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Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam

August 19 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Beet Tartare with Sesame Labneh + Amsterdam Earlier this year we were in New York to launch Green Kitchen at Home. We had a blast doing a live cooking session at Food52, teaching a cooking class and had a book signing in a tiny but packed little store in Greenwich Village. But what I really wanted to talk about today was our night off. When we tucked baby Noah (formerly known as Gabriel) to sleep in his stroller and headed to ABCV for dinner. Side note: You should know that for being a food writing couple, Luise and I very rarely go out and eat at proper restaurants. With kids, it’s just easier to do takeaway or pick places where it’s okay that they climb, run and crash. Also, fancy restaurants make me feel awkward. But we had an epic evening at ABCV. We tried the tasting menu of which I can’t even remember half of the dishes. But I know that there were simple crudités with lots of spreads, some kind of soft beet carpaccio/­­tartare with a little bit of sting to it, a whole roasted cauliflower with turmeric tahini dressing(!), avocado lettuce cups, roasted shiitake and a couple of desserts. And what made the evening even better was that Noah slept through almost the entire dinner (thank you jetlag!). We have been talking about that beet carpaccio (and the cauliflower with tahini turmeric dressing) a few times since we got back. And when Luise recently spotted a recipe for roasted beets and sesame labneh in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine, we started talking about it again. Looking through our recipe archive, it is pretty obvious that we’ve got a love for beets. They are sweet and mildly earthy, have an awesome color, can grow in our harsh Swedish climate and are cheap! What’s not to love? So a couple of days ago, we picked up a few bunches of beets, started cooking and here we are. With some kind of beetroot tartare (mixed minced beets), dollops of sesame labneh and a few suggestions on what can be used to scoop it into your mouth, apart from crackers. And as a last minute contribution, we are also offering a less fancy way of serving this, inside a rye waffle toast (yup, you might want to scroll down to it right away). This recipe is great as a starter, at a buffet table or a party. It’s pretty and impressive, creamy and delicious with plenty of flavor from fresh dill and mint and a little sting from horseradish. Since we love yogurt just as much as we love beetroots, we invited labneh (yogurt’s fancy cousin) to the party. We totally stole the idea to mix tahini into labneh from that Jamie Mag article. You should too. You need at least two hours to let the yogurt drain into labneh cheese but I’m still going to claim that this is an easy recipe - only a few ingredients and apart from draining the yogurt, it’s all pretty quick.  I imagine that a quick cheat version could be accomplished by simply using thick yogurt without draining it and buying pre-cooked beetroots. I can’t promise that it will be as good, but it’ll at least be quick and effortless. http:/­­/­­www.greenkitchenstories.com/­­wp-content/­­uploads/­­2017/­­08/­­Labneh_­drip.mp4 Okay, I can hear Isac trying to teach baby Noah how to roar like a lion with the only result that little brother cries like a baby. So I better post this now before major chaos is breaking out. No proofreading needed because yolo. Enjoy the recipe and check out info below re Amsterdam. Ciao! Beet Tartar & Sesame Labneh Serves 4 Recipe is inspired by a recipe from Jamie Magazine, Aug 2017 and a dinner we had a ABCV NYC. Sesame labneh 2 cups /­­ 500 g Greek or Turkish Yogurt 1/­­2 tsp salt 2 tbsp tahini 1 tbsp olive oil Beet Tartare  1/­­2 kg /­­ 1 lb  beetroots 2 tbsp capers juice from 1/­­2 lemon 1 tsp horseradish (or mustard) 1 handful fresh dill 1 handful fresh mint leaves salt & pepper Topping 1 handful pistachio nuts, finely chopped fresh dill, chopped fresh mint leaves, chopped 2 tbsp capers, halved lemon slices olive oil Serve with rye bread crisps, tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices Start by making the labneh. Add salt to the yogurt and stir until smooth. Wrap the yogurt in a cheese cloth or other clean thin cloth and tie it over a bowl for about 2 hours or more to allow liquid to be drained (meanwhile, cook the beetroots). You can leave it for 24-36 hours if you prefer a thicker labneh but 2 hours and a gentle squeeze (to get rid of some extra liquid) works fine. Stir in tahini, transfer to a serving bowl and top with a little bit of olive oil. Peel the beetroots, divide them in quarters and cook in salted water for approx 20 mins min or until tender. When ready, let cool and then transfer them to a food processor along with capers, lemon juice, horseradish, fresh dill, mint and seasoning. Pulse a few times until the beetroot has the consistency of course grits. Not too much though or you will end up with a sauce. You can also dice them finely. Arrange the beet tartare on a large serving plate. Fold in large dollops of sesame labneh and top with pistachio, fresh herbs, capers and lemon slices. Add a drizzle of olive oil and serve with crackers or thin rye bread crisps (thin rye bread pieces toasted in a pan or the oven for a couple of minutes), tender gem lettuce or cucumber slices to scoop with. Beet & Labneh Rye Waffle Toast We made this Waffled rye bread toast with the leftovers.  It’s a family favorite and we’ve got another recipe and the whole story behind this method in our latest book. Here are some quick instructions: Simply smudge labneh on two pieces of dark rye bread, add some spinach, fresh dill and mint and a thick layer of beet tartar. Brush a hot waffle iron with butter or coconut oil, combine the two slices and place inside the waffle iron, pressing together lightly. When you’re bread has got a nice and brown waffle pattern, the toast is ready. Cut the waffle toast in half and eat it while it’s hot. **************************** AMSTERDAM & ANTWERP - 7-9 September Green Kitchen at Home is being released in Dutch next week and to kick things off, we are coming to Amsterdam and Antwerp for a couple of press events, signings, dinners and talks. We will have a little talk, signing and dinner at the bookstore ‘t Stad Leest in Antwerp at 19.30 pm on 7 September. Tickets can be booked here. We are having a little talk + Q&A and a book signing at Limon in Amsterdam on 9 September between 10.30-11-30. There will be nibbles from the book served and we will end with a book signing. There will also be a lunch afterwards (between 12.00-14.00) and we will try to move around so we get the chance to chat with all of you. You can either buy tickets for both the talk and lunch, just the talk or just the lunch. Follow this link to read more about it in Dutch: Greenkitchenbooks.nl  

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl

March 10 2017 My New Roots 

Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Poke seems to be everywhere these days, from fine restaurant menus, to fast-casual and even food trucks. Chefs are coming up with clever combos and creative reinterpretations - even fish-free versions for the veg set. I knew had to take a stab at it. Or at least a poke. Sorry. For those of you hearing about poke for the first time, this fresh and tasty dish (pronounced POH-kay), hails from Hawaii. In its most unadulterated form, poke is raw fish, originally combined with sea salt, candlenut and seaweed. It evolved over the years as ingredient availability increased, and the salt was replaced with soy sauce, the seaweed with spring onion, the candlenut with sesame and so on. Once it hit mainland America a few years ago, poke mania ensued and the dish evolved to become more of a meal - not just a snack. Now it is often served atop rice and garnished with all manner of innovative ingredients. Fully-focused poke restaurants have established themselves in major cities across North America. Many of these eateries allow their patrons to customize their bowls with veggies, sea weed, pickles, beans, nuts, and alt-grains, tapping into the to the fact that fast, fresh, healthy meals are becoming mainstream. Which totally rocks. I had most of the elements for my own poke-inspired version in my head...except for the fish (the most important part?). I racked my brain to come up with something that looked just like tuna or salmon, but didnt want to use fruit, like watermelon or papaya, since I didnt want the dish to be sweet. It wasnt until I was trying to fall asleep one night, that it came to me...chiogga beets! Chiogga, or candy-striped beets are gorgeously two-toned when they are raw. Sliced thin horizontally, they reveal rings of deep pink pigment and creamy white, resembling something that your grandmother keeps on her coffee table in a crystal dish. But for anyone who has ever roasted these stunning creatures will know that the magic doesnt last; the magenta bleeds into the white during cooking, resulting in an almost homogenous pale pink, with slight variegation. WHICH LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE TUNA. I almost couldnt sleep. Too excited. The next day I gathered up all the things Id like in a poke bowl: short grain brown rice (not long grain - an important distinction), spring onion for bite, carrot for crunch, edamame for pop and protein, and avo for creaminess. I took this last one a step farther and blended it with lemon and wasabi for the most boss sauce ever. This alone would be delish on most things...please try it. And for the fishy component, I thought back to the raw vegan tuna I made for my first cookbook, and how effective adding a sprinkle of nori was to boost that fresh-from-the-sea flavour. This is not a deal breaker for the overall dish, but it definitely made it taste complete. If you cant find nori flakes, just crunch up a couple sheets of the stuff that youd use to make sushi. Easy fix! I like to use wasabi powder in the avo cream since the pre-made stuff in a tube is questionable. Have you ever read the ingredient list on one of those packages? It can be scary stuff. In a pinch, use it, but tracking down the powder is worth it from a nutrition standpoint, and also a flavour one. The real stuff tastes infinitely better! What a shocker. Wasabi is Japanese horseradish, and like its western counterpart, it belongs to the Brassica family, like cabbage, broccoli and mustard. The root is dried and then pulverized, which gives us the powder that we can blend with water to create wasabi paste. It is a difficult crop to grow, which explains the high price for the genuine product. Most wasabi powders dont contain any wasabi at all, but are instead a mix of mustard powder and regular horseradish mixed with green food dye. A high-quality wasabi powder should be organic and contain only horseradish and wasabi. The colour should be pale green - not disco neon. Most health food stores carry wasabi powder. This is a good brand. Everything unfolded just as Id hoped it would. The beets came out perfectly pink with those thin white stripes that look just like fat striation. The marinade that I tossed them around in was acidic and ginger-y and just plain yum. Building the meal up with the rice, the beans, the veggies, a dollop of cream, a sprinkle of nori and roasted sesame, was ever so satisfying and fun. This healthy, fresh meal is calling you. No need to poke about, just make it. Again, sorry.     Print recipe     Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 200g short grain brown rice, soaked overnight if possible 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 2 cups /­­ 250g edamame beans, fresh or frozen 2 tsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches flaky sea salt Beets & Marinade 3 medium Chiogga (candy striped) beets 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1 tsp. finely grated ginger pinch fine sea salt Avocado Wasabi Cream 2 medium ripe avocados 2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1-2 tsp. wasabi powder, to taste pinch fine sea, to taste 2 spring onions, sliced lengthwise into ribbons 2 medium carrots, julienned 2 Tbsp. sesame seeds 3 Tbsp. nori flakes Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wrap beets in aluminum foil and place on a baking sheet in the oven. Roast until tender, about 45 minutes (to check doneness, peel back the foil of one beet and insert the tip of a sharp knife. If there is little resistance, its ready). Peel back foil from each beet and let cool slightly. 2. While the beets are roasting, make the rice. Drain and rinse well. Place in a pot with 2 cups /­­ 500ml of fresh water and salt. Cover, bring to a boil and reduce to simmer. Cook until tender (add more during cooking if necessary), about 45 minutes. 3. While the rice is cooking, make the Avocado Wasabi Cream. Scoop out the flesh from both avocados and add to a food processor. Blend on high, then add the lemon juice, wasabi powder and salt. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, ginger and salt. Slip the skins off the cooled beets. Cut the beets into cubes and toss in the marinade. Let sit for at least 20 minutes. 5. While the beets are marinating, bring a medium pot of water to the boil. Add a few pinches of salt and the edamame. Simmer for a couple minutes until bright green and tender (do not overcook!). Drain and rinse under cold water to halt cooking. Toss with a little olive oil and sprinkle with flaky salt. 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast sesame seeds, stirring often until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside. 7. Julienne the carrots. 8. To assemble, divide the rice among the bowls. Add the marinated beets, edamame, carrots and a dollop of Avocado Wasabi Cream. Sprinkle with nori flakes, the toasted sesame seeds and top with the spring onions. Enjoy! I’m on my last few days of the North American tour now. Honestly, it’s been just magical and I am so grateful to all of you who came out to show some love and connect with the healthy community around them! I have just one more event left, and if you’re in LA, please come to The Springs tomorrow! I’ll be giving a lecture on Improving Immunity, Digestion and Detoxification, serving a delicious lunch, and launching a recipe collaboration with their chef! Hope to see you there. All love and smiles, Sarah B Show me your bowls on Instagram! #mnrpokebowl The post Poke-Inspired Beet Bowl appeared first on My New Roots.

Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding

January 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding Happy New Year! Checking in with a quick breakfast recipe idea that was born out of my struggle to feed my very picky eight year old a nutritious breakfast. Chia pudding used to be a staple breakfast for her, flavored differently depending on the season or what was on hand, and I felt pretty good about her starting the day with a nice portion of the Omega-3 rich seeds. Then, one day she decided that she doesn’t like the texture of chia in her pudding any longer (too crunchy! too chewy!), and getting breakfast into her before leaving for school became a monumental task. I’m sure many parents out there can sympathize with me when I say I would pay money for this picky eating stage to be over. But for now, I deal with it by identifying a food Paloma loves and then trying to mask other nutritious ingredients with it. For example, she’s crazy about tomatoes, so I make a crushed tomato-based stew with other veggies mixed in, and she tends to be ok with eating that. Recently, Paloma’s been obsessed with our tahini hot chocolate, and I figured that blending chia seeds into a similar mixture and letting it sit to solidify into a pudding could work. The chia is still there, but not as noticeable since it’s whipped up with the rest of the ingredients. And it worked – the child is fed, chia is back in business, and I loved the result so much for its simplicity that I decided to share it here. I like to make this pudding the night before and let it chill in the refrigerator overnight for the chia to become its most springy self. I’m also planning on trying this one out with carob powder instead of cacao, just to ease up our cacao consumption. There are some links after the jump, have a peaceful Monday :) Patti Smith on the Here’s The Thing Podcast The Making of the Sqirl Cookbook Cover – one of our favorite cookbook covers of all time The Art of Forecasting Food Trends – a prediction for what’s hot in 2017: ‘Jackfruit! Sorghum! Harissa! And dont ignore horseradish, spirulina and Asian-inspired breakfasts. Authenticity and its cousin transparency are in. So is food inspired by Africa. Or maybe its the Philippines. Even French food has a constituency.’ Destroyer – an LA restaurant’s beautiful instagram Dreaming in French, The Paris Years of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, Susan Sontag, and Angela Davis – currently reading Things to Come – can’t wait to see this movie Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding   Print Serves: 3-5 Ingredients for the pudding 5-6 prunes 1½ tablespoon raw cacao powder 4 tablespoons chia seeds 2-3 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon coconut oil ½ tablespoon almond butter ½ tablespoon tahini 2¼ cups water cacao nibs - for garnish hemp hearts - for garnish optional add ins 1 tablespoon hemp (or other) protein ½ tablespoon mesquite powder 1 teaspoon maca powder 1 teaspoon moringa powder Instructions Comine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender until very smooth. Distribute between bowls or pour into a large jar, cover, and let sit in the refrigerator for a minimum of one hour or overnight before eating. Garnish with cacao nibs and hemp hearts. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Berry Tarts with a Peach and Herb Sorbet Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange Miso Glaze & A New Cookbook! Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake Valentines Day Dessert - Rose Ice Cream, Pomegranate Sorb... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Oil-Free Baked Portobello Fries

April 19 2016 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Oil-Free Baked Portobello Fries Before I get to the recipes (two and a video!), I want to ask you a HUGE favor. This blog is up for a Bloggy Award from VegNews magazine, and while it’s a great honor to be nominated, it would be even better to win! The blogs with the most votes will be featured in VegNews this summer, and I would love to be one of them. To vote, just go to http:/­­/­­veg.gy/­­1gxdm. Thank you! Do you know why vegan cooks are so creative? I think it’s because we’re constantly being tempted by interesting dishes on restaurant menus that are “vegan except for.” You know, the chickpea appetizer that is vegan–except for chicken broth. Or the hash browns that are vegan–except they’re cooked on a griddle alongside bacon. Or the portobello fries that are vegan–except for buttermilk. Going out to eat and having one vegan-looking dish after another turn out to contain just one (usually unnecessary) non-vegan ingredient is enough to make some people throw up their hands and vow to do all their own cooking. I look at it as a challenge (I can usually get the kitchen to make something vegan for me) and as a source of inspiration. Portobello fries sound good; therefore, I will find a way to make them not only vegan but also oil-free. Take that, restaurants of the world! (...) Read the rest of Oil-Free Baked Portobello Fries (797 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2016. | Permalink | 13 comments | Add to del.icio.us Post tags: Gluten-free, Southern cooking The post Oil-Free Baked Portobello Fries appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Harissa Carrots and Fennel with Lentils

January 14 2016 My New Roots 

Harissa Carrots and Fennel with Lentils My trip to Seattle to work on the Cody nutrition video series proved to be a pretty ragin food fest. The pre- and post-production days, along with nights off gave me some time to explore the city, meet the amazing locals, and sample, er, quite a bit of fantastic food. You know, for research purposes. When I travel, I put wish-list restaurants in two groups: the vegetarian restaurant, and the non-vegetarian restaurant that has enough veg-friendly options to be worth the visit. As much as I find a lot of inspiration at both of these types of establishments, they can also have their drawbacks. First, the vegetarian restaurant, bless them, can tend towards the dated, you know what I mean? Overly-sauced, overly-cheesed, overly seitan-ed out places that offer satisfying, but not very health conscious dishes reminiscent of 1997. Yea. The second place is great if you want to eat out with meat-loving friends (and thank goodness most American restaurants recognize that vegetarians dont always travel in packs!). The issue is that these places dont recognize that we also need substance. There are plenty of creative veggie-centric plates, but nothing that is going to really fill me up! When I was in Seattle, I rarely saw a single bean, lentil or a cube of tempeh on a menu. If I was lucky enough to see a whole grain, it was a sprinkle on top like a garnish. I feel like Im always compromising somehow, which sounds ridiculously gripe-y, but maybe this is my PSA to say that both types of restaurants are so close to getting it so right that it is worth putting it out there in hopes that someone hears my cry. One of my most favourite dishes at a hip and trendy non-vegetarian spot was a roasted carrot, fennel, harissa and yogurt combination, that was as strong in its presentation as it was in flavour. The plate was literally piled with roasted carrots and fennel - a stellar sight for ravenous eyes – bathed in the silkiest scarlet sauce, all nestled in a generous swathe of thick yogurt. It was kind of thing I could barely wait to dig into (I had to share with the rest of my table...rough!), and sad to see the server remove the licked-clean plate. BUT! Where was the rest of it? I realize that this was intended to be a side dish, but there were literally no other options on the menu unless I was to join my table mates and dig into a roast chicken. Being back home in Copenhagen in the thick of winter, I felt the urge to bring a little light and spice to the table. Fondly recalling the jolt to my taste buds that carrot dish conferred, I decided to make my own version that included a simple upgrade with lentils that any vegetarian would be happy to call dinner. Or anyone for that matter. Harissa is a north African chili pepper paste traditionally added to meat and fish stews, and to spice up couscous, but I think its delish with all the things, especially winter veg that could use a major flavour injection. If you have not made your own harissa before, its a relatively quick and painless process that can give your food a serious wake-up. It is bright, bold, spicy, smoky and just plain yummmm. It keeps well in the fridge and a delightful thing to have on hand when youre not really sure what to do with that pumpkin (slather it in harissa and roast it!) or that tempeh (marinate it in harissa and fry it!) or that kale (dress it in harissa and stuff your face!). If you cant wait another second to make this dish, you can also buy pre-made harissa paste at ethnic grocers and gourmet markets. Its sold in small tins, tubes, or jars - just look for versions without any preservatives or unpronounce-ables (but it goes without saying that the homemade kind is best, obvi). You can really use any kind of chili to make harissa, and I suggest a variety to achieve a deep and complex flavour. Some of the ones I chose (based solely on the fact that I already had them in my pantry) were smoked whole ?oras peppers, guajillo, and birds eye for some serious heat. Chipotle would be very tasty (its a good idea to have at least one smoked pepper variety), or de arbol, jalepeno, ancho...you get the idea. You can also make harissa with crushed chili flakes if that is all you have, just make sure that you balance it out with perhaps more tomato paste and roasted bell peppers. I believe that you should be able to eat a small spoonful of pure harissa without blowing your head off. Youre after something spicy, but also rich and savoury, so strike that balance as youre choosing the ingredients. Its Getting Hot in Here Chili peppers are a fantastic food to add to your diet, especially in the colder months, as they actually heat us from the inside out! Chilies contain an active substance called capsaicin that significantly increase thermogenesis (a.k.a. heat production), in our bodies. This is precisely why eating spicy food makes us turn read. break a sweat, and can even aid weight loss, as thermogenesis literally burns calories! These burned calories translate into warmth in the cells and therefore heat in the body. This is the exact same process that takes place in hibernating animals to stay warm. Other foods that have this thermogenic effect are horseradish, mustard, cinnamon, fennel seed, garlic, ginger, ginseng, and turmeric. I love this kind of dish from a construction standpoint. The first bites deliver the big bold flavours of the roasted veg dripping in smoky sauce alone, and then as you begin to go further and dig around, everything kind of melds together, creating mouthfuls with a little bit of this, a little bit of that. The lentils start hanging out with the lemon-spiked yogurt giving the smooth consistency some tooth and texture, which the veggies then become coated in. The harissa drippings work their way into all the nooks and crannies, and the mint pokes you every so often with a hello, my name is FRESH! It hits all the texture notes, the flavour notes, and youre left feeling, well, really satisfied. Not to mention, full. This dish is totally vegan aside from the yogurt, which could even be replaced with a cashew yogurt, like the one in my cookbook, or another plant-based one. You can even leave it out all together if you like, but its a great team player with the other elements. The lentils could easily be replaced by the beans of your choice, and the veg you can change up according to what you have available. You can even make the harissa dressing for any manner of green salad and serve it over raw things too. This dish would also be really tasty with some toasted nuts or seeds sprinkled on top.     Print recipe     Harissa Paste Makes about 1 1/­­4 cup /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 25g dried chilies of your choice (choose a few types and include one smoked and one spicy variety, if possible) 2 red bell peppers 6oz /­­ 170g can tomato paste (1 small can) 2 cloves garlic 2 tsp. cumin seeds 2 tsp. coriander seeds 2 tsp. caraway seeds 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice a couple pinches sea salt cold-pressed olive oil, to cover Directions: 1. Soak the dried chilies in just-boiled water for about 30 minutes until softened. Remove stems and seeds (wear gloves if youre handling really spicy ones). Save soaking liquid. 2. Preheat the oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Rub the bell peppers with a little coconut oil and place on a line baking sheet. Roast for 20-30 minutes until blistered and turning black in spots. Remove from oven and place in a bowl, cover with plastic wrap and let cool for 15 minutes (this process will help steam the peppers making them really easy to peel). Once cool enough to handle, simply slip the skins off of the peppers, remove the stem and seeds, and the discard them. Put flesh aside. 3. While the peppers are roasting, toast the spices in a dry skillet over medium heat until fragrant, 3-5 minutes. Transfer to a mortar and pestle or a spice grinder and grind until powder-y. 4. Peel garlic and place in the food processor. Pulse to mince. Add the soaked dried chilies, roasted red peppers, ground spices, tomato paste, lemon juice, and salt. Blend on high until relatively smooth (add some of the chilli soaking liquid to thin, if desired). Season with salt to taste and add more lemon juice if desired. 5. Transfer harissa to a clean glass jar and cover with a thin layer of olive oil - this will help prevent it from spoiling. Cover with a tightly-sealed lid and store in the fridge for up to one month.   Roasted Carrot and Fennel with Harissa, Black Lentils and Yogurt Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 pound /­­ 500g carrots 1 pound /­­ 500g fennel (about 2 medium bulbs) 2 medium red onions 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches salt and pepper 1 cup /­­ 250ml Greek-style yogurt (preferably goat or sheep) zest of 1 lemon pinch of sea salt 1 cup /­­ 225g black lentils (Du Puy or French lentils would also work), soaked if possible 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil a handful of mint leaves, roughly chopped flaky sea salt, to garnish Harissa Dressing 1/­­4 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1-4 tsp. harissa paste, to your taste (I used 3 tsp.) 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1/­­2 Tbsp. maple syrup pinch sea salt, to taste Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Scrub carrots well and slice them in half lengthwise (if they are relatively large, slice them in quarters lengthwise). Wash fennel and slice lengthwise into thin sections. Peel and slice red onion into eights. Place carrots on a baking sheet and rub with a little coconut oil. Place fennel and red onion on a separate baking sheet and rub with a little coconut oil. Place in the oven to roast for 25-35 minutes until tender and charred around the edges (the fennel and onions may take longer than the carrots, so remove carrots first if necessary). Remove from oven and season with salt and pepper. 2. While the vegetables are roasting, cook the lentils. Wash lentils well, drain and rinse until water runs clear. Place in medium saucepan and cover with plenty of water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook covered for about 15 minutes. Add about a half teaspoon of salt, stir and continue to simmer covered, until the lentils are tender, about 5 more minutes. Drain and rinse. Stir in olive oil and season to taste. 3. While the lentils are cooking, whisk the dressing ingredients together. Start with a teaspoon of harissa paste and add more to suit your taste. The dressing should be spicy, but palatable. Add the roasted vegetables and fold to coat well. 4. Combine the lemon zest and yogurt. 5. To assemble, divide the yogurt and lentils among four plates. Pile the vegetables on top, sprinkle with flaky salt, mint, and drizzle any remaining dressing over the top. Enjoy. *   *   *   *   *   * Oh yea, Happy New Year everyone! I hope everyone’s 2016 has started off on the right foot. Here are a couple things I’ve been up to: Cody app and I have collaborated to create an online video series with 21 episodes geared towards anyone who wants to learn how to cook healthy, plant-based meals! I have been wanting to put together an educational + cooking video program for so long now, and I am very proud of how this has turned out. I hope you check it out. The entire program is on sale until the end of today (01/­­14/­­16, PST time zone) so act quickly if you want to get the bundle at a great price! We’ve added four brand-new and exclusive recipes to the My New Roots app. These recipes are specifically for cleansing and detoxification, so if you’re January hasn’t been as “clean” as you would have liked, maybe this will give you some inspiration! Update your app or download it now and get this recipe for Nori wraps with Cleansing Broccoli Pesto along with three other delicious and detoxifying delights (use the filter button to select “Super Clean 2016″) Check out the recipes here. And I was invited to speak on Jessica Murnane’s podcast, The Things that Freaked my Week. It was fun. Listen here. BIG love and best wishes for your year ahead. xo, Sarah B Show me your harissa on Instagram: #MNRharissa

Carrot Gazpacho with Chopped Salad

February 17 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1. Bring carrot juice and grated carrot to simmer in saucepan. Reduce heat to low, cover pan, and simmer 5 minutes. Uncover, and cool. 2. Blend whole grape tomatoes, diced cucumbers, onion, vinegar, horseradish, red pepper flakes, and carrot juice mixture in blender 1 1/­­2 minutes, or until smooth. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Chill at least 30 minutes. 3. Place finely diced carrot in small bowl, and microwave on high 1 minute to soften. Transfer to medium bowl; add finely diced tomatoes and cucumber, lettuce, and oil. Toss to blend. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Divide gazpacho among shallow bowls. Garnish with salad.

6 Easy and Tasty Slaws

October 29 2014 VegKitchen 

6 Easy and Tasty SlawsTri-Color Coleslaw combines massaged kale with both green and red cabbage. It goes with just about every kind of meal, and you can vary it each time with different dressings. You can also add a little dried fruit or apple for a sweet twist. Combining cabbage, sweet potato, and some mildly Thai flavors, this easy (and rather addictive) Raw Sweet Potato Salad with Coconut-Lime Dressing is a treat all year around. Crushed pineapple is the standout ingredient in this pleasant Creole Coleslaw. It provides a good balance to spicy or bold dishes. My favorite dishes to serve it with are, appropriately,   Vegan Jambalaya and   Pasta Jambalaya . Tangy Coleslaw is perfect for picnics, vegan barbecues, or to dress up everyday meals. It gets an extra kick from pickles, fresh dill, and horseradish. I find this simple raw Kale and Cabbage Salad to be positively addictive. It goes with just about any kind of meal and is good year around. Napa Sriracha Slaw is great  alongside vegan brats & beans, tempeh sliders are generously mounded with the stuff and lately I cant get enough of this slaw stuffed inside my tacos. If you are looking for a super creamy slaw adjust the vegan mayo according to your taste.  - For lots more features on healthy lifestyle, explore VegKitchens   Healthy Vegan Kitchen  page.

Walnut-Horseradish Cheese in Endive Petals

October 21 2014 Vegetarian Times 

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Spread walnuts on baking sheet, and toast 7 to 9 minutes in oven, or until golden brown and fragrant. Cool. Set aside 1/­­2 cup walnut pieces for garnish. 2. Process walnuts in food processor until finely ground. Add cottage cheese and horseradish, and pulse until smooth. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. 3. Spoon 1 Tbs. cheese mixture onto wide end of each endive petal. Garnish with reserved walnut pieces and dried cranberries.

One Ingredient, Three Ways: Beets

January 29 2016 Vegetarian Times 

One Ingredient, Three Ways: BeetsWe asked our friends at the National Gourmet Institute to weigh in on popular, healthy ingredients and cooking methods. Vegetarian Times has partnered with the renowned New York-based culinary school to create a  comprehensive new online course, Foundations of Plant-Based Nutrition. Whether you’re a new vegetarian, an avid cook wanting to expand your skills, or contemplating a career in the food industry, you will find this course helpful. Sign up to receive discounts and information about this awesome course.   Have you noticed a number of new beet products on store shelves lately? From beet hummus to beet-infused sports drinks, beets are now in the spotlight, and for good reason. A 2015 review in the journal Nutrients found that beets and their concentrate hold promise in treating oxidative stress and inflammation. But the health benefits associated with beets dont stop there. They’ve also been shown to lower blood pressure, slow the progression of dementia, enhance exercise performance, lower blood glucose, and increase insulin sensitivity in people with diabetes. This chenopod packs fiber, essential minerals, vitamin C, and more. Here are three easy ways to integrate beets in your  diet: Beet Salad: Albeit a more traditional avenue, nothing beats (unable to resist the pun) a fresh salad with citrus, goat cheese, walnuts and herbs for flavor. Note that golden, or yellow, beets have a mild flavor compared to their red counterparts, so consider incorporating some to broaden the flavor profile of a salad. Sauce: Beets are versatile, and can be part of a simple beet and horseradish sauce–like that served as part of a Seder--or replace some of the tomato in a non-traditional beet marinara. Embrace a root-to-frond mindset and use the beet greens to create a pesto sauce, or simply sauté them with garlic. Chocolate beet cake: While beets dont always replace a single ingredient in cooking, their water content can help add moisture to baked goods. Try adding some to your next chocolate cake! Kayleen St. John is the resident nutritionist at NYCs Natural Gourmet Institute. Kayleen has a Masters degree in clinical nutrition from NYU and is a registered dietitian. Her research examines the relationship between diet and inflammatory conditions. Kayleen is an avid runner and believes smart nutrition contributes to optimal athletic performance. Our new course, Foundations of Plant Based Nutrition, led by Kayleen, covers essential plant-centric professional cooking techniques, health-focused topics including allergens and inflammation, and how to separate nutrition fact and fiction in a vegan and veg diet. 

C-CAP Celebrates 25 Years of Transforming Lives

March 9 2015 Meatless Monday 

C-CAP Celebrates 25 Years of Transforming Lives   On Tuesday, March 3, Careers Through Culinary Arts Program held their annual benefit, this year honoring business leader & philanthropist Dick Parsons and chef/­­restaurateur Alexander Smalls . For those of you who couldnt afford the $1000 ticket or dont live near New York, heres a brief summary of the event: Delicious. Inspiring. Incredible. C-CAP is a national non-profit that prepares at-risk high school students for college, and careers in the restaurant and hospitality industry. Founded in 1990, C-CAP has awarded over $43 million in scholarships, and classrooms have received $3.8 million worth of supplies and equipment. Meatless Monday has been a major supporter of the program for many years.   Marcus Samuelson and other illustrious New York chefs, several of them C-CAP alums, gathered to support the cause. Together with their restaurants, each chef prepared a signature dish; then the crowd of supporters, celebrities, and the media roamed the tables and sampled the exquisite offerings. Besides offering the opportunity to taste luscious creations the event also provided a chance to speak with chefs about the latest trends in cooking, especially if theyre friends of Meatless Monday like chef/­­owner Bill Telepan of Telepan . A lot of restaurants are seeing an upturn in vegetarians coming in. I started seeing it about ten years ago so weve included a lot of vegetarian dishes on our menu...and theres so much great produce in this area, that its crazy not to utilize it...It helps us be more creative as chefs.   Jonathan Waxman, Chef at Barbuto , created a delectable farro salad with fennel, olive, meyer lemon & almond for the occasion. When asked what vegetables were particularly popular right now, he said, Honestly I think vegetables in general are the trend...People are not only recognizing that vegetables are good for them, and delicious, but they can be spectacular. You dont need to have meat. You dont need to have cheese. You dont need to have anything else. You can just have vegetables. The Corporate Chef at Dos Caminos , Ivy Stark, sounded a similar note. Vegetables are huge right now....just the fact that more and more chefs are using them as the center of the plate item is the trend...its a good thing. Chef Bryce Shuman from Betony served up beets with horseradish and goats milk for the crowd. According to him, people are more excited than ever about enjoying vegetables. Think about how many meats we eat. Ten, maybe twelve. Or different types of seafood you eat? Forty or fifty? But then veggies - its just like thousands and thousands of different types of vegetables. You have so many vegetables to cook, so much variety to choose from...Im really excited to see the trend. Because...I love veggies. While chefs got to show off and New York society got to enjoy some spectacular food, the auctions and sponsorships made sure more underserved kids will get the opportunity to be tomorrows brilliant chefs and restaurateurs. The post C-CAP Celebrates 25 Years of Transforming Lives appeared first on Meatless Monday.

8 Easy, Amazing Vegan Appetizers -VegKitchen’s Favorites

December 7 2014 VegKitchen 

8 Easy, Amazing Vegan Appetizers -VegKitchen’s FavoritesFor winter gatherings, my favorite food theme for entertaining is a delicious vegan appetizer buffet with wine, cocktails, and/­­or mocktails. After that, who needs dinner? You can then skip to coffee/­­tea and light desserts. Here are 8 tasty dips and finger foods, our absolute favorites from VegKitchen’s vast array of Vegan Appetizer Recipes. Choose 5 or 6 of these and serve with your favorite beverages. Above, Smoky Vegan Cheddar Cheez. You’ll find the way to the recipe with the 4th link below, along with its spreadable version. Photo above by Hannah Kaminsky. Colorful and briny, small servings of Olive Bar Medley with Tofu “Feta” go a long way. Choose two or three different varieties of pitted olives from your supermarkets olive bar, add an extra item or two, and you’ve got a winning appetizer. Photo above by Susan Voisin. Rosemary Roasted Mushrooms is an appetizer that can also be used as a first course for almost any kind of meal. Use any kind of mushroom you like, or a combination of two or three. Skillet Spiced Chickpeas will give you good flavor and texture every time; oven-roasting seems to dry these delicious legumes out. These are good eaten out of hand as a snack, in place of far more caloric nuts. They make a tasty salad topping, as well. You can make Smoky Vegan Cheddar Cheez as a spread in no time, or let it set up into slices, as shown at the top of this post. I like it both ways and hope that you will, too. This is good with sliced fresh baguette, or serve it with whole-grain crackers or crisp breads, and/­­or fresh veggies. Photo above by Hannah Kaminsky. Tempeh Fries with Horseradish or Wasabi-Dill Mayonnaise can be a bit addictive, so you may want to double the recipe if serving hungry tempeh fans. Photo above by Hannah Kaminsky. Sweet and Spiced Glazed Nuts are a tasty finger food at special occasion, or as an everyday snack. Use any combination of your favorite nuts -- peanuts, almond, pecans, walnuts, macadamia nuts, cashews, etc. Green Pea, Parsley, and Pistachio Dip is great served with brightly colored vegetables--baby carrots, sliced red bell peppers, rounds of yellow squash, and thin wedges of raw sweet potato. Photo above by Hannah Kaminsky.

Tricolor Beet Salad with Horseradish Dressing

October 21 2014 Vegetarian Times 

1. To make Dressing: Heat 1 tsp. oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add shallots, and cook 5 minutes, or until softened. Add tofu, and cook 2 minutes. Remove from heat, and cool. 2. Transfer mixture to blender. Add remaining 1/­­2 cup oil, horseradish, vinegar, and salt, and blend until smooth. Blend in a little water if Dressing seems too thick. (You should have 21/­­4 cups.) Chill. 3. To make Salad: Preheat oven to 350°F. Wrap each beet in foil. Roast on baking sheet 1 hour, or until tender. Cool. Peel and dice beets. 4. While beets are roasting, spread pecans on baking sheet, and toast 5 minutes on separate oven rack, or until golden brown, shaking pan once or twice. Transfer to plate to cool. 5. Cook green beans in 8 cups boiling, salted water 5 to 8 minutes. Drain, rinse under cold water, and drain again. Set aside. 6. Heat oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Add reserved beet greens, and cook 2 minutes, or until tender. 7. Transfer beet greens to large salad bowl. Add beets, green beans, and fennel, and toss together. Add 1 cup Dressing, and toss to coat. Serve topped with pecans, apple, and cranberries.


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