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Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby

January 7 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby Beth Kirby is a photographer, cookbook writer, entrepreneur, and the creator of Local Milk, her food, travel, and lifestyle blog. We are endlessly amazed by Beth’s ability to present her work with both authenticity and style, and we were completely blown away by each one of her thoughtful and inspiring answers in this interview. It’s a true gem. In this dialogue, Beth tells us about self-care as the foundation for happiness, having a schedule as a way to avoid stress, why she doesn’t believe in the idea of work-life balance, and how her routine has changed since becoming a mother, as well as her newfound love for weight training, the adaptogens and herbs she incorporates into her everyday potions, beauty, motivation, sustenance, and much more. There’s some amazing business advice here, too! Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Routine is so very important to me. Routines ensure that time is carved out for the important things in my days & life. Im super flexible with my routines so theres no such thing as failing, but the closer I adhere to the routine, the more impact I tend to make in my day. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I actually just wrote a little guide to a slow morning routine that details mine! I usually wake up when my baby wakes up, between 6:30-7:30 AM. The first thing I do every morning is make the bed because I feel this sets the tone for the rest of my day. My husband takes the baby to give me 10 minutes to meditate (I love the Headspace app) and do a few sun salutations to wake my body + mind connection up. After that I brew my morning elixir, a simple lemon, ginger, and turmeric tea, and then I do some journaling while I drink it. After that comes breakfast & a matcha potion, a shower & getting dressed for the day, a quick tidy of my space if I need it, and then Im down to work! I dont always do every single thing, but the more of them I hit, the better my morning! -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Im so exhausted at the end of the day, I dont usually need much help sleeping! I love making moon mylks with sleep promoting herbs as a little night time luxury. We keep the bedroom a sleep only zone with no television or computers, so its quite easy to pass out once Im in my own bed (or whatever bed I happen to be in!) -- How has your routine changed since you had your daughter? Its gotten a lot more flexible! If shes having a bad morning, things like preparing breakfast can take a lot longer or maybe I skip the shower (truth time!), but in a lot of ways, its made me more routine because if I dont have a plan and stick to it, the day can slip away a lot more easily when you have kids. I kinda floated through my days doing whatever I wanted whenever I wanted before she was born because I had all the time in the world. Now its make hay while the sun shines or forget having any hay! Haha. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  Miso Soup, 7 minute veggie & egg steam, and rice. After spending a fair amount of time in Japan, this has become my breakfast of choice. I keep dashi in the fridge for a quick miso soup so it takes literally minutes, and I steam a few veggies, whatever is on hand, in my steamer with an egg in its shell for 7 minutes. It all, including the egg, comes out perfectly! We cook rice in a rice cooker or donabe depending on where we are. I usually have a little miso dressing in the fridge to dip my veggies and eggs in and enjoy them alongside the rice & soup. Its so comforting and healthy, but its also really quick and easy as long as you throw the rice in a rice cooker and have dashi on hand. Lunch –  Smoothie! I usually hit my work stride during midday, and I dont like to take a massive amount of time (or make a big mess!) for lunch, so my favorite thing to do is whip up a super food adaptogen rich smoothie. I love pineapple and avocado as a base, and if its after a workout I make sure to throw some hemp & moringa in there for a plant based protein punch. Snack –  Ume plum onigiri. I almost always have leftover rice on hand, so I make rice balls with pickled plums in the center and wrap them with toasted nori for a quick snack. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Coffee makes me crazy, so I only have it on special occasions (like if Im near a really, really amazing café I might have a cappuccino), but when Im at home Ive started making a morning matcha potion.   -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I used to! But its lessened over the past couple of years as I cut back on candy & sweets. I love sugar, but I like to save it for feast days like holidays and celebrations instead of consume it as part of everyday life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I incorporate adaptogens & tonic herbs--particularly rhodiola, ashwaghanda, he shou wu, astragalus, maca, and reishi--into a lot of my food like smoothies, mylks, and matchas. I also love Wooden Spoon Herbs tinctures, especially Anxiety Ally (anxious lady over here!) as well as her Green Protein Powder after workouts. Ive also recently discovered tocos and MCT oil, which I work into either my smoothie or matcha each day. -- Youve spent significant amounts of time in both Japan and France. How have those cultures influenced your cooking? For sundry reasons, Japan has definitely had a bigger impact on my cooking than France even though we live in Paris about half the year. I love to eat French food, but I find a lot of it is richer than I care to eat on a daily basis, and because I cook vegetarian at home 99.9% of the time, Japanese cuisine is, in my experience, much easier to adapt to that. And I just love Japanese flavors. I would say I cook Japanese inspired meals more than anything else (even when in Paris!) -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Weve done baby led weaning which simply means offering solids around 6 months and letting her decide what and how much shed like to eat of what we offer. We try to make sure shes offered a wide variety of whole food options, and dont worry about it after that. She eats what we eat, and at 16 months shes still breastfed, and thats fine by me. We are super, super laid back about it. She eats what and when we eat, and she can still have mom milk whenever she wants. That said, those organic baby food pouches are a lifesaver on the go because she can hold them! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I see a personal trainer for an hour a day, five days a week. On my days off I do one day of cardio and one day of rest. I do mainly resistance training with weights and bodyweight and a little cardio. I think a lot of women do a toooonnn of cardio and are afraid of weights because they think theyll bulk up when in reality getting big is incredibly difficult. Instead weights make you stronger, toned, healthy, and able to eat more…which I love! Before Eula I ate very few calories and did lots of cardio, and while I was thin, I never felt healthy. Now I eat as much healthy food as I want when Im hungry and lift weights. While Im not where I want to be post-baby yet, Im on the road! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I freaking hate cardio. Especially running. I dont run. Unless something is on fire. I actually like weight lifting and resistance training. Its hard, but the time flies, and I can feel my body getting stronger. Having a trainer, while an investment, has been the trick for me. I need that accountability, and I needed to feel like someone who knew my goals for my body was guiding me towards them as opposed to me just randomly doing things. What motivates me is freedom from issues around food, being fit for the first time in my life, being a good example to my daughter, keeping up with my fit husband, and getting a toned butt! Haha! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? This is probably cliché but confidence. When someone is confident in their own skin and in who they are as a person, confident about where they are in the journey whether theyre only beginning or years down the road, that is beautiful. When you love yourself inside and out, you glow. Easier said than done, I know, but when we work towards banishing self loathing we arent only more beautiful to ourselves, we are more beautiful to others as well.   -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? As for my face, I keep it super simple: I wash and exfoliate with Aesop, and then I tone with Thayers Rose Tonic and hydrate with Evan Healy moisturizer. I love her formula because its natural and it isnt greasy like so many. It goes on so light. I also get a HydraFacial every couple of months. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I drink tocos daily in my smoothie or matcha, as its amazing for skin. He Shou Wu is another herb I take for beauty, again usually stirred into tea or a smoothie since I have one of those two things almost every day. I also take an ultra collagen supplement by Reserveage.   -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Dont wash your hair everyday! This strips hair of its oils and can dry it out and make it brittle. I wash mine once every 3-4 days, and I use a dry shampoo by Oribe on the days in between as needed. And if nothing else, if I can throw on a bit of Benefit Porefessional, mascara, and do my brows, I feel done. But the truth is, I hardly ever do my make up unless I have an event or am going to be on camera. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Not taking on more than I can handle, delegating, saying no as often as needed, having a schedule, and planning help me avoid stress. As a very DIY spirited entrepreneur, I constantly have to fight the temptation to just do it myself, and as a person who really likes to do what I feel like doing when I feel like doing it, I have to fight the urge to float through my days working on whatever catches my eye. Instead, batching days and time blocking (i.e. Mondays are for marketing & meetings, Tuesdays are for client work, Wednesdays are for editing & writing, Thursdays for content creation, Fridays are for finance, Saturday is for family, and Sunday is for weekly food prep, etc...) helps keep me on track. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Meditation is my not-so-secret weapon. And exercise. And sleep. If Im meditating, sleeping at least 7 hours a night, and getting my work-outs in, I can field whatever stress comes my way with reasonable grace. And it does come. I also find the simple belief that everything happens for a good reason calms down the stresses of life, big and small. Whether Im stuck at a red light when Im running late, or I didnt get something I thought I wanted, this belief frames it as a blessing. I choose to believe the universe knows better than I do what should happen and when. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic! I immediately start sucking on cloves of garlic. More than 50% of the time this knocks it out. It smells strong, but hey, it works! It has antibiotic properties (they called it Russian Penicillin during the war!), and it can kill bugs. I also start drinking a lot of herbal tea. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This may sound strange to say, but I dont believe in work life balance. Balance implies everything has equal weight all the time. I believe in boundaries, but not balance. I dont believe anything great was ever created meting out time to it in a stingy way. Passion is going all in. Its long days and late nights. Its a pendulum swing. Whats important to me is not living these perfectly balanced days where everything gets equal weight, but rather in knowing when to swing back. You have to define your non-negotiables, and then the rest of your time is fair game. My non-negotiables are my weekly workouts, morning routine (though I shorten it as needed depending on the day), and an hour or so at the end of the day to cuddle and connect with my family. When Im in a season of intense work, say launching something new or writing a book, people know they will see less of me. I will spend less time on other things. And when I need a break or when its complete, I will just the same pour myself all into to rest and enjoying the people I love. Its about knowing your own limits, setting boundaries so that the priority gets to be the priority, pushing it to the boundary, and then stepping back when its time. Thats my approach. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself. When you truly, fully grasp that if you dont take care of yourself all the other things you want will forever remain out of your grasp, then it becomes really easy to stay motivated and prioritize yourself. We all have different goals and dreams, but what most people have in common is that they quite simply want to be happy. You can make seven figures and be perfectly miserable if you dont take care of yourself. Its the foundation the rest is built on. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Working out, specifically weight training. I have spent my entire life avoiding exercise. I always really hated it, and it felt like a waste of time when I could be working. Which was so silly! It gives me more energy, better focus, elevates my mood, and helps me make better food choices because when you make one good choice it becomes easier to make others. Also, full disclosure, it really helps with libido! As a woman who is crazy about her husband but definitely suffered from sloth like tendencies post baby, this has been awesome! Intimacy is such a priority for me, and working out has totally reenergized our relationship. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Ha! Story of my life. Honestly, I lean into it. What those periods mean, usually, is that Im burnt out or theres some big issue in my life or business that isnt working, and Im not dealing with it. In those periods, I let myself rest. And I take a look at whats not working, and I try to develop a solution. If Im simply burnt out, a good rest will leave me totally inspired. And if theres something that isnt working in my life or business, taking time to figure it out becomes the priority. Once the problem is solved, motivation and inspiration return. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Tools of Titans, The One Thing, and Essentialism are all books that deeply influenced my routines and my general philosophy on life. While largely geared towards entrepreneurs, I think their principles can apply to anyone. Knowledge -- Your home birth story was incredibly inspiring and touching. How did you come to the decision to have a natural home birth? Do you have any resources to recommend to future parents thinking of doing the same? Well, Id actually planned to give birth at the hospital for the majority of my pregnancy. I decided to have a home birth weeks before she was due! It was kind of crazy. In the process of writing my birth plan, I realized how against the grain I was going for a hospital birth by simply wanting no medication or unnecessary medical interventions. I didnt want to be swimming upstream while doing the hardest thing I would ever do. If someone is thinking about doing the same, I would say do a lot of research on the quality of midwifery care in your area. Not every area of the world is created equally when it comes to available care. The Farm Midwifery Center has lots of great resources for people considering the option! -- Do you have any tips for surviving or minimizing jetlag, and for dealing with a jetlagged baby? I actually have a whole blog post on traveling with baby! If you are traveling across many, many time zones and its at all possible, build a few extra days into your schedule to take it easy and recover from jetlag. When she was under one year old, we took turns getting up with her those first few nights, and tried to keep her awake as long as possible near bed time. And while I know a lot of people might not be comfortable with this, once she was over one year old we gave her a small, weight appropriate dose of benadryl the first two to three nights to help reset her clock. It was an amazing life saving discovery that our pediatrician approved, and we felt comfortable with after lots and lots of research. If you dont want to do that, you can try melatonin or herbal remedies like No Jet Lag. In the end whether you use anything or not, the baby adjusts much quicker than the adults in my experience! -- Youve masterfully created your own brand, and your photography style is instantly recognizable, yet weve read that you are completely self-taught. What was your path to building such a successful lifestyle brand? What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out? Oh man! I have WAY too much to say about this. Im writing e-courses for 2018 that deal with this very topic. So! My path was to embrace the public learning curve. I didnt wait until I had it all figured out to start. I just started, and I got better as I went along. The better I got, the more readers and opportunities I had. There was no overnight success. There was passion, hard work, and showing up everyday for years. I have ALWAYS focused on two things above all else: content and relationships. I dont deal in mediocre and always strive to produce the best content I possibly can, and I aim to treat everyone I come in contact with love and respect. Those are the foundations, in my estimation, of any successful enterprise. The advice I would give to someone starting out, the short version, is this: First, you need to figure out what youre passionate about and be super specific, start with one thing. For me, that was cooking. You can branch out into other niches later, but start with one. Then you need to figure out the core values of your brand. For instance beauty, mindfulness, and authenticity are some of the core values of Local Milk. This is going to set the tone for all that you do. The next thing, the most important thing, you need to figure out is who youre talking to. Who is you dream customer, client, audience? What do they love? What are their hopes, dreams, fears, struggles? How can you make their lives better? This is where youll get ideas for content, revenue streams, copywriting, and everything. Its so important. You cant skip it. You cant hit a target you arent aiming for, and you need to know what your target audience looks like (eg: is it magazine editors or stay at home moms? or both? why?) and responds to before you go on to create your brand. I could keep going! But Ill leave the nitty gritty details for the e-course! The biggest advice I can give is: Just start! There is ALWAYS room at the top, and NO ONE starts there. -- You are a true believer in the fact that a dream life and dream job is achievable for anyone, even those at their lowest point. Can you tell us a bit more about how you were able to come to this realization? Well, Im living proof, so its an easy thing for me to believe. I spent the first decade of my adult life in the throes of bipolar and drug addiction. Im a high school AND college drop out. I started this business when I was 29 on VERY little money. The only thing Id ever done before this was wait tables. I had to heal myself before I could start this journey, but once I did that, I didnt quit, and I didnt look down. Every small win felt like a huge win to me. I was grateful for the first $20 I was ever paid for a photo. And to be honest, it was probably only worth $20. I have the unshakeable belief that if you work hard at something youre truly passionate about, you cannot fail. But you have to work hard. And you have to be passionate, you have to love it. Before you can do any of it, however, you must take care of yourself spiritually and physically. That was the key to all of my success. Ten years of failure because I could not and would not take care of myself. Once I started, it all just flowed. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? In no particular order: sailing anywhere with clear blue water, Netflix and chill with my husband, and playing Warcraft. Haha! I try to make it to the sea at least once a year, and I love to hang out with my husband doing anything or nothing. When work is done for the day, I like to relax with a good series. And Warcraft is my secret pleasure. Especially when Im really burnt out, and I just need to get away”. I absolutely love video games, specifically WoW, and while I cant play full time anymore, whenever Im taking one of those breaks from work to rejuvenate, Ill get on there for a few days. Im hoping to find time soon to play! Its great because it has NOTHING to do with work. And when you have a lifestyle brand, EVERYTHING can be turned into work! But I think its safe to say the World of Warcraft remains and always will remain firmly off brand! -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Nabokovs Lolita (topic notwithstanding its some of the best writing in the world) Song/­­Album – Songs of Leonard Cohen Movie – The Empire Strikes Back (its my favorite movie, so you know...it sure feeds my soul!) Piece of Art – anything by Cy Twombly -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are a few essential objects that would be in yours? This is actually labeled my minimalist packing list in my evernotes! camera laptop external hard drive phone earphones passport/­­visas wallet medicine dry shampoo brush Cosmetics aesop face wash + exfoliant thayers rose tonic deodorant toothbrush + paste underwear black boots blockshop scarf sunglasses 1 oversized necklace 1 pair earrings 1 hat 2 trousers 2 elizabeth suzann linen tunics 1 over sized sweater 1 silk shift dress 1 pair black tights lauren manoogian capote coat socks -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Heidi Swanson, Jenna Kutcher, Alison Wu, and Melyssa Griffin are my current woman crushes. Photos by Beth Kirby. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes

January 1 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes Lauren Haynes is a folk herbalist, medicine maker, plant enthusiast, and the founder of Wooden Spoon Herbs, a small apothecary line based in the Appalachian mountains. Take a look at Lauren’s shop offerings, and you’ll be immersed in a world of plant-powered tinctures, salves, oxymels, and teas, each one more magical than the other. In this interview, Lauren tells us about self-care as a form of self-respect, kindness as a form of beauty, her favorite plants for stress, beauty, and colds (and more!), the importance of sourcing her ingredients locally and working with what’s available, as well as exercise, sustenance, inspiration, procrastination, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Oh, open and free, absolutely. Since I work from home, things end up being pretty routine: tea, emails, breakfast. But if I have my way I love to see how the day unfolds uninhibited. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Most mornings start with a hot tea or something creamy with raw milk and occasionally marshmallows. I check and return emails first thing, then Ill meditate and make some breakfast and get to work. On lazier mornings well go into the small town nearby and eat eggs benedict and read the paper. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My new favorite nighttime tool is the Flux app for my computer. It gradually turns your screen from blue light to orange with the arc of the day, so the blue light doesnt deter melatonin production come bedtime. Other than that, just reading a great book until my eyes get tired. Living out in the county where its dark and quiet helps me sleep soundly every night. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – smoked salmon omelette with sauteéd greens Lunch – egg salad sandwich with a bowl of good soup Snack – fruit or hummus or a little chocolate Dinner – soul food: pinto beans, cornbread, a baked sweet potato and collard greens, topped with hot sauce and ferments and a slice of blue cheese -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink tea most mornings. Sometimes matcha or Earl Grey, or sometimes just ginger and lemon balm, to ground and calm myself before a hectic day. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Um... yes, check. I have a major sweet tooth and Lilys stevia-sweetened chocolate bars save my life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Right now my regimen includes fish oil, Mothers Best beef liver pills, a tincture of medicinal mushrooms, and evening primrose oil. I also love using lymphatic herbs steeped in vinegar throughout the year. Every spring I steep whatever edible herbs are coming up naturally in raw apple cider vinegar: plantain, violet leaf, dead nettle, dandelion greens, chickweed and cleavers. That lasts me all year and keeps me feeling vital, just a spoonful a day. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I try to exercise but if I have a full schedule its the first thing I cut out. I live on a tract of wilderness, so walking a few miles a day is super easy and I do that interspersed with yoga when Im feeling too tired to get outside. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? A little bit of both! Its definitely hard to make the time for it since I work from home and just go, go, go. I definitely find walking in the woods pleasurable, so that keeps me motivated to exercise. I cant even imagine going to a gym... Maybe someday. Exercise is something Im starting to get excited about. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? True beauty is when someone makes you feel like your soul is illuminated by the way that they treat you. Thats what is beautiful to me. If I want external beauty, Ill just scroll Instagram for a bit, you know? But true kindness is actual beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Laidback is how I would describe my skincare routine. See also: erratic. I use a rosewater and witch hazel toner daily (Poppy & Someday), followed by a blend of rosehip and carrot seed oil (Zizia Botanicals). Sometimes I use a gentle rose quartz scrub on my face (Aquarian Soul), followed by oil cleansing, but usually Im pretty lowkey. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! Nettle and alfalfa infusions, and also evening primrose oil internally. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Drink tons of water, sleep as much as you can, and wear red lipstick. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Consistent routines are hard for me, but I am constantly checking in to make sure I dont get overwhelmed by stress, even if that means five minutes of yoga in the middle of the day. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I really love regular acupuncture treatments and massage, as well as daily meditation and moxibustion. Calming teas that ease tension, like ginger and chamomile. Also just goofing off as much as I can get away with. You cant be silly and stressed at the same time. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? My first line of defense is a few dropperfuls of fire cider. I make one called Sunshine Cider with turmeric and rosehips, but my friend Gretchen made me some with habanero peppers and that always helps me stay on the right side of health. Fire cider, a shot of elderberry syrup and then some red root tincture, an amazing lymphatic herb that relieves a sore throat. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely bleed together, as I work from home and run my business with my partner. I try to take the weekends off and get out of the house daily to break up the work mode, even if its just a drive to the post office. Luckily, I love my work because its a huge part of my life. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Honestly, mindfulness is key. Just checking in with myself constantly to see how Im feeling, why Im feeling that way and what I need. I just take little tea or chocolate breaks or go put some sun on my face or make a nourishing meal. A hot shower if Im feeling cold. Self massage if Im feeling anxious. Shutting the computer if Im getting tired. And making time for the little things that make me happy, like reading a book. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Cleaning up my diet was key for me in resolving a lot of health issues. In college I was just eating garbage and drinking alcohol and doing all the teenage things. Once I realized that youre literally what you eat, and started treating my body with respect, a lot shifted for me. I really feel like that small change helped align me with the path Im on now, which is 100% what Im supposed to be doing. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Im usually brimming with ideas and running myself ragged trying to make them all happen, so if I struggle with anything its occasional procrastination. Usually this looks like doing the easier things on my to-do list before the hard-hitting work chores, which isnt such a bad thing. I just kind of let myself have some slower times, because I work really hard. I may sip tea and pull tarot cards and then eventually get a burst of energy. Or sometimes I do nothing for like two full days. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So, so many. I love The Gift of Healing Herbs by Robin Rose Bennett and Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz, as well as so many books from the 70s by obscure hippies and natural living advocates. Living on the Earth by Alicia Bay Laurel, for example. Knowledge -- What was your path to studying herbology and founding Wooden Spoon Herbs? I came to herbs when looking for a path to self-sufficiency. I romanticized living off the land, providing all that I would need for myself through my connection to the earth. And thats basically how it happened. I got all the books I could find about herbalism, read them, and started making herbal remedies. I started selling them slowly and it just kind of took off. Then I got to put my business hat on and thats been such a rewarding challenge. -- Can you talk a little bit about your decision to work only with herbs native to your home region of Appalachia? Theres so much to say about this. When I started opening my eyes to the bounty that surrounded me, it struck me as absurd to order herbs from suppliers that sourced from the far corners of the earth, when we had so many of the same herbs that could be sourced from the bioregion of Appalachia. For example, why am I going to order nettle that comes from Croatia when my friend has an acre of it on her farm? And no offense to Croatia or the herbalists that use those sources, but it just wasnt for me. I saw the opportunity to create a righteous supply chain and source from local farmers and forage my materials. To this day I still source directly from small organic farms around the country. Appalachias medicinal herbs are legendary: ginseng, goldenseal, bloodroot. People from all over the world use these herbs exclusively. And many of the herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine grow in Appalachia, because when the continents were Pangea parts of what is now China and parts of Appalachia were the same land. The geography of these regions is still very similar, and that is really special. So I wanted to learn about these plants for myself, because they are my neighbors and we share the same space. Not to mention that my family has been on this land for at least five generations, probably more. Its my most recent ancestral tradition, and I think its really important to learn about the traditions of your own ancestors so that youre not co-opting someone elses. Our pasts are precious. Finally, I believe in slow, local medicine for the same reasons I believe in slow, local foods – because theyre more potent and they taste better. -- What are some of your best-selling products and what herbs is your customer most excited about at the moment? My bestsellers are the Anxiety Ally, Brain Tonic, Moontime Magic and Migraine Melter tinctures. Elderberry Sumac Syrup is always a hit, as well as the Golden Cocoa (adaptogenic golden milk meets hot chocolate). I also have some new, more esoteric offerings based on the elements, and the Spirit one has been selling really well. I think my customers are just always after herbs that ground and expand the spirit, which is super beautiful. That and herbs for stress, always. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment?  Podcasts! All the podcasts: Medicine Stories, Thats So Retrograde, So You Wanna Be A Witch, Being Boss. That and the color cobalt blue. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love seeking out hot springs, getting massages and acupuncture, going to the movies with my partner and eating at good restaurants. In the summer, swimming in the river behind my house and lying in the sun. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Caravan by Stephen Gaskin Song/­­Album – Tried So Hard by Gene Clark Piece of art – the entire Motherpeace tarot deck -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? My favorite mohair cardigan, a striped shirt, high-waisted leggings and denim, Poppy & Somedays Gypsy Rose Toner, whatever books Im reading, a notebook and Uniball pen, magazines, calming tinctures, bagged tea, thermos, Ricardo Medina botines, charcoal toothbrush -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jess Fuery, Beatrice Valenzuela, Shiva Rose, the founders of Cap Beauty, Ashley Neese, Connie Matisse of East Fork Pottery, jeweler Annika Kaplan, Erica Chidi Cohen, Rachel Craven, Beth Kirby of Local Milk, Rachel Budde of Fat and the Moon, Kristen Dilley of Nightingale Acupuncture, and, naturally, Ilana Glazer Photos by Beth Kirby and Lauren Haynes You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff

December 10 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Sasha Swerdloff is a Certified Ayurvedic Consultant and blogger at Tending the Table, where she shares plant-based recipes and writes about sustainability, health, and wellness. We love Sasha’s thoughtful approach to cooking, breathtaking photography, and Ayurvedic advice. In this interview, Sasha tells us about her morning, bedtime and exercise routines, as well as self-care as a type of non-violence, addressing the root cause of health-related imbalances, the breathing technique she uses during stressful times, skincare, nourishment, yoga, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Routine is super important for me. Without it I tend to feel scattered, flustered and irritable. I think this has a lot to do with my constitution. I know that I tend to struggle with uncertainty so having a routine makes me feel a little more in control and a little less terrified. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I usually wake up around 7am, do my morning stuff (scrape my tongue, do neti, wash my face etc.) then try to drink a big mug of hot lemon water. I like to listen to NPR and snuggle on the couch with my pups while I drink my morning matcha latte. Then I do yoga before making breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Ive struggled with insomnia a fair amount but paying attention to my stress level and having a solid bedtime routine has helped a lot. A hot bath and self massage with plenty of herbal oil especially on my head works wonders. I also really love sipping on some warm almond milk with spices before bed. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast - Sautéed greens, a fried egg from the chicken ladies in the backyard, and sourdough toast. Lunch - Soup or a big bowl of roasted veggies with some sort of cooked grain, some protein, and a half an avocado. Snack - Apple and almond butter Dinner - Soup, roasted veggies, salads, veggie tacos with beans, roasted sweet potato, cabbage slaw and avocado. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Ive never been able to drink coffee or black tea without getting super jittery but it took me years to finally listen to what my body was telling me. Instead of coffee I drink a matcha latte with almond milk and raw honey every morning. --  Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Not having sweet stuff around is the only way to stop me from eating a whole bar of chocolate or way too many cookies. --  Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Im not a fan of taking lots of herbs or supplements for long periods of time. Its easy to take a pill but its a lot harder to address the root cause of an issue and make diet and lifestyle changes to address that imbalance. In the long term though, addressing the root cause through diet and lifestyle is a whole lot more affordable and leads to long term results. I do take Ashwagandha and Vit D regularly to support my nervous system and to keep me sane through the dark winters here in Seattle. Exercise --  Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I try to practice at least an hour of yoga daily. I also walk a fair amount and jog every once in a while. In the winter I cross country ski as much as I can. Ive noticed that the forms of exercise I enjoy most incorporate some sort of rhythmic, repetitive motion which I find to be super calming and meditative. Also, any time I can get outside Im happy. --  Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Both. There are days when I dont exercise or get outside but I try to not beat myself up about it. Its too easy to get into a pattern of negativity and its much more beneficial long term to practice having compassion for yourself. The things that motivate me to get on my mat each day are my physical and mental health, someone else (my husband) holding me accountable, and the respect and admiration I have for my yoga teacher and the Ashtanga lineage. Beauty --  What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Confidence is beautiful to me. I feel more beautiful when I stand up straight and hold my head high. Im slowly learning that its less about how I look and more about how I feel. --  What is your skincare approach – face and body? My skin has always been sensitive and problematic and Ive always had negative body image issues associated with it. Im finally starting to get a handle on it by going off of hormonal birth control and eliminating sugar and dairy. I also have a pretty strict routine that helps keep my skin free from breakouts. In the morning I wash my face with warm water and moisturize with January Labs Revitalizing Day Cream or Osmia Organics Purely Simple Face Cream . In the evening I cleanse and exfoliate with Beauty Counters Charcoal Cleansing Bar and the Clarisonic skin brush then moisturize with grapeseed oil and Living Libations Dew Dab which helps prevent breakouts and combat hyper pigmentation. In the summer I spritz my face with rose water to help me cool down. --  Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I started taking a zinc supplement a few months ago for my skin and it has helped a ton. Overall though, I notice that cutting out sugar and dairy from my diet makes the biggest difference. --  Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Like I said before, for me, diet makes a huge difference. But I also love my Clarisonic skin brush. It seems like a weird gadget but it has made all the difference for me. Stress, etc. --  If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Making sure not to get too over stimulated or overcommitted helps me stay grounded but if I do get spun out I practice Nadi shodhana breathing and take some Anxiety Soother to take the edge off. I also like to do Yoga Nidra . Getting some fresh air and planting my feet on the ground or pulling out the watercolors always helps too. --  What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I usually mega dose on Echinacea and Sambu Guard then take a hot bath and bundle up. I also try to slow down since for me, colds are often the result of stress. If I slow down my body can usually heal itself. Motivation --  Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I like to think about yoga philosophy and the eight limbs. The first limb is yama. The yamas are a set of five precepts that help us interact with the world in an ethical manner. The first yama is ahimsa or non-violence. This means non-violence towards all living things, including ourselves,  in thoughts, words and actions. For me self-care is a type of non-violence towards my physical and mental being. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I take a break from whatever it is that Im struggling with and do something else to clear my mind. Knowledge --  What was your path to studying Ayurveda and yoga and how do you incorporate that knowledge into your everyday?  I first learned about Ayurveda from my yoga teacher, Christine Hoar . I had been practicing yoga with her for a year or so and was struggling with some health problems so decided to do an Ayurvedic consultation with her to see what she could recommend. Her simple diet and lifestyle recommendations completely changed things for me. I felt like all of a sudden, all of the issues I had struggled with throughout my life made sense and fit into a bigger picture of who I am. I continued studying Ayurveda with Christine and then after college completed an Ayurvedic Certification program and Kripalu. For me, Ayurveda provides a framework from which to view the world and my place in it. Im constantly thinking about the qualities of the foods I eat and the things I do or experience from an Ayurvedic perspective. Ayurveda helps me understand and take control of my health. --  Do you practice a certain type of yoga, and why did you choose that particular branch?  I practice Ashtanga Yoga. I sort of stumbled into it. A college friend told me about a summer special at a nearby studio and suggested I sign up. I did and I went to class there every day for a month. After the month was up I just kept going. I was hooked. I think a big part of why Ive stuck with Ashtanga is because of my teacher. Shes pretty incredible and has been a huge influence in my life. The method of Ashtanga also really resonates with me. I enjoy the repetition, the meditative quality of the breath, the focus and concentration required, the rigor of it and the tradition. --  Do you have any recommendations for someone who wants to establish a daily yoga practice but doesnt know where to begin? Find a teacher you connect with. Finding the motivation to practice on your own is challenging but if you have a teacher you admire and respect and a community of fellow students who are counting on you, youll show up every day. --  Your recipes are so beautiful, approachable and inventive. What is your process when it comes to developing recipes? Thank you! Sometimes Im inspired by meals Ive had while travelling but mostly I draw inspiration from whatever produce I have on hand. I love combining flavors and experimenting with spices and herbs to elevate something simple and make it unique. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Im excited to be incorporating more Ayurveda and wellness themes into my work. Its a big part of my life and I want to share it with others so they can feel empowered to heal themselves. Ill be teaching my first Ayurvedic workshop in the Spring here in Seattle which should be a lot of fun. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love a good pedicure or a trip to the Korean spa for a soak and body scrub. But more often I find myself going for a walk or taking myself out to tea if I need a boost. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book - Mary Oliver New and Selected Poems Song/­­Album - No Hard Feelings The Avett Brothers Piece of Art -  Satsuki Shibuya -- What are your favorite places to eat in Seattle? We dont eat out all that often, but when we do we usually head to Delancey , Seawolf , The Whale Wins or Frankie and Jos . -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? -Earplugs – Anxiety Soother -A headlamp -Licorice tea -A big scarf – Lip balm -A snack (always) -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jessie Snyder of Faring Well Photos by Sasha Swerdloff and Renee Byrd You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips

November 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips Lacy Phillips is an LA-based manifestation advisor and founder of the blog Free & Native, an amazing resource for all things to do with emotional and physical wellbeing. Lacy’s manifestation approach is truly unique and rooted in psychology just as much as it’s based on spirituality. With her clients, she focuses on pinpointing the true self, which ultimately leads to the discovery of one’s personal freedom. We’ve been reading Free & Native for years, and it’s opened our eyes to so many new ideas – from the concept of self-worth, to the recipe for the nettle and raspberry leaf infusion that helps our hair grow like crazy. In this interview, Lacy tells us about her favorite transformative supplement as of late, her number one cold cure, exercising smart not hard, as well as her morning and bedtime routines, her approach to beauty and stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I LOVE routine. But when I have a free day, I’ll only schedule one or two things tops because I love the freedom to do whatever I want or process in my head all day alone. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. My mornings are pretty much the same. Right now, when I wake up, I sip my Chinese herbs, bone broth with gelatin, and then I have breakfast (always within an hour of waking because I’ve suffered from endocrine and blood sugar issues). That usually looks like sprouted GF oatmeal with honey and almond butter – something that I could NEVER do in the past until I had some massive healing on my endocrine and blood sugar issues, for I would have had to have animal protein to keep my blood sugar stable. It was quite a fete when I didn’t need to do that anymore. I credit all of this to my healer Anthony Cahill in LA. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes, as you’re probably gathering my endocrine and hormones are very sensitive. So a rule that I had to implement in our house is no screens in the bedroom after 9p. And all screens are always on F.lux or “nighttime mode” to do away with blue light, which was severely messing with my melatonin production. Instead, I light beeswax candles in the room to suggest that red/­­orange sunset light that produces melatonin. Nightly I also practice Haley Wood’s nighttime intuitive cleansing and lymph massage technique. And I’ll usually take some time out to get quiet and grateful for the day. I’m religious about my sleep cycle which is 10p-6a. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Sprouted oatmeal or a scramble with ferments or leftovers Lunch – Leftovers or I’ve gotten terrible at ordering lunch and dinner lately which usually consists of Honey Hi, Cafe Gratitude, Dune, Botanica, Sage Bistro… Snack – Usually a smoothie in the summer or a tonic in the winter -- Do you partake in caffeine? Because of my adrenals, I had to kiss caffeine goodbye four years ago. Along with cacao and sugar. I know, what’s the point of living? Thank God for bananas and avocado. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I do when I’m extra estrogenic (estrogen dominant), which is typical for those with endocrine issues. I’m pretty good about getting that balanced now, but I can always tell when I’ve gone too estrogenic because I get very anxious and I crave a lot of sugar. Due to giving up sugar, for me, a treat is usually a date with almond butter or a smoothie. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful to your energy level and general wellness? Oh man, it’s long. So I drink three teas a day from raw herbs prescribed to me by my acupuncturist Dr. Dao, and a supplement that has been transformative for me lately is Gold Genesis which Shiva Rose gifted me. Those are the two universal ones that can benefit everyone. However, the others are genuinely tailored to my issues based on blood work. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do. Three times a week I do HIIT, cardio three days a week, and I’m just now starting to do pilates and yoga again. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset to keep up with it?  I do. But I don’t kill myself with it. I can only exercise 20 mins a day, or I tax my adrenals, so I’m very gentle with all of them. I’m all for exercise smart, not hard. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Completely internal. In my work with my clients, it’s all about raising your subconscious worth to project magnetism. There is indeed nothing more radiant or prosperous. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Uncomplicated and hypernatural! Less is more. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Absolutely! My hair started growing like crack when I began swapping water for nettle herbal infusions in search of all of those bio-available minerals and vitamins. Herbal infusions, to me, are a real beauty secret that not enough people do! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. It’s interesting. I grew up with a mom that is very tough, androgynous and Irish. She washes her face once a week with Ivory soap. Skincare wasn’t something I was taught. I had to go out and learn. I think I’ve tried it all in the wellness realm now, and I do have to say that since my skin is extra dry two factors have been transformative: cleansing with oil and using a washcloth to wipe it off, which also exfoliates. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines to avoid stress? The BIGGEST is Vedic Meditation twice a day, which I learned from Jac of The Broad Place. Second is the reprogramming techniques that I teach my clients and community. Third has been Gold Genesis as it’s loaded with adaptogens. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Saying no to outside events or invitations so that I can be alone to gather my energy and ground. A lot of inward moments. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The truth – which works every single time – the moment I feel even the slightest, I do a coffee enema, then I hop right in bed and rest. Without fail, I always wake up the next morning healthy since I flushed the liver and drained the lymph. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I do. I’m getting MUCH better at it. This next year, I’m cutting back immensely on one-on-one energy and making my offerings more accessible to everyone through new digital options which are much more affordable. Such as my UNBLOCKED classes and my entire Manifestation Formula and Reprogramming Video Workshop launching in mid-December. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Well, a lot of it has to do with my Manifestation work. So much of that is welcoming our darkness, looking at the patterns showing up in our lives, using it as a map to get into our subconscious limiting beliefs, and shifting those to get closer to our authentic essence which is our genuinely magnetic state. I’m the person that’s like, Oh wow, I’m so excited that these “issues” are showing up. Because I know exactly what to do with them and how they will turn into magnificent opportunities that connect me with what I’m calling in. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Working for myself. Only saying yes to what feels right. It’s what creates balance for me. And it took me a loooooonnnnggg time to get here. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I get out in the world and find it again. At galleries, in garments, weaves, cinema, literature… There’s more than I can consume in this lifetime. Always something. And I pull from it all. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Life experiences. They are what allowed me to discover my manifestation formula, which is hinged on self-worth = your manifestation. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting Free & Native and creating your manifestation formula? They were rather parallel. At the same time I said I’d never work for another person again, was the exact year that I threw away all of the superstitions that I head learned through New Age manifestation culture (and I had explored it all). I realized I was an incredible manifestor but never in the ways that those books and teachings suggested. And I also realized that I was worth more than I was being treated in previous jobs. I tossed them both away and decided to follow and note what works for me when. And here we are today. -- In your practice, you put a lot of emphasis on raising one’s self-worth and expanding beliefs. Why are those such key points in your formula? I realized that anytime I wouldn’t accept being small anymore, and then I wouldn’t settle for the small opportunities coming in after, while doing work on myself, bam my manifestations would come through. It all finally channeled through to me. The entire process. And I finally realized that The Universe’s only intention for us is to grow into our whole, authentic selves. Everything it does or gives us, good or bad, is to keep us on that trajectory. The gift that I realized I have is channeling those messages, and my claircognizance ability to spot energetic patterns. The third gift I have is taking the abstractness of energetic patterns and boiling them down into actionable steps and work. And now after helping hundreds of people and seeing result after result, I realized why I had to suffer through loads of superstitions and life-struggles. -- You seem to seamlessly marry psychology and spirituality in your work. Can you speak a bit about how you are able to achieve this balance? Absolutely. I always say manifestation is very easy; we’re complicated. We manifest from our subconscious beliefs rather than our thoughts. I always joke in my workshops by saying, “if only we were that powerful (manifesting from our thoughts). We think in such polarity all day long; our lives would look like a shit show.” Psychology is a means to our subconscious. Accessing it and shifting it. -- Are there any books that you recommend that are in line with your manifestation formula? I wish there was! This is a question I get all the time. In fact, I never intended to write a book, but I’m having to now as it just simply doesn’t exist. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Watch TV shows. We are avid show bingers. It’s one of the only ways that I can thoroughly check out as I’m so Aquarius and vata. I just transport to another world and completely disconnect with all the pressure I’m responsible for in this one. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Right now… Book – The Awakened Family Song/­­Album – Alice Coltrane, “Om Shanti” Movie – Lady Bird Art – Ryan Snow -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? A cozy wool sweater, boots, jeans, Gold Genesis, eye mask, and a book. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Shiva Rose and Meredith Baird. Photos courtesy of Free & Native and Serafina LoGiacco. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Miso Caramel Popcorn

December 18 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Miso Caramel Popcorn This popcorn is the treat I’ll be gifting my friends and bringing to holiday parties this coming week. After spending some time contemplating the bags of caramel popcorn for sale at the grocery store, I became curious about making it at home. After a few trials, I’m pleased to say that it’s quite easy and satisfying to put together on your own, delicious and – I have to warn you – extremely addictive. The caramel here is on the healthier side of the spectrum, made with coconut milk and coconut sugar instead of butter/­­regular sugar, and the addition of miso adds a nice, salty hint to contrast all the sweetness. If you’ve never made stovetop popcorn before, we’ve got some tips to help you through the process in the recipe. There are some weekend links after the jump. Stay warm this Sunday :) Fire Cider – this recipe from Kimberley of The Year in Food looks amazing, going to give it a shot to keep the bugs at bay Chyawanprash – just ordered this Ayurvedic herbal jam that stimulates the metabolism, aids digestion and helps strengthen the body in face of stress. So curious to try it out! Has anyone had it before? Interview with Nahvae Frost on Local Creatives – can’t wait to visit her cafe Durga Chew-Bose’s Twitter – captivated with this writer’s words The Well Woman – new instagram crush McKel Hill on Chris Ducker’s podcast – stripping back a personal brand success story Miso Caramel Popcorn   Print Serves: 12-15 cups Ingredients for the miso caramel 1 can full fat usweetened Thai coconut milk 1/­­2 cup coconut sugar 1 tablespoon neutral extra virgin coconut oil 2 teaspoons vanilla extract (optional) 1 tablespoon sweet miso paste for the caramel popcorn 1½ tablespoons coconut oil ½-3/­­4 cup popcorn kernels (see note) miso caramel (from above) 2 tablespoons chopped dark chocolate (optional) Instructions to make the miso caramel Combine coconut milk and coconut sugar in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for about 30 minutes, stirring, until thickened to a caramel consistency. Remove from heat and whisk in coconut oil, vanilla extract and miso paste, until smooth and well combined. to make the caramel popcorn Warm a large, heavy bottomed pot (pot must have a tight fitting lid) over high heat. Add coconut oil and let it melt and heat up for about 30 seconds. Drop in 3 popcorn kernels to test the heat and shake the pot a bit to cover them with oil. Once those kernels pop, your oil is hot enough and you are ready to add all the popcorn kernels. After adding all the kernels to the pot, cover it with a lid and begin moving the pot back and forth over the burner, to ensure that all the kernels are being covered with oil and to keep them from burning. Once you hear that the popcorn has started popping, turn down the heat to medium low and keep moving/­­shaking the pot quickly. Youll know that all/­­most of the kernels have popped when you hear the popping slow down - once there are about 5 seconds between each pop, remove the pot from the heat, your popcorn is ready. If you smell any burning at any point, remove the pot from the heat. Preheat oven to 250° F (120° C). Place two oven racks in the top and bottom third of the oven. Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking trays. Pour caramel into the pot with the popcorn, a little bit at a time, mixing it in every time. If possible, have someone help you - one person can pour and the other can mix. Immediately distribute the popcorn between the two baking trays in a single, even layer. Place in the oven and bake for about 1 hour, mixing every 15 minutes, until caramel is candied. Once popcorn is ready, optionally sprinkle the chopped dark chocolate over one of the trays of popcorn while its still hot and mix to coat to make chocolate caramel popcorn. Keep the popcorn in an airtight container or distribute between paper bags for gifts. Notes 1. The amount of popcorn kernels you use depends on what kind of popcorn you want. If you want popcorn thats completely covered in caramel (like the second photo in this post), use ½ cup kernels. If you want popcorn with bits of caramel here and there, with some white still showing (like the first photo in this post), go for the ¾ cup. 2. Caramel popcorn technique adapted from The Kitchn. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Welcome Spring Raw Cake from Karolina Eleonóra Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Miso Caramel Popcorn appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry

October 31 2016 Meatless Monday 

Green beans, bell peppers and chunks of pumpkin are seasoned sweet and spicy with chilis, curry paste and coconut water. Kaffir lime leaves and Thai basils herbal notes add depth to the flavor of this curry, finished off with a bright squeeze of lime. This recipe comes to us from Ashley of Ashleyz Sprout. Serves 4 - 2 tablespoons canola oil - 3 tablespoons red or yellow curry paste* - 1-2 Thai chilis*, minced - 1 can coconut water* - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons sugar - 3 kaffir lime leaves* - 1/­­2 cup green beans, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1/­­4 cup bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1/­­4 cup Fresno peppers, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1/­­2 8 ounce block extra-firm tofu, cubed - 3/­­4 cup pumpkin, peeled and cubed - 1 cup low sodium vegetable broth - 1/­­2 cup Thai basil leaves* - 1 lime, cut into wedges *Found in Asian markets or the Asian section of some grocery stores. Place the oil into a large wok over medium-high heat. Season with the curry paste and Thai chilis. Cook for 1-2 minutes, or until the spices become fragrant. Whisk the coconut water, sugar and lime leaves into the wok. Cook for 2-3 minutes more. Add the green beans, bell peppers, Fresno peppers, tofu, pumpkin and vegetable stock to the wok. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 25 minutes, or until the vegetables are cooked through. Add the Thai basil to the wok. Stir and remove from heat. Divide into 4 portions, top with a squeeze of lime and enjoy! The post Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca

October 12 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca This weekend, we are off to a log cabin in the Appalachian Mountains with the whole family. Our kitchen is finally being taken apart in preparation for renovations, so we’re getting away from the dust and craziness for a week while the space gets stripped. The cabin is in a pretty remote and quiet place, and the leaves are turning – all great reasons to chill, hike, meditate, and get some much needed sleep. I’ve already packed up all the ingredients for this mocha to bring on the trip, since it’s been my favorite thing to drink in the mornings, and I can’t wait to sit on the cabin porch, sipping on this cozy herbal coffee. The base for this drink is roasted chicory root, a common coffee substitute, which gives it the deep flavor and rich color. In the U.S., chicory coffee is known as New Orleans style coffee, where it became popular during the Civil War, when the importing of coffee was stalled due to blockades. Chicory is also very common throughout Europe, and I grew up in a culture, where it was highly regarded as a medicinal plant and foraged in the summer for making herbal tea. Chicory is easy to distinguish in the wild due to its bright blue flowers (pick some if it grows around you!) and is related to dandelion, so you can use Dandy Blend here if you can’t get your hands on pure chicory (Dandy Blend includes both dandelion and chicory roots). It contains no caffeine, is rich in vitamin C and has the highest concentration of inulin of all plants. When roasted and ground, chicory miraculously resembles the flavor and depth of coffee. These days, I mostly try to stay away from caffeine, so coming up with drinks that will provide some of that much-needed comfort in the morning, minus the jitters, makes me quite happy. I add raw cacao and maca powders here for an energy boost, which also contribute more wealth to the flavor and take this drink into the ‘mocha’ territory. I’m in love with this cozy sip and find myself craving it throughout the day. It’s great hot and equally as good chilled, after some time in the fridge, or even iced. We’ve accumulated quite a few interesting links, which we are sharing today. We will be back with our weekend link roundups, along with all kinds of other good stuff very soon ;) Enjoy. Inside Glossier – I find this beauty company’s no-makeup makeup strategy and image quite fascinating and inspiring, so I found this in depth article and interview with their founder very interesting How I Built This – I listen to podcasts almost every day in the kitchen, and get very excited when a new, high-quality one comes out. This one is by NPR and has a series of interviews with successful entrepreneurs about how they started their businesses. So far they’ve interviewed creators of Instagram, Vice, Spanx and more. Reluctance NY – love cool bakery instagrams like this one Sans Ceuticals Journal – a natural beauty company with a journal full of clever, health-centric recipes like lacto pickles, Buddhist lunch, vegan butter, Bloodlesss Mary, vegan berry Eton Mess and much more How the Sugar Industry Shifted Blame to Fat – this is crazy!!! Navigating the Beauty Supplement Aisle Interview with Jacqui Lewis – Vedic meditation teacher Lauren Spencer King – studio and short interview, love the photos here Eat This Food – refreshingly unique food blog design Behind the Scenes with Solange + love her new, perfectly pastel videos, one, two Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 teaspoon roasted and ground chicory root 2 soft Medjool dates - pitted 1⅓ cup boiling water 1 cup unsweetened almond milk or other plant milk 1 tablespoon raw cacao powder 2 teaspoons maca powder ½ tablespoon mesquite powder (optional) seeds of ½ vanilla bean (optional) 1 teaspoon coconut oil - if drinking hot (optional) Instructions Place chicory into a strainer or a tea bag and combine with dates in a heat-proof vessel. Pour boiling water over them and leave for 10 minutes to steep. Combine chicory coffee, dates, almond milk, cacao, maca, mesquite, vanilla, and coconut oil, if using, in an upright blender. Blend until smooth and frothy. Serve warm, chilled or over ice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Brew your own Kombucha!

July 20 2016 My New Roots 

Brew your own Kombucha! This post has literally been years in the making. After countless requests for a kombucha brewing method and recipe, I finally feel confident enough to write about such a HUGE topic. Considering the fact that there are entire books about this one subject, Ill start off by saying that I do not consider myself a kombucha-brewing expert. Although Ive brewed hundreds of liters of the stuff by now, I am still learning and just happy to share my processes and experiences with you so far. Everyone has a slightly different way of brewing and this is mine - it works perfectly for me and I hope for you too! Making kombucha, like any kitchen project seems pretty daunting until you actually do it. Once you take the first step and brew your own batch, you wont believe how simple and easy it is to make your own kombucha and be able to drink it every day of your life! Youll also wonder why you waited so long to start. With just a 20-minute time investment every 7-10 days youll have access to the most delicious, high-vibe kombucha youve ever tasted at a faction of the cost of buying from the store. Plus, if you make it yourself, it will be 100% raw and full of those precious, digestion-supporting enzymes that our diets are typically lacking, whereas commercial kombucha has often been pasteurized – a process that destroys enzymes. You can ferment it to suit your taste, make it as fizzy as you desire, and even add flavourings. How rad is that? What is Kombucha? Although kombucha is experiencing a major surge in popularity, it has actually been around for thousands of years. It is essentially sweetened tea, fermented with the help of a SCOBY, transformed into a fizzy, effervescent drink. SCOBY is an acronym, which stands for Symbiotic Culture Of Bacteria and Yeast. Its an odd-looking thing - often compared to an organ, a slippery mushroom, or a rubbery pancake - but its the essential ingredient in making the miracle beverage that is kombucha. Its flavours can range from pleasantly vinegar-y to champagne-like, with sweetness varying according to the original brew and second fermentations. Where can I get a SCOBY? Since the SCOBY duplicates every time you make kombucha, there are plenty out there in the world for free! I recommend asking at your local health food store - in my experience it seems like the place to either purchase one, or connect with someone who brews and enjoys spreading the kombucha gospel and giving their extra SCOBYs away. Alternatively, try your local Craigstlist to find a culture. You can even buy them online. Here is a worldwide source: www.kombu.de What about sugar? Yes, you need sugar to brew kombucha but that doesnt mean that youll be consuming it - its only food for the SCOBY! What starts off as very sweet tea completely transforms through the fermentation process, and that SCOBY turns all of that food into a delightful mixture of beneficial organic acids, B-vitamins, and enzymes. If its something you are concerned about, just let your kombucha ferment for the full 10 days, or longer. The longer the tea ferments the less sugar it contains. Usually by day 10 there isnt a trace left - but your tea will be rather acidic-tasting just so you know! There are a few types of sugar you can use for feeding the SCOBY, but cane sugar is the most recommended by seasoned brewers. I use the least processed form of cane sugar I can find - organic evaporated cane juice - but even the most sugar-avoiding, health-conscious people I know brew with refined white sugar. Remember: the sugar feeds the SCOBY, not you! What about caffeine? The caffeine range in kombucha is extremely broad, and is mostly dependent on the type of tea used to brew it. Black tea contains substantially more caffeine than green tea for instance, and since I am sensitive to caffeine, I always brew with green tea. In general, brewed kombucha will contain approximately 1/­­3 of the caffeine of the original tea. If black tea contains 30-80mg of caffeine per cup, the same sized up of kombucha would contain 10-25mg. Green tea kombucha may have just 2-3mg per cup. Whatever you do, do NOT use decaffeinated tea to brew kombucha. Instead, blend the black tea with green tea or simply use green tea alone. What about alcohol? Fermenting anything sweet with yeasts is going to produce booze, that is just nature! With kombucha youre looking at an average of 0.5 – 1% alcohol by volume. With home-brewing, there is always a risk of more alcohol forming since it is in an uncontrolled environment, so keep that in mind if that is a concern for you or someone you are serving it to. What are the health benefits of Kombucha? First, kombucha is a probiotic drink, so it is an excellent beverage for improving digestion, and supporting healthy bacteria in the gut. Its high enzyme content also promotes healthy digestion and nutrient assimilation. Lab tests show that kombucha has antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal properties, and the ability to improve liver function and reduce oxidative stress in the body. Many people report success in relieving their symptoms of arthritis, allergies, chronic fatigue, hypertension, metabolic disorders, and digestive issues. What I think is very exciting and promising about kombucha however, are the acids formed during fermentation. These acids have incredible detoxifying and antioxidant capabilities. Glucuronic acid, for example, is the bodys most important detoxifier and made by the oxidation of glucose. Glucuronic acid binds to toxins in the liver and flushes them out through the kidneys. It also works in conjunction with gluconic acid, which binds with heavy metals and ushers them out of our systems. Acetic acid inhibits the action of harmful bacteria. Usnic acid protects against viruses through its antibiotic properties. Malic acid helps detoxify the liver. Butyric acid is produced by the beneficial yeasts in kombucha and protects cellular membranes and combines with gluconic acid to strengthen the walls of the gut to combat harmful yeasts such as candida albicans. Of all the healthy habits Ive adopted in my life, Id say that drinking kombucha has actually made a difference in how I feel. Every time I take a sip it feels like every cell of my body is screaming YAAAAAHHHHHSSSSSS! Really and truly. To me, it is life elixir, and a fabulous drink to add to your healthy lifestyle. But I will also say that kombucha is not a panacea. The hype around this beverage has reached astronomical heights and I believe its important to consume kombucha without the expectation that its going to change your life. What works for me, may work for you and it may not. At the end of the day, kombucha is purely delicious and I think its best to enjoy it for that reason alone. Can I drink too much kombucha? Kombucha, like anything, should be enjoyed responsibly. Just as you wouldnt eat a pound of chia seeds in a sitting, nor should you drown yourself in kombucha (although it would be a delicious way to go). If you have never had kombucha before, start out with about half a cup (125ml) and work your way up over the course of a few weeks or months. I probably drink around 1-2 cups a day (250 - 500ml) but my body is used to it and I too eased into this amount. Remember: food is medicine! You never know how your body will react, so its best to take things slow with such powerful potions. Second fermentation – flavouring your brew and making your kombucha fizzy Although kombucha straight after the first fermentation is delish, I love to flvour it and make it really fizzy through a second fermentation. This involves adding a sweet substance, like fresh fruit or juice (I use unfiltered apple juice), to the bottles of brewed kombucha and letting it sit, sealed at room temperature for another couple of days instead of refrigerating it right away. This extra dose of sugar will feed the kombucha further and produce gas, which builds up inside the sealed bottle. This step is optional, but will make your kombucha really special and sparkly! Its essential that you use flip-top bottles with good seals for this step, since you want the gas to build inside the bottles at this stage. But because the pressure can be quite strong, I always recommend burping your bottles once a day until they have reached the amount of fizz youre after. Simply flip the top on the bottles and you should hear the gas escaping, which is just enough to take the pressure off - there will still be plenty of sparkle in the kombucha. If you fail to burp your bottles, you may end up with an explosion on your hands! Needless to say this is quite dangerous, so set a timer for once  day if youre a forgetful person. Taking a break from fermenting There will come a time when youll have to pause your kombucha brewing cycle – perhaps if youre traveling for a period of time, or simply feel like stopping - in which case, you need to know how to take a break. Remove the SCOBY from the jar, separate the mother and the baby and put them into the same or separate glass jars (separate if youre giving one away) with enough brewed kombucha to cover it, and seal with a plastic lid (remember that kombucha can not come into contact with metal, so stay on the safe side and use plastic). Keep this in the fridge where the temperature will slow down fermentation, and it will keep for many months. When you want to brew your new batch, remove the SCOBY from the fridge and let it come to room temperature before adding it to the sweetened and cooled tea, along with kombucha from your last batch, the SCOBY and the liquid it was stored in. If you can time it properly, its a nice to be able to bottle your last batch right before you leave so that you can put your SCOBY away at the end of a cycle. I time it so that my second fermentation ends on my travel day so that I can store my bottles in the fridge while Im gone. If it doesnt exactly line up, you can do this by increasing the first or second fermentations by a few days. Remember that if you bottle early, it will be sweeter, and if you leave it longer it will be more acidic. Some people will leave their kombucha brewing for up to a month and that may suit you, but I personally wouldnt leave mine for more than 2 weeks. If you are flexible on the taste and dont mind these flavour variations, it will be a lot easier to time your break. Whatever you do, dont start a brew right before you leave for more than a couple weeks (unless you like very vinegar-y kombucha), and definitely dont leave your second fermentation bottles out at room temperature! Youll come home to an epic mess or worse.     Print recipe     Homebrewed Kombucha Makes 1 gallon /­­ 4 liters Equipment: something to brew tea in (very large teapot or stockpot) 1 five-quart /­­ five-liter glass jar 4 one-quart /­­ one-liter flip-top glass bottles tightly woven cloth (a clean tea towel, paper towel, or many layers of cheesecloth) rubber band wooden spoon Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 210g organic, evaporated cane juice or raw sugar (you can also use refined white sugar) 2 Tbsp. loose black or green tea OR 8 tea bags (I prefer green) 4 quarts /­­ liters water 2 cups /­­ 500ml kombucha tea (from your last batch or acquired) 1 SCOBY (from your last batch or acquired) Second fermentation (optional): 3 cups /­­ 750ml fruit juice of your choice OR 1 cup chopped fresh or dried fruit Optional flavourings: fresh or dried fruit fresh ginger /­­ ginger juice fresh or dried herbs and spices honey or maple syrup food-grade essential oils Method: 1. Brew the tea. Use unchlorinated /­­ unflouridated water. Bring to the boil and pour over the tea of your choice and let steep for 20-30 minutes (you want it to be very strong). If using a small tea pot, brew two pots and pour brewed tea into your kombucha container. 2. Sweeten the tea. Add the 1 cup /­­ 210g of sugar and still well to dissolve. 3. Cool the tea. This step is important since the SCOBY does not tolerate heat and has the potential to die if added to hot liquid. To speed up the cooling process, I brew 8 cups /­­ 2 liters of strong tea, then add 8 cups /­­ 2 liters of cold water. This way, it usually takes only an hour or two to reach room temperature. 4. Add 2 cups /­­ 500ml pre-made kombucha and the SCOBY. Add the pre-brewed kombucha, which raises the acidity level of the tea. This aids the fermentation process, but also protects the SCOBY from harmful bacteria during the initial fermentation phase. If it is your first time brewing kombucha, simply purchase 2 cups /­­ 500ml of kombucha to add to the cooled tea, along with whatever liquid your SCOBY came with. If you are bottling your own kombucha, simply add 2 cups /­­ 500ml from your last batch. Remove all of your jewelry and wash your hands thoroughly. Gently slip the SCOBY into the tea. 5. Cover. Use a piece of fabric that is tightly woven (a clean tea towel works well) or several layers of cheesecloth, secured with a rubber band. You can even use a piece of paper towel or a coffee filter. The point here is to allow air to flow in and out of the brewing container, while keeping pests like fruit flies out - they love this stuff! 6. Give your kombucha a home. Place the kombucha container in a place where it will not be disturbed or jostled, out of direct sunlight, but where it will get enough airflow (a small cupboard is therefore not the best place). I leave mine out on the counter where I can keep an eye on it, but I do not move it until day 7 when I start tasting. 7. Let ferment for 7-10 days. During the fermentation time, you may see a lot of activity in the brewing container. Bubbles, film-y bits, and the mother SCOBY floating and around and changing positions are all normal occurrences. After a few days youll notice the surface of the tea changing and becoming cloudy or opaque-looking. This is the new SCOBY forming and is a great sign that you have a healthy brew on the way! As the days The fermentation time depends on a few factors, such as the temperature of the environment (warmer temperatures speed fermentation), but also your preferences. If you like a sweeter kombucha, one week may be enough time. If you like a less sweet, more vinegar-y kombucha then allowing the brew to ferment for 10 days or more may be what youre into. I recommend tasting the kombucha every day from day 7 onwards and bottle it once its reached a taste that you enjoy. Its totally subjective and totally up to you! Thats one reason its so great to brew your own. 8. Remove SCOBY and 2 cups /­­ 500ml kombucha. Once your kombucha tea tastes just the way you want it to, prepare to bottle it. Take off all your jewelry and wash your hand thoroughly. Remove the SCOBY 9a. Bottle kombucha and repeat the process. I like to pour the kombucha tea from the large brewing jar into a container with a spout to avoid spills. You can also use a funnel for this process. Seal the bottles and place in the fridge. And now it’s time to brew a fresh batch! Start up at step 1 and complete the cycle. Now you’re a kombucha brewer! 9b. Second fermentation – optional. If you want to carry out the second fermentation, divide the juice or fruit among the bottles first, then add the brewed kombucha on top. Seal the bottles and let at room temperature for 2-3 days until it is carbonated to your liking, then store in the fridge. Very important: remember to release the pressure in the bottles every day that they sit at room temperature - this is called burping - open the lid briefly to let any excess gas out, which will prevent an explosion (I am totally not kidding). 10. Enjoy! It’s finally time to enjoy your kombucha! Drink it as is, or flavour it further as you like. I like to add sliced seasonal fruit to my glass before serving, a few slices of ginger, essential oils, superfoods like spirulina or more fresh juice. Important things to note: 1. Kombucha survives and thrives on cane sugar. You can use raw cane sugar like I do, instead of bleached white sugar, but both work fine. Honey, maple syrup, coconut sugar etc. and other healthier alternatives have very mixed results. I realize its hard for any health-conscious person to use sugar, but remember that the SCOBY is fed, not sweetened with sugar. 2. Always use unchlorinated /­­ unflouridated water for brewing the tea. 3. Do not use herbal tea or any tea that contains flavourings or oils, Earl Grey tea for instance. Stick with organic, pure black or green tea leaves /­­ bags. 4. Do not allow the SCOBY to come into contact with metal at any time (remember to remove your jewelry before handling the SCOBY). 5. Wash your hands and your equipment extremely thoroughly every time. Vinegar is better for cleaning than soap as it does not leave any residue that can harm the SCOBY. 6. Keep the critters out! Use very tightly woven fabric to cover your brewing container. 7. The SCOBY is very sensitive to air contaminants, so dont burn incense or smoke near the brewing container. 8. If mold forms, or if you see any worms /­­ flies in the kombucha or on the SCOBY, toss the entire batch including the SCOBY and start over. Do not be discouraged - it happens! I know that this seems like a lot of information, but I wanted this post to be thorough so that you could have all the information you need to start brewing! If you have another variation on brewing, or tips and tricks that you think others would find helpful, please let me know in the comments! And because I know you’re going to have a lot of questions, I’ll try to check in on this post more often to answer them. Here are some great online resources for those who want more information on brewing kombucha: - The most in-depth kombucha brewing info and how-to videos: Cultures for Health - Step-by-step photos: The Kitchn - Excellent troubleshooting resource: Bestweb Remember that it may take a few batches (and a few SCOBYs) to get your kombucha just the way you like it, but its a really fun, empowering and delicious project that will make you feel like you can do anything in the kitchen! Did I mention youll get to drink kombucha every day for the rest of your life? Yes, theres that too. All love and happy brewing, Sarah B. Show me your kombucha on Instagram: #MNRkombucha *   *   *   *   *   * More news! The My New Roots recipe app now has an updated iPad design and it synchronizes your favorites, shopping list and recipe notes between your iPhone and iPad. In other words: make your shopping list on the iPad, and you’ll have it right on the phone when you’re in the store. Neat! If you already have the app, just update it. If not, click here to go to the App Store. The post Brew your own Kombucha! appeared first on My New Roots.

Tropical Soba

June 1 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tropical Soba The hotter the weather gets, the more I find myself substituting meals with just a ton of watermelon, mango or papaya, or even some kind of iced and very hydrating smoothie or drink. The heat brings out those strong cravings for all things hydrating, juicy, and cooling, and I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this. For something more substantial and nourishing, but still in line with all the aforementioned requirements for a hot summer day meal, there is this Tropical Soba. Papaya is one of my favorite tropical fruit. Of course, we didn’t have anything like it when I was growing up in Russia, so when I moved to Florida and tried papaya for the first time, I was blown away by its buttery consistency and complex, unfamiliar flavor. I was also pleasantly surprised by all its sunny health benefits – papaya is anti-inflammatory due to a wealth of vitamin C and beta-carotene, and some special enzymes, and contains other good stuff like potassium, magnesium, copper, fiber and folate, etc. (the list is quite long). I had a very similar story with mangoes, being completely overjoyed the first time I tried one. So when both of these fruit come into season, they sneak into all kinds of meals around here. Soba noodles are on high rotation in our house as well. Paloma, being in her very picky eater stage, will accept some kind of soba bowl any time of day, which I’m ok with, as the protein-rich buckwheat in soba makes the noodles filling and nutritious. For her, I tend to buy the 100% buckwheat soba, just to pack in as many extra goodies as I can into her meal, but I also like wheat/­­buckwheat blend soba, which tends to be more affordable. This recipe basically combines everything we want to eat at the moment. Nourishing, chilled soba noodles are the base, accompanied by sweet and luscious pieces of papaya and mango, jicama for a nice crunch, a sprinkle of desiccated coconut for some bite, basil, cilantro and mint for that herbal freshness, all dressed with a creamy coconut milk and lime sauce. A tropical dream in a bowl really. I hope you get around to making it sometime this summer :) Tropical Soba   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 large, ripe mango - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces ½ medium papaya - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces 1 small or ½ large jicama - peeled and cut into small cubes basil, mint, cilantro - to taste juice of 2 large limes - divided 1 8 oz package of soba noodles (I used these) sea salt Thai chili paste/­­sriracha - to taste (optional) 1 can light coconut milk unsweetened desiccated coconut - for garnish Instructions Combine mango, papaya, jicama and herbs in a large bowl. Squeeze juice of 1 lime over the mixture, toss to coat. Cook soba noodles in well salted water, according to instructions on the package, take care not to overcook. Drain over a colander, rinse briefly with cold water and shake off any excess water. Add soba to the bowl with the fruit, toss gently and squeeze juice from the second lime over the dish. Add a little squeeze of chili paste, if using, followed by coconut milk. Toss to coat well. You can add more coconut milk to make the dish soupier, if desired. Distribute between bowls or serving plates, garnish with desiccated coconut and more herbs. 3.5.3208   You might also like... Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza No Noodle Pad Thai Raw Caramelized Vegetables in Crispy Coconut Cups Raw Thanksgiving .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tropical Soba appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi

November 23 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi These gnocchi are one of my favorite fall dishes to make for company. The process of gnocchi-making is fun and gratifying, and the result is always a tasty, light and unmistakably autumnal crowd pleaser. These gnocchi are gluten-free (and can be vegan if ghee is substituted with coconut oil), with nutritious buckwheat flour and sweet winter squash acting as main ingredients. Even without eggs, these have a nice pillowy texture, thanks to the softness of pureed squash. The great thing about this recipe is that it can be interpreted and adapted based on the produce you have on hand. There is  a variation on these gnocchi in The Vibrant Table, where I use beets and sweet potato in place of squash. I went for the classic earthy combination of sage and squash for the herbal pairing here, which is hard to beat. I also like to serve these gnocchi alongside chimichurri, one of my favorite simple herb sauces. I like to make homemade sprouted buckwheat flour for this recipe, but you can also use store-bought flour, which is darker in color and has a slightly denser texture, but also a more distinct nutty flavor. I created this recipe as part of a healthy recipe package for Food & Wine online, see the detailed recipe here. I want to take this opportunity to wish all U.S. readers a very Happy Thanksgiving and express my immense gratitude for your readership and support! Here are a few Thanksgiving table ideas: Sorghum Pilaf with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Cranberries and Grapes Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice Shaved Brussels Sprout, Pomegranate and Lentil Salad Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Gingery Pear Rutabaga Handpies Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Butternut Squash and Cranberry Cookies

Apple Basil Paninis

October 19 2015 Meatless Monday 

Sharp Dijon mustard makes a savory seasoning with sweet apple slices in these fruity paninis. Mozzarella lends a luxurious mouth feel and fresh basil provides an herbal note. This recipe comes to us from Cat of The Verdant Life. Serves 2 - 1 tablespoon canola oil - 2 small baguettes, sliced in half - 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard - 4 slices lowfat mozzarella cheese - or - 4 slices dairy free mozzarella - 6 basil leaves, cut into chiffonade - 1/­­2 apple, thinly sliced Place the oil in a cast iron skillet over medium heat. Spread the mustard evenly between both halved baguettes. Layer the mozzarella, basil leaves and apple slices on the bottom side of each baguette. Close the sandwich with the top halves. Press the sandwiches together with a heavy pot or foil covered brick. Place in the skillet, continue pressure on the sandwich using a spatula and cook for 3-4 minutes. Flip and cook 1-2 minutes more, or until the cheese has melted. Cut each sandwich in half, serve one sandwich per person and enjoy! The post Apple Basil Paninis appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sweet Potato Caramelized Onion Stew

February 16 2015 Meatless Monday 

Pumpkins are roasted sweet, potatoes are steamed tender and onions are caramelized in this hearty stew with flavors both sweet and savory. Curry powder and chili powder give this supper a kick, while fresh thyme lends its herbal undertone. This recipe comes to us from GF Celebration! Serves 8 - 2 pie pumpkins, halved and seeded - 3 sweet potatoes, cut into 1 inch cubes - 5 red potatoes, cut into 1 inch cubes - 32 ounces low sodium vegetable stock - 2 teaspoons curry powder - 2 teaspoons chili powder - 1 teaspoon salt - 1 red onion, sliced - 1 yellow onion, sliced - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon fresh thyme - 1 tablespoon canola oil, for preparing the onions Preheat an oven to 350 degrees. Place the pumpkin halves, cut side down, onto a cookie sheet and bake for about 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until the pumpkin becomes tender when pierced with a fork. Set aside to cool. Fill a saucepan with 1 inch of water and place it over medium heat. Add the cubed potatoes, cover and steam for about 25 minutes, or until the potatoes become tender. Transfer to a large mixing bowl and set aside. When the roasted pumpkin has cooled, scoop out its flesh and add it to the mixing bowl with the potatoes. Season the potatoes and pumpkin with the vegetable stock, salt, curry and chili powder. Transfer to a pot and cook over medium heat while you prepare the onions. Place the oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add the onions and cook for about 10 minutes, or until the onions are well done and translucent. Add the caramelized onions to the stew on the stove. Season everything with the garlic and fresh thyme, taking care to stir to ensure the ingredients are evenly distributed. Add the onions to the simmering potato mixture. Stir, turn heat down to medium low and let simmer for about 20 minutes, or until the flavors have melded. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. Divide into 8 portions and enjoy! The post Sweet Potato Caramelized Onion Stew appeared first on Meatless Monday.

A Winter Weekend Cleanse

January 9 2015 My New Roots 

A Winter Weekend Cleanse Happy 2015, dear friends! I wasnt sure about doing a detox post this year simply because it seemed predictable, but over the past couple weeks, my body told my brain to stop thinking so much and just do what I feel. Smart body. There are many reasons people feel the need to press the reset button this time of year. Overindulgence, chronic stress, feelings of fatigue or sluggishness are the usual suspects, but there are also positive grounds for clearing out the cobwebs such as wanting to gain more energy and increase vitality, achieve higher levels of clarity, and realign with our internal guidance systems. I know the telltale signs for myself, and they usually involve a slight disinterest in eating (sounds crazy, I know), along with the desire to examine my food-body-mind relationship. Since I am often cooking everyday for a living, I can sometimes lose sight of the total magic that food is. If I slice open a head of red cabbage and fail to swoon, or that pomegranate doesnt bring me to my knees in awe, I know its time to take a break, simplify, and make space for those feelings again. But how can we make this really easy? Ive gotten so much positive feedback from my past cleanses and detox programs for Oprah magazine and Whole Living magazine, (all of which are still online here, here and here), but one thing that people mention is how much food there is! Taking that into consideration, I thought I would design a super-simple plan this year with only two recipes and you can make the decision how long you want to go for. One smoothie. One soup. Both are alkalizing, filling yet detoxifying, mega green but super tasty. In fact, Ill wager that youll love both of these recipes so much that youll be enjoying them long after the cleanse is over! The Ginger-Mint Pear Smoothie is luscious, sweet-and-spicy with cooling mint and creamy avocado. The Cilantro Spinach Sweet Potato Soup is like eating a crazy-delicious hug. Detoxifying Habits Its true that certain foods and herbs can aid in the detoxification process, but what else can we do to boost our cleansing process on a daily basis? Exercise: Moving our bodies is essential for balance and overall health because it creates the conditions to breathe deeply, stretch, circulate the blood and lymph, and sweat. The more we move, the more efficient our body becomes at circulating and flushing out toxins. Gentle, low-intensity exercise such as yoga, stretching, or walking is best during a juice fast or reduced-calorie diet (such as this weekend cleanse), while high-impact exercise is recommended at least 3 times a week once you are back to eating a regular, healthy diet. Dry skin brushing: Dry skin brushing helps stimulate your lymphatic system, which is responsible for ridding the body of toxins. Skin brushing improves the surface circulation on the skin and keeps the pores of the skin open, encouraging your bodys discharge of metabolic wastes, and resulting in an improved ability to combat bacteria, plus helping your skin to look and feel healthier and more resilient! Skin brushing also strengthens the immune system and helps aid the digestion system, both of which are greatly involved in the detoxification process. Take a sauna: Although it is a major eliminative organ, most people’s skin is very inactive. Sweat is a most important elimination route for toxins. Repeated use of the sauna can help slowly restore skin elimination. Viruses, toxin-burdened cells, and tumours are weaker than normal cells and tolerate heat poorly. The heating of the tissues, which takes place in a sauna helps the body heal from infections and disease more quickly. I make it a habit to go to the sauna once a week for a deep, cleansing sweat. It feels amazing and does a body good! Below is a sample plan for the Winter Weekend Cleanse. You can do the program for just one day, but I would recommend at least two to really feel the benefits. You can also go longer if you like, and include one or more of the recipes from my previous programs to compliment the new one, just so those taste buds of yours stay excited! Drink as much water as you feel like /­­ need, but consume at least 1 1/­­2 liters throughout the day. Always begin the day with warm water with lemon, as this will assist in flushing your digestive system, preparing your tummy for food by increasing stomach acid, and alkalizing your entire system. Herbal teas are acceptable, but choose ones that are particularly detoxifying. Burdock, cleavers, chickweed, yarrow, nettle and plantain are some of my favourites. I also have a wonderful Detox Tea Blend recipe here. You can eat your smoothie for breakfast and afternoon snack, but it also fills in for a lunch if that is all you feel like. You can make up the entire batch for a day (the recipe makes about 3 cups /­­ 700ml) if you know youll be on the go and sip on it when you need a pick-me-up. Or you can divide the ingredients in half and make it fresh if youll be near a blender. Since we are in the colder months of the year here, Id encourage you not to use frozen fruit, as its important to keep warm when the weather is not! I like to enjoy this smoothie at room temperature, and I promise its just as delicious as its cold counterpart. The soup can be eaten for lunch and dinner or as a snack too. I really like it blended, but feel free to keep it chunky too! Winter Weekend Cleanse Plan Upon rising: warm water with lemon Breakfast: Ginger-Mint Pear Smoothie Throughout the day: water! Aim for 1 1/­­2 – 2 1/­­2 liters a day (about 6-10 cups), depending on your activity level Lunch: Cilantro Spinach Sweet Potato Soup Snack: Ginger-Mint Pear Smoothie Dinner: Cilantro Spinach Sweet Potato Soup Repeat on the following day, for as many days as you like. Things to Avoid: caffeine, sugar, alcohol, tobacco, computer time, television, stressful situations. Things to Embrace: sleep and rest, time outdoors, yoga, meditation, deep breathing, sauna, dry skin brushing.     Print recipe     Winter Weekend Cleanse Recipes Ginger-Mint Pear Smoothie Makes 3 cups /­­ 700ml Ingredients (all organic if possible): 2 pears 1 avocado, flesh scooped out 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 35g firmly packed baby spinach 1 cup /­­ 250 ml water 2 tsp. minced ginger 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. freshly-squeezed lemon juice 10-20 mint leaves (to your taste) Directions: 1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Enjoy. Cilantro Spinach Sweet Potato Soup Makes 6.5 cups /­­ 1.5 liters Ingredients (all organic if possible): 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 medium onions, chopped 5 cloves garlic, minced 1 tsp. sea salt 3 cups /­­ 700ml water 2 medium-large sweet potato, scrubbed and cut into 1 cubes 1 Tbsp. freshly-squeezed lemon juice pinch – 1/­­4 tsp. cayenne pepper (to your taste) 2 cups /­­ 60g cilantro (leaves and tender stems) 2 cups /­­ 50g firmly packed baby spinach Directions: 1. Heat coconut oil in a large stockpot. Add onions and salt, stir to coat and let cook until onions have softened, about 5-7 minutes. Add garlic, stir, cook 1 minute. Add sweet potato and water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook until the sweet potatoes are tender, about 12-15 minutes. 2. Place soup contents in a blender. Blend on high until smooth, then add spinach, cilantro, lemon and cayenne. Season to taste. Serve and enjoy. Store cooled leftovers in the fridge.   I hope you all find your own reasons for trying out this simple cleanse, and that it proves to be as helpful as it is delicious! Remember to take things slow, set realistic goals for yourself and be celebrate each small victory! I truly wish you all the best for 2015 - this year is going to be the cleanest, greenest yet. Love and light, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Check out my interview with the gorgeous McKel over at Nutrition Stripped!

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte

October 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte This happens to me pretty much every day at around 3 o’clock, providing that I’m working from home. I get up from my desk, put on the teapot, throw a bunch of things in the blender, whirl it all together, and end up with a cozy and satisfying latte-ish drink that gets me through to dinner time. I don’t drink caffeine anymore, because I’ve always been very sensitive to it, and found that avoiding it altogether really helps with even energy levels (I may have made a few exceptions in Italy :)). But this little ritual takes me back to the days when 3 o’clock meant a cup of really good tea or a matcha. There’s really nothing better. I end up making a different drink every time, based on my mood and the ingredients I have on hand, but the general formula is the same. There’s always something for creaminess, something for flavor, something for an energy boost… So I thought I’d give a ‘no-recipe’ recipe here, as well as a few of my favorite combinations. Midday super-latte making is a really fun routine to add to your day if you’re around a blender, and it’s good for your in a number of ways: it gets you out of the busyness of the day and nudges you to take a break, it’s creative, and the beverage you’ll end up with will likely be good-for-you, warming and tasty. Tahini Hot Chocolate This was one of our most popular recipes last winter. It’s an incredibly satisfying blender hot chocolate that comes together in seconds. Rosemary Hot White Chocolate Another hot chocolate, but this one is a white hot chocolate infused with rosemary. A great case for using cacao butter in drinks, which lends both its chocolatey flavor, as well as a richness and a froth. Spirulina Latte Another blender latte, but this time boosted with all the green benefits of spirulina, without the swampy taste. Chamomile Latte The most grounding and delicious latte to drink before bed. Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca Playing off New Orleans-style coffee, this herbal mocha is a great option for those trying to take a break from coffee and missing it dearly. Chicory brings a coffee-like richness, while maca and cacao boost energy. Honey Miso Latte This is basically a golden milk latte, but boosted with the flavor and health benefits of miso and raw honey. I like to drink this one before plane journeys, since miso might be helpful when it comes to countering the radiation we are exposed to on any given flight. Hibiscus Ginger Latte This latte gets is beautiful color and a pleasant sour note in the flavor from steeped hibiscus flowers. Pear Cranberry Chai Any modesty aside, this is the best chai I’ve ever had or made in my life. A great example for how creative you can get with your beverages, this one uses both fruit and a bunch of healing spices to achieve an otherworldly flavor. No-Recipe Vegan Cozy Latte Start With: This is your base liquid, which will determine what other ingredients you will add to your blender. Choose one or a couple. Hot water is a blank canvas, while herbal coffee and tea will give you a base flavor, which you can play off off with your other ingredients. - hot water - chicory coffee or Dandy Blend - tea – herbal, black, green, etc. - hot plant milk – coconut, almond, cashew, oat, etc. Creamy: Add one of these ingredients or a combination of a few of them for a rich, extra-creamy latte, especially important to include if you are just using hot water as the base. - coconut butter - tahini - almond butter/­­cashew butter/­­any other nut butter - tocos - cacao butter Frothy: This is optional if you already have a creamy element, but adding some extra fat to your latte contributes to the most beautiful froth. Also, if your base is something with caffeine like a black or green tea, this will help slow the absorption of caffeine for a more even boost of energy (like in Bulletproof coffee). - Coconut oil/­­MCT oil - Ghee Sweet: Add as much sweetness as you need, tasting as you go. - dates - raw honey - maple syrup - date syrup Flavor: Play off your drink base while adding some flavor. Both cacao powder and turmeric do well in creamy, milky drinks, while spices, herbs and vanilla can be used millions of ways (just see the drink round-up above). - cacao powder - cacao butter - turmeric - other spices like cinnamon, cardamom, nutmeg, ginger - vanilla - herbs - miso Extras & Boosts: My absolute favorite energy-boosting ingredient for drinks is maca powder – it instantly wakes me up and tastes so delicious. But there are a ton of other boosters you can add to your lattes, some ideas below. - maca powder - cacao butter - other adaptogens: chaga, reishi, lion’s mane, cordyceps, ashwagandha - more: pearl powder, tocos, mucura pruriens, spirulina, etc. etc. Blend all your components until frothy and enjoy :) You might also like... Berry Kombucha Float Peach and Zucchini Smoothie Avocado Kiwi Smoothie and a Jus by Julie Cleanse Giveaway Honey Miso Latte .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight

July 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight This post was created in partnership with Whole Earth Sweetener Co. Turkish delight is one of those old-school sweets that was always around during my childhood in the Soviet Union, which is surprising because treats were scarce and mainly homemade. There was a tiny store a short walk away from our home, where they carried neat, white paper boxes, lined with tissue and filled with delicate pink, sugar-dusted Turkish Delight squares. We called the treat rahat lokum (just another commonly used name for Turkish Delight). I spent my childhood convinced that it was fairy food, and cherished every pleasantly jelly-like, aromatic bite from the magical paper box. I’ve since completely forgotten about rahat lokum, dismissing it as an outdated sweet of my semi-hungry childhood, until I was in Moscow a few months ago. There is a high-vibe sweets brand sold in some grocery stores in Russia, which makes chocolate, wafers and such, with surprisingly wholesome ingredients, cool herbal add-ins, and a pleasantly low amount of non-refined sugar. I always make a point of hunting down some of their stuff to bring back home. This time around, I discovered a new product of theirs, which was a healthier, green tea-flavored Turkish Delight. It was delicious and disappeared in no time once my family got a taste of it back in Florida. I quickly got the urge to figure out my own recipe, as I often do with these types of obsessions. Thankfully, I’m no stranger to the thickening and gelatinizing properties of arrowroot (starch from a tropical tuber) and agar-agar (sea vegetable). Both make for the perfect, allergy-friendly and healthful alternative to cornstarch, which is traditional to Turkish Delight recipes. After some consideration, I decided to color my delight with hibiscus tea, as a tribute to the pink treats of my childhood, and because I’m generally obsessed with hibiscus and its million health benefits. For an extra aromatic finish, I added some orange blossom water instead of the more commonly used rose water, which truly takes this treat to the next level. When coated in arrowroot powder, this Turkish Delight looks surprisingly professional, as though it was store-bought. The cool thing is that in reality it’s pretty easy to make at home, just take a look at the video above to see the whole process. For sweetener in this recipe, I used an organic blend of stevia and honey from Whole Earth. I’ve had a pretty turbulent relationship with stevia over the years. I’ve always wanted to get into it as a sugar substitute, knowing that it’s totally natural, free of calories, and a zero on the glycemic index, but I just cannot get used to its potent, powerful flavor (when extracted it’s something like 200 times sweeter than sugar!). Any time I add pure stevia extract to anything, it’s all I can taste, and that flavor lingers in my mouth for hours in an unpleasant way. Thankfully, Whole Earth Sweetener Co. figured out that when mixed with other, more traditional sweeteners, stevia is barely distinguishable, and they offer a few carefully considered stevia blends. The neat thing is that because of stevia’s potency, you only need half of the amount of their sweetener in any given recipe. In other words, this Turkish Delight recipe only calls for 1/­­4 cup of the honey and stevia blend, while you would need twice the amount (1/­­2 cup) of pure honey or maple syrup to achieve the same sweetness without the stevia. After trying the Whole Earth stevia-honey blend, as well as their stevia-raw sugar blend, I’m totally on board. I love being able to use less sugar in my sweet recipes, and I’m hoping that these products can help me ease into a love affair with pure stevia, some day :) I’m curious to hear about your guys’ experience with stevia. Do you use it? Did it take you some time to get used to it? Any tips and stories are much appreciated! Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight   Print Serves: about 48 pieces Ingredients 3½ cups purified water 2 tablespoons dried hibiscus flowers ⅔ cup plus ¼ cup arrowroot powder, divided ¼ cup stevia-honey blend or ⅓ - ½ cup pure honey or maple syrup 4½ tablespoons agar agar powder (not flakes) 1¼ teaspoon orange blossom water or rose water Instructions Combine the water with the hibiscus in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let the tea steep for 30 minutes. Prepare an 8 x 8-inch square, rimmed dish by lining it up with parchment paper. Set aside. Strain the hibiscus tea. Mix ½ cup of the tea with ⅔ cup of the arrowroot powder in a medium bowl. The mixture will be quite thick and difficult to mix at first. Set aside. Pour the rest of the hibiscus tea into the same saucepan used for brewing the tea. Add the sweetener and the agar agar powder, whisk to combine and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for 5 minutes, whisking periodically. At the end of the 5 minutes, give the prepared arrowroot mixture a good stir and slowly pour it into the saucepan with the agar mixture, stirring vigorously. The mixture will be very thick and stretchy. Remove from heat and add in the orange blossom water, whisking to combine. Immediately spoon the mixture into the prepared dish, evening it out as much as you can. Place the dish into the refrigerator for 1-2 hours, until the mixture is completely set. Once set, lift the delight square out of the dish onto a cutting board, using the extending ends of the parchment paper. Slice into around 48 cubes and roll them in the remaining ¼ cup arrowroot powder to coat. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Cosmic Sweet Potato Chocolate Truffles Almost Savory Raw Chocolate Raw Honey Maca Pancakes, a Weekend Breakfast Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tahini Hot Chocolate

December 4 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tahini Hot Chocolate Most of us know that feeling that usually rolls around at around 3 pm on a workday, when it seems as if you’ve hit a wall and need to somehow recharge before going back to work. I have to say that since I’ve been taking a break from caffeine, it has been less a of a crash and more a need to get up, stretch and whip up some kind of fun potion in the blender, just as a mental breather. Since it’s been cold out, I’ve been really into making hot, frothy, restorative drinks as my 3 pm activity, and this super quick tahini hot chocolate has come out on top many times. This drink gets its decadent chocolate flavor from raw cacao powder, which, contrary to popular (and my own until very recently!) belief, contains insignificant amounts of caffeine. The energizing properties of cacao come from theobromine, a mild cardiovascular stimulant (while caffeine is a nervous system stimulant) that increases heart function and blood flow and is much milder in effect than caffeine. Cacao is also high in magnesium, a mineral known for its relaxing properties, anandamide – the ‘bliss chemical,’ and PEA – the ‘love chemical.’ So this drink will calmly wake you up and give you a lift in mood – nothing crazy and no jitters. It gets its creaminess from tahini and nut butter, and its sweetness from prunes (you can also use dates, but I like the richer flavor the prunes yield here) and honey. It’s very easy to make and comes together in no time. I drink this hot chocolate as an afternoon pick-me-up, but it’s good enough to serve on a special occasion, and could act as an elegant, sweet finish to a festive meal. There are some links after the jump, have a nice Sunday :) Immunity Herbal Infusion – I’ve been very much into making herbal infusions and drinking them instead of water throughout the day (nettle, raspberry leaf and goji is still my favorite), and this immunity-supporting one sounds amazing. Actually, Let’s Not Be in the Moment – an article questioning the recent trends of mindfulness, full of many valid points and this response, very valid in its own way. Willka Yachay Instagram – amazing photographs of the Q’eros Nation of Peru by an organization helping their community thrive in the modern world. Well + Good’s Health and Wellness Trends of 2017 – I’m especially into the #s 5, 11, 13 and 14 Amanda Chantal Bacon on the One Part Podcast How Ayurvedic Beauty Can Change Your Health – all good reminders Tahini Hot Chocolate   Print Serves: 1 mug full (about 1½ cups) Ingredients 1½ cups hot water 2 prunes or dates 1 heaping teaspoon tahini 1 heaping teaspoon almond butter 1 tablespoon raw cacao powder 1 tablespoon raw honey, or more to taste pinch cinnamon (optional) Instructions Combine all ingredients in a blender until smooth and frothy. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes Black Sesame Cappuccino Beet Tahini Snack Bars Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tahini Hot Chocolate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Pear Cranberry Chai

October 30 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Pear Cranberry Chai Are you guys dressing up for Halloween? I’m not, but Paloma is going to be John Lennon circa 1974 (the rest of her friends are princesses). Yep, the Beatles obsession is as strong as ever. Right now, John is the absolute favorite. 1980 (year of his death) is the WORST number, not to be spoken in the house, and she’s been know to put on Imagine and cry to it more than a few times. And this is an otherwise cheerful, happy kid too. Crazy! Anyways, whether you are participating in this weekend’s spooky activities or not, maybe you can consider treating yourself with this seriously autumnal chai, or better yet, plan to serve it at some sort of holiday occasion. I’m confident your guests will be blown away. As far as I can recall, this is the best chai I’ve ever tried. Besides all the required, invigorating spices, this one is infused with fresh pears and cranberries, which add lovely flavor and a tiny hint of sourness. It’s a bit sweet, spicy, gingery and creamy. And if you are wondering what I do with all the leftover stewed pears, I blend them into a pear sauce and spoon it onto all kinds of dishes. There are some weekend links after the jump. Have a nice one :) Protein, Iron, Calcium – I’ve been finding Gena’s articles about protein/­­iron/­­calcium-rich plant food combinations so helpful Urban Moonshine – I’ve been taking these digestive bitters before almost every meal and have really noticed a difference. Highly recommended if you have any mild issues with digestion or even as a blood sugar stabilizing aid. Also, want to make this Happy Belly Seed Mix soon. Sophie Buhai’s New Jewelry Collection – the photos! Exceptional Advice from Anthony Bourdain’s New Book – please never change Tony .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Pear Cranberry Chai appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Farro and White Bean Veggie Burgers

September 5 2016 Meatless Monday 

These veggie burgers are a great meatless option for barbecues and gatherings, but also refrigerate well once cooked for meatless meals throughout the week. This recipe comes to us from from Plant-Powered for Life by Sharon Palmer, RDN, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Makes 10 servings (1 patty, bun, and lettuce leaf, and 2 tomato and avocado slices each) - 3/­­4 cup (156 g) uncooked farro - 3 cups (711 ml) water - 1 teaspoon reduced sodium vegetable broth base - One 15-ounce (425 g) can cannellini beans, no salt added, rinsed and drained (liquid reserved), or 1 3/­­4 cups cooked - 1 medium onion, finely diced - 1 cup (70 g) finely chopped mushrooms - 1 cup (110 g) grated carrots (2 medium) - 1/­­4 cup (29 g) chopped walnuts - 1/­­4 cup (15 g) chopped fresh oregano, or 1 teaspoon dried - 2 tablespoons minced fresh chives - 1/­­3 cup (52 g) uncooked old-fashioned oats - 1/­­2 cup whole grain bread crumbs - 1 teaspoon low-sodium herbal seasoning blend - 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - 1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric - Pinch of sea salt, optional - 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - Ten 1 1/­­2-ounce (43 g) whole grain buns - 10 lettuce leaves - 3 medium tomatoes, sliced into 20 slices - 2 avocados, sliced into 20 slices Place the farro in a pot with the water and broth base. Stir well, cover, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium, cook for 35 to 40 minutes, and drain any leftover liquid. Place the cannellini beans in a mixing bowl and mash slightly with a potato masher, until thick and lumpy. Mix in the cooked farro, onions, mushrooms, carrots, walnuts, oregano, chives, oats, bread crumbs, herbal seasoning, black pepper, turmeric, and sea salt, if desired. Combine the ingredients using clean hands, then add 2 to 3 tablespoons of the reserved bean liquid to make a thick yet moistened mixture that sticks together. Chill for about 1 hour. In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil over medium heat. Form patties out of 1/­­2 cup of the bean mixture with your hands, mashing the ingredients together so that they do not crumble. Carefully place 3 to 4 patties at a time into the hot oil and cook for 6 minutes on each side, turning carefully. Repeat, adding 1 tablespoon of olive oil to the skillet with each batch of patties, until all the patties are done. Serve each patty with 1 bun, 1 lettuce leaf, 2 tomato slices, and 2 avocado slices. The post Farro and White Bean Veggie Burgers appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday

June 12 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday To continue with the herbal/­­floral theme from last week, this Sunday, we’ve got Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream. We’ve been having quite a steady supply of fresh chamomile at the local market, and those bouquets fill the house with the most calming, quiet aroma, which I usually associate with bedtime and all things peaceful, due to the herb’s well-studied chill-out properties. I’ve had a note to make chamomile ice cream ever since I made chamomile sorbet years ago, which was essentially frozen chamomile tea and honey – sounds so simple, but its refreshing flavor left quite an impression for all these years. Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. There’s that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Read on for the recipe and some weekend links, and have a chill Sunday :) Is sugar really bad for you? – starting in 2018, nutrition labels on packaged foods will have to list the amount of added sugars in addition to total sugars, and this article answers some important questions in regards to that. Obviously, we love sweets, so – everything in moderation :) Aloe Vera – summer beauty food The Voyageur – a favorite, dreamy online travel journal All You Need, You Already Have – an inspiring post on Zen Habits Kid Friendly Herbs – to go with the theme of this post, a round up of herbs that are ok to give to children Sarah Britton interview – “It was about three years before I got a comment from someone whose last name wasn’t mine.” One Part Podcast – been listening to this while doing things around the kitchen. So far loved episodes with Bryant Terry, Dana Shultz, Laura Wright. Blog love – we are in complete awe of The Artful Desperado’s food photography, green caesar non-alcoholic cocktail, soft meringue s’mores with blood orange, roasted artichoke and cauliflower with creamy harissa dip. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 cans full fat Thai coconut milk ¼ cup dried chamomile flowers ¼ cup honey - divided, plus more for drizzling juice and zest of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder Instructions Combine coconut milk and chamomile in a medium saucepan. Bring to a gentle simmer, preferably on a double boiler, or over regular heat. Simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from heat, cover and let infuse and cool to room temperature. Strain chamomile milk. In a blender, combine milk with 2 tablespoons honey, lemon juice and arrowroot. Blend until smooth. Chill the mixture well in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Process mixture in an ice cream machine for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon ice cream into a container in layers, drizzling the remaining honey between the layers. Serve immediately as soft serve or place in the freezer to harden further for at least 4 hours. Remove from freezer 10-15 minutes before serving. Garnish with lemon zest and more honey when serving. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Tarragon and Mint Ice Cream Raw Blackberry and Lime Miniature Tarts with Cardamom Ice Cream Bee Pollen and Manuka Honey Ice-Cream Beet Tahini Snack Bars .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Homemade Chamomile Tea with Fresh Flowers from The Garden

May 29 2016 Vegan Thyme 

Homemade Chamomile Tea with Fresh Flowers from The Garden The flowers of the chamomile plant resemble a carpet of mini-daisies blanketing a small, sunny corner of my vegetable patch.  They're lovely, actually. Hardy, too. Tonight I made my first batch of chamomile/­­mint tea.  By the way, mint is the other "easiest herb in the world to grow"--you simply cannot kill it.  Trust me.  So back to chamomile: I snipped a small bouquet of the white and yellow flowers and placed them in my coffee mug with a few sprigs of mint leaves. I poured warm water over and set the timer for about five minutes.  I strained the liquid into another mug, and like magic, we had homemade chamomile tea. Your tea will taste nothing like the dried bags of herbal chamomile tea you may have tried.  The fresh-flower variety of tea is very herb-y. A bit of a lemony taste, too. It's delicious.  Chamomile tea is said to be good for helping ease stomach upset and to help with sleep. The best chamomile herb to buy is one of German origin matricaria retutica, or so I've read.  I basically used common sense and bought the herb from the nursery with the tag that said, Excellent for Making Tea!  Side-by-side growing mint with green beans. I KNOW!  But it works.  Make sure you strain the tea. Once you do, you'll have this lovely pale greenish-yellow brew.  Comfort in a cup. In other news. This is Frankie. She's a giant. We just adore her and her sissy tolerates her. 

Brussels Sprouts with Dates & Dill

November 9 2015 Meatless Monday 

Brussels sprouts are browned and dressed in Meyer lemon juice. This tart coating is balanced by sweet medjool dates and herbal fresh dill in this diversely seasoned side. This recipe comes to us from Nimisha of Club Dine In! Serves 8 - 2 pounds Brussels sprouts, washed and trimmed - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon Meyer lemon juice* - 1/­­2 cup pecans, toasted and coarsely chopped - 1 tablespoon flaxseeds** - 5 medjool dates, quartered - 3 sprigs fresh dill, fine chopped - salt and pepper, to taste *Meyer lemons are sweeter than standard lemons and found in the citrus section of many markets and grocery stores. Standard lemon juice can be substituted if Meyer lemons are not available.   **Fiber filled flaxseeds can be found in health food stores or the health food or grain section of many grocery stores. Bring a pot of water to a boil over high heat. Add the Brussels sprouts to the boiling water and cook for 3-5 minutes, or until the Brussels sprouts are beginning to become tender. Drain the Brussels sprouts in a colander and rinse with cold water to stop the cooking. Cut the boiled Brussels sprouts in half and set aside. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add Brussels sprouts and season with a pinch of salt. Cook, stirring often, for about 5 minutes, or until the edges begin to brown. Remove from the heat. Pour the lemon juice over the Brussels sprouts and stir well. Toss in the chopped pecans, flaxseeds, dill and dates. Season with salt and pepper to taste and enjoy. The post Brussels Sprouts with Dates & Dill appeared first on Meatless Monday.

How to Pick, Prep, and Cook with Parsnips

February 20 2015 Vegetarian Times 

How to Pick, Prep, and Cook with Parsnips Except for their ivory color and generally wider girth, parsnips look a lot like carrots. Nutty and slightly sweet tasting, these root veggies are at their best when the weather turns chilly. The cool temperatures concentrate the sugars in their cells, making them sweeter, explains Andy Griffin, owner of Mariquita Farm in Watsonville, Calif. Pick Check that parsnips are free of cracks, and avoid any that bend or show soft spots. A fresh parsnip will have an herbal fragrance, Griffin says. Despite what you might hear, smaller parsnips are not necessarily sweeter and better tasting than larger ones, he adds. Parsnips can last up to three weeks when kept in cool conditions with high humidity, such as a plastic bag placed in the refrigerator crisper. Prep Raw parsnips tend to have a tough, woody texture; cooking makes these veggies more palatable. Roasting really enhances their sweetness, says Griffin. Peeled and sliced parsnips quickly turn dark when exposed to air, so cook them right away, or store them in water with a touch of lemon juice. To avoid mushy parsnips, Griffin advises adding them to soups and stews toward the end of cooking. Try This! o Shred parsnips, and add to baking batters as you would carrots or zucchini. o Boil or steam parsnips, and mash with an equal amount of potatoes, plus milk, butter, grainy mustard, smoked paprika, and fresh sage for a savory take on mashed potatoes. o Combine whole, peeled parsnips with pearled onions and rosemary on a roasting pan; toss with olive oil and sea salt, and roast at 400°F until tender. o Toss grated parsnips and carrots with flour, eggs, chopped chives, and salt and pepper to taste; drop batter by the scoopful into an oiled skillet to make parsnip patties. o Simmer sliced leeks, parsnips, and potatoes in vegetable stock; purée, and garnish soup with crumbled feta and toasted pecans. o Pair them with carrots: we love steamed, glazed parsnip and carrot sticks and roasted carrots and parsnips. What about you? What’s your favorite way to use parsnips?

Louisiana Citrus Crepes

February 16 2015 Meatless Monday 

Crepes are wrapped around vanilla custard then topped with refreshing orange and grapefruit segments. Sprigs of mint make for a lovely herbal finish to this Mardi Gras breakfast. This recipe comes to us from myrecipes.com and CookingLight.com. Serves 8 For the filling: - 2 cups nonfat milk - 1 5 inch vanilla bean, split lengthwise - 1/­­2 cup sugar - 2 tablespoons cornstarch - dash of salt - 3 large egg yolks - 1/­­2 cup low fat sour cream For the crepes: - 1/­­2 cup nonfat milk - 5 tablespoons water - 2 tablespoons butter, melted - 1/­­2 teaspoon vanilla extract - 1 large egg, lightly beaten - 2/­­3 cup all purpose flour - 1/­­2 teaspoon sugar - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - nonstick cooking spray To complete the Louisiana Citrus Crepes: - 2 naval oranges, peeled and separated into segments - 2 red grapefruit, peeled and separated into segments - 1/­­4 cup sugar - 2 tablespoons fresh mint, chopped - 1 tablespoon powdered sugar - 8 sprigs mint* *optional To make the filling: Pour the milk into a medium saucepan. Scrape the seeds from the vanilla bean and add the seeds and bean to the pan. Place the milk over medium-high heat and warm until it reaches 180°, or until tiny bubbles form around edge, but before the milk boils. Remove from heat and set aside. Mix the 1/­­2 cup sugar, cornstarch, dash of salt and the egg yolks together into a large bowl. Gradually whisk in 1 cup of the hot milk mixture to the egg mixture. Return the milk mixture to the pan and bring to a boil, stirring constantly with a whisk. Cook for 1 minute more and remove the pan from the stove. Spoon the filling into a bowl and discard the vanilla bean. Stir in sour cream. Place plastic wrap on surface of custard. Chill thoroughly. To make the crepes: Pour the milk, water, melted butter, vanilla and egg into a blender. Add the flour, sugar and salt. Process until smooth and chill in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour. Prepare an 8-inch nonstick crepe pan or skillet with a light layer of nonstick cooking spray. Place the pan over medium heat. Pour about 3 tablespoons of batter into the pan. Quickly tilt the pan in all directions so that the batter covers the pan with a thin film. Cook for 2 minutes. Carefully lift the edge of the crepe with a spatula to test for doneness. Turn crepe when it can be shaken loose from the pan and the underside is lightly browned. Cook 1 minute more on the other side, or until the center is set. Place the crepe on a towel and cool completely. Repeat until all of batter is used. Stack the crepes between single layers of wax paper to prevent them from sticking. To complete the Louisiana Citrus Crepes: Place the orange and grapefruit segments together in a large bowl. Add the sugar and mint and toss gently until combined. Place 1 crepe on every plate, spread about 1/­­3 cup chilled filling over each crepe. Fold each into a triangle. Top each serving with 1/­­4 cup fruit mixture. Sprinkle crepes evenly with powdered sugar, garnish with mint sprigs, if using, and enjoy. The post Louisiana Citrus Crepes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Brussels Sprouts with Dates & Dill

October 13 2014 Meatless Monday 

Brussels sprouts are browned and dressed in Meyer lemon juice. This tart coating is balanced by sweet medjool dates and herbal fresh dill in this diversely seasoned side. This recipe comes to us from Nimisha of Club Dine In! Serves 8 - 2 pounds Brussels sprouts, washed and trimmed - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon Meyer lemon juice* - 1/­­2 cup pecans, toasted and coarsely chopped - 1 tablespoon flaxseeds** - 5 medjool dates, quartered - 3 sprigs fresh dill, fine chopped - salt and pepper, to taste *Meyer lemons are sweeter than standard lemons and found in the citrus section of many markets and grocery stores. Standard lemon juice can be substituted if Meyer lemons are not available.   **Fiber filled flaxseeds can be found in health food stores or the health food or grain section of many grocery stores. Bring a pot of water to a boil over high heat. Add the Brussels sprouts to the boiling water and cook for 3-5 minutes, or until the Brussels sprouts are beginning to become tender. Drain the Brussels sprouts in a colander and rinse with cold water to stop the cooking. Cut the boiled Brussels sprouts in half and set aside. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add Brussels sprouts and season with a pinch of salt. Cook, stirring often, for about 5 minutes, or until the edges begin to brown. Remove from the heat. Pour the lemon juice over the Brussels sprouts and stir well. Toss in the chopped pecans, flaxseeds, dill and dates. Season with salt and pepper to taste and enjoy. The post Brussels Sprouts with Dates & Dill appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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