green beans - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Navratri (2018)

Schezwan paneer recipe | paneer schezwan | schezwan chilli paneer

Butternut Squash & Black Bean Enchiladas

Poha pakoda recipe | poha pakora recipe | easy & crisp veg snack










green beans vegetarian recipes

Best Vegan Restaurants – Dallas

September 18 2018 VegKitchen 

Best Vegan Restaurants – Dallas Where do you find the best plant-based meal in Dallas, Texas? The prospect of eating out while vegan may seem daunting at first. Dallasites are well-known for their love of BBQ, and steak features in many of the local specialties. But Dallas is a diverse and evolving city, with a wide selection of vegan eateries. Dont forget to check out the food trucks, which can rival the citys best vegan restaurants. Dallas also offers various upscale, all-vegan cafés. 12 of the Best Vegan Restaurants in Dallas, TX If youre new in D-Town or you dont have much experience with the vegan food scene, it can be hard to know where to start. Here is a list that will help you discover some of the most delicious vegan dishes out there. 1. Spiral Diner & Bakery If youre on the hunt for vegan comfort food, consider Spiral Diner on North Beckley Avenue. Spiral has a proud tradition of serving plant-based versions of your favorite childhood dishes. Founded in 2002, Spiral is now one of the pillars of the Dallas vegan scene. You may want to start with their Blue Plate Special with vegan chickn, potatoes, peas, carrots, and green beans. Then […] The post Best Vegan Restaurants – Dallas appeared first on VegKitchen.

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 29 2018 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterThe Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl This year I traveled to Ethiopia in the weeks before Easter - one of several special times of fasting, when the majority of the country eats entirely vegan! I explored the central cities, traveled overland to the north, went trekking in the highlands and stayed with families in remote villages. As with all my travels and culinary research, I am extremely grateful for the privilege to learn, share & exchange, and be guided & supported by many families and professional cooks who invited me in their kitchens and shared amazing meals with me. Since returning to Berlin, I’ve been cooking Ethiopian and Eritrean food practically non-stop, recreating recipes and dishes, constantly inviting friends and guests to my cooking studio for lunch and dinner parties. Abebech showing me traditional village cooking in the Ethiopian Highlands. Making Injera for the first time in Ethiopia The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA is my newest cookbook with original recipes, artwork, photography and stories inspired by these latest culinary adventures. It includes over 70 recipes based on the mouth-watering meals in bustling cities & towns, at road-stop eateries, and in rural highland villages. As with my previous 5 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. The ETHIOPIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 6th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 140 pages with 70+ recipes and over 60 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in East Africa - Also based on experiences with international communities of Europe (London, Paris, and Berlin) and North America (Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C.) and over 25 years of vegan cooking - Ethiopian & Eritrean classics, familiar restaurant & family favourites, delicious delights, wonders & surprises, and creative culinary experiments - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Doro Wat – spicy seitan stew Spinach Dinach Butecha – Chickpea “Egg” Salad Minchet Abish – spicy soy mince & walnuts Duba Wot – pumpkin stew Shimbra Asa – chickpea “fish” Asa (Jackfruit) Tibs Fosolia – green beans & carrots Pizza Lalibela Ingudai Tibs – spicy mushrooms Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping Ambasha – sweet bread Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA - Traditional Berbere spice mix (simple + advanced) - Nitir Qibe – spiced butter/­­oil - Mitmita – extra hot spice mix - Yewot Qimen – black pepper spice mix - Shiro – chickpea/­­bean spice mix - Data (Yekarya Delleh) – roasted chili, garlic, onion & herb sauce - Traditional Injera – Ethiopian sourdough crepe - Quick Injera - Ambasha - sweet raisin bread - Doro Dabo – baked stuffed bread - Difo Dabo - spiced bread - Pizza Lalibela - with tomato sauce & roasted potato topping - Sambosa – savory pastry with lentil filling - Senig Karia – roasted spicy stuffed chilies - Injera Firfir – traditional flatbread with spicy tomato sauce - Yesuf Fitfit – chopped injera & lemon sunflower seed dressing - Kita (Injekita) – sweet breakfast flatbread & jam - Chornake /­­ Pasty – fried bread - Genfo – roasted wheat & barley porridge - Selata - super simple salad - Selata Delux - with mango, dates, avocado mixed greens & lentils - Butecha - chickpea “egg” salad - Selata Timtim - tomato salad - Selata Dinich - potato salad - Selata Bekarot - carrot salad - Telba - roasted flax dressing - Shiro Wot - chickpea puree - Misir Wot – red lentils - Doro Wot – spicy seitan - Soy Tibs - spicy soymeat strips - Ingudai Wot - spicy mushrooms - Bamia - spicy okra - Minchet Abish - spicy soy mince & walnuts - Shimbra Asa – spicy chickpea “fish” - Kik Alicha – yellow lentils - Atakilt Alicha – cabbage, carrots & potatoes - Keysir - beet root - Duba Alicha - pumpkin stew - Tikr Gomen - greens with garlic - Spinach Dinich - spinach & roasted potatoes - Fosolia – green beans & carrots - Asa Tibs – lemon pepper jackfruit fritters - Tofu Alicha - batter fried tofu in mild garlic & onion sauce - Ingudai Alicha – mushrooms w/­­ creamy cashew, lemon, pepper, thyme, parsley - Peppers & Potatoes - garlic ginger stir-fry - Inkulal Firfir – spicy tofu scramble & tomatoes - Ful – fava beans - Ayib – cottage cheese - Bedergan – roasted eggplant - Vegetable Lentil Soup - Vegetable Pasta – spaghetti with mixed chopped vegetables - Macaroni Firfir – noodles with garlic onion tomato sauce on injera - Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping - Ethiopian Mashed Potatoes - Traditional Coffee Ceremony - Spiced Black Tea - Roiboos tea with lemon, ginger &cardamon - Mango Moringa Banana Smoothie - Injera w/­­ dates - Banana Bread - Fasting Muffins - Rooibos Tea Ice Cream Video: Justin P. Moore Music: Nils Kercher Nanfulle from Ancient Intimations (live) (C)2016 Ancient Pulse Music PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl The post ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for August

August 14 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for AugustThe hot humid weather is back in full force and so is my desire for quick and easy meal solutions. On hot days like the ones weve been having lately, I prefer to do any cooking that needs to be done early in the morning to save me from heating up the kitchen later in the day. Today, I’ve put together a list of some of my favorite vegan recipes for the blisteringly hot days of August. 10 Cooling Vegan Recipes August Cucumber and White Bean Ceviche - Traditionally made with raw fish or scallops, I like to make this lime-marinated salad from Peru with cucumbers and white beans for a nice contrast of refreshingly crisp and creamy. Fire and Ice Sesame Noodles - The evocative name refers to the heat from the sriracha and the cold since I usually serve this dish chilled. You can serve it at room temperature, if you prefer, but fire and room temperature just doesnt have the same ring to it. Indonesian Gado Gado - Gado-Gado is an Indonesian main-dish salad of raw and cooked vegetables tossed with a spicy peanut sauce. The flavor improves with time, so plan on making this crunchy salad the day before you need it. Bánh M? Tostadas - East meets West in this tasty fusion combo. Tostada means toasted in Spanish and is the name of a Mexican dish in which a toasted tortilla is the base for other ingredients that top it. Bánh m? is a popular Vietnamese sandwich that features crisp pickled vegetables, fragrant cilantro, chiles, and zesty hoisin and sriracha sauces. Soba Slaw - Plus - The Soba Slaw in Quick-Fix Vegan, with its chewy noodles and crunchy cabbage and carrots, is a nice refreshing salad on its own. To make it a heartier meal, however, I usually add some cooked shelled edamame or some diced baked tofu, and a little sriracha sauce to give it some heat. Chilled Glass Noodles with Snow Peas and Baked Tofu - This light but satisfying salad should be prepared at least 30 minutes ahead of time for the best flavor. Made from mung bean flour, glass noodles are also called cellophane noodles, bean thread noodles, and harusame. English Garden Salad- Little gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head-- and its perfect for this English Garden Salad. Chickpeas Nicoise - One of my favorite flavor combos is the one found in a Nicoise Salad:  the melding of creamy potatoes, fresh green beans, sweet tomatoes, and piquant olives hits all the right flavor notes. Watermelon Paletas- These watermelon popsicles make a refreshing end to a spicy meal or a cooling snack on a hot day. Pina Colada Squares -  These no-bake treats arent too sweet if you use unsweetened coconut. The post 10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for August appeared first on Robin Robertson.

English Garden Salad

August 7 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

English Garden SaladLittle gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head-- and it’s perfect for this English Garden Salad. If you cant find Little Gem lettuce, substitute another type of lettuce, such as Boston or Bibb. English Garden Salad Little gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head. If you cant find Little Gem lettuce, substitute another type of lettuce, such as Boston or Bibb. - 4 ounces thin asparagus or young green beans trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces - 1 cup green peas, fresh or frozen - 2 to 3 heads Little Gem lettuce or other tender lettuce, coarsely chopped (about 5 cups total) - 4 cherry or grape tomatoes, halved lengthwise - 1/­­2 English cucumber, thinly sliced - 4 red radishes, trimmed and thinly sliced - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon leaves - 1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives - 1 tablespoon torn small fresh mint leaves - 3 tablespoons olive oil - 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice or white wine vinegar - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1/­­8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - Pinch sugar - Steam the asparagus and peas over boiling water, using a steamer pot with a perforated insert until crisp-tender, 2 to 3 minute. Run cold water over the vegetables to stop the cooking process, then drain and pat dry. - Transfer the cooled vegetables to a large bowl. Add the lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, radishes, and fresh herbs. - In a small bowl, combine the oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper, and sugar. Drizzle over the salad and toss gently to combine. Serve immediately. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington.   The post English Garden Salad appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Indonesian Gado-Gado

August 1 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Indonesian Gado-GadoGado-Gado is an Indonesian main-dish salad of raw and cooked vegetables tossed with a spicy peanut sauce. The flavor improves with time, so plan on making this crunchy salad the day before you need it.   Indonesian Gado-Gado - 1 tablespoon neutral vegetable oil or 1/­­4 cup water - 2 shallots, chopped - 1 large clove garlic, chopped - 1/­­2 cup peanut butter - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons wheat-free tamari - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice - 1 teaspoon natural sugar - 1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne - 3/­­4 cup unsweetened coconut milk - 2 cups green beans, cut into 1-inch lengths - 1 cup small cauliflower florets - 2 carrots, shredded - 2 cups shredded cabbage - 1 cup fresh bean sprouts - 1/­­3 cup roasted peanuts - Heat the oil or water in a skillet over medium heat. Add the shallots and garlic. Cover and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the peanut butter, tamari, lemon juice, sugar, cayenne, and coconut milk. Simmer over low heat for 2 minutes, stirring to blend. - Transfer the mixture to a blender or food processor, or use an immersion blender, and puree until smooth, adding water or more coconut milk to thin, if needed. - Steam the green beans and cauliflower just until ten- der and place them in a large bowl. Add the carrots and cabbage. Pour the sauce over the vegetables and toss to combine. Sprinkle the bean sprouts and peanuts on top. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei. The post Indonesian Gado-Gado appeared first on Robin Robertson.

10 Vegan Pesto Recipes for Warm-Weather Meals

May 24 2017 VegKitchen 

10 Vegan Pesto Recipes for Warm-Weather Meals Theres something about pesto that immediately brings summer to mind -- of course, its that magical aroma of basil. And though basil is a must-have ingredient of classic pesto sauces, there are countless variations on the theme when it comes to vegan pesto recipes. Here are 10 recipes for pesto as well as dishes that […] The post 10 Vegan Pesto Recipes for Warm-Weather Meals appeared first on VegKitchen.

Green Bean Curry from Saffron Soul

May 21 2017 Oh My Veggies 

Fresh green beans are simmered in Indian spices with juicy tomatoes to create this healthy vegan curry.

What are Carbohydrates and Why Do We Need Them?

May 2 2017 VegKitchen 

What are Carbohydrates and Why Do We Need Them? Excerpted from Questioning Meat by Robin Schaper, reprinted by permission. What are carbohydrates, and what are carbohydrate foods? Why do we need carbohydrates? And what is the difference between good and bad carbs? Well answer these questions, but first, a distinction: We all need plenty of good carbs. Meat and other animal-based food contains hardly any […] The post What are Carbohydrates and Why Do We Need Them? appeared first on VegKitchen.

Creamy Spinach Soup + Our New Book!

March 18 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Spinach Soup + Our New Book! Woot woot! Before we jump into today’s recipe, we can finally share more information about our next book! It’s called Green Kitchen At Home and it’s something we have been working on under wraps for the past year. And now we have finally received a pre-copy of it. As the title suggests, this book is a gathering of all the recipes we eat most often in our home - our familys favorite dishes really. The book focuses on simple and comforting dishes that are easy to like, adapt and cook. We have tried to minimize weird ingredients so your mom, brother or non-vegetarian best friend also will find it inspiring and useful. Many recipes in the book have naturally started off here on the blog, but we are also sharing loads of previously unpublished recipes that we have kept within our family until now. Youll find the golden millet porridge or the Spinach & Banana Pancakes that we often make in the mornings, the savoury broccoli muffins that travel well in a backpack, sheet pan dinners for stressful weeknights, our super simple rye bread waffle toast, a fun vegetarian version of fish & chips, wine-baked mushrooms for a weekend with friends, and our childrens favorite - our va-va-voom baked donuts that have been a success at many kids parties. And lots more. Its not a vegan book as we eat egg and cheese in our family, but just like our other books, many recipes have vegan suggestions. A lot of the recipes are based on our fridge staples and in the book we show how to vary these staples into a multitude of easy shortcut dinners. The book has about 100 recipes in total - and all of them have been tested by a separate tester. We will be sharing more info as we are closing in on the release. It feels crazy and completely unreal that we have actually written a fourth cookbook and we are immensely grateful for all your support along the way. We hope that you will love this book and find it useful at home. We are planning a small US book tour and will let you know more about that really soon. The book is released already on 1 April in Australia and NZ, 20 April in the UK and 2 May in the US. It will also be released in several European languages after the summer. Here are some pre-order links:   Amazon.co.uk (UK). Amazon.com (USA). Booktopia.com (Australia & NZ). To celebrate the book, we made soup. A very green soup. The soup itself is good and simple. Basically just leek, potatoes and spinach. But what gives it a delicious and pungent kick is the topping. Quick-cooked green beans are tossed in a spicy chermoula made from pickled jalape?os, herbs, oil, lemon and a dash of maple syrup and it works so well with the mild and creamy soup. We also add avocado, yogurt and a generous drizzle of hemp seeds on top which takes it up another notch. Sometimes when a recipe image looks too good, I find myself thinking “but it probably isn’t that good in real life”. This is. One great thing with this method is that our kids eat this soup with just a drizzle of yogurt instead of the spicy beans, while we (for once) get it exactly as spicy as we want it. Everyone’s happy! The inspiration for this soup actually came from a toast. One of our favorite Stockholm cafes, Pom & Flora, serve an avocado toast with pickled jalapeno chermoula, cream cheese and hemp seeds. That toast has such a lovely combination of sweet, creamy and spicy tones, and this soup picks up much of the same flavors. A visit to one of their cafes is mandatory if you are visiting Stockholm! Spinach & Potato Soup with Spicy Chermoula Beans Serves 4 This soup is spectacular paired with the beans, but if you decide to serve it without you can add some chili flakes to the recipe to make it a little more pungent. 1 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil or olive oil 2 small leeks, rinsed and finely chopped 2 cloves garlic 1-2 tbsp fresh ginger 2 tbsp fresh thyme, chopped 600 g potatoes, peeled 4 cups/­­1 liter vegetable stock (or 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water + 1 tbsp dried vegetable stock powder) 1 large bunch /­­ 150 g large-leaf fresh spinach, rinsed and thick stems discarded sea salt, to taste Serve with 1 avocado, sliced yogurt or coconut yogurt Jalape?o Chermoula Beans (recipe below) hemp seeds drizzle of olive oil Heat oil in a large sauce pan on medium heat. Rinse and finely chop the leeks, peel and crush the garlic and grate the ginger. Add them to the saucepan along with the thyme and let sauté for a few minutes until soft and smells fragrant. Peel the potatoes, cut them into quarters and add them to the saucepan along with vegetable stock. Let cook for 10-15 minutes and then add spinach. Stir to let the spinach wilt down into the soup and let simmer for just a few minutes. Use a hand blender to mix the soup smooth. Add salt, taste and adjust the flavours. Serve the soup topped with a quartered and sliced avocado, a dollop of yogurt, jalapeno chermoula beans (see recipe below), a scattering of hemp seeds and a drizzle of olive oil. Jalape?o Chermoula Beans 1 tbsp cumin seeds 1 large bunch fresh parsley 1/­­2 lemon, juice 10-12 slices pickled jalape?os (or 1 whole) 2 cloves garlic, peeled 1 tbsp maple syrup 4 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil sea salt 1 large handful /­­ 200 g green string beans Toast cumin seeds in a dry skillet on low-medium heat for a few minutes. Add them to a mortar (or food processor) along with the other ingredients (except the beans). Use the pestle to mash everything into coarse dressing (or pulse a few times if using a food processor). Taste and adjust the flavors. Bring water to a boil in a large sauce pan. Trim off the ends off the beans and cut them in half. Add the beans to the water and let them cook for no more than two minutes. Strain the water and add the chermoula to the sauce pan. Toss until all the beans are dressed with the sauce.

Sarah Bs Balinese Gado Gado

February 5 2017 My New Roots 

Sarah Bs Balinese Gado Gado First of all, hello you. Its been a while. I can hardly believe that the holidays are behind us and even the whole of January. What happened?! Well, before I launch into the recipe, I just wanted to update you all on a couple things. I need to start by saying that the Wild Heart High Spirit Bali Retreat was, without a doubt, one of the coolest projects Ive ever had the pleasure to work on. Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I welcomed and held space for 16 women to totally transform, and come out on the other side of seven days, new humans. We all landed back into our physical bodies, rediscovering the euphoria of movement and breath, the taste of real food, the feeling of laughter in our cells, sun on our skin, smiles in our hearts. I could go on forever about how deeply moved I feel about the whole thing, but I will just say thank you to everyone who came, and that we are going to do another one very, very soon. There are a few photos from the retreat at the bottom of this post - I hope you enjoy, and join us next time. Also. Cookbook tour. Its happening. Naturally Nourished officially lands in North America February 14th and I am close behind. Ill be visiting New York, Toronto, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles. There are more details at the bottom of this post and on my Events page, so please have a look. For all other countries, please stay tuned! Now, its recipe time. If youre a vegetarian traveling through Indonesia, gado gado will save your life. Its the dish that is on every single menu, a veggie-loaded, protein-rich salad drenched in the most flavourful, luscious peanut sauce that youve ever tasted. Combining raw and slightly steamed or blanched vegetables and bean sprouts, it is typically served with fried tofu or boiled eggs and prawn crackers, but so easily made vegan. The first time I traveled to this part of the world, I ate gado gado so often, that I almost grew tired of it. Almost. What was my initial meal to celebrate the return to the magical island of Bali this time? Naturally, gado gado, and it did not disappoint. There is something incredibly satisfying about the dish, something that grabs a hold and makes you coming back for more - I believe it is the exquisite balancing act of flavours and textures. The veggies are light and tender (never mushy!), the sprouts are crunchy and fresh, but the true magic lies da sauce. It hits all the notes with its creamy, rich, salty, sweet, acidic, toasty and spiciness. While eating it youre coming up with ways to justify pouring it on everything (Rice? Yes! Spring rolls? Obviously! Roasted veggies? Of course! Bean salad? Why not?!). Of all the dishes I taught during my retreat cooking classes in Bali, this is the one that the ladies really went wild for. Because sauce. I will mention that I am taking major liberties with the traditional recipe, keeping my version vegan and soy-free, and switching out the peanuts for more health-supportive almonds. I realize that this is akin to making pasta out of vegetables (i.e. not at all pasta), but we often and readily make allowances for the promise of something healthier, so just roll with me on this one, okay? Thanks. But Sarah, whats wrong with peanuts? You may recall me tackling this subject before, but for those of you who are hearing just learning that peanuts and the things made with it are less-than-awesome, lets recap! Although there are a lot worse things you could be eating, there are also plenty of healthier choices than peanuts, and heres why. First of all, peanuts are a bit of an odd duck plant. Not a true nut, but a bean in fact, peanuts grow underground in their thin-skinned pods, which come into direct contact with the surrounding soil. Because this soil is often moist and warm, it presents the ideal environment for fungus to proliferate. Now, its not the fungus that is the issue in this case, but the poison it releases, called alflatoxin, which is a cancer-causing agent that attacks the liver. What is the most shocking news, is that the highest levels of alflatoxin arent found in big brand peanut butters, but in the peanut butter ground fresh in health food stores. Second of all, conventionally-grown peanuts are sprayed with very high levels of pesticides and are one of the most contaminated crops in the North America. They are also often genetically modified. Thirdly, peanuts contain very high levels of Omega-6 fatty acids, an essential fat that we consume too much of in general. Ideally, Omega-6 and Omega-3 fats should be consumed in a 3:1 ratio (like the ratio found in hemp seeds!), otherwise inflammation erupts in the body. If youre a serious peanut and peanut butter lover, there are a few things you can do. For starters, find a brand of peanuts that have been grown organically in a dry environment (New Mexico for instance). Dry environments mean drier soils, which means less fungus. Make sure the nuts you are buying are very fresh and raw, since the word roasted cruelly translates to deep fried. Dry-roasted are okay since they dont use oil in the cooking process, but these nuts are typically old. But the best alternative of all? Other nuts! Like almonds. Almonds are high in vitamin E, a potent antioxidant that makes our skin look radiant, and helps protect again heart disease. Almonds have been proven to help lower cholesterol, the risk of weight gain and diabetes. They have about half the amount of Omega-6 fats that peanuts do, along with fewer calories. I snack on almonds and almond butter whenever I can, and have successfully replaced peanuts with this healthier option. I hope youre inspired to do the same! The cool thing about this dish is that you can make it any time of year with seasonal veggies and prepare them the way that suits you and the outdoor temperature, while keeping the sauce exactly the same. I like to eat veggies almost entirely raw in the summer, and include things like cucumber, green beans, radish, and lettuces. In the winter however, gado gado is truly the prefect cold-weather salad since everything can be slightly cooked and enjoyed warm. For this version, I chose two kinds of cabbage, kale, carrots, sweet potato, and freshly sprouted mung beans. An improvement Ive made since teaching this recipe at the retreat was tossing the still-warm vegetables in virgin coconut oil - best decision. This adds a whole other layer of flavour and creaminess, plus adds even more richness, which need this time of year. Did I mention theres also sauce?! There are a couple ways of making my version of gado gado sauce. The best method, for sure, is roasting your own almonds and making your own fresh nut butter. The flavour will truly blow your mind if you go in this direction. But! If you are pressed for time and /­­ or dont feel like going through the rigmarole, you can totally use store-bought almond butter. Just make sure that it is unsweetened and made from roasted almonds, not raw. We want the full depth of flavour here - raw almond butter is too mild and will be overwhelmed by the other sauce ingredients.     Print recipe     Sarah B’s Balinese Gado Gado Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed coconut oil 1/­­2 small head savoy cabbage, shredded 1/­­2 small head red cabbage, shredded 6-7 lacinato kale leaves, ribbed and sliced into ribbons 2 medium sweet potato 4 carrots, julienned or spiralized 2 cups packed /­­ 180g mung bean sprouts (or any sprouts!) 2 shallots, sliced into rings 1 small bunch cilantro, roughly chopped a few pinches flaky sea salt limes for serving, optional Almond Gado Gado Sauce 350g almonds = 1 cup /­­ 250ml almond butter 1 small chili, to taste (use as much or as little as you like) 1 clove garlic 2 Tbsp. tamari juice of 1/­­2 lime 2 Tbsp. coconut sugar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml full-fat coconut milk 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml water, to thin as needed Directions: 1. Make the almond gado gado: preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Spread almonds out evenly on a cookie sheet and roast until fragrant and golden, about 10-15 minutes. Check often - they burn quickly! Remove from oven and let cool. 2.  Place the almonds in a food processor and pulse to chop them up, then remove a good handful for garnish. Blend the remaining almonds on high, scraping down the sides every so often, until the mixture becomes smooth and liquid. Depending on your food processor, this may take up to 10 minutes - be patient, it will work! 3. Roughly chop the chili and garlic, add them to a food processor, along with the tamari, lime juice, coconut sugar and coconut milk. Blend on high and add water to achieve the correct the consistency: the sauce should be thin enough to pour, but not water-y. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. Store in a glass jar with an airtight lid (keep leftovers in the fridge). 4. Wash and prepare the vegetables: cut the sweet potato into wedges, spiralize or julienne the carrots, shred the cabbage and kale. Set a steamer over boiling water and place the sweet potato inside first, cover, and set a timer for 6 minutes. If the sweet potatoes are tender at this point, remove them from the steamer and set aside and toss with a little of the coconut oil, then cover to keep warm (if they are still raw, continue to steam until tender). Next place the carrots and cabbage in the steamer and cook for 2-4 minutes until tender-crisp, then toss with remaining coconut oil. In a large bowl combine all the steamed veggies with sprouts, shallots and cilantro. Sprinkle with salt and toss. 5. To serve, spoon a generous portion of sauce onto each plate. Lay the salad on top (or arrange it neatly as I have), sprinkle with chopped, toasted almonds, more cilantro and shallots, as desired. Top with more sauce, if desired. Dig in.   Here are some shots I took during the retreat in Bali. It was beyond magical. If you’d like to stay updated about the next one, please sign up for our newsletter and be the first to know once we announce! And now for the book tour! I am so insanely excited to get on the road with my latest cookbook, Naturally Nourished, which you can preorder here. I’ll be in New York City and Toronto first, and tickets for the events in those cities are now available. Check the Events page, Instagram and Facebook for the remaining cities, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles. See you soon! February 20th My New Roots x The Aerie Collective: WisdomShare “Turning Your Creativity Into a Career” Spend an evening with Sarah for an inspiring presentation about how she has grown her food blogging passion into a thriving career. Her book is available for purchase & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 21st My New Roots + Food52 Livestream Tune in to Food52’s Facebook at 3pm EST, for a live broadcast of Sarah Britton demonstrating two of her favourite recipes from her new cookbook Naturally Nourished. Live event link: www.facebook.com/­­food52 February 21st My New Roots + Jessica Murnane + Julia Turshen A very special night of inspiring conversation + a celebration + great women in food! Join us for the launch party of two beautiful & brilliant new cookbooks: Sarah Britton’s Naturally Nourished and Jessica Murnane’s One Part Plant With the conversation led by the highly acclaimed author & chef, Julia Turshen. Come for the bites, drinks, and book signings by all three women – stay for the good times & (selfies)! Click here for tickets and more details February 22nd My New Roots + Amy Chaplin + The Finch: Plant-based Dinner Celebration We’re thrilled to invite you to a very special dinner collaboration at Michelin-starred restaurant The Finch, celebrating two fantastic women in food. Join us for this inspired & intimate gathering. Click here for tickets and more details TORONTO February 24th My New Roots x The Aerie Collective: WisdomShare “Turning Your Creativity Into a Career” Spend an evening with Sarah for an inspiring presentation about how she has grown her food blogging passion into a thriving career. Her book is available for purchase & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 25th Naturally Nourished Book Launch at Appetito! We’re very happy to welcome you to join us for an excting interview with Sarah, Q&A, recipe tasting from the cookbook, book purchasing & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 26th My New Roots + The First Mess: Cookbook Celebration Gathering Together with Sarah, Laura and an incredible community we would love to invite you to meet, feast & celebrate in their cookbook launch! Click here for tickets and more details The post Sarah B’s Balinese Gado Gado appeared first on My New Roots.

9 Meatless Thanksgiving Sides

November 21 2016 Meatless Monday 

9 Meatless Thanksgiving SidesGive Thanks with these Seasonal Side Dishes There is so much more to a Thanksgiving meal than just the turkey. Thanksgiving is a time for families to gather, catch up and, of course, share the foods they love. We’ve hand-picked the best meatless sides for your Thanksgiving dinner, courtesy of our Official Meatless Monday bloggers. Bring some of these flavorful side dishes to your family’s table and share the delicious benefits of plant-based foods! Oven Roasted Root Vegetables | The Roasted Root Lighter Stuffing Muffins | Homemade Nutrition Roasted Green Beans | Mango & Tomato Fluffy Cornbread {Vegan} | The Veg Life! Mashed Cauliflower | Veggie Chick Cranberry- Ginger Sauce | Kroll’s Korner Hasselback Potatoes | The Salty Tomato Roasted Brussel Sprouts and Apples with Balsamic Glaze | Bean a Foodie Mom’s Sweet Potato Casserole Made Gluten- Free and Vegan | Eating Bird Food The post 9 Meatless Thanksgiving Sides appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Green Beans Amandine

October 18 2016 Vegetarian Times 

1  Blanch beans in large pot of boiling, salted water 4 to 6 minutes, or until bright green and just tender. Transfer to bowl of ice water to stop cooking, and drain once cold. 2  Melt butter in large skillet or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add shallots, and cook 4 minutes, or until golden, stirring frequently. Add beans; cook 1 to 2 minutes, or until heated through. Season with salt and pepper, then toss with almonds.

Marinated Summer Vegetables and Beans over Freekeh

July 6 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Marinated Summer Vegetables and Beans over Freekeh Today I thought I would share an everyday recipe that I make quite often, great for satisfying a vegetable craving, and nourishing but summery at the same time. One of my favorite treatments for vegetables, besides the go-to roasting/­­steaming/­­sautéing, is marinating, which is especially good for summer, since marinated vegetables are at their best when cold. Marinated beans are another staple in our house. I try to make a pot of beans most weekends, and let them develop in a marinade of lemon juice, oil, garlic and herbs over the week. It’s a great thing to have in the refrigerator for spooning into salads and bowls throughout the workweek – an easy way to make a quick, nourishing meal. Right now, I’m obsessed with Rancho Gordo’s heirloom Scarlet Runner Beans, which are perfectly plump, meaty and creamy all at the same time, but use any favorite beans in this recipe. In this dish, a rainbow of crisp, blanched and sautéed summer vegetables and velvety beans is marinated in a simple, garlicky and mildly spicy dressing. Use whichever vegetables you have on hand here – omitting a few is fine – but I recommend keeping the cauliflower as a constant, whether purple or regular in color, as it tastes amazing here. Have you tried freekeh yet? It’s fairly new to me, and very much worth seeking out if you’re looking for variety in your grain selection for salads and bowls. Freekeh is made of an ancient wheat variety, which is harvested when young and roasted over an open fire, which burns off all of the grain’s outer shell, while the inner young grain stays intact. This intricate process yields a pleasant, slightly smoky flavor. These veggies and beans taste delicious over freekeh, but any grain of choice can of course be used in place of it. Lastly, this year’s Saveur blog awards are upon us, and being nominated has proven to be an important milestone for any food blog, a kind door opener if you will. If you enjoy our recipes and photos, we would be absolutely thrilled if you could take a minute out of your day and nominate us for the food obsessive award category, which is basically a special diet category, (or any other category that you see fit). It would truly mean the world. Thank you for your support, and as always, we wouldn’t be here without your readership. Marinated Summer Vegetables and Beans over Freekeh   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the marinade 1 tablespoon cumin seeds 4 garlic cloves - minced juice of 1 lemon - freshly squeezed 1 teaspoon sweet Hungarian paprika ½ teaspoon sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice or more to taste 3 tablespoons olive oil sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste for the vegetables and beans 1 small cauliflower head - cut into florets 1 yellow summer squash or zucchini - sliced into bite-sized pieces 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 small broccoli head - cut into florets handful green beans - strings removed if present sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2-3 large kale leaves - stems removed and sliced (optional) 1 large carrot - shaved into ribbons with a vegetable peeler 1 cup cooked beans large handful fresh dill - minced large handful parsley - minced 1 cup freekeh or other grain of choice - cooked (optional) Instructions to make the marinade Toast cumin seeds in a small pan until fragrant, for about 1 minute, then grind in a mortar and pestle. Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until blended well. Set aside. to cook the vegetables Bring well salted water to a boil in a medium soup pot. Prepare an ice or cold water bath for blanched vegetables. Add cauliflower to the boiling water and blanch for 2 minutes. Add zucchini and blanch together with the cauliflower for another minute. Drain and transfer into the cold water bath. Warm coconut oil in a large saute pan over medium high heat. Add broccoli and green beans, sprinkle with salt and freshly ground black pepper, and saute for 3-4 minutes, until bright green and crisp-tender. Add kale and stir around until wilted. Add cauliflower, zucchini and carrots, toss to combine. Remove from heat, add beans and herbs. Pour marinade over and toss to coat. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Serve immediately over freekeh/­­other grain of choice or transfer to a glass container and let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Refrigerate until ready to eat. The flavors will develop further with time. Notes You can cook the vegetables any preferred way - steam, boil or sauté. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Summer Squash Herb Salad Ethiopian Injera with Mustard Lentils and Braised Cabbage Colourful Veggie Falafel with Pickled Turnips Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Marinated Summer Vegetables and Beans over Freekeh appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Summer Greek Salad

June 23 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Summer Greek Salad I’m getting over a bad cold that really took me down by surprise, and finding myself craving plates of vegetables and not much else, after having no appetite for a few days. Having a big batch of this summery Greek salad in the refrigerator has been helpful for regaining some strength and vibrance. I’ve been making salads like this one quite a lot these past few hot months, they are can serve as a great fridge clean-out aid, and are just really delicious. I love to order a bowl of good Greek salad when out. Everything about the combination of fluffy lettuce (original Greek salad does not come with lettuce, I’ve learned), juicy tomatoes, crunchy cucumbers, briny olives, a bit of sharpness from onion, and creamy feta is just right. This is my upgraded and loaded summer version of Greek salad, with the addition of protein-rich chickpeas, grilled and raw zucchini, bell peppers, spears of asparagus and green beans, and various herbs. Since I’m wanting to eat plants only while getting over this cold, I opted out of feta cheese, replacing it with savory toasted pine nuts and a sprinkle of nutritional yeast – the vegan answer to cheese. If you haven’t tried nutritional yeast yet, it’s a really neat and nourishing little topping, composed entirely of flakey, deactivated yeast, and with a surprisingly cheesy, nutty flavor. Enjoy :) Summer Greek Salad   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients for the dressing 3 garlic cloves - minced 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 teaspoon sea salt freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup olive oil for the salad ½ red onion - sliced thinly juice of ½ lemon handful asparagus - tough ends removed handful green beans - strings removed if present 1-2 small to medium zucchini - grilled 2 cups romaine lettuce - torn 1 cup cooked chickpeas 1 small to medium yellow summer squash - shaved w/­­ a vegetable peeler 1 cup cherry tomatoes 1-2 heirloom tomatoes - sliced 1 small English cucumber - sliced 1 red or yellow bell pepper - sliced 1 cup olives ½ cup pine nuts - toasted nutritional yeast - for sprinkling, to taste handful basil leaves - torn handful parsley and dill - finely chopped Instructions to make the dressing Combine all the ingredients in a small jar, whisk until smooth. to make the salad Place red onion in a small bowl, squeeze lemon juice over it, toss to coat and and let marinate while making the salad. Grill, blanch or saute asparagus and green beans until crisp-tender and bright green. Grill the zucchini. Arrange romaine lettuce, chickpeas, yellow squash ribbons, tomatoes, cucumber and bell pepper slices, olives, asparagus, green beans, and grilled zucchini on a large platter. Drain onion slices and scatter them over the salad. Drizzle the dressing over the salad and sprinkle with pine nuts and nutritional yeast. Garnish with fresh herbs. Serve immediately. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Sorghum Pilaf with Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Cranberries and Grapes Beet Mille-Feuille from the La Tartine Gourmande Cookbook Mung Bean Falafel Bowl with Pickled Rainbow Chard Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Summer Greek Salad appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans

August 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I have a major weakness for anything marinated, especially vegetables and beans or lentils, probably because of where I grew up. Though Russian cuisine is known for straightforward foods like meat, potatoes, and mayonnaise-heavy salads, I come from a special pocket in the southwest of Russia, where the foods of many cultures intersect. We have culinary influence from Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Karachay-Cherkessia – all Southern nations that are known for their use of spices and herbs that make their food much brighter than traditional Russian fare. The region is also known for delicious, marinated foods, which I grew up eating lots of – marinated eggplant, peppers, mushrooms, green beans and so on. You name it, and chances are that they marinate it. That might be why I’m so excited to share this light, summery, fennel-marinated zucchini and mung bean dish. It’s comfort food to me, and I think you’ll really like it as well :) What brings this whole dish together is the lemony fennel marinade. I usually reach for cumin when putting together marinades for vegetables, but I had the epiphany to use fennel here, and I’m so happy I did. It has the perfect, bright and summery anise flavor, which is also quite unique. Another amazing thing about fennel is that it’s a digestion aid. In parts of India, fennel seeds are chewed after a meal precisely for that purpose, and also as a breath freshener. So cool! The preparation here is quite low maintenance, and we’ve got a video up top to show the whole process. The zucchini is not cooked, just ribboned and marinated, which makes it softer, but with a pleasant, crisp bite. It’s served over marinated mung beans (I mixed in some lentils as well), with lots of herbs, microgreens and avocado. This dish can serve as an excellent, summery side or an addition to salads, but honestly, I’ve been eating it as a light meal most of the time. It’s nourishing and filling enough because of the inclusion of fiber and protein-rich mung beans and lentils. Both mung beans and lentils fall under the nutritious category of pulses, together with all other beans, chickpeas and dried peas, which might just be the most affordable superfoods out there. This year, we are working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on creating some simple, weekday-friendly pulse recipes, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. Making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week always leads to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes, check out our Red Lentil Gazpacho, White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, or any recipes on the Pulses website. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup mung beans or French lentils, or a combination of both - soaked in purified water overnight sea salt 4 small zucchini - sliced into thin ribbons lengthwise, preferably on a mandolin ⅓ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice ⅓ cup olive oil ½ tablespoon fennel seeds - toasted and freshly ground 1 garlic clove - minced pinch of red pepper flakes about 1 cup minced fresh herbs, such as dill, mint, parsley, basil, cilantro freshly ground black pepper avocado - for serving (optional) microgreens - for garnish (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the mung beans/­­lentils and place them in a medium soup pot. Cover with plenty of water, bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 7 minutes. Taste for doneness and cook longer if needed, until fully cooked, but not mushy. Add salt at the end. Drain, transfer to a medium bowl or shallow dish and set aside. If cooking both mung beans and lentils, cook them separately, as they have different cooking times. Place the ribboned zucchini in a colander and generously sprinkle with salt. Let soften and release excess liquid for up to 30 minutes. In a small bowl, combine the lemon juice, olive oil, fennel seeds, garlic and red pepper flakes, mix until well combined. Add half of the marinade, half of the herbs, salt and pepper to the dish with the cooked mung beans/­­lentils and stir to coat. Rinse the zucchini, pat it dry with paper towels, and transfer to a medium shallow dish. Add the remaining marinade, herbs, salt and pepper to the zucchini, and toss to coat. Roll the zucchini slices and put them into the dish with the mung beans/­­lentils. Drizzle any remaining marinade over top. Alternatively, you can simply combine the beans, zucchini, all of the marinade, herbs, salt and pepper in a dish or bowl, and toss to coat thoroughly, skipping the rolling of the slices (that step is just for looks). Cover the dish and let marinate in the refrigerator for a few hours or days - the longer, the better. Serve garnished with avocado and microgreens, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Barley Tomato Salad Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables

July 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables Here’s a true weeknight dinner scenario. I found some leftover raw broccoli and green beans while cleaning out the fridge the other day, and decided to roast them up to extend their shelf life and work them into salads and bowls throughout the week. I love how roasting transforms both of those vegetables from something quite boring to savory and special. The very next day, they made it into this very easy, creamy green pasta that I spontaneously threw together. It exceeded my expectations and got my eight year old devouring both green beans and broccoli, which is a huge triumph in my book. She was even impressed enough to suggest that I share the recipe on the blog, so here I am :) Paloma is a pretty good eater as far as kids her age go. She eats most leafy salads, loves to munch on raw carrots and apples, and could easily devour a certain teff polenta of mine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. When it comes to things like broccoli and green beans (and mushrooms!) though, she is your typical, picky eight year old. If anything of the sort makes it onto her plate, she begins the meal with diplomatic negotiations about how she will eat this, but not that, and what sort of dessert she will be getting as a reward. We do have a rule that she has to try everything before refusing it, which is what got her with this pasta. In this recipe, the noodles are cooked in a creamy mixture of coconut milk and veggie broth, and jazzed up with some garlic and miso, while the caramelized, roasted vegetables get mixed in and slathered in all that creamy goodness as well. This preparation makes the otherwise tame green veggies into something irresistible, as proven by my kid’s enthusiasm. It’s also just a really great, easily customizable weeknight recipe. The roasted green beans and broccoli can be replaced by any other roasted vegetables, and you can play around with the addition of other types of greens, herbs and spices. I hope you’ll give this one a try :) Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Vegetables   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the vegetables 1 small head of broccoli - cut into florets about 8 oz green beans - strings removed, if present 3 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or other oil of choice 3 garlic cloves - minced sea salt freshly ground black pepper for the pasta 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk or 1½ cups almond milk 2 cups vegetable broth sea salt freshly ground black pepper pinch of red pepper flakes 10 oz whole grain fettuccine 2 tablespoons miso paste 2 tablespoons vegetable broth or coconut/­­almond milk about 3 cups spinach (optional) 2-3 garlic cloves - minced juice of ½ lemon 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (optional) handful parsley leaves - chopped handful basil leaves - torn (optional) Instructions to roast the vegetables Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Line a rimmed baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper and place the broccoli and green beans on the sheet. Drizzle the vegetables with the oil, sprinkle with minced garlic, salt and pepper, and toss with your hands, making sure to coat the vegetables thoroughly with the oil. Roast for 20 minutes, or until soft and golden in places, turning the baking sheet at half time. to cook the pasta While the vegetables are roasting, combine the milk, vegetable broth, salt, pepper and red pepper flakes in a wide saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Add the pasta and simmer until al dente, according to the time on the package. Add more broth/­­milk if needed. While the pasta is cooking, combine 2 tablespoons each miso paste and veggie broth/­­milk in a small bowl and mix until smooth. When the pasta is done, remove it from the heat and mix in the spinach to wilt it, if using. Add in the miso mixture, garlic, lemon juice and nutritional yeast, if using, and stir to incorporate. Mix in the roasted vegetables and herbs. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Vegan Menu: Greek Potato Stew

May 22 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Menu: Greek Potato Stew When warm weather settles in, there are still plenty of opportunities to enjoy comforting fare like this easy Greek Potato Stew with Zucchini and Green Beans. Though its bursting with summery flavors in a mellow tomato base, it can actually be enjoyed any time of year. My favorite time to make it is in late […] The post Vegan Menu: Greek Potato Stew appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Curry with Sweet Potatoes, Chickpeas and Eggplant

May 4 2017 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Curry with Sweet Potatoes, Chickpeas and Eggplant I steered toward cozy, comfort food last night. My kitchen provides a respite for the chaotic world outside the door, and in our own personal lives. With my Spice Tiffin and my mother's vintage copper bottom pot at hand, I was able to whip up a wonderful, aromatic, flavorful, smooth not too-spicy-but-just-right curry. I added a touch of coconut milk to the dish just before serving. There's something magical about the addition of coconut milk to curries. I can't quite put my finger on it, but it's a fine balance of how the flavors meld together before and after--the after being much, much better. This dish took me about 30 minutes give or take. I used my new favorite cookbook for inspiration: America's Test Kitchen Vegan for Everybody.  The first step in any cooking direction I take when it comes to making curry is to add spices to warm oil. I always include brown mustard seeds. They impart a tart component that, once cooked down, evolve into a creaminess. Well, to my mind they do. Then you add a bit of this and that from the spices you see here. My general ratio is more of the Sweet Curry spice to the rest (I get mine at Penzey's)--and I add based upon my preferred tastes for the evening. I wanted a garam masala boost to this dish: warm cinnamon and cloves permeate this on the front end, but once I added in my second favorite curry seasoning: The Now Curry (again, from Penzeys), it came together very nicely. My motto in curry is: More is Better. I keep tasting until I find the right heat, flavor combo. Taste. Taste. Taste. I only needed half an eggplant for this. I find I dislike the taste of eggplant heavy flavor. I bet that's why I love the addition of coconut milk to this curry. The flavor boosters go in next: minced fresh ginger, garlic and onion (diced, not minced). Then the other veggies I have on hand: eggplant, sweet potato, some green pepper, a handful of green beans. It then is up to you as to whether or not you want to add a can of diced tomatoes. I usually do. I had a splash of veggie broth left over from the other night, and about a half cup of it was added, plus a little water. Then I added about a third of a cup of coconut milk and that's when the flavors really did their thing.  We are experiencing our second flood in our community in fifteen months. I look at the map of the rest of the country and it's as if there is the vortex here in the middle that keeps circling around our state just daring us to keep dry. The photos above were taken on our single sunny day we had on Tuesday as the waters on the Meramec River began rising.  She hates this weather.  Meantime, I baked more vegan chocolate chip cookies. My End of World plan for survival.  Vegan Curry with Sweet Potatoes, Chickpeas and Eggplant 3 T. olive oil 1 T. vegan butter 1" minced fresh ginger 3 garlic cloves minced 1 onion diced 1 t. brown mustard seeds 2-3 t. curry powder 1/­­2 t. tumuric powder 2 t. garam masala salt and pepper to taste 1 medium sweet potato cut into half moons 1 green pepper chopped 1/­­2 medium eggplant chopped into 1/­­2" pieces 1 can chickpeas 1/­­2 cup green beans 1/­­2 cup or more veggie broth 1 can diced tomatoes 1/­­3 cup lite coconut milk Over medium heat, add oil and spices. When mustard seeds begin to pop, add the rest of the veggies. Simmer for about five minutes. Add remaining ingredients and allow to simmer together about 20 minutes. Taste as you develop the flavor. If mixture becomes too thick, add more broth or coconut milk. Serve over rice.  

Pea and Avocado Penne

March 20 2017 Meatless Monday 

Sweet peas are mashed with avocado and toasted pine nuts for an untraditional, yet luxuriously creamy, pesto sauce. String beans, lima beans and penne round out this green-hued pasta to celebrate Spring. This recipe comes to us from Trudy of veggie.num.num. Serves 6 For the pea and avocado pesto: - 1 1/­­2 ounces pine nuts, toasted - 2 cups baby peas, shelled - 1 avocado - 2 garlic cloves, diced - Lemon juice, to taste - 2 cups baby spinach, roughly chopped To complete the Pea and Avocado Penne: - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 10.5 ounces penne pasta, cooked according to package instructions - 9 ounces green beans, trimmed - 1 1/­­2 cups canned lima beans, drained and rinsed - or - 1 1/­­2 cups fresh lima beans, cooked To make the pea and avocado pesto: Toast the pine nuts in a dry pan over medium-high heat for 2-4 minutes, or until the pine nuts become fragrant. Set aside to cool. Place about 3 cups of water in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil and cook the peas for 1-3 minutes, or until just tender. Strain, rinse and set aside. When the pine nuts have cooled, reserve a few for garnish. Chop the rest roughly. Place the avocado, pees, garlic, chopped pine nuts together in a large bowl. Drizzle with a few squeezes of lemon juice and mash with a fork until the pesto comes together, but still maintains some variety of texture. Stir in the chopped baby spinach and set aside. To complete the Pea Avocado Penne: Place fill a double boiler or steamer with water over medium-high heat. Add the green beans and steam for 3-4 minutes, or until just tender. Set aside. Heat the olive oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the steamed green beans and lima beans, toss to combine and cook for 1-2 minutes. Add the cooked penne and mix until combined. Reduce heart to low and add the pea and avocado pesto. Toss until the pesto is evenly distributed on throughout the penne, green beans and lima beans. Divide the pasta into 6 portions and enjoy topped with the reserved pine nuts and a few extra baby spinach leaves. The post Pea and Avocado Penne appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Crispy Quinoa Crumbs

February 16 2017 VegKitchen 

Crispy Quinoa Crumbs Here’s a clever way to turn quinoa into tasty crispy crumbs. They pack more nutrition than breadcrumbs and are naturally gluten-free. Bake up a batch and you’ll see why we love to have them on hand.The post Crispy Quinoa Crumbs appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Lucky Meatless Recipes to Start the Chinese New Year

January 23 2017 Meatless Monday 

Lucky Meatless Recipes to Start the Chinese New YearThe Chinese New Year begins this Saturday to usher in the Year of the Rooster. This annual tradition originates from a timeless legend about a deadly beast who could only be frightened away by loud noises, bright lights and the color red. The vibrant festivities take place not only in Mainland China, but also in areas with significant Chinese populations, such as Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines. The Chinese year is based on the lunar calendar and the animal for each year is assigned by Chinese astrology. In fact, if youre interested, check out these additional Chinese New Year tidbits. This two-week celebration is full of family, fun, and, of course, great food. Special dishes are prepared that are said to bring prosperity and good fortune in the New Year. The classic Chinese dumplings, which can be made with just vegetables, are always a favorite. And Spring Rolls have a pale yellow color that resembles gold bars. Theres also good fortune fruit, such as oranges and tangerines, that are always very popular. We invite you to enjoy some of these wonderful meatless recipes below and wish you good fortune and great prosperity in the coming Chinese New Year!   Longevity Noodles, Driftwood Gardens    Tea Eggs for Chinese New Year,  She’s Cookin’ Soy Nuggets in Chinese Garlic Brown Sauce, Simply Vegetarian 777 Vegetarian Chinese Dumplings in Soup, An Exercise in Trivial Pursuits Honey, Soy, and Ginger Stir-Fry, 40 Plus and All is Well Stir Fry Spicy Green Beans, Easy Cooking with Molly Vegetable Spring Roll, Bok Choi and Broccoli For more recipes to help you celebrate a meatless Chinese New Year, visit our Pinterest board or the Meatless Monday recipe archive! The post Lucky Meatless Recipes to Start the Chinese New Year appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry

October 31 2016 Meatless Monday 

Green beans, bell peppers and chunks of pumpkin are seasoned sweet and spicy with chilis, curry paste and coconut water. Kaffir lime leaves and Thai basils herbal notes add depth to the flavor of this curry, finished off with a bright squeeze of lime. This recipe comes to us from Ashley of Ashleyz Sprout. Serves 4 - 2 tablespoons canola oil - 3 tablespoons red or yellow curry paste* - 1-2 Thai chilis*, minced - 1 can coconut water* - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons sugar - 3 kaffir lime leaves* - 1/­­2 cup green beans, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1/­­4 cup bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1/­­4 cup Fresno peppers, cut into 1-inch pieces - 1/­­2 8 ounce block extra-firm tofu, cubed - 3/­­4 cup pumpkin, peeled and cubed - 1 cup low sodium vegetable broth - 1/­­2 cup Thai basil leaves* - 1 lime, cut into wedges *Found in Asian markets or the Asian section of some grocery stores. Place the oil into a large wok over medium-high heat. Season with the curry paste and Thai chilis. Cook for 1-2 minutes, or until the spices become fragrant. Whisk the coconut water, sugar and lime leaves into the wok. Cook for 2-3 minutes more. Add the green beans, bell peppers, Fresno peppers, tofu, pumpkin and vegetable stock to the wok. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 25 minutes, or until the vegetables are cooked through. Add the Thai basil to the wok. Stir and remove from heat. Divide into 4 portions, top with a squeeze of lime and enjoy! The post Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry appeared first on Meatless Monday.

From Garden to Grill: The Tasty AND Socially Conscious Way to BBQ

September 5 2016 Meatless Monday 

From Garden to Grill: The Tasty AND Socially Conscious Way to BBQWhen it comes to turning your grill green, you have a smorgasbord of issues to choose from. Youve probably heard that gorging on meat filled with hormones and antibiotics is not good for your health. Or, that you can save a lot of carbon emissions by going meatless at least one day a week. Then there are the land sustainability and the water security issues. Throwing a barbecued fruit-and-veggie party is not only fun and inventive; it could change the course of a lot of peoples lives. But what you may not realize is that greening your grill sacrifices no flavor at all. In fact, the sweet, smoky notes that barbecuing brings out in fruits and vegetables will speak for themselves--once you get the hang of green grilling. Ready to take on the meatless grilling challenge? Share your pictures with Meatless Monday and Slow food USA using the hashtag #GrillChallenge on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter!   Tips to Help Get You Started Go firm, go fresh. When it comes to grilling, shop the freshest fruits and vegetables at your local farmers market. The firmer the vegetable, the less it will crumble when grilled. Court the usual suspects. Traditional candidates for the grill are peppers, carrots, beets, turnips, zucchini, corn, green beans, asparagus, tomato (firm ones), onion, eggplant, garlic (whole cloves), potato, squash, peppers, broccoli, cauliflower, and turnips. For fruits, consider peaches, apples, pineapple, and figs. But also try the unusual. Avocado, artichoke, romaine lettuce, portobello mushroom, and watermelon are just some of the new grillees that are becoming trendy. Oil down first. Many vegetables need just a light brushing of olive oil before grilling. For extra kick, add spices and marinate overnight, Arrange the perfect meatless match-up. Kabobs are a BBQ staple, but you can make them entirely with veggies: think tofu cubes mixed with cherry tomatoes, mushrooms, roasted potatoes or just about any other vegetable that strikes your fancy. Support guilt-free burgers. Make your own veggie burgers packed with hearty ingredients like black beans, lentils, quinoa, or chickpeas. You can also find healthy pre-made patties at supermarkets and natural food stores. Make a burger trade. Swap a meat pattie for a portobello mushroom or eggplant slices. Use your same bun and add your favorite toppings, like avocados, caramelized onions, roasted red peppers, or an olive spread. Smoke out your pizzas. Turn up the creativity and make delicious veggie pizzas right on the grill. All you need is pizza dough, sauce, and your favorite vegetables thinly sliced or pre-grilled. For dessert, consider a fruit pizza with grilled peaches drizzled with vanilla icing. Cross party lines. Dressing your grilled veggies in taco form will garner you a lot of new fans. Be prepared to make extras. Keep up the cubes. Tofu can be bland so enlist your favorite marinade recipe to add flavor. Grill the cubes up and add them to a salad, serve them with veggies, or enjoy them as appetizer served with a dip. Give your salads a good grilling. Garnish grilled romaine lettuce with a bit of fruit, feta cheese, and extra virgin olive oil, or simply drizzle with balsamic vinaigrette. Enlist your favorite sides. When planning a meatless BBQ, pasta salads, raw vegetables, and hummus dip are great ways to turn your plant-based dishes into a full meal. Grill-Worthy Recipes to Download and Share   The post From Garden to Grill: The Tasty AND Socially Conscious Way to BBQ appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Weekly Plant-Based Dinner Plan, June 27 - July 1, 2016

June 27 2016 VegKitchen 

Weekly Plant-Based Dinner Plan, June 27 - July 1, 2016 Summer produce season is in full swing, so lets take full advantage of it in this weeks plant-based menus. Case in point -- good, fresh green beans are still one of the veggies that have a short season (at other times, they can be tough and stringy). Grab some while you can (preferably organic) to make

Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle

June 8 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle This is a simple plate of tangled summer vegetables – tender zucchini noodles and carrot ribbons, gently blistered green beans and shallot-kissed mushrooms, all dressed up in a bright, smoky sauce. We’ve been eating it this week, first as a salad on its own, then as a side dish, and the leftovers made their way on top of hearty sourdough toast – all equally delicious and so fresh. There’s a few things to be said about the bright orange sauce that completes this summery veggie tangle. The color comes from Spanish smoked paprika, which is one of my most reached for items on the spice rack. The spice, which comes from hot peppers that have been smoked dry and then ground, can add just the right amount of deep, savory flavor to so many dishes. It yields a warming, complex flavor, but isn’t as hot as pepper flakes or cayenne, so I use it pretty generously. In the winter, when I roast squash and roots, I often give them a pinch of smoked paprika, which takes them to that next level of heartiness. I also love adding it to all kinds of grain dishes, stews and marinades. If you haven’t tried smoked paprika yet, I encourage you to give it a go, it’s a game changer and will be your friend when building up flavor in many savory dishes. At first, the sauce acts as a dressing, but after a few nights in the fridge, the vegetables marinate in all the smokiness, and the dish gets a sort of second life, and a delicious one at that. This kind of spicy, marinated vegetable dish reminds me of the cuisines of my homeland in the southwest of Russia, the Caucasus, where in the summer, the markets are overflowing with stands full of the most colorful pickles and marinated veggies that you can buy by the kilo. Food has an extraordinary ability of bringing back the feeling of home, if even for a second. Enjoy! Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the smoky sauce 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon tamari juice of 1 lemon ¼ teaspoon sriracha/­­hot sauce of choice 2-3 garlic cloves - minced for the tangle 1-2 small to medium firm zuchini - sliced into noodles using a julienne peeler, spiralizer or mandoline (I use this one) 1 medium carrot - shaved into ribbons with a vegetable peeler ½ tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon neutral coconut oil - divided 1 shallot - chopped ½ lb crimini mushrooms - sliced tamari for drizzling - to taste 2 large handfuls young green beans - strings removed if present juice of ½ lemon handful parsley leaves - chopped (optional) salad greens and/­­or microgreens few tablespoons chopped hazelnuts or almonds - toasted if preferred Instructions to make the smoky sauce Combine all ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until smooth. Set aside. to make the tangle Combine zucchini and carrots in a large mixing bowl or platter. Set aside. Warm ½ tablespoon coconut oil over medium heat in a large saute pan. Add shallot and saute for 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and saute for another 5-7 minutes, until they begin to brown. Lightly drizzle with tamari and stir around until absorbed. Add the sauteed mushrooms and shallot to the zucchini and carrots. Warm the remaining 1 teaspoon coconut oil over medium heat in the same saucepan. Add green beans and saute for 2-3 minutes, until bright green and blistered in places. Squeeze lemon juice over beans and lightly drizzle with tamari. Cook for another 1-2 minutes, until liquid is evaporated and beans are crisp-tender. Add to the bowl with the vegetables. Add parsley, if using, and salad greens and/­­or microgreens. Drizzle the smoky sauce over vegetables. Toss to coat and sprinkle with chopped nuts. Serve immediately. You can also store the tangle in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. The vegetables will become marinated and delicious in a new way. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Mango Salsa and an Ayurveda Birthday Vegan Cheese Plate Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Chocolate-Blueberry Pudding by Scandi Foodie .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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