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Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2

July 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 Here comes Part 2 of our Plant-Based Summer meal plan, which we created in hopes of helping some of you get more plants into your life on a day-to-day basis. We aimed for efficiency, but also tried to come up with recipes that are inspired and delicious. Part 2 focuses on dinner and dessert only. There are tacos and fajitas, as well as a juicy fruit crisp. To see the breakfast and lunch recipes, as well as the grocery shopping list for the entire meal plan, head to Part 1. If you use this meal plan, we would appreciate your feedback a whole lot. Tell us which parts were useful and where we could improve. These meal plans are a ton of fun to come up with, but they are also a ton of work, so we want to make sure that we are putting our energy into something that’s practical to you. Providing that everything goes well, we’ll come out with the next meal plan in the fall. Until then, we are back to our regular schedule of two recipe posts a week :) Menu (see Part 1 for breakfast and lunch recipes) Breakfast Almond Pulp Lime Ginger Granola Overnight Berry Chia Oats Lunch Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad Basil Zucchini Chowder Dinner Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas Zucchini Kimchi Tacos Dessert Peach and Blackberry Crisp *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Day by Day Prep List Monday Night: Make the fajitas to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you already prepped the vegetables and spice blend during prep day. Bake the crumble for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week.  - Make the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas - Bake the Crisp (+ second batch of almond milk if you didnt make it on prep day) Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the fajitas, prepare the Kimchi Zucchini Tacos for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. They are a very quick, weeknight-friendly dish. These tacos would also work well as a lunch, if you need a break from the soup and salad. - Make the Zucchini Kimchi Tacos   Recipes 1. These fajitas make for a very satisfying dinner, and they taste like the real deal, too. They utilize the chickpeas and half of the cauliflower, left over from Part 1, as well as the piquant fajita spice. When wrapped in a tortilla, the spicy onions and peppers, meaty portobello wedges, caramelized cauliflower, and chickpeas make up the perfect pocket of flavor, especially when finished off with all the fixings. Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas   Print Ingredients 4 tablespoons neutral coconut oil 1 cup cooked chickpeas (from part 1) fajita spice mix - (recipe in part 1) ½ cauliflower - cut into florets (left over from part 1) juice of 2-3 limes - divided 1 large red onion - chopped 1 red, yellow or orange bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 green bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - seeded and sliced 2 portobello mushrooms - sliced tortillas of choice (corn for gf) 1 avocado - sliced, for serving cilantro - for serving vegan sour cream or yogurt - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a large cast iron pan over medium heat. Add the chickpeas, sprinkle with the fajita spice and sauté until golden. Remove the chickpeas from the pan and set aside. Add another tablespoon of oil to the pan, add the cauliflower florets in a single layer, sprinkle with the fajita spice and cook for about 3 minutes, until the underside is golden. Flip the florets, sprinkle with more of the fajita spice and cook for another 3 minutes or until the other side is golden. Pour the juice of ½-1 lime over florets and cook until it evaporates, stirring. Remove the cauliflower from the pan and set it aside. Add one more tablespoon of the oil to the pan, followed by the onion and all the peppers. Sprinkle with the fajita spice and sauté for about 8 minutes, until the onion the vegetables are soft and golden in places. Pour the juice of 1 lime over the vegetables and stir them around until it evaporates. Push the vegetables to one side of the pan and add another tablespoon of the oil to the emptied space. Add the mushrooms in a single layer, sprinkle with the fajita spice and let them cook for about 3 minutes, until the underside is golden. Flip the mushroom slices, sprinkle with more of the fajita spice and cook for another 3 minutes, or until the other side is golden as well. Pour the juice of ½-1 lime over the mushrooms and stir around until evaporates. Stir the onion-pepper mixture into the mushrooms and turn off the heat. Warm the tortillas, if desired, and keep them wrapped in a kitchen towel. To serve, place a few pieces of the cauliflower in the middle of the tortilla, followed by a small handful of the pepper and mushroom mixture and some chickpeas. Top with avocado slices, cilantro leaves and sour-cream, if using. Repeat with the other tortillas, as you go, and enjoy. 3.5.3226 2. These tacos are incredibly easy to make, but mindblowingly good despite that fact. I make them at least once a week in the summer, for a reliable, no brainer-style dinner. The kimchi basically does all the work for you here, infusing the zucchini and carrots with its powerful flavor, while the creamy avocado and cilantro bring on the perfect finishing touch. Zucchini Kimchi Tacos   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 small to medium carrot - shaved 2-3 small to medium zucchini - spiralized or julienned about 1 cup kimchi, or more to taste ½ cup cooked chickpeas (from part 1, optional) 1 avocado - cubed handful cilantro leaves - for serving tortillas of choice (corn for gluten-free) - for serving Instructions Warm the oil in a large sauté pan. Add the carrot and zucchini and sauté for a couple of minutes, until they are just beginning to soften. Remove the pan from the heat, add the kimchi and chickpeas, if using, and toss to mix. Warm up the tortillas, if desired, and serve the zucchini-kimchi mixture inside the tortillas, topped with the cubed avocado and cilantro. 3.5.3226 3. A fruit crisp is one of the easiest desserts to make, especially in the summer, when so many fruits and berries are at the peak of their flavor. This recipe utilizes the almond pulp, left over from making almond milk, for the crisp topping, leaving no part of the almond behind! Feel free to use any other fruit or berries for this recipe, just make sure to adjust the sweetener if you have a fruit that’s less sweet, like plums. Peach and Blackberry Crisp   Print Ingredients for the filling 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 3 ripe peaches - sliced 1 cup blackberries freshly squeezed juice from ½ lemon 2 tablespoons coconut sugar or maple syrup splash of vanilla extract (optional) ½ tablespoon arrowroot powder (optional) for the topping 1 cup almond pulp (left over from making nut milk in part 1) 1 cup rolled oats sea salt ¼ cup chopped almonds, walnuts or other nuts of choice ¼ cup maple syrup ¼ cup coconut oil - soft Instructions Preheat the oven to 375° F (190° C). Oil a medium-sized baking dish or a 9-10-inch cast-iron pan and combine the rest of the filling ingredients in the pan. Toss to mix. Combine all the topping ingredients in a medium bowl and mix thoroughly with your hands. Sprinkle over the filling. Place the pan into the oven and bake for 30 minutes. Cover with parchment paper and bake for 10 more minutes, until the fruit is bubbly and the topping is golden. Enjoy right away with vanilla ice cream, if desired. Store in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna Roasted Root Vegetable, Red Rice and Lentil Stew Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight

July 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight This post was created in partnership with Whole Earth Sweetener Co. Turkish delight is one of those old-school sweets that was always around during my childhood in the Soviet Union, which is surprising because treats were scarce and mainly homemade. There was a tiny store a short walk away from our home, where they carried neat, white paper boxes, lined with tissue and filled with delicate pink, sugar-dusted Turkish Delight squares. We called the treat rahat lokum (just another commonly used name for Turkish Delight). I spent my childhood convinced that it was fairy food, and cherished every pleasantly jelly-like, aromatic bite from the magical paper box. I’ve since completely forgotten about rahat lokum, dismissing it as an outdated sweet of my semi-hungry childhood, until I was in Moscow a few months ago. There is a high-vibe sweets brand sold in some grocery stores in Russia, which makes chocolate, wafers and such, with surprisingly wholesome ingredients, cool herbal add-ins, and a pleasantly low amount of non-refined sugar. I always make a point of hunting down some of their stuff to bring back home. This time around, I discovered a new product of theirs, which was a healthier, green tea-flavored Turkish Delight. It was delicious and disappeared in no time once my family got a taste of it back in Florida. I quickly got the urge to figure out my own recipe, as I often do with these types of obsessions. Thankfully, I’m no stranger to the thickening and gelatinizing properties of arrowroot (starch from a tropical tuber) and agar-agar (sea vegetable). Both make for the perfect, allergy-friendly and healthful alternative to cornstarch, which is traditional to Turkish Delight recipes. After some consideration, I decided to color my delight with hibiscus tea, as a tribute to the pink treats of my childhood, and because I’m generally obsessed with hibiscus and its million health benefits. For an extra aromatic finish, I added some orange blossom water instead of the more commonly used rose water, which truly takes this treat to the next level. When coated in arrowroot powder, this Turkish Delight looks surprisingly professional, as though it was store-bought. The cool thing is that in reality it’s pretty easy to make at home, just take a look at the video above to see the whole process. For sweetener in this recipe, I used an organic blend of stevia and honey from Whole Earth. I’ve had a pretty turbulent relationship with stevia over the years. I’ve always wanted to get into it as a sugar substitute, knowing that it’s totally natural, free of calories, and a zero on the glycemic index, but I just cannot get used to its potent, powerful flavor (when extracted it’s something like 200 times sweeter than sugar!). Any time I add pure stevia extract to anything, it’s all I can taste, and that flavor lingers in my mouth for hours in an unpleasant way. Thankfully, Whole Earth Sweetener Co. figured out that when mixed with other, more traditional sweeteners, stevia is barely distinguishable, and they offer a few carefully considered stevia blends. The neat thing is that because of stevia’s potency, you only need half of the amount of their sweetener in any given recipe. In other words, this Turkish Delight recipe only calls for 1/­­4 cup of the honey and stevia blend, while you would need twice the amount (1/­­2 cup) of pure honey or maple syrup to achieve the same sweetness without the stevia. After trying the Whole Earth stevia-honey blend, as well as their stevia-raw sugar blend, I’m totally on board. I love being able to use less sugar in my sweet recipes, and I’m hoping that these products can help me ease into a love affair with pure stevia, some day :) I’m curious to hear about your guys’ experience with stevia. Do you use it? Did it take you some time to get used to it? Any tips and stories are much appreciated! Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight   Print Serves: about 48 pieces Ingredients 3½ cups purified water 2 tablespoons dried hibiscus flowers ⅔ cup plus ¼ cup arrowroot powder, divided ¼ cup stevia-honey blend or ⅓ - ½ cup pure honey or maple syrup 4½ tablespoons agar agar powder (not flakes) 1¼ teaspoon orange blossom water or rose water Instructions Combine the water with the hibiscus in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let the tea steep for 30 minutes. Prepare an 8 x 8-inch square, rimmed dish by lining it up with parchment paper. Set aside. Strain the hibiscus tea. Mix ½ cup of the tea with ⅔ cup of the arrowroot powder in a medium bowl. The mixture will be quite thick and difficult to mix at first. Set aside. Pour the rest of the hibiscus tea into the same saucepan used for brewing the tea. Add the sweetener and the agar agar powder, whisk to combine and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 5 minutes, whisking periodically. At the end of the 5 minutes, give the prepared arrowroot mixture a good stir and slowly pour it into the saucepan with the agar mixture, stirring vigorously. The mixture will be very thick and stretchy. Remove from heat and add in the orange blossom water, whisking to combine. Immediately spoon the mixture into the prepared dish, evening it out as much as you can. Place the dish into the refrigerator for 1-2 hours, until the mixture is completely set. Once set, lift the delight square out of the dish onto a cutting board, using the extending ends of the parchment paper. Slice into around 48 cubes and roll them in the remaining ¼ cup arrowroot powder to coat. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Almost Savory Raw Chocolate Raw Honey Maca Pancakes, a Weekend Breakfast Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Steamed Buns (Oil Free)

July 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Steamed buns are great for a dinner dish, or even to snack on. We love them because you can get really creative with what you fill them with! But if you need a little help coming up with a filling idea, Honeybunch of Onion Tops has created a fantastic, healthy filling with tofu, mushrooms and potatoes in this awesome video recipe. These steamed buns are vegan, plus they are oil-free! Can’t get much better than that. Here’s how to make them: Read the recipe in full here. The post Vegan Steamed Buns (Oil Free) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway

June 28 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway This post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes. We’ve got a zinger of a hot weather dish for you today. Have you ever tried cucumber noodles in favor of the more common spiralized zucchini? I’m obsessed. They are the perfect, cooling and hydrating food, especially when dressed with plenty of lime juice, herbs and a kiss of spice. They’re great with tropical fruit, creamy avocado, and a sprinkling of toasted seeds, as well as tofu for more substance and a savory element. The glazed tofu recipe I give here is an absolute favorite of mine and generally very special, easy, and able to transform any tofu hater into a true believer. It’s garlicky and spicy, and with a touch of sweetness. You can see the video of the whole process above. I love cooking with tofu because it’s a flavor sponge and therefore extremely versatile. One of the most important steps in achieving outstanding tofu involves draining it of the liquid that it comes in. Generally, the less liquid tofu holds, the better it is at absorbing all the surrounding flavors. That’s where the beautiful, stainless steel Tofu Press from Raw Rutes comes in. Raw Rutes is a charming, online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, from dreamy fermenting crocks to home brewing supplies, dehydrators and even freeze dryers (!). They sent me their Ninja Tofu Press to try out, and though I’m often skeptical of single-purpose kitchen tools, this one stole my heart. Previously, I would make a contraption of two plates, kitchen towels and a large jar of water for draining tofu, and I’m pretty relieved that I no longer have to make that much mess for such a simple step. This tofu press looks great and comes with a 4.5 lb weight, which gets all the liquid out of the tofu quickly and efficiently, with no required effort on your part. It can also be used for making your own homemade tofu (still on my list of things to try), as well as getting moisture out of pretty much any foods that fit. I’ll definitely be using it for my homemade nut cheeses. Some other items on my Raw Rutes wish list include this terra-cotta sprouter, this fermenting crock, and this crazy cherry pitter (why not?). Discount Code and Giveaway! For 11% off any items on Raw Rutes, enter code GOLUBKA at checkout through July 31st, 2017. To enter to win one Ninja Tofu Press, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite way to prepare tofu until July 5th, 2017 (USA only). Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the glazed tofu 1 14 oz (398 g) package firm tofu (I used sprouted tofu) 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice - divided ½ tablespoon tamari 1 teaspoon sriracha 1 tablespoon miso paste ½ tablespoon honey or maple syrup 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 4 garlic cloves - minced for the bok choy (optional) 1-2 baby bok choy - sliced into wedges splash of tamari juice of half a lime for the cucumber noodles 2 English cucumbers - spiralized or julienned ½ -1 lime sea salt pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil large handful each basil and cilantro leaves for serving 1 ripe, firm avocado - thinly sliced 1-2 small ripe, sweet mangoes - thinly sliced toasted sesame seeds basil/­­cilantro/­­mint leaves - for garnish Instructions to prepare the glazed tofu Press the tofu for 15-30 minutes to drain it of as much liquid as possible. Slice it into cubes. Combine 1½ tablespoons lime juice together with the tamari and sriracha in a small bowl. Set aside. In another small bowl, combine the miso paste, honey/­­maple syrup and the remaining ½ tablespoon lime juice, and set aside as well. Warm the coconut oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tofu and sauté, flipping periodically until golden on all/­­most sides. Add more oil if needed throughout the process. Drizzle 1 teaspoon of the sesame oil over the tofu and add the minced garlic, sauté for 30 seconds until fragrant. Add the tamari mixture, bring it to a boil and cook until reduced and syrupy, for 1-2 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the miso mixture into the pan and toss until well-combined. Remove the tofu from the pan and set it aside. to cook the bok choy Return the pan to the heat and add the bok choy. Cook for about 2 minutes on each side, or until the white parts are lightly golden. Add a splash of tamari and a squeeze of lime juice, and stir until most of the liquid is evaporated. Remove from heat. to prepare the cucumber noodles Place the spiralized cucumber into a medium/­­large serving bowl. Squeeze the lime juice over the noodles, sprinkle with salt and red pepper flakes, and drizzle with sesame oil. Add the herbs and toss gently to coat. to serve Distribute the noodles between serving bowls. Arrange the avocado slices on top of the noodles, followed by the mango, bok choy and spicy tofu, toasted sesame seeds and herbs. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream Turnip Blueberry Muffins Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Grapefruit Smoothie .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London

June 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London We love yogurt in our family*. The unsweetened, thick, creamy and tangy kind. We enjoy yogurt for breakfast (with fruit) and sometimes dessert (with dates + chocolate + nuts). We top our soups with yogurt, we add it to smoothies and ice pops and we also dress our salads with it (Isac likes to dress himself with it as well). Yogurt works remarkably well both with sweet and savory flavors. And yet, the thought of making a yogurt bowl with savory toppings instead of sweet, had never struck us before. But as we were playing around with this crunchy cucumber and melon salad with spiced chickpeas, we (and with we, I humbly mean ME, MYSELF and I - as in, not David) had the simple idea to put them on a bed of yogurt instead of doing the usual yogurt dressing. In theory, it’s more or less the same thing but in reality it’s so much better. The warm, rich and spicy chickpeas on a bed of cold, thick and tangy yogurt, with the addition of a fresh salad with lots of crunch. It’s simple but yet so very good. And quick too. I’m sure there are plenty of savory yogurt bowls all over internet, but now they are also in our kitchen. *David and Isac are actually intolerant to dairy but yogurt is their weak spot. We buy oat yogurt for them but David often chooses a day of stomach ache just to enjoy a bowl of plain yogurt. And Isac has literally been caught with his hand in the yogurt jar more than once. Coconut yogurt has a fantastic taste and consistency but is simply too expensive to enjoy more than as an occasional treat (very keen on giving Ashley’s versions a try though!). Hey hey hey, wait a sec. This is David acting as proofreader today and I just noted Luise’s attempt at hijacking my idea. This recipe = my idea. Just wanted to make that clear. I’ll give the word back to her now. The salad is super quick as you just need to chop everything up. We found that crunchy vegetables like cucumber, celery, sturdy roman lettuce and radishes work really well here, with the avocado and melon adding softness and sweetness. The yogurt is, well, just yogurt. It needs to be quite thick to hold up the topping - our preference is Greek yogurt but choose whatever you prefer. The only thing that needs a little more preparation and heat are the spiced chickpeas. Even if the ingredient list looks long, it’s simply spices, oil and chickpeas and the result tastes way better than just using plain chickpeas. They have a rich, spicy and slightly nutty flavor which works so well with the freshness from the yogurt and the crunchy and sweet salad. VARIATIONS There are plenty of ways to vary this recipe and we’re going to leave you with a few ideas. - Whisk some creamy goat’s cheese into the yogurt. It will dissolve, become smooth and give the yogurt a more mature flavor. - If you don’t have all the spices at home for the chickpeas, use what you find. A bread spice mix works great along with a little cayenne. A turmeric or curry version would be interesting too. - You can skip the salad and pour the yogurt into small sealable jars with spiced chickpeas on top. Store them in the fridge for a quick snack. - Vegans can of course use a vegan yogurt option or simply settle for the salad with warm chickpeas stirred through. - Roasting the chickpeas in the oven together with eggplant or pumpkin could be amazing on top of the yogurt as well. Let us know if you have any other favorite variations on savory yogurt bowls and we can include them in this list. Savory Yogurt Bowl with Spicy Chickpeas & Cucumber Salad Serves 4, or 2 very hungry persons Cucumber & Melon Salad 1 cucumber 1 small (or 1/­­2 regular) melon (we used Piel de Sapo but honeydew would also work) 1 spring onion 2 celery stalks 10-15 fresh mint leaves 1 avocado 6 radishes 1/­­2 roman lettuce 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil Spiced warm chickpeas 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 1 tbsp sesame seeds 2 tsp fennel seeds  1 tsp coriander seeds 1 tsp cardamom seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika powder 1/­­4 cup – 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed For serving 2 cups plain full-fat Greek yogurt  For the cucumber & melon salad:  Wash all produce. Cut cucumber and melon in large bite-size pieces. Trim and finely slice spring onion, celery and mint leaves. Cut the avocado in half and remove the stone, then cut into cubes. Trim the radishes and thinly slice them. And chop the roman lettuce. Place all prepared ingredients in a mixing bowl, squeeze over lemon juice, drizzle with olive oil and a little salt, give it a good toss and set aside. For the spiced warm chickpeas:  Add all seeds and spices (except for the ground spices) to a dry skillet, heat gently for a couple of minutes while stirring. When the spices starts to pop and smell fragrant, they’re done. Pour into a mortar and give them a few bashes with the pestle (alternatively on a cutting board and use the back of a chef’s knife). Transfer the seeds and spices back to the skillet. Now add oil (start with the lesser amount and add more later on if it looks dry), ground spices  and chickpeas and heat on low temperature for 2-3 minutes. Stir to combine. When the chickpeas are warm and covered in spices and seeds, remove from the heat. Dollop the yogurt into four bowls. Use the back of a spoon to smooth it out. Arrange the salad on one side of the yogurt and the spiced warm chickpea on the other side. Drizzle a little extra oil on top. Enjoy immediately while the chickpeas are still warm. ********* LONDON + BATH In all my excitement over a simple bowl of yogurt, I almost forgot to mention that we are coming to London and Bath next week for a couple of book events. We’re very excited and can’t wait to meet some of you! We’re having a supper club at Grace Belgravia on Monday 5 June, 7-10 pm. More info here. We’ll do talk and Q&A at Whole Foods Market in Kensington on Wednesday 7 June, 6.30 pm. More info and tickets here. We’ll also do a talk and cooking demo at Topping & Company Booksellers in Bath on Friday 9 June, 7.30 pm. More info and tickets here. Finally, we’re having a hands on cooking class at Bertinet Kitchen in Bath on Saturday 10 June, 10 am. Tickets here (only one left). Big love!

Strawberry Guacamole

May 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Strawberry Guacamole Earlier this spring, I talked a little bit about what an explosive strawberry season we experienced this year. I couldn’t keep myself away from our nearby organic strawberry farm, and as a result ended up with lots of berries that needed to find a home in one dish or another, since my freezer can only fit so much. I made this pie, a cobbler, and sprinkled the berries over everything from morning bowls to salads. I also remembered that strawberries work surprisingly well in guacamole, as proven to me by a friend years ago. I love how every family seems to have their own specific guacamole recipe, and my friend came from a clever bunch that dealt with an influx of home-grown strawberries by enjoying them in guacamole. I can’t say enough about how much the combination of creamy avocado, sharp red onion, cilantro, jalape?o, and lime benefits from the juicy, sweet bursts of strawberries. It’s heaven. I could easily eat a bowl all to myself. Give this guac a try one hot day this summer with some good chips and a glass of something cold and fizzy, you won’t regret it! There is a quick step-by-step video above and weekend links below. Sunday hugs to you, friends :) Fields Of Study – currently participating in this four day online meditation workshop for anxiety and stress, and can’t say enough about it. There’s breath work, reading, exercises, and recorded guided meditations, as well as all kinds of practical tips on the use of minerals, flower remedies, etc. as tools for grounding and stress relief. My Place – liking this video series on Nowness The Hippies Have Won – yay Dear Sugar – a new-to-me podcast I’ve been enjoying The Planted One – a seriously inspiring meal-planning instagram Excited to get my hands on these books – Just the Essentials, The Wellness Project Strawberry Guacamole   Print Serves: 4-ish Ingredients 2 large, ripe but firm hass avocados 2 cups strawberries - hulled, sliced in half or quartered 1 cup cilantro leaves ¼ small red onion - finely chopped 1 small jalapeno - seeded and minced juice from 1 large or 2 small limes sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions Cut the avocados in half vertically and remove their pits. Scoop the avocado flesh into a medium bowl, using a spoon. Mash with the avocado with a fork. Add the strawberries, cilantro, onion, jalape?o, lime juice, salt and pepper to taste. Mix until well combined. Serve with your favorite tortilla chips. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ramp Flatbread Pizza with Garlic Cream Pear Cranberry Chai Baked Latkes with Beet and Avocado Salad Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Strawberry Guacamole appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

top 6 honey benefits | diy home remedies with honey

April 25 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

top 6  honey benefits | diy home remedies with honeytop 6 honey benefits | diy home remedies with honey along with photos. honey is considered as one of the best and oldest sweet product with several health benefits. honey is a best alternative for sugar and used for sweetness. honey is not only used for cooking purposes, but also has medicinal usage and is used for skin and hair care. Continue reading top 6 honey benefits | diy home remedies with honey at Hebbar's Kitchen.

No Bake Coconut Lemon Bars

April 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No Bake Coconut Lemon Bars I’ve been dreaming about making no-bake lemon bars for a while now and finally got around to the idea a few weeks ago. The goal was to have absolutely no oven time required for both the crust and the lemon filling, while having solid bars that stay together nicely and, of course, taste delicious. The idea to include coconut in the mix came about naturally, since I knew that I would have to use coconut milk for the creamy lemon mousse anyway. I decided to take it one step further and incorporate dried coconut flakes into the crust, and I loved the way all of the flavors came together. I’ve made these bars three times within the past couple of weeks, and each time they disappeared before I knew it. Definitely a universal crowd pleaser. We’ve got another step-by-step video for you today, which shows the fairly simple and very fun process of making these lemon bars. We are kind of addicted to the whole video-making thing now, so there are many more to come. The no-bake crust here is very simple, consisting of macadamia nuts, coconut flakes, lemon juice/­­zest and a bit of sweetener. The yellow mousse mixture gets its lemony flavor from plenty of lemon juice, while a pinch of turmeric helps bring out that beautiful yellow color. The mousse comes together in the blender and hardens in the refrigerator overnight to a perfectly sliceable consistency, made possible by coconut milk and oil, as well as a bit of arrowroot powder. The whole package is just sweet enough, creamy and rich. I like to shape the bars into small squares, since they are quite satisfying and a few bites go a long way. Enjoy! No Bake Coconut Lemon Bars   Print Serves: about 16 small bars Ingredients for the crust 1⅓ cups macadamia nuts 1⅓ cups dried coconut flakes, plus more for garnish 3 tablespoons maple syrup or honey 3 tablespoons neutral coconut oil zest from 1 lemon - preferably organic 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice pinch sea salt for the mousse 1 13.5 oz can full fat coconut milk - refrigerated overnight 1½ teaspoons arrowroot powder 1¼ cups cashews - soaked for 2-4 hours ⅓ cup plus 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice ¼ cup maple syrup or honey ¼ teaspoon turmeric pinch sea salt 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil Instructions to make the crust Place macadamia nuts in the freezer 30 minutes prior to making the crust. Put the chilled macadamia nuts and dried coconut flakes into the bowl of a food processor and pulse to achieve rice-sized pieces. To the food processor, add the maple syrup/­­honey, coconut oil, lemon zest, lemon juice and salt, and pulse until mixture is well-combined and sticking together. Prepare an 8 x 8 baking dish and cover it with parchment paper - parchment paper should extend up the sides for lifting the bars out of the dish later. Spoon the crust into the dish and smooth it out into an even layer. Place in the freezer while making the mousse. to make the lemon mousse Remove the can of coconut milk from the refrigerator and open it. The coconut fat should be accumulated at the top of the can. Scoop out the fat into a small saucepan. Measure 2 tablespoons of the remaining coconut water from the can and add it to the saucepan. Melt and bring to a simmer over medium low heat. Meanwhile, combine the arrowroot powder with 2 teaspoons of the remaining coconut water from the can in a small bowl and stir to combine. Pour the arrowroot mixture into the simmering coconut fat and stir until the mixture thickens slightly. Remove from the heat and set aside. Combine the cashews, lemon juice, maple syrup/­­honey, turmeric, salt and vanilla in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Add the thickened coconut fat and coconut oil and blend to incorporate. to assemble and serve Take the crust out of the freezer and pour the lemon mousse over the top, distributing it evenly and smoothing out with a spoon if needed. Place the dish in refrigerator until set, preferably overnight. Remove the bar out of the baking dish, lifting it up by the extended parchment paper. Place on a cutting board and slice into 16 square bars or bars of any shape of choice. Sprinkle with coconut flakes and serve. Store refrigerated in an air-tight container. Notes 1. Make sure to place the can of coconut milk in the refrigerator overnight so that the fat separates from the water. Also a reminder to place the macadamia nuts in the freezer 30 minutes prior to making the bars. 2. If you can get them, Meyer lemons work really well in this recipe. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ant Hill Forest Cake Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins Raw Strawberry Shortcake .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No Bake Coconut Lemon Bars appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spicy Spaghetti with Roasted Vegetables

March 22 2017 Meatless Monday 

The theme of the 2017 Careers through Culinary Arts Program (C-CAP) Meatless Monday Recipe Contest was Oodles of Noodles and it challenged teen chefs to create innovative, meatless noodle recipes. This recipe is the Arizona regional winner and comes from Austin Neanover of Glendale High School. Serves 6 - For the Spicy Tomato Sauce: - 1 Small onion, minced - 28 oz crushed San Marzano tomatoes - 1 Tbsp red pepper flake - 2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil - 1 tsp basil - 1 Tbsp - 1 Tbsp Honey - 4 cloves garlic - To Taste - salt - To Taste - pepper - For the Spaghetti: - 1 pound spaghetti of your choosing - Roasted Vegetables - 2 Zucchini, quartered lengthwise and cut into 1-inch cubes - 2 Yellow squash, quartered lengthwise and cut into 1-inch cubes 2 I Red bell peppers, cored and cut into 1-inch strips - 1 Red onion, peeled and cut into 1-inch strips - 10 Cremini mushrooms, quartered -  1/­­4 Extra virgin olive oil - 1 tsp salt - 1 tsp ground black pepper - 1 tsp basil - 1 tsp oregano -  1/­­2 tsp thyme -  1/­­2 tsp marjoram -  1/­­4 tsp rosemary - 3 cloves garlic - To Garnish: - Parsley, minced - Parmesan cheese Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. In a bowl, toss the peppers, zucchini, squash, mushrooms, and onions with olive oil, teaspoon of salt, teaspoon of pepper, and dried herbs. Lay on baking sheet and roast for 15 minutes or until Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil over high Add pasta and cook until al dente. Drain in a colander. In a saucepan, pour olive oil and tablespoon of red pepper flake until the chilis get aromatic. Add onion and stir until they begin to sweat or become translucent. Then, pour crushed tomatoes, garlic, honey, and basil, stir. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Lastly, In a large bowl, toss drained pasta, roasted vegetables, and spicy tomato sauce. Use tongs or a spoon to gently mix the ingredients until all the components are incorporated and pasta is covered with sauce. Top with Parmesan cheese and minced parsley. The post Spicy Spaghetti with Roasted Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spirulina Latte

March 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Spirulina Latte Checking in really quickly with this trippy spirulina latte. Half the fun of eating spirulina is its color, the other half is knowing its many incredible health benefits, while the swampy, algae flavor is no fun at all. I usually just include spirulina in smoothies, where the flavor gets masked by the sweetness of the fruit, but that also means that its magical, aquamarine color will get lost among the numerous berries that I put in my smoothies. This latte is a more direct and, let’s say, conscious way of consuming spirulina – it’s fun to make, warm, cozy, slightly sweet, and not at all swampy in taste. Drinking a beverage of this color will definitely make you appreciate spirulina in all its glory and provide you with a bright start to your morning or a smile during your afternoon break. There are some links after the jump, enjoy your Sunday! Immigrant Food Stories 25 Songs That Tell Us Where Music Is Going (have your sound on) Scott Chalky, America’s Favorite Farmer – interviewed on Here’s the Thing Laura Miller’s Talking in Circles This ‘Poke’ Bowl! Speaking of Superfood Lattes – check out the Good Sort’s… Enjoyed This Zadie Smith Interview on Fresh Air (from November ’16) Spirulina Latte   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients 2 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice (I used homemade hazelnut) 1-2 teaspoons organic spirulina powder 1 teaspoon maca powder (optional) ¼ - ½ teaspoon ground ginger 1 tablespoon honey or more to taste 1 teaspoon coconut butter (optional) 1 teaspoon sunflower lecithin (optional) beet powder mixed with coconut sugar - for garnish (totally optional) Instructions Pour the milk into a medium saucepan and warm over medium high heat until pleasantly warm but not boiling. Put the warmed milk into the blender together with the rest of the ingredients, except the beet powder garnish. Blend until smooth and frothy. Distribute between cups, garnish with the beet powder and enjoy warm. Store the leftovers refrigerated in an airtight container. This latte can also be enjoyed chilled or iced. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte Juicing Elderflower Lemonade Honey Miso Latte .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spirulina Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

3 Favorite Quick Treats

February 21 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

3 Favorite Quick Treats Our daughter’s school teacher sent along a pale blue little text book for her to draw and write in during our recent trip to Cape Town. Considering that Elsa’s previous writing experiences mostly consisted of scribbling random letters from the alphabet and signing her drawings (often reversed), we honestly didn’t expect this journal to be anything more than a sketch book. But to our surprise, she filled the pages with both drawings and sentences about her days. She is no Donna Tartt just yet. Her letters look a little wonky, she spells words exactly as they sound and writes without space between (so it all looks like a long hashtag): weesaasharkindeseetodey. But regardless of how much or little that happened each day, she found something to write about, she tried her best to get the spelling right and she filled that book with memories. The connection I am trying to make here is that this blog is Luise’s and my journal. And we have been bad at filling it lately - with memories and recipes. Ever since the children outnumbered us, it has been difficult to write. Not only due to lack of time and sleep, but we’ve also been looking for meaning, relevance and motivation. We have been doing this for more than seven years now and I have personally come to a point where I want everything to be so damn perfect every time that I often get stuck in this circle of “this is not good enough”. But seeing Elsa’s journal made me realise that we don’t always need the grandest of recipes or ideas. Sometimes a simple 5-minute snack or treat can be good enough. Okay, I don’t really think one snack is good enough. So we are actually sharing three today! These recipes are all great options when you need a late afternoon pick-me-up, a post workout treat or simple Tuesday dessert. Although different in their execution, they can all be made in a breeze and all of them also happen to include tahini. If you haven’t tried tahini with sweet flavours before, consider this your lucky day. It’s the bombest flavour combo! First up, easy but epic stuffed dates. I shared these stuffed dates on instagram a few weeks ago, calling them ugly delicious. Although a lot of people seemed to think that they weren’t ugly, I still argue that this isn’t a very glamorous dish. Frozen raspberries, grated ginger and tahini, mashed into soft dates is preferably something that is enjoyed under dim light in front of a tv series. Unhulled tahini is excellent for this dish because of it’s richer tones. And if you’ve got a dark chocolate bar (70-80%) lying around, you can break it up and cram small pieces of chocolate into the date along with the other ingredients. It’s probably the quickest and easiest sweet firework your mouth will ever experience. Tahini & Raspberry Stuffed Dates Makes 10 10 soft dates 1 tsp fresh ginger 3 tbsp tahini (preferably unhulled), almond butter or nut butter of choice 20 fresh or frozen raspberries a handful desiccated coconut dark chocolate (optional) Open up all the dates, discard the stones and place the dates on a plate. Grate the ginger over the dates and then fill them with approx 1/­­2-1 tsp tahini per date and two slightly mashed raspberries (and a small piece of chocolate, if using). Top with a scattering of desiccated coconut. Indulge. We obviously think smoothies are the ultimate quick treat, having written a whole book about them. They are easy to make, easy to improvise and easy to like. This recipe is not from the book but it combines many of our favorite smoothie ingredients mentioned in the book into one master smoothie which we often make in family size and portion out in mini bottles. Berries are always great in smoothies being low on sugar and high on freshness. Avocado and banana makes it exceptionally creamy. Dates add a caramel tone and cardamom, ginger and tahini blasts the flavours. Depending on the tartness of your berries, a squeeze of lime or lemon can also be good in this. Berry & Tahini Smoothie 2 large glasses 1 banana 1/­­2 avocado 2-3 soft dates 1 tsp freshly ground cardamom 1 tsp fresh ginger 1 tbsp tahini 1 cup /­­ 150 g frozen raspberries and blackberries 1 cup oat milk or other plant milk Add all ingredients to a blender and mix on high speed until smooth. Taste and adjust the flavour, add more ginger, tahini or cardamom if needed. Add more milk if it feels too thick. Pour into two large glasses or bottles and enjoy right away or store in the fridge with a lid on. On a recent car ride from Copenhagen to Stockholm, Luise picked up a snack pack of cottage cheese with topping. It is not something we often buy but it tasted pretty good and we started talking about making our own version of it, adding lots of crunch and more freshness along with the sweetness. We have combined cottage cheese with yogurt here to make it more creamy, fluffy, tangy and rich in protein  and this has become one of our favorite post workout meals lately. We serve it with chopped apples, an easy crunchy topping of toasted buckwheat groats and nuts and top it all with a delicious syrup made of honey, fresh ginger, cardamom and tahini. The syrup should taste quite strong of ginger to contrast the cheese and it’s really what makes this dish special, but if you are not a fan of ginger, use the lesser amount. If you’ve got a jar of our Ginger & Turmeric Honey Bomb at home, that can be used instead.   Cottage Cheese with Apple, Ginger Honey and Crunch Serves 2 (hungry people) or 4 (as a snack) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 50 g buckwheat groats 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35 g hazelnuts, roughly chopped 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1 cup /­­ 250 g cottage cheese 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml plain thick yogurt (turkish or greek style yogurt) 1 large apple 1 1/­­2-2 tbsp honey 1 tbsp tahini 1/­­2-1 tsp freshly grated ginger 1/­­2 tsp ground cardamom Dry toast buckwheat groats, hazelnuts and salt in a skillet or sauce pan on medium heat for approx 10 minutes, stir every now and then. While its toasting, divide the cottage cheese on two plates or four bowls. Discard the core from the apple and chop it in roughly 1/­­2 inch /­­ 1 cm pieces. Scatter the apple pieces over the cottage cheese. When the buckwheat and nuts smell fragrant and look golden, turn off the heat and scatter it over the cottage cheese and apple. Without rinsing the skillet/­­saucepan, use the after-heat in the pan to stir together tahini, honey, ginger and cardamom - it only need a little heat to combine easily. Drizzle generously over the two plates and finish with a sprinkle of cinnamon. Dive in!

Hibiscus Ginger Latte

January 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Ginger Latte Hibiscus is a powerful tropical flower with a long list of health benefits (anti-inflammatory, digestive aid, metabolism-boosting, helps with cholesterol level and blood pressure maintenance). It also happens to produce the most brilliant, ruby red-colored tea with a prominent tart flavor. I’ve always found pure hibiscus tea to be a little too sour for my taste, but came up with this latte in a recent attempt to get more of its stunning color into my morning routine, and now I’m completely hooked. The creaminess of the almond milk helps offset the harshness of the hibiscus, and the ginger adds a nice note of warmth and complexity, making this latte a great winter drink. The green tea is optional here, but a great addition when you need a little help waking up in the morning or as a mid-afternoon boost. And I swear I feel like I’m getting color therapy when drinking this latte – the fluffy, pink foam is so soothing to look at, I’m in a complete state of peace by the time I’ve taken my last sip. We have some weekend links for you after the jump, have a great Sunday :) - The Cookbook Deal – I’ve been so excited for this podcast, in which Jessica Murnane documents a whole year of her life while making her first cookbook. I loved the first two episodes, and although that might have something to do with the fact that I’ve now gone through the book-making process twice, I think anyone can enjoy it because Jessica is such a great and charming storyteller. And if you are thinking of writing a cookbook, you should definitely give this one a listen. - This Hibiscus Mask from S.W. Basics - Andrea Gentl’s Photo Essay From Her Time in the Andes – breathtaking - Feedback, NY, Down the Aisle – interesting people interviewed about their grocery shopping routines. So far I’ve enjoyed interviews with Julia Turshen, Hannah and Landon Metz, Kenny Anderson. - The Matriarch Behind Beyoncé and Solange - On The Rocks – crystals explained on Garance Doré Hibiscus Ginger Latte   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 tablespoon dried hibiscus flowers 1 piece ginger - shredded 1 green tea bag 1½ cups hot water 1½ cup unsweetened almond milk or other milk of choice 1 tablespoon honey/­­any other sweetener of choice, or to taste (optional) Instructions Combine hibiscus, ginger, green tea and water in a teapot or a large mug, keep covered while steeping. Remove the green tea bag after 2-4 minutes of steeping. Let the hibiscus steep for another 15-20 minutes. Warm up the milk if you prefer a hot latte. Pour the tea into a blender through a strainer. Add the milk and honey to the blender and blend until frothy and smooth. This latte also tastes great iced. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Elderflower Lemonade Black Sesame Cappuccino Spiced Hot Chocolate and a Cookbook of Our Own Quick Persimmon Eggnog .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hibiscus Ginger Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Red Cabbage with Orange & Apple

January 9 2017 Meatless Monday 

Red cabbage is chopped into ribbons and tossed with red wine vinegar, honey, coriander, soy sauce and chili powder for a sweet-sour-spicy flavor. Green apples soak up this delectable sauce, before this fruit veggie medley is topped with freshly grated ginger. Try this dish on the side in place of coleslaw. This recipe comes to us from Jenné of Sweet Potato Soul. Serves 4 - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­2 head red cabbage, washed & cut into ribbons - salt, to taste - 1/­­2 onion - 1 clove garlic, minced - 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar - 1 teaspoon honey - 1 bay leaf - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground coriander - 1 teaspoon low sodium tamari or soy sauce - 1 teaspoon red chili powder - 1/­­2 cup fresh squeezed orange juice with pulp - 1 Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored and cubed - 1 teaspoon fresh ginger, grated - fresh black pepper - orange slices*, for garnish Place the olive oil in a large, deep pot over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for 4-6 minutes, or until the onion begins to soften. Add the red cabbage ribbons, sprinkle with a little salt, stir and cover. Cook the cabbage for about 2 minutes, or until the cabbage begins to soften. Uncover the pot and coat the cabbage with the vinegar, honey, bay leaf, coriander, tamari or soy sauce and chili powder. Stir thoroughly, turn down heat to medium-low and cover again and cook 4-6 minutes. Uncover and pour in the orange juice, orange pulp and apple cubes. Cook about 10 minutes more, or until the cabbage has reached desired tenderness. Taste for seasoning and adjust to preference. Serve hot or warm, sprinkled with freshly grated ginger and black pepper. Garnish with sliced oranges, if using, and enjoy! The post Red Cabbage with Orange & Apple appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Watermelon, Cucumber, and Feta Mason Jar Salads

July 3 2017 Oh My Veggies 

When its too hot to cook, try these individual watermelon feta salads with cucumber, feta cheese, fresh basil, and a honey-jalape?o dressing.

Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade

June 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade Have you ever tried adding fresh aloe vera to your drinks? As soon as the days get unbearably hot around here, I like to keep a few aloe leaves in my fridge for a good number of reasons, especially for healing unexpected sunburns and making the most refreshing post-beach tonics. Aloe is one of those amazing, all-purpose healing plants; it’s anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, helps lower cholesterol, works wonders when applied topically to skin by moisturizing it and helping ease acne and blemishes, and the list goes on and on. If you’ve never taken apart a fresh aloe leaf before, its insides are made up of a clear, jellyfish-like material, which is where most of the healing magic is contained. The problem is that on its own, the flesh is quite bitter and soapy. I’ve noticed that citrus really helps neutralize that unpleasant taste, so I love adding aloe to lemonade. This lemonade recipe is pretty special – it’s just the most refreshing thing you can think of after a hot day outside. It’s minty, with a cooling effect from the cucumber and a nice tartness from freshly squeezed lemon juice. I also think it would make for a great summery cocktail mixer, if you feel so inclined :) One last aloe tip – when I’m cutting apart an aloe leaf in the kitchen and putting most of the flesh into the blender, I rub the green skins with any leftover flesh on my (clean) face, which makes for a refreshing face mask. There are some links below, Sunday hugs to you, friends. The Next Gluten Matthew Kenney on Pardon My French Human Design BodyGraph – sort of like an astrology birth chart, but it combines a bunch of traditional sciences like astrology, the Hindu-Brahmin Chakra system, the Zohar or Kabbalah, and the IChing to map out a ‘body graph.’ We found ours to be pretty accurate and fascinating. Patti Smith on Singing at Bob Dylan’s Nobel Prize Ceremony (make sure to watch the video) Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables – I’ve got my eye on this cookbook Roasted Poblano and Jackfruit Tacos – can’t wait to make these Our Youtube Channel – we are obsessed with making videos! Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade   Print Serves: 5-6 cups Ingredients 1 packed cup mint sprigs, plus more for serving 3 cups purified water half of a large cucumber 1 large aloe leaf 1 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (4-5 lemons) ¼ cup maple syrup Instructions Bruise the mint a bit by rubbing it between your hands. In a small saucepan, combine the mint sprigs and water, bring to a boil and let cool to infuse. Once cool, strain the mixture into an upright blender and discard the mint sprigs. Cut the cucumber half in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Optionally, shave off a few cucumber ribbons with a vegetable peeler for serving in the glass. Roughly chop the cucumber and put it into the blender. Cut the white base off the bottom of the aloe leaf, then cut off the spiky sides. Cut off the top layer of the skin lengthwise. Scoop out all the flesh into the blender using a spoon. Add the lemon juice and maple syrup to the blender and blend everything until smooth. Let cool completely in the refrigerator. Serve over ice, with cucumber ribbons and more fresh mint leaves. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Pi?a Colada Milkshake - Ice Cream Sunday Raw Spearmint and Chocolate Cheesecake Superberry Smoothie Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones

May 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones This post was created in partnership with Bob’s Red Mill. When I was writing my first cookbook four years ago, I was completely infatuated with developing gluten-free baking recipes and baking almost every day. More than that, I was really into making my own flours (by blending whole grains in my Blendtec), and mixing my own gluten-free flour blends. I am one of those crazy people that enjoys making everything from scratch, but I also did all of those things out of necessity, since there were no high-quality gluten-free flour blends out on the market. Things have really changed since then! Health food stores are now flooded with all kinds of exotic flours and flour blends, which makes me a little less compelled to make my own. I still do from time to time, but I feel comforted by the fact that I can pick up a gluten-free flour blend in the store and whip up some tasty scones without getting messy with the blender and tons of jars. I should add that I don’t have a gluten sensitivity, but a few people I like to share scones with do, and I also just really love the challenge that gluten-free baking presents. I’ve been baking with Bob’s Red Mill 1 to 1 Gluten Free Baking Flour and can confidently say that it’s the best pre-mixed gluten-free flour blend I’ve tried. The blend was formulated to substitute wheat flour in baking recipes in exact amounts, which makes it super easy to use if you ever want to try your hand at a gluten-free version of your favorite recipe. These blueberry lemon scones are my favorite thing I’ve made with the flour so far. I’ve tested three batches, and each one has disappeared within a day, with the help of friends and family. They are a true crowd pleaser, and make for a satisfying little breakfast or dessert. Slightly crisp on the outside and nice and crumbly inside, with pockets of blueberries, and a sweet and tangy lemon ‘glaze.’ There’s a lovely zing from lemon zest throughout, and they are pretty low maintenance in terms of preparation, as scones should be. I hope you’ll give them a try :) Gluten-Free Blueberry Lemon Scones   Print Serves: 8 scones Ingredients for the scones ½ cup unsweetened almond milk ½ tablespoon apple cider vinegar ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons gluten free rolled oats 1½ cups 1 to 1 gluten free flour blend ¼ cup plus 1 tablespoon coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling on top 2 teaspoons baking powder pinch of sea salt zest of 2 organic lemons, divided ¼ cup neutral coconut oil - scoopable, at room temperature ½ cup pistachios - chopped, plus more for garnish 1½ cup fresh or frozen (not thawed) blueberries ¼ cup aquafaba (water from a can of chickpeas or other beans) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract for the glaze ¼ cup cashew butter 1½ tablespoons maple syrup or honey ¼ teaspoon turmeric - for color juice of 1 lemon Instructions to make the scones Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a baking sheet by covering it with a piece of parchment paper. Combine the almond milk and apple cider vinegar in a small bowl and set aside to make a vegan buttermilk. Pulse the rolled oats several times in a high speed blender or food processor to grind them partially. Combine the oats with the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and ⅔ the amount of the lemon zest in a medium bowl, toss to mix thoroughly. Add coconut oil and work it into the flour mixture with a fork until mostly mixed in, with some small clumps remaining. Add the pistachios and blueberries, toss to combine. Make a well in the center, add the buttermilk, aquafaba and vanilla, and mix to combine. Take care not to overwork the batter. Transfer the batter to a floured surface and use your hands to form a disk about 1-inch thick. Cut into 8 wedges with a floured knife. Transfer the wedges onto the prepared baking sheet with a spatula or a pie server. Sprinkle some coconut sugar on top of each scone. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until the edges are golden and crispy. Let cool and drizzle with the glaze (recipe follows), sprinkle with the rest of the lemon zest and pistachios. to make the glaze In a small bowl, combine the cashew butter with the maple syrup and turmeric, mix until smooth. Add lemon juice and whisk until shiny and smooth, add more lemon juice or water if the glaze seems too thick. Drizzle over the scones and enjoy. Notes I learned from Minimalist Baker that coconut oil works best in vegan scones when its not in a frozen or a liquid state, but in between those two and scoopable, the way its sold in grocery stores from. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Cornbread Pancakes

May 1 2017 Oh My Veggies 

These simple cornbread pancakes are light and tender, with a texture and flavor reminiscent of honey cornbread.

7 Substitutes for Honey

April 20 2017 Oh My Veggies 

When opting to avoid honey, some may have trouble finding substitutes for honey that are suitable. Check out this extensive list of substitutes for honey.

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways

March 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three WaysThis post was created in partnership with Revol. So excited to share this recent discovery with you today. If you follow us on instagram, you may have seen me posting an abnormal number of pancake photos recently. That would be because Ive been cooking some variation of blender pancakes almost every morning for the past couple of weeks. Seriously obsessed. Blender pancakes start out with whole grains instead of flour, which get soaked overnight in purified water. Soaking not only softens the grains and makes them more blend-able, but also awakens the life within each individual grain and rids them of phytic acid, making them more bioavailable and easier to digest. You could use a number of grains here, but I find raw buckwheat to be the perfect neutral base. Buckwheat is also incredibly nutritious, and is actually not a grain at all, but a fruit/­­berry of the buckwheat plant (related to rhubarb!). In the morning, simply combine your soaked grains with a liquid and other add-ins in a blender, whirl everything into a smooth batter and you are ready to fry up your pancakes. Its all super quick, easy and so tasty, and there is a lot of room to get creative, too. The whole process kind of reminds me of making a smoothie because the flavor combo possibilities are endless, and because you can just throw a bunch of ingredients into the blender and expect totally delicious results (almost) every time. I offer three of my favorite flavor combinations here, two sweet and one savory. The orange, sweet potato pancakes are subtly sweetened with maple syrup and jazzed up with spices. They are hearty, warming, and very kid-friendly. The green ones are flavored with matcha and studded with sesame seeds that add tiny pops of crunch throughout. Matcha is the star in this variation, youll be able to taste its lovely, grassy and sweet notes very well. The pink, savory pancakes, combine beet with spices, ginger and greens, making them a great option for those who favor a non-sugary breakfast. I love them with our avocado mayo, but you can employ pretty much any one of your favorite, creamy sauces as an accompaniment. Whichever variation you try, you will love how easily they come together and how forgiving the recipes are in terms of add-ins. I know by now youve noticed the beautiful plates/­­cups /­­enamel board in the photos. They are from Revol, a French cookware and bakeware brand with a newly launched website. They sent me a few items of my choice from their Color Lab and Crumple collections, and I was blown away by the quality of their wares. The half-glazed dinner plates are handmade in France and feel incredibly sturdy. They stack up perfectly when you store them in the cupboard and are just a true pleasure to eat off of. I couldnt resist the pink crumple cups because they are adorable, and because I was missing vessels of that size in my kitchen. They are the ideal size for espresso or cappuccino, if thats your thing, but I will be using them for my occasional morning ginger-turmeric shots. The little cheese plate/­­presentation board is hand-dipped in enamel, and will make for a perfect snack board at any get-together. All the pieces are refined and minimal, yet they still feel warm and welcoming, and you can definitely sense the hand in all of them. Everything is oven and dishwasher safe, too, so there’s a perfect balance of beauty and utility. Spiced Sweet Potato Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 12 pancakes Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato coconut oil for roasting sweet potato and frying ¾ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight 1 tablespoon sesame tahini or other nut/­­seed butter 1 cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar ½ teaspoon baking powder pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 4 cardamom pods - green shells removed (optional) ½ teaspoon ground ginger (optional) 1 tablespoon maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon ground flax or chia seeds (optional) 2 tablespoons hemp seeds (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400°F (200° C). Prick the sweet potato with a fork several times and place it on a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Roast for 40-50 minutes or until tender throughout. Let cool, then peel. Alternatively, peel the sweet potato and roughly chop it into cubes. Place onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray and roast for 30-40 minutes, until tender. Mash the sweet potato pieces a bit with a fork when you are measuring out 1 cup of the flesh in the next step. Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with 1 cup sweet potato flesh, sesame tahini, almond milk/­­water, apple cider vinegar, baking powder, salt, spices and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add flax/­­chia and hemp seeds, if using, pulse to combine. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt and/­­or cacao nibs. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Matcha Sesame Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 8 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon matcha powder 1-2 tablespoons maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon sesame seeds (I used black) Instructions Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with almond milk/­­water, matcha, and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add sesame seeds and pulse on low to mix the seeds into the batter. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 more minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with more sesame seeds, coconut flakes, fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt, etc. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Savory Beet Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 9 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup whole sorghum groats or more buckwheat/­­barley/­­quinoa etc. - soaked in purified water overnight ½ small cooked beet 1 tablespoon sesame tahini ½ cup water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon tamari or more to taste ½-inch piece ginger ¼ teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cumin ⅛ teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chia or flax seeds (optional) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (optional) 1 tablespoon dulse (optional) large handful chopped spinach/­­kale leaves or small handful sliced scallions avocado mayo - for serving (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the buckwheat and sorghum very well. Combine the grains with the beet, sesame tahini, water, apple cider vinegar, tamari, ginger, baking powder, smoked paprika, cumin, red pepper flakes, and chia/­­flax, nutritional yeast, dulse, if using, in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Add chopped spinach/­­kale/­­scallions and pulse to mix in. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with avocado mayo/­­plain yogurt/­­any sauce of choice and more sliced scallions. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways

March 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways I finally got around to trying sweet potato toast this week, a concept that I’ve been seeing circulating around the internet. Our instagram post about it generated a lot of interest, so I thought I would go into more detail here today. Basically, the whole idea is replacing bread with thinly sliced, toasted sweet potato and topping it as you would any toast. I know, why mess with an already perfect concept like toast? For one, it’s great for those trying to take it easy on grains or gluten. It’s also perfect for sweet potato lovers just looking to change things up for breakfast, snack, etc. (me). It’s a fun way to eat a nutritious root vegetable, and I have a feeling that it could easily be made very kid-friendly. It is decidedly its own thing, not toast, but totally stands on its own as tasty and filling fare. As with any toast, there are infinite possibilities when it comes to the toppings, since sweet potato gives a pretty neutral base. I offer my favorite sweet and savory options below. In the sweet one, earthy and creamy tahini is studded with jammy, smashed raspberries (I use frozen and defrosted ones this time of year), drizzled with honey/­­maple syrup and sprinkled with cacao nibs and seeds, and that combination is incredibly lovely. The savory one is (surprise!) avocado toast, but made a bit more substantial with the addition of balsamic lentils, a dusting of nutritional yeast and seeds. On a technical note, the whole reason behind the sweet potato toast craze is that you can cook the sweet potato slices right in the toaster. The catch is that I don’t own a toaster, so what I like to do is cook the slices in the oven the night before and then re-heat them, either in the oven or in a pan on the stovetop whenever I’m ready to eat my ‘toast.’ You could even cook a bigger batch for the week ahead, since the roasted sweet potatoes hold up well in the refrigerator. But if you do have a toaster, by all means cook the potato slices in there. I offer directions for both methods in the recipes. There are some weekend links below, Sunday hugs to you :) What The Health – a new film from the creators of Cowspiracy, this time targeting health organizations. Really excited to watch it, it’s available to stream on their website now. Hugh Forte’s Food Photography – just learned that the photographer behind Sprouted Kitchen has a separate Instagram account for his dreamy food photos, I can stare at them for ages. How Millions of Kids Are Being Shaped by Know-It-All Voice Assistants Sweet Potato Sheet Pan Dinner Salad – looks perfect, and those photos are amazing. The Avocado Show – an Amsterdam cafe centered around everything avocado, look at that. What We Eat When We Eat Alone – recently discovered this gem by Deborah Madison. Raspberry-Tahini Sweet Potato Toast   Print Serves: 4-6 toasts Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato ½ tablespoon coconut oil - soft (if using the oven) 2-4 tablespoons sesame tahini ¼ cup raspberries (fresh or frozen and thawed) honey or maple syrup for drizzling mixed seeds for garnish (I used cacao nibs, hemp, pumpkin seeds) Instructions Peel and slice the sweet potato into even, ¼-thick slices. If you have an organic sweet potato, you can leave the skin on, but I prefer it peeled. If using an oven, preheat it to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet and place the sweet potato slices on the sheet. Add the coconut oil and mix with your hands to coat. Put the baking sheet into the oven and cook for 15 minutes. Flip the slices and cook another 10-15 minutes until cooked through. Add toppings and enjoy right away or refrigerate in an air-tight container until ready to eat. Reheat in a 350° F (175° C) oven for about 5 minutes, then top. If using a toaster, place the sweet potato slices in the toaster and toast on high for about 5 minutes, until cooked through and toasty at the edges. Cooking time will vary slightly for different toasters. Spread tahini on each slice. Add raspberries, mashing them a bit with a fork. Drizzle each slice with the desired amount of honey/­­maple syrup and sprinkle with mixed seeds. Enjoy! 3.5.3226   Avocado-Lentil Sweet Potato Toast   Print Serves: 4-6 toasts Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato ½ tablespoon coconut oil - soft (if using the oven) ⅓ cup cooked black or French lentils 1 teaspoon olive oil ½ teaspoon balsamic vinegar, plus more for drizzling 1 small, ripe avocado juice of ½ small lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste nutritional yeast for garnish mixed seeds for garnish (I used hemp, flax, pumpkin, and sunflower seeds) Instructions Peel and slice the sweet potato into even, ¼-thick slices. If you have an organic sweet potato, you can leave the skin on, but I prefer it peeled. If using an oven, preheat it to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet and place the sweet potato slices on the sheet. Add the coconut oil and mix with your hands to coat. Put the baking sheet into the oven and cook for 15 minutes. Flip the slices and cook another 10-15 minutes until cooked through. Add toppings and enjoy right away or refrigerate in an air-tight container until ready to eat. Reheat in a 350° F (175° C) oven for about 5 minutes, then top. If using a toaster, place the sweet potato slices in the toaster and toast on high for about 5 minutes, until cooked through and toasty at the edges. Cooking time will vary slightly for different toasters. In a small bowl, combine lentils, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, half of the lemon juice, salt and pepper. In another small bowl, mash the avocado with the remaining lemon juice, salt and pepper. Spread mashed avocado onto each sweet potato slice, followed by the lentils and a sprinkle of nutritional yeast and mixed seeds. Drizzle with more balsamic vinegar and enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles

February 26 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles These cheesecake truffles are another fun recipe I developed for Nuts.com. Chocolate truffles full of healthful ingredients are everywhere these days, but that’s not so much the case with white chocolate, since it is admittedly more difficult to reinvent into a high-vibe and wholesome treat. It is possible, though, and the two ingredients perfect for the job are coconut and cacao butters, both of which happen to be really good for you, loaded with healthy fats and all. If you’ve never heard of coconut butter before, it’s a product made of the entire contents of the coconut – meat and oil – and you will most likely be amazed by how rich and delicious it is upon your first taste. I love having a jar of it in the kitchen, and since a little of the butter goes a long way, the jar lasts a pretty long time, while I add it to desserts, hot drinks, porridges, smoothies, and even slather it on toast. Cacao butter is another entirely natural ingredient that’s amazingly luxurious, so it goes without saying that these vegan cheesecake truffles are as decadent as they get. The sweetness comes from your choice of maple syrup or honey, and the characteristic, tart cheesecake flavor is brought out with the addition of fresh lemon juice and zest. The texture is soft, airy and very cheesecake-like –  you could technically eat these truffles with a fork if you wanted, but I recommend biting. Indulging in these feels good, since all the ingredients are real foods, which is not generally the case with white chocolate truffles. There are some links below, a lot of really good ones this week. Enjoy your Sunday! Chef’s Table Season 3 – the 1st episode with Jeong Kwan, a Buddhist nun recognized for her temple food cooking by chefs around the world, blew me away. The Woman Behind Martin Margiela Nigel Slater Quotes – a twitter account that makes me smile, highlighting some of Slater’s finest quotes like ‘Cooking has always been the cheapest therapy in town,’ ‘I swear I can hear the courgettes growing,’  ‘You could measure my life in fishcakes,’ and ‘Ginger swings both ways.’ Inside Sarah Britton’s Kitchen The True Hard Work of Love and Relationships – Alain de Botton interviewed on the On Being podcast Caren Motika and Adam McPherson’s Home – in love with the photos (and the house) I Work From Home – made me laugh Vegan Samosa Shepherd’s Pie – YUM Follow this link to get the recipe for the Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles :) You might also like... Sweet Dukkah Cigars Raw Ginger and Lemon Pyramid Cakes Taco Collard Green Rolls Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp

February 10 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp Last week, I talked a little bit about my love for homemade nut milk, how it always tastes better than the store-bought kind, and how the amount of control I have over the process and ingredients makes it all worth the tiny bit of fuss. I’ve noticed that whenever I discuss making nut milk with anyone, the question of utilizing the leftover nut pulp is bound to come up. No one wants to throw it away, but not many people know what to do with it, either. I was in the same boat for years – sometimes, I would freeze the pulp for later use in place of almond flour in baked goods, which didn’t always work out because the pulp is not quite as dry as almond flour. Other times, I tried incorporating it into granola, but If I’m being honest, I often ended up throwing it away, not without some serious guilt. About a month ago, I opened up the question on instagram and got so many fascinating suggestions that went way beyond baking/­­granola: a base for stuffing, a thickener for smoothies, chicken feed, face scrub (!), and energy balls. I found the idea of pulp-based energy balls to be really compelling and set out to make both a sweet and a savory version. I’m really excited to share the results! Both of these recipes are ‘kitchen sink’-style and can easily act as a pantry cleanout aid. The sweet bites are full of toasty notes from the nuts, seeds and coconut, chocolatey and energizing with the addition of cacao, and sweetened with dates. The savory ones remind be a bit of the raw falafel I used to make back in the day. There’s miso, tahini, and tamari, as well as invigorating spices, herbs and even seaweed. Both make for an amazing pick-me-up snack, easy to transport and a breeze to prepare. And I definitely won’t be throwing away any more nut pulp. Savory Energy Bites   Print Serves: about 30 balls Ingredients 1 cup nut pulp, left over from making plain nut milk ¼ cup toasted unhulled sesame seeds, plus more for coating 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds 2 tablespoons sesame tahini 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon miso paste 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil ½ tablespoon tamari 1 teaspoon smoked paprika, plus more for coating 1 teaspoon turmeric, plus more for coating optional add ins 1 tablespoon dulse seaweed 3 scallions - thinly sliced 1 garlic clove - minced 1 tablespoon chopped dill Instructions Mix all the the ingredients in a food processor or in a bowl by hand, until well combined. Roll into balls about 1-inch in diameter. Coat with sesame seeds, turmeric and/­­or smoked paprika, if desired. Keep refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   Sweet Energy Bites   Print Serves: about 30 balls Ingredients 1 cup mix of various toasted nuts and seeds, such as hazelnuts, walnuts, pumpkin, sunflower or sesame seeds, plus more for coating 2 large, soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 1 cup nut pulp, left over from making nut milk 4 tablespoons raw cacao powder 3 tablespoons honey or maple syrup, or to taste 2 tablespoons almond butter 2 tablespoons tahini 2 tablespoons chia seeds 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil optional add ins 1 tablespoon hemp hearts handful toasted coconut flakes or desiccated coconut 2-3 tablespoons cacao nibs ½ tablespoon mesquite powder ½ tablespoon moringa powder 1 teaspoon maca powder 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground ginger matcha powder - for coating raisins - for decorating Instructions Place toasted nuts/­­seeds into the bowl of a food processor and grind into a meal. Drain dates and add them to the food processor with the rest of the ingredients. Process until thoroughly combined. Roll into balls about 1-inch in diameter. Coat in seeds and matcha, if using, and decorate with various nuts and raisins, if using. Keep refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a week. 3.5.3226   Have you heard of Daily Harvest? They deliver healthy, ready-to-blend smoothies and ready-to-heat soups to your door, which casually include all kinds of superfoods like açaí, cacao, camu camu, adaptogenic mushrooms, astralagus, and ginseng, in addition to freshly frozen fruits and veggies. I love making my own soups and smoothies, but I’m not going to lie, having a wholesome and delicious option in the freezer is really nice on busy days, especially when I know that I can stand behind all the ingredients. If you happen to be in need of a healthful shortcut, use the discount code above to get 3 free smoothies or soups :) You might also like... 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Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Lucky Meatless Recipes to Start the Chinese New Year

January 23 2017 Meatless Monday 

Lucky Meatless Recipes to Start the Chinese New YearThe Chinese New Year begins this Saturday to usher in the Year of the Rooster. This annual tradition originates from a timeless legend about a deadly beast who could only be frightened away by loud noises, bright lights and the color red. The vibrant festivities take place not only in Mainland China, but also in areas with significant Chinese populations, such as Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines. The Chinese year is based on the lunar calendar and the animal for each year is assigned by Chinese astrology. In fact, if youre interested, check out these additional Chinese New Year tidbits. This two-week celebration is full of family, fun, and, of course, great food. Special dishes are prepared that are said to bring prosperity and good fortune in the New Year. The classic Chinese dumplings, which can be made with just vegetables, are always a favorite. And Spring Rolls have a pale yellow color that resembles gold bars. Theres also good fortune fruit, such as oranges and tangerines, that are always very popular. We invite you to enjoy some of these wonderful meatless recipes below and wish you good fortune and great prosperity in the coming Chinese New Year!   Longevity Noodles, Driftwood Gardens    Tea Eggs for Chinese New Year,  She’s Cookin’ Soy Nuggets in Chinese Garlic Brown Sauce, Simply Vegetarian 777 Vegetarian Chinese Dumplings in Soup, An Exercise in Trivial Pursuits Honey, Soy, and Ginger Stir-Fry, 40 Plus and All is Well Stir Fry Spicy Green Beans, Easy Cooking with Molly Vegetable Spring Roll, Bok Choi and Broccoli For more recipes to help you celebrate a meatless Chinese New Year, visit our Pinterest board or the Meatless Monday recipe archive! The post Lucky Meatless Recipes to Start the Chinese New Year appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy

January 8 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy It’s interesting how motivating the tiniest tips from people you care about or respect can be. I was recently on a short flight and read the autobiography of a certain Soviet-era singer, whose music I grew up with. It was a thin, throwaway paperback that I read back to back during the flight, but something about her positivity really made an impression on me. This singer is almost eighty years old, but looks great and has stayed incredibly active, and the book is studded with small, often old-school tips of how she believes she’s managed to keep up her health. She walks everywhere she goes, covering large distances on foot in Saint Petersburg, Russia, and her two drinks of choice are carrot juice in the morning and chamomile tea at night. Sure enough, I’ve been noticing myself drinking both of those with more frequency and taking longer walks whenever possible. And it doesn’t matter to me how silly of a motivation that was, if it helps me get from point A to point B in taking more care of myself, I’m all in. So here’s the carrot-based tonic I’ve been inspired to drink more often. Since I don’t love pure carrot juice, I doctor it up with ginger, turmeric, lemon and honey, which makes it a true remedy and a preventative for winter colds and flu. It’s delicious – potent, refreshing, spicy and sinus-clearing, and a little goes a long way – I like having a shot or a small glass at a time. Some weekend links after the jump, stay warm this Sunday :)   Yvon Chouinard of Patagonia on the How I Built This Podcast (scroll down a few) Mark Bittman on Changing the Food Industry and Living Dangerously – on Tim Ferriss’s podcast Ron Finley, Gangsta Gardener Amy Revier, Weaving Worlds Beyond Words   Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy   Print Serves: 1 large glass Ingredients 8-10 large carrots - peeled if not organic 1 piece ginger or more - peeled if not organic 1 piece fresh turmeric root - peeled if not organic 1 lemon 1 teaspoon raw honey Instructions Run the carrots, ginger, turmeric and lemon through a juicer. Pour juice into a blender, add the honey and blend until the honey is incorporated. Enjoy. Notes 1. I like to use organic lemons for this juice, so that I can run the peel through the juicer and get its oils and benefits into the tonic. 2. I generally use a bit more than 1 of ginger for this amount of juice, but I like things really fiery. If you are the same way, add some more ginger. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Jujube Ginger Tea Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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