even dark chocolate isnt necessarily dairy-free, she adds. Not to worry. A number of candy classics--including Skittles, Jolly Ranchers, Sour Patch Kids, and Smarties--can help keep your Halloween vegan-friendly. Here are a few more dairy-free treats that make the grade: Surf Sweets ?Trick or Treat Pack ?These fun-size ?packs of organic chewy bears ?deliver plenty of fruity flavor. $6.99/­­?20-treat packs Setton Farms ?Pistachio Chewy Bites ?Lightly sweetened with agave, each ?mini bar packs a ?one-two punch ?of crunchy pistachios and chewy cranberries. $14.99/­­16-pack Endangered ?Species Dark ?Chocolate Bug Bites ?Each organic chocolate square comes packaged with an insect trading card to inspire up-and-coming entomologists. $0.69/­­piece Want to make your own Halloween goodies at home? Check out these scary-good treats.

New Study Reveals the Carbon Footprintof Meat-Eaters, Vegetarians & Vegans

August 4 2014 Meatless Monday 

New Study Reveals the Carbon Footprintof Meat-Eaters, Vegetarians & VegansClimate Week NYC is less than two months away. And as governments, businesses and individuals will gather to focus on ways to find low carbon solutions, one answer is right on our plate. Quite simply: eat less meat. According to a study from Oxford University, as reported by the Washington Post, the difference in environmental impact between a heavy meat eater (defined as someone who eats more than 3.5 ounces per day as many Americans do) versus a light meat eater is significant. Image Source: The Washington Post And one of the leading factors impacting the environment is the industrialized meat industry. Slow Food neatly sums up the environmental impact of modern, commercial meat production in its just-released newsletter, Too Much At Steak. The quantities of manure that the animals produce are so excessive that they become pollutants. The feed is produced by intensive cropping methods, sometimes hundreds or thousands of miles away, using environmentally damaging mineral fertilizers and pesticides. Industrial livestock production pollutes water, soil, air with excess nutrients from manure and fertilizers and is a large contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. That consumers arent more aware of the problem isnt surprising, its a bit of an out of sight, out of mind issue for most of us. Its hard to imagine the cost of livestock production on the environment unless you live near a commercial feedlot. But if the effects of meat production on the environment arent in plain sight, it has been appearing a lot in the nations headlines, as food advocates, researchers and entrepreneurs have all taken notice of the issue and are doing their part to drive awareness. Beef itself is the priciest livestock out there, if youre looking at its environmental costs. commented Flatow during Whats The Real Cost of Your Steak. According to the USDA, there are 87.7–almost 88 million– head of cattle in the US. Feeding, raising, processing all those cows takes a huge amount of resources. The fact is, there is one head of cattle for every three Americans, and keeping this system going requires a lot of area to grow feed. In the US, 47% of the entire surface area is devoted to food production, points out Gidon Eshel, Research Professor, Environmental Science and Physics, Bard College. Foods that we consume directly like vegetables, fruits, nuts, takes just a few percent, 4-5% tops. All the rest, something like 42% of the entire surface area of the nation, is to feed livestock. Photo: Nico Piotto/­­Getty Images Looking at the issue in terms of its total cost, according to Mark Bittman, is crucial to coming to solutions. If we acknowledge how much burgers really cost us, he writes in The True Cost of a Burger“, listing some of costs as carbon generation, obesity, and risk associated with cardiovascular disease and mortality, we might either consume fewer, or force producers to pick up more of the charges or--ideally--both. The post New Study Reveals the Carbon Footprint of Meat-Eaters, Vegetarians & Vegans appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Green Lasagna Rolls

June 6 2014 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Green Lasagna Rolls Its basil season! And spinach season! And, well, lets just say its lasagna roll season, too. These make a great appetizer if youre doing a little summer entertaining, or a filling entree if you prefer. Tofu ricotta is elevated with the addition of some Pumpkin Seed Pesto. The mellow flavor of pumpkin seeds really lets the basil shine. The sautéed spinach is really really garlicky, as is the pesto, so this makes the perfect date night meal. What I really love, besides how flavorful these are, is the texture. Baking the rolls makes the noodles soft but still toothsome, with little crunchy bits on the edges. Smothered in cashew cream and pesto and finished off with a scattering of additional pumpkin seeds, these lasagna rolls will fulfill even the most wild fantasies: creamy, crunchy, velvety, chewy, and hearty all at once. Yes, there are a few components here, but none are too difficult to pull off and also LASAGNA ROLLS. Serve with Caesar Salad to round out the meal! PS This is my first blogpost using only iPhone photos, so take a deep breath with me. Sorry $2000 camera, this is just easier. Since Im not an aspiring photographer, Im not ashamed to admit that adjusting lighting and apertures and editing in Photoshop is just too labor intensive for me these days. A few adjustments in VSCO cam, a button to upload to Flickr, and my work is done here. You get the picture. Har har.


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