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grapes vegetarian recipes

Warm Beet Pistachio Salad

January 1 2018 Meatless Monday 

Baby beets are roasted sweet and contrasted with bitter frisee and salty roasted pistachios. Sherry vinegar, honey and grapeseed oil are infused with fresh sage and peppercorns to dress this delicious beet salad. This recipe comes to us from Chef Jason Weiner of Almond Restaurants in New York City and Bridgehampton. Serves 4 - 1 1/­­2 cups baby beets - 3 tablespoons honey - 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar - 2 tablespoons grapeseed or canola oil - 1 teaspoon cracked peppercorns - 3 sprigs sage - 1 head frisee or curly endive, core and dark leaves discarded - 3 tablespoons roasted pistachios, shelled - 5 chives, cut into matchsticks - salt, to taste Preheat an oven to 375 degrees. Place the beets in a baking pan with about 1 cup of water. Cover tightly with foil and transfer to the oven. Roast for about 40 minutes, or until tender when pierced with a fork. The roasting time will depend on the size and age of the beets. When the beets are tender, set aside to cool. Whisk the honey, vinegar, oil, sage and peppercorns together in a mixing bowl. Transfer to a saucepot over high heat for 2-3 minutes, or until the dressing comes to a simmer. As soon as the dressing bubbles, remove it from the heat and pour through a strainer to transfer it back to the mixing bowl, omitting the sage and peppercorns. When the beets have cooled, slip off their skins and dice them roughly. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Add the curly endive and roasted pistachios to the serving bowl.  Season the beets, greens and nuts with salt to taste. Drizzle with the honey-sage vinaigrette, tossing to ensure all ingredients are evenly distributed, until the salad is dressed to preference. You may not need all the vinaigrette. Divide into 4 servings, top each with chive matchsticks and enjoy! The post Warm Beet Pistachio Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff

December 10 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Sasha Swerdloff is a Certified Ayurvedic Consultant and blogger at Tending the Table, where she shares plant-based recipes and writes about sustainability, health, and wellness. We love Sasha’s thoughtful approach to cooking, breathtaking photography, and Ayurvedic advice. In this interview, Sasha tells us about her morning, bedtime and exercise routines, as well as self-care as a type of non-violence, addressing the root cause of health-related imbalances, the breathing technique she uses during stressful times, skincare, nourishment, yoga, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Routine is super important for me. Without it I tend to feel scattered, flustered and irritable. I think this has a lot to do with my constitution. I know that I tend to struggle with uncertainty so having a routine makes me feel a little more in control and a little less terrified. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I usually wake up around 7am, do my morning stuff (scrape my tongue, do neti, wash my face etc.) then try to drink a big mug of hot lemon water. I like to listen to NPR and snuggle on the couch with my pups while I drink my morning matcha latte. Then I do yoga before making breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Ive struggled with insomnia a fair amount but paying attention to my stress level and having a solid bedtime routine has helped a lot. A hot bath and self massage with plenty of herbal oil especially on my head works wonders. I also really love sipping on some warm almond milk with spices before bed. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast - Sautéed greens, a fried egg from the chicken ladies in the backyard, and sourdough toast. Lunch - Soup or a big bowl of roasted veggies with some sort of cooked grain, some protein, and a half an avocado. Snack - Apple and almond butter Dinner - Soup, roasted veggies, salads, veggie tacos with beans, roasted sweet potato, cabbage slaw and avocado. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Ive never been able to drink coffee or black tea without getting super jittery but it took me years to finally listen to what my body was telling me. Instead of coffee I drink a matcha latte with almond milk and raw honey every morning. --  Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Not having sweet stuff around is the only way to stop me from eating a whole bar of chocolate or way too many cookies. --  Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Im not a fan of taking lots of herbs or supplements for long periods of time. Its easy to take a pill but its a lot harder to address the root cause of an issue and make diet and lifestyle changes to address that imbalance. In the long term though, addressing the root cause through diet and lifestyle is a whole lot more affordable and leads to long term results. I do take Ashwagandha and Vit D regularly to support my nervous system and to keep me sane through the dark winters here in Seattle. Exercise --  Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I try to practice at least an hour of yoga daily. I also walk a fair amount and jog every once in a while. In the winter I cross country ski as much as I can. Ive noticed that the forms of exercise I enjoy most incorporate some sort of rhythmic, repetitive motion which I find to be super calming and meditative. Also, any time I can get outside Im happy. --  Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? Both. There are days when I dont exercise or get outside but I try to not beat myself up about it. Its too easy to get into a pattern of negativity and its much more beneficial long term to practice having compassion for yourself. The things that motivate me to get on my mat each day are my physical and mental health, someone else (my husband) holding me accountable, and the respect and admiration I have for my yoga teacher and the Ashtanga lineage. Beauty --  What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Confidence is beautiful to me. I feel more beautiful when I stand up straight and hold my head high. Im slowly learning that its less about how I look and more about how I feel. --  What is your skincare approach – face and body? My skin has always been sensitive and problematic and Ive always had negative body image issues associated with it. Im finally starting to get a handle on it by going off of hormonal birth control and eliminating sugar and dairy. I also have a pretty strict routine that helps keep my skin free from breakouts. In the morning I wash my face with warm water and moisturize with January Labs Revitalizing Day Cream or Osmia Organics Purely Simple Face Cream . In the evening I cleanse and exfoliate with Beauty Counters Charcoal Cleansing Bar and the Clarisonic skin brush then moisturize with grapeseed oil and Living Libations Dew Dab which helps prevent breakouts and combat hyper pigmentation. In the summer I spritz my face with rose water to help me cool down. --  Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I started taking a zinc supplement a few months ago for my skin and it has helped a ton. Overall though, I notice that cutting out sugar and dairy from my diet makes the biggest difference. --  Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Like I said before, for me, diet makes a huge difference. But I also love my Clarisonic skin brush. It seems like a weird gadget but it has made all the difference for me. Stress, etc. --  If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Making sure not to get too over stimulated or overcommitted helps me stay grounded but if I do get spun out I practice Nadi shodhana breathing and take some Anxiety Soother to take the edge off. I also like to do Yoga Nidra . Getting some fresh air and planting my feet on the ground or pulling out the watercolors always helps too. --  What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I usually mega dose on Echinacea and Sambu Guard then take a hot bath and bundle up. I also try to slow down since for me, colds are often the result of stress. If I slow down my body can usually heal itself. Motivation --  Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I like to think about yoga philosophy and the eight limbs. The first limb is yama. The yamas are a set of five precepts that help us interact with the world in an ethical manner. The first yama is ahimsa or non-violence. This means non-violence towards all living things, including ourselves,  in thoughts, words and actions. For me self-care is a type of non-violence towards my physical and mental being. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I take a break from whatever it is that Im struggling with and do something else to clear my mind. Knowledge --  What was your path to studying Ayurveda and yoga and how do you incorporate that knowledge into your everyday?  I first learned about Ayurveda from my yoga teacher, Christine Hoar . I had been practicing yoga with her for a year or so and was struggling with some health problems so decided to do an Ayurvedic consultation with her to see what she could recommend. Her simple diet and lifestyle recommendations completely changed things for me. I felt like all of a sudden, all of the issues I had struggled with throughout my life made sense and fit into a bigger picture of who I am. I continued studying Ayurveda with Christine and then after college completed an Ayurvedic Certification program and Kripalu. For me, Ayurveda provides a framework from which to view the world and my place in it. Im constantly thinking about the qualities of the foods I eat and the things I do or experience from an Ayurvedic perspective. Ayurveda helps me understand and take control of my health. --  Do you practice a certain type of yoga, and why did you choose that particular branch?  I practice Ashtanga Yoga. I sort of stumbled into it. A college friend told me about a summer special at a nearby studio and suggested I sign up. I did and I went to class there every day for a month. After the month was up I just kept going. I was hooked. I think a big part of why Ive stuck with Ashtanga is because of my teacher. Shes pretty incredible and has been a huge influence in my life. The method of Ashtanga also really resonates with me. I enjoy the repetition, the meditative quality of the breath, the focus and concentration required, the rigor of it and the tradition. --  Do you have any recommendations for someone who wants to establish a daily yoga practice but doesnt know where to begin? Find a teacher you connect with. Finding the motivation to practice on your own is challenging but if you have a teacher you admire and respect and a community of fellow students who are counting on you, youll show up every day. --  Your recipes are so beautiful, approachable and inventive. What is your process when it comes to developing recipes? Thank you! Sometimes Im inspired by meals Ive had while travelling but mostly I draw inspiration from whatever produce I have on hand. I love combining flavors and experimenting with spices and herbs to elevate something simple and make it unique. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Im excited to be incorporating more Ayurveda and wellness themes into my work. Its a big part of my life and I want to share it with others so they can feel empowered to heal themselves. Ill be teaching my first Ayurvedic workshop in the Spring here in Seattle which should be a lot of fun. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love a good pedicure or a trip to the Korean spa for a soak and body scrub. But more often I find myself going for a walk or taking myself out to tea if I need a boost. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book - Mary Oliver New and Selected Poems Song/­­Album - No Hard Feelings The Avett Brothers Piece of Art -  Satsuki Shibuya -- What are your favorite places to eat in Seattle? We dont eat out all that often, but when we do we usually head to Delancey , Seawolf , The Whale Wins or Frankie and Jos . -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? -Earplugs – Anxiety Soother -A headlamp -Licorice tea -A big scarf – Lip balm -A snack (always) -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jessie Snyder of Faring Well Photos by Sasha Swerdloff and Renee Byrd You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Lentil Moussaka

December 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Lentil Moussaka This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. As our new cookbook release date approaches and we enter a really busy season of our lives (more on that soon!), we count on hearty and sustainable meals like this lentil moussaka to see us through periods of tiredness or stress. If you are feeling any kind of holiday season-related pressure, it might just be the perfect, comforting dish for you, too. I love casserole-style dishes – they take some initial effort to put together, but afterwards they turn into a meal that just keeps on giving. This moussaka is definitely like that – the portion is big enough to have dinner or lunch taken care of for a solid few days, it keeps well and only gets better with age, can be eaten hot or cold, and can even be re-imagined as, say, a toast topping, if its initial layered charm ever wears off.  Moussaka is cooked in numerous countries in the Middle East and the Mediterranean, and the recipe varies from region to region, but it usually involves layers of ground meat, eggplant or potatoes, and a béchamel or egg custard blanket on top. In our vegan version, protein-rich lentils take place of the ground meat. Once they are cooked in a mixture of mushrooms, carrots, onion, herbs, and crushed tomatoes, and layered with silky roasted eggplant, it’s incredible how savory and satisfying they become. We went with mashed potatoes for the top layer, in place of the custard or béchamel, which takes this dish even further into the cozy and wintery meal territory. The mashed potato blanket also gets the most incredible, crispy, golden crust on top after some time in the oven, which makes the whole thing even more irresistible. I suggest roasting the eggplant, making the mashed potatoes, and maybe even cooking the lentils in advance, that way assembling the moussaka will feel like a breeze. All the ingredients in this recipe are very affordable and widely available, and it’s amazing that such a satisfying meal can be made with just lentils and veggies. I generally make sure to keep a big jar of French lentils in my pantry, because they are very versatile and perfect for adding substance to all kinds of plant-based meals. Lentils fall under the category of pulses, together with chickpeas, beans and dry peas, which are all perfect vehicles for sustainable and nourishing meals. We’ve been having a ton of fun working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on creating accessible recipes, centered around pulses, as part of their Half Cup Habit initiative. Try adding a half cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – they will up your whole healthy cooking game, I promise. For more of our pulses recipes, head here, as well as to the Half Cup Habit website. Enjoy :) Vegan Lentil Moussaka   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 3 medium-large eggplants - sliced in ½ inch thick rounds 4 tablespoons neutral coconut or olive oil - divided sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 cup dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of acv 4 medium Yukon gold potatoes - peeled and quartered 2 tablespoons olive oil or ghee, plus more for brushing the mashed potato layer 1 large yellow onion - chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1-2 celery ribs - sliced (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon each fresh or dried thyme, oregano and/­­or marjoram (optional) 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 lb baby bella or crimini mushrooms - sliced 1 28 oz can of box of crushed tomatoes 1 tablespoon tomato paste ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cinnamon (optional) ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg (optional) handful of toasted pine nuts (optional) chopped parsley and dill - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking sheets. Arrange the eggplant slices on the baking sheets in a single layer, oil with 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast for 20 minutes. Flip the slices and roast for another 15 minutes, until silky. Set aside. Lower the oven temperature to 375° F (190° C). While the eggplant is roasting, drain and rinse the lentils. Cover them with purified water in a medium pot, and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 10-15 minutes or until cooked, but not mushy. Add salt at the end. Drain over a colander and set aside. Place the potatoes in the same pot you used to cook the lentils, cover with purified water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until soft throughout. Add salt at the end, then drain, reserving ¼ cup of the cooking water. Return the potatoes to the same pot. Mash them with 2 tablespoons of olive oil or ghee, black pepper and ¼ cup of the reserved cooking water. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Continue to mash until smooth. Set aside. Warm the remaining 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, carrots, celery, if using, salt and pepper, red pepper flakes and oregano/­­thyme/­­marjoram, if using. Sauté for 7 minutes, until the vegetables soften up. Add the mushrooms and sauté for another 8 minutes, until the water released by the mushrooms evaporates and they begin to brown. Add garlic and stir around for another minute. Add the lentils, crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, smoked paprika, cinnamon and nutmeg, if using, to the pot with the mushrooms. Stir to combine, then cover and cook for 5 minutes for the flavors to incorporate. Arrange half of the eggplant slices on the bottom of a 9 x 9 baking dish. Top with half of the lentil mixture, followed by the remaining eggplant slices and lentils. Spoon the mashed potatoes on top, evening them out with a spoon into a smooth layer. Brush more olive oil/­­ghee over the potato layer and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the pine nuts and herbs, if using, and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

November 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese

Pulled Jackfruit BBQ Sandwiches

July 3 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Pulled Jackfruit BBQ Sandwiches Not only does jackfruit lend itself well to shredding for that pulled effect, but its also great at soaking up the zesty barbecue sauce, making it an ideal candidate for these hearty sandwiches. Look for canned water-packed jackfruit in Asian markets or well-stocked supermarkets (be sure not to get the kind packed in syrup). If jackfruit is unavailable, substitute your choice of chopped seitan, steamed crumbled tempeh, or chopped or shredded mushrooms (portobellos or oyster mushrooms are especially good here). Pulled Jackfruit BBQ Sandwiches - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 yellow onion, minced - 1 (16-ounce) can water-packed jackfruit, drained and shredded or thinly sliced - 1 tablespoon tamari soy sauce -  1/­­4 teaspoon smoked paprika - Salt and ground black pepper - 1 1/­­2 cups barbecue sauce, store-bought or homemade (recipe follows) - 4 sandwich rolls, split and toasted - Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the jackfruit and cook until softened, about 10 minutes. Stir in the soy sauce and season with the paprika and salt and pepper to taste. Add as much of the barbecue sauce as desired, stirring to mix well. Use a fork (or two) to break up the jackfruit. If hard pieces remain, remove them to a cutting board and finely chop, then return them to the skillet. Cook for about 10 minutes to heat through and blend the flavors. Pile the jackfruit mixture onto the toasted sandwich rolls. Serve hot. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.   Barbecue Sauce - 1 tablespoon grapeseed or sunflower oil - 1 yellow onion, minced - 3 garlic cloves, minced - 1 (28-ounce) can tomato sauce or puree - 1 canned chipotle chile in adobo sauce, minced - 1/­­2 cup pure maple syrup or dark brown sugar - 1/­­4 cup water - 1/­­4 cup cider vinegar - 1/­­4 cup tamari - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground black pepper - 1/­­2 teaspoon liquid smoke - Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic and cook for 5 minutes, until the vegetables soften. Add the tomato sauce, chipotle, maple syrup, water, vinegar, tamari, salt, and pepper, stirring to mix well. Simmer for 20 minutes, or until the sauce reduces to the desired consistency. Near the end of the cooking time, stir in the liquid smoke, then taste and adjust the seasonings, adding more salt, maple syrup, or vinegar if needed to balance the flavors. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. The post Pulled Jackfruit BBQ Sandwiches appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Avant Garden New York

June 27 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Avant Garden is a wonderful vegan restaurant in East Village, New York. When you walk through the door there is a very nice ambiance. We didnt make any reservations but we were fortunate that we got seating at the bar, so we could see all the chefs work in the open kitchen. Is there anything better than watching people passionately create one wonderful plate after another? Avant Garden is truly upscale, vegan dining. They let vegetables simply be vegetables. They bring out the very best of each ingredient while bringing together various greens, veggies, fruits, grains, nuts, legumes, herbs and spices in a wonderfully creative way. Every plate is like a colorful painting, bursting with colors and flavors. The two of us shared four dishes and each of them was a feast for the eyes. We enjoyed a baby gem salad with smoked tomato, ranch and preserved lemon with avocado as a starter. Next was the toast with cremini mushroom with onion marmalade, grapes, herb de Provence and walnut puree on the side. We topped it off with two great main dishes; roasted carrots with faro, ramp chimmichuri, tzatziki and some pita bread and my favorite parpadelle pomodoro with herbed gremolata. […] The post Avant Garden New York appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich

June 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Everything tastes better on the beach. The sun and saltwater create a special kind of exhaustion that will make even the blandest piece of food taste mind-blowing. When I was a kid, we were usually handed fresh peaches after a long, tiring swim. The peach juice would inevitably end up all over our faces and running down our arms, but no one cared because the way they tasted made the whole world go quiet. Those same peaches never seemed quite as delicious at home, and one year I even made a point of only eating them when at the seaside. Today’s sandwich can be eaten anywhere and anytime, but it will also make for one very special beach snack. The main component of the sandwich is a white bean ‘tuna’ that has all of the best flavor components of tuna salad, with a little summer flare from fresh cucumber and basil. When mixed with red onion, pickles, olives, sunflower seeds, herbs and a mayo-like sauce, white beans taste remarkably close to tuna salad, especially sandwiched between some bread. Once you have all your ingredients at the ready, the ‘tuna’ comes together easily, and the batch will last you for close to a week’s worth of sandwiches. It’s sturdy and portable, and as a bonus has none of that characteristic scent that follows a tuna sandwich lunch. It’s satisfying and nutritious too, since white beans (as well as all pulses, aka chickpeas/­­beans/­­lentils/­­dry peas) are protein and fiber-packed little superfoods. This year we are partnering with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on sharing some tasty, simple recipes centered around pulses, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. The goal is to kindly inspire you to include at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week, for sustainable, nourishing and tasty meals. This sandwich is a good start :) Summery White Bean Tuna Sandwich   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients for the white bean tuna salad juice of half a lemon ¼ medium red onion - chopped ½ cup dried white beans (such as cannellini, navy, baby lima, etc.) - soaked overnight in purified water and cooked ½ cup chopped English cucumber ⅓ cup chopped pickles ⅓ cup chopped olives ⅓ cup toasted sunflower seeds ⅓ cup chopped dill and/­­or parsley 1 tablespoon capers 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast freshly ground black pepper handful basil leaves (optional) ½ teaspoon garlic powder (optional) ¼ cup mayo, or more to taste - recipe follows sea salt - if needed for the mayo 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon sunflower butter or any nut/­­seed butter 1 teaspoon sriracha juice of 1 lemon or more if needed sandwich add-ins shredded red cabbage tomato slices more whole basil leaves sprouts or microgreens Instructions to make the white bean tuna salad Pour the lemon juice over the chopped red onion in a small bowl and let it sit while preparing the rest of the ingredients. Combine the onions in lemon juice with the rest of the ingredients in a food processor. Pulse a few times, taking care not to over process; the mixture should be slightly chunky. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Keep refrigerated in an air-tight container. Serve on good sandwich bread, with red cabbage, tomato, more basil, sprouts/­­microgreens, or any other favorite sandwich add-ins. to make the mayo Combine all the ingredients, except the lemon juice, in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the lemon juice and combine thoroughly. Add more of the lemon juice, if needed to achieve a creamy, slightly runny consistency. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Kohlrabi Avocado Salad Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice Lemon Tarts from Laura at The First Mess Ethiopian Injera with Mustard Lentils and Braised Cabbage .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Summery White Bean ‘Tuna’ Sandwich appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Gluten-Free Strawberry Cobbler

June 8 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Gluten-Free Strawberry Cobbler Checking in really quickly today with a recipe and step-by-step video of this gluten-free and vegan Strawberry Cobbler. I wasn’t kidding when I said I would be flooding this space with strawberry recipes this spring and summer :) Similarly to crumbles or crisps, cobblers are delightfully lazy fruit desserts that require no perfection on the cook’s part, but manage to come out a perfectly jammy and satisfying mess almost every time. Earlier this spring, I set out to develop a version that is both gluten-free and vegan, but also quick and with a manageable list of ingredients – here is the result! Sweet summer berries don’t need much to taste good in a cobbler. In this recipe, I add a minimal amount of maple syrup to the berry mix, as well as lemon juice for a hint of brightness, and arrowroot powder to help make things jammy. You can easily adapt this recipe to use any fruit or berry, just use a little more maple syrup if you have fruit that’s less sweet than strawberries. The cobbler topping is made with a mix of gluten-free oat and corn flours, and comes out of the oven perfectly buttery (thanks to coconut oil/­­fat) and crumbly. The fruit and the topping marry so nicely with the contrast of juicy, sweet berries and buttery dough – it’s what cobbler is all about. Add a scoop of vanilla ice cream and you’re in heaven. Enjoy! Gluten-Free Strawberry Cobbler   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the filling neutral coconut oil for oiling the pan 4 cups strawberries - hulled and halved, quartered for larger berries juice from 1 lemon 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder for the batter 1¼ cup gluten-free rolled oats 1¼ cup corn flour 1 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons baking powder ¼ cup coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling 5 tablespoons coconut oil - cold, firm 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1 13.5 oz can full fat coconut milk - refrigerated overnight Instructions Preheat the oven to 425° F (220° C). Prepare a 8-9 inch cast iron skillet or other heavy-bottomed skillet/­­baking pan by oiling it thoroughly. Place the strawberries into the pan, pour the lemon juice and maple syrup over them, add arrowroot powder, and toss to coat. Grind the rolled oats into a flour in a blender, food processor or coffee grinder (use oat flour if you have it) and pour it into a large bowl. Add the corn flour, salt, baking powder, and coconut sugar, and mix to combine. Cut the firm coconut oil into the bowl and work it into the flour with your hands. Add the apple cider vinegar and mix to incorporate. Scoop the fat from the top of the jar of coconut milk (it should separate in the refrigerator overnight) and add it to a small saucepan along with 3 tablespoons of the coconut water from the same can. Heat the mixture up until melted and hot and add it to the batter, mix to combine. You can also do all of the mixing in a food processor. Scoop and drop the batter over the filling with an ice cream scoop. Sprinkle the cobbler with more coconut sugar. Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the filling is bubbly and the batter is lightly golden. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Portobello Nachos Sour Cherry Pie - Moms Specialty Spiced Amaranth Porridge with Ginger Stewed Apples and Raisins Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Gluten-Free Strawberry Cobbler appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Wines and Wine Pairings: Q & A with Whitecliff Winery

March 20 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Wines and Wine Pairings: Q & A with Whitecliff Winery What is vegan wine? When and why is wine not vegetarian or vegan? Many wine drinkers, even those who are vegetarian or vegan, may be unaware that animal ingredients are often used in the wine clarifying process.The post Vegan Wines and Wine Pairings: Q & A with Whitecliff Winery appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Black Lentil & Vegetable Bolognese

January 23 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Black Lentil & Vegetable Bolognese Pavarotti’s “Nessun Dorma” (none shall sleep) is blasting on repeat in my headphones. But it’s the opposite case over here. All the children are finally asleep and while Luise is taking care of the dishes, I’m trying to channel my inner Italian so we can publish this recipe before another year has passed. We wrote our last blog post in Copenhagen and this one is brought to you from a house we are borrowing, on the slope of the Table Mountains in Cape Town, South Africa. If we keep this trend of travelling south for every new blog post, we will be writing the next one from Antarctica. It feels a little weird writing about these comforting and wintery pasta bowls from here, but I’m trusting that Pavarotti will help me channelling my inner Italian and get me in the right mood. It’s summer in South Africa, we’ve got lemon trees growing in the garden, there is a small pool, a cute kitchen and Elsa and Isac are keeping occupied by throwing grapes at each other in some kind of never-ending grape war. In short, we are very happy and grateful to spend a month here. Apart from the children’s fights, the scene is vastly different from two weeks ago when we shot this recipe. Isac had pneumonia, Elsa and Gabriel were snoring with colds and we were all cozied up (or more like stuck) in our Stockholm apartment - pale, tired and gloomy, surrounded by cold winter. The only thing we craved then were simple and comforting pasta dishes like this. Vegetarian bolognese is perhaps not one of our most unique recipe ideas but it is January food at its best, so we thought it might be something you’d also be interested in maning. We often make a kids pasta sauce that contains tomatoes, grated carrot, grated zucchini and red lentils. As it simmers, the lentils dissolve into the tomato sauce and it all becomes quite sweet and smoothly textured. It’s a simple way to sneak extra nutrients in a meal that our kids always are happy to eat. This is a slightly more adult approach on that dish. The sauce has more texture and chunks and a deeper flavour from herbs and red wine. We use black lentils as they stay intact in the sauce. The lentils work as replacement for the meat in the classic bolognese ragu - they both add protein and have a nice and soft, chewy consistency. We combine chopped and grated carrots to get a mix of textures. You can of course add more veggies if you prefer. We kept it simple and used what we had at home because of sick kids and cold weather, but also because it is what Italians do. “Pochi ingredienti, tanto tempo” (few ingredients, long cooking time) is an Italian expression - that I just invented, but I’m pretty sure Pavarotti would agree. Simple cooking with great ingredients is key in the Italian kitchen. However, if you have some mushrooms or an eggplant/­­aubergine at home, either of them would work excellent in this recipe as well as they add meaty texture to the dish and make it even more vegetable packed. Enjoy! That’s it, blog post number two of the year. And no babies were neglected this time. I even managed to mention Pavarotti three times, talk about grape wars and make up my own Italian food expression. If that doesn’t qualify me as a full-blooded Italian, I don’t know what does. You can call me Davide from now on.  Vegetarian Bolognese Serves 4-6 2-3 tbsp olive oil 1 large onion, peeled and coarsely chopped 3 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed 2 large carrots, peeled 2 sticks celery, rinsed 4 tbsp green olives, stones removed and slightly bruised 1 tbsp fresh basil (or 1 tsp dried) 1 tbsp fresh oregano, rosemary or marjoram (or 1 tsp dried) 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup red wine 100 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup uncooked beluga lentils (or puy), rinsed 400 ml /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup vegetable stock (or water) 2 bay leaves 2 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tins crushed tomatoes sea salt and freshly ground black pepper To serve pasta of choice (we used a lentil flour spaghetti) vegetarian parmesan style cheese fresh parsley olive oil Heat the oil in a large saucepan on medium heat. Add onion and garlic and sauté for a few minutes. Meanwhile, chop one of the carrots and the celery into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch chunks and add them to the pan along with olives and dried herbs (if using). Let soften for a couple of minutes, add the red wine and let cook until the alcohol evaporates. Add lentils, half of the vegetable stock, bay leaves, tinned tomatoes, fresh herbs (if using) salt and pepper. Grate the remaining carrot and add it as well. Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and let simmer for 30 minutes or until the lentils are cooked, stirring from time to time as not to burn the base of the sauce. Add the remaining stock or water, little by little, to loosen the sauce whenever it is looking dry. Cook your pasta of choice. Serve the sauce stirred through the pasta, topped with a sprinkling of grated cheese, fresh parsley or other herbs and a drizzle of oil. PS. We actually prepared one more blog post before we left and we will try to share it soon,  along with some photos and tips from Cape Town. Meanwhile you can see some snapshots from out trip on instagram.

Tahini Hot Chocolate

December 4 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tahini Hot Chocolate Most of us know that feeling that usually rolls around at around 3 pm on a workday, when it seems as if you’ve hit a wall and need to somehow recharge before going back to work. I have to say that since I’ve been taking a break from caffeine, it has been less a of a crash and more a need to get up, stretch and whip up some kind of fun potion in the blender, just as a mental breather. Since it’s been cold out, I’ve been really into making hot, frothy, restorative drinks as my 3 pm activity, and this super quick tahini hot chocolate has come out on top many times. This drink gets its decadent chocolate flavor from raw cacao powder, which, contrary to popular (and my own until very recently!) belief, contains insignificant amounts of caffeine. The energizing properties of cacao come from theobromine, a mild cardiovascular stimulant (while caffeine is a nervous system stimulant) that increases heart function and blood flow and is much milder in effect than caffeine. Cacao is also high in magnesium, a mineral known for its relaxing properties, anandamide – the ‘bliss chemical,’ and PEA – the ‘love chemical.’ So this drink will calmly wake you up and give you a lift in mood – nothing crazy and no jitters. It gets its creaminess from tahini and nut butter, and its sweetness from prunes (you can also use dates, but I like the richer flavor the prunes yield here) and honey. It’s very easy to make and comes together in no time. I drink this hot chocolate as an afternoon pick-me-up, but it’s good enough to serve on a special occasion, and could act as an elegant, sweet finish to a festive meal. There are some links after the jump, have a nice Sunday :) Immunity Herbal Infusion – I’ve been very much into making herbal infusions and drinking them instead of water throughout the day (nettle, raspberry leaf and goji is still my favorite), and this immunity-supporting one sounds amazing. Actually, Let’s Not Be in the Moment – an article questioning the recent trends of mindfulness, full of many valid points and this response, very valid in its own way. Willka Yachay Instagram – amazing photographs of the Q’eros Nation of Peru by an organization helping their community thrive in the modern world. Well + Good’s Health and Wellness Trends of 2017 – I’m especially into the #s 5, 11, 13 and 14 Amanda Chantal Bacon on the One Part Podcast How Ayurvedic Beauty Can Change Your Health – all good reminders Tahini Hot Chocolate   Print Serves: 1 mug full (about 1½ cups) Ingredients 1½ cups hot water 2 prunes or dates 1 heaping teaspoon tahini 1 heaping teaspoon almond butter 1 tablespoon raw cacao powder 1 tablespoon raw honey, or more to taste pinch cinnamon (optional) Instructions Combine all ingredients in a blender until smooth and frothy. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes Black Sesame Cappuccino Beet Tahini Snack Bars Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tahini Hot Chocolate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Saturday Six | Butternut Mac, Pumpkin Spice Golden Milk & Grape Crostini

October 1 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Were rounding up some of our favorite recipes from this weeks Potluck submissions, including butternut squash mac & cheese, pumpkin spice spiked golden milk, and crostini topped with juicy roasted grapes.

Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms

September 7 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms I’ve found a new favorite weeknight meal that allows me to pack in as many different vegetables as I want, and, after the initial chopping, pretty much cooks itself. I’ve been needing for something like this to come along, since we’ve been having some very busy times around here. Going through house renovations, book edits and a third grader’s school homework all at the same time is no piece if cake, while food easily becomes that much needed escape from daily stress. There have been too many no-food-all-day-then-pizza-at-night days for me, and I knew it had to stop. It goes without saying, I’m very excited to share this lifesaver of a recipe with you today! I’ve been making lots of sweet skillet crumbles this summer, with any and all fruit I’d come across, from cherries and strawberries, to peaches and plums. It’s kind of the perfect lazy man’s dessert – so easy to prepare (chop, mix, bake) and very delicious. It’s really no wonder I’ve gotten hooked on whipping one up almost every week. This is where I got the curiosity to try out a savory crumble – what if the same breezy and flavorful preparation could be applied to vegetables? Well, turns out that it can, and it’s really good. For this particular savory crumble, I used the vegetables that are most abundant right now – zucchini, eggplant and tomatoes, with an addition of mushrooms for their meatiness and substance, and complete with warming curry spice. That being said, this recipe is highly customizable – use any vegetable in season (squash soon!), and any spice mix you prefer, keeping the crumble topping the same. After about an hour of slow-baking in the oven, you will have an amazingly comforting and nourishing meal. The leftovers are really tasty, too. Now you might be wondering what that beautiful wooden appliance gracing some of the photos is. Pleasant Hill Grain, a supplier of high-quality kitchen equipment, sent me one of their grain mills made by KoMo for grinding dry grains and beans, and I am in love! I wrote a lot about the advantages of freshly grinding your own flour in my book – it’s more affordable (whole grains are generally cheaper than flour), more nutritious, and so much more flavorful. It’s an especially great strategy for gluten-free baking, where a mix of various flours is often required. Before this mill, I did all my grinding in my high-speed Belndtec, but the way the KoMo mill is different and better for grinding flours is through its use of stones. Stone grinding is the most ancient form of pulverizing grain, and creates the most nutritious flour, simply because the flour never gets heated up too much while milling, allowing it to retain all the nutrition of the grains. KoMo also uses state of the art stones, made of a combination of corundum and ceramic, which basically never get worn down, and can produce very fine to coarse flour, based on your setting. I can genuinely say that fresh, stone-ground flour is absolutely the best, most flavorful flour you’ll ever cook with. Lastly, can we talk about the minimal design of this mill – is it not the most beautiful appliance you’ve ever seen? It’s designed in Germany and made in the Austrian Alps, and there’s not a single detail that doesn’t have function. The housing is made of Beechwood, and those meticulously crafted finger joints at the corners make me swoon. Once my kitchen is renovated, this guy will be on display, front and center. The most exciting news, though, is that we will be giving away one KoMo mill next week, so a hot tip – stick around for that :) Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the vegetables 1-2 eggplants - cubed 2 zucchini - diced into thick half-rounds ½ lb crimini or baby bella mushrooms 3-5 tomatoes - roughly chopped 1 yellow onion - chopped 3-5 garlic cloves - sliced 1-2 tablespoons curry powder, preferably homemade (I use recipe from this book) sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I used untoasted, unrefined pure sesame oil, a new discovery, excellent for cooking and oil pulling) or ghee for the crumble topping 1 cup old fashioned rolled oats ½ cup freshly ground barley, or cornmeal/­­polenta ½ cup ground almonds sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 teaspoon baking powder ¼ cup ghee or neutral coconut oil - cold and solid (I prefer using ghee for this recipe as it goes really well with the curry spice) ¼ cup unsweetened, cold almond milk or other plant milk Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Combine all the vegetables and mushrooms in a large bowl. Add curry powder, salt, pepper and oil and toss to coat. Transfer the mixture into a 10-inch cast iron pan and set aside. Combine oats, barley flour/­­cornmeal, almonds, salt, pepper and baking powder in the same bowl. Cut the cold ghee or coconut oil into pieces and add to the bowl. Use your hands to mix the ghee/­­oil into the dry ingredients thoroughly. Add milk and mix to incorporate. Scatter the topping over the vegetables in the skillet and place into the oven. Bake for 1 hour. Serve garnished with fresh herbs, if desired. Reheat leftovers in a pan over low medium heat. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Temaki-zushi Broccoli Stem Riceless Risotto Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh

October 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Ally Walsh is a model and co-founder of Los Angeles-based organic coffee company, Canyon Coffee. Though we’ve never met, we love Ally’s easy-going approach to wellness, her beautiful instagram, and what her and her partner are doing over at Canyon. It’s an all-around girl crush :) In this interview, Ally tells us about her transition from a vegetarian diet to a feel-good, intuitive diet, the tonic she always takes before bed, the books she’s found to be instrumental to her well-being, exercise, beauty, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I love routine, but that probably has a lot do to with the fact that my schedule is constantly changing! I really enjoy my morning routine, waking up early and making coffee at home. But its always nice to switch things up and come back to that. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning.  I definitely try to ease into my morning. I used to grab my phone first thing when I woke up--now I keep it out of the bedroom. Instead, the first thing I do when I wake up (on a good day!) is sit upright and do a 20 minute meditation. To me, theres no better way to start off the day. Meditation is always followed by some Canyon Coffee. At home, I typically make a pour-over, which is another little opportunity to be mindful as I start my day. On a day off its so nice to sit outside on the porch with some friends and read and have coffee together. We get the New York Times delivered to our house on Sunday mornings and I could spend the whole day reading and relaxing outside in the sun. Its honestly one of my favorites things to do. If I’m shooting though, or out of town for a job, most days start early and end late. The schedule for modeling is often last minute--I sometimes dont know my schedule until the day or night before. In contrast, its nice to have Canyon, where I make my own schedule. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I make a glass of calm/­­magnesium before bed every night! I take that with me wherever I go--security always pull me aside at the airport to ask about what this white powder is ha :) Aside from magnesium, Ill sometimes make a warm tonic with some ashwaganda. And reading always helps me to fall asleep. I guess I wouldn’t call it a ritual, but I do love watching a show or movie before sleep, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast: I have a cup of black coffee and almond butter or avocado toast with gluten-free bread every morning. Im a creature of habit... I have my favorite go-tos, and Im happy eating them every day. If I have to work super early sometimes i like to make overnight chia seed oatmeal. Ill mix in some oats, chia seeds, almond milk, maca and flax seeds, and then in the morning top it off with some fruit and almond butter. Lunch:  Usually a salad with quinoa, avocado, kimchi, roasted seasonal vegetables, seeds, lemon and different oils like grapeseed, olive, and white wine vinegar. I would also be very happy with just roasted kabocha squash and pesto :) Snack: Cashews, pumpkin seeds, Dates and almond butter, green juice, avocado toast, and currently addicted to Honey Mamas Chocolate! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Well, it kind of comes with starting a coffee company ;) Some people are surprised to learn, though, that I only drink one cup of black coffee in the morning! Thats pretty much it. I cant do too much caffeine. Only on rare occasions, like when Im on vacation, will I have an afternoon espresso or cortado. I was in Copenhagen and Stockholm recently, and fell in love with oatmilk cortados! Definitely pushed my caffeine limit there! -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I honestly don’t! I love raw chocolate, but Im really sensitive to sugar! So Im kind of weird in that I really dont love sweets. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? In addition to magnesium at night (for sleep), Ill take ashwaganda at any time of the day for my adrenals, and probiotics daily. I feel such a difference when I take b12, too. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Yes. Yoga has been such an important practice to me, for years. I usually go to a class a couple times a week. I intersperse that with hiking in the Santa Monica mountains and walks on the beach. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I actually look forward to exercise. I dont really partake in any forms of exercise that arent enjoyable. For example, Ive never really gotten into spinning or boot camp-style workouts. I love getting out in nature for hikes, and I find an hour-and-a-half in the yoga studio to be very meditative. After a long work day, I really look forward to being able to do something nice for my body. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really think the most beautiful people are those that feel confident in their skin and are who they want to be--not what society expects them to be. Someone thats naturally comfortable in any setting. As a model, so much emphasis is put on the external, and thats important for a photograph or video. But in person, beauty really does come from within. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I think the most important thing for healthy skin is to eat and drink clean. Especially drinking lots of water. As for products, I use the most natural that I can find. I love Earth tu Face, True Botanicals, Osea and Linne! I use oils for moisturizing and just use water to wash my face in the morning. I love using Bodha and CAP Beauty rose water spray, too. Ill try to do a face mask once a week from Wildcare while taking a bath! Its very relaxing :) -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water! I also think getting a good night of sleep is just as important! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Stay hydrated. My mom is 59 & has the most beautiful skin – not one wrinklel! And she swears by drinking lots of water! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Im trying to get better at this, but acupuncture has been a life saver! Its a place to relax and reset. I see Maria at Elysia Life Care and she is life-changing! I think getting into a regular routine of acupuncture and meditation can help so much with stress. After having a consistent routine with both, you start to notice things that used to stress you or make you upset no longer have the same power or effect on you. You can laugh it off, or just observe it and not be affected by it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going on a walk always helps. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Lycopene vitamin C packets, lots of ginger and tea tree oil (usually just put it in my water!) -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This has been a learning process for me, how to balance everything. Modeling, Canyon Coffee, relationship with my partner, my friends, and time for myself. Especially with starting a company with your partner, that start-up grind can be all-consuming because theres always more work you can do! So weve had to learn how to turn off- and make sure to make time for a date night! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? My goal is to maintain a state of love (as opposed to state of stress, or lack, or anger, etc.). I was lucky to learn from a qi gong master named George Falcon for a couple years before he passed, and I feel like his teachings provided me with tools to help stay in this mindset throughout the stressors and obstacles of daily life. One of the big ones is to take responsibility for our actions and state of being. Its easy for us to blame, to say he, she, or it made me feel this way. But really its our decision. Of course, we sometimes fall out of that consciousness of love. When Im not feeling well, my first step is to take a break. To meditate, listen to a recorded guided meditation of George, go on a walk or a hike. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Ive made different changes throughout my life that have been substantial in terms of my wellness. I stopped eating meat when I was 19, then introduced fish (mainly salmon!) back in years later. Acupuncture has perhaps been the most substantial in helping me maintain balance and wellness. All of these changes or decisions are really informed by just listening to my body. You can get caught up in the mindset and identity of, say, Im vegan. But its important to check in with yourself and ask, Am I feeling good? Is this helping live a balanced and vibrant life? If not, then its important to make a change! -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So many books! If I had to pick two, Id say Anatomy of the Spirit by Caroline Myss and Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert. Anatomy really opened me to the power of our bodies to heal and self-nourishment. It helped me connect my mental and spiritual state to my health and well-being. Its a book you can go back to, re-read and continue to learn from over time. Big Magic was instrumental in motivating me to start Canyon Coffee. It made me feel like I had more to give, creatively, and pushed me to start something with a greater purpose. It brought clarity to the creative process for me, breaking it down in a way that makes it approachable and applicable to my own life. Its one of those books that really inspires you to follow your dreams, and what could be more important for self-nourishment? Knowlegde -- You run Canyon Coffee together with your boyfriend, Casey. What was your path to starting your own coffee company? Personally, I was feeling uninspired. I felt like I wasnt making the most of my creativity and talents. Ive always been grateful for my modeling career, but I had also always wanted to start something of my own, and I was feeling that itch. Casey and I had both fallen in love with coffee over the years... through making it at home together and visiting coffee shops in our travels and around LA. Casey actually started working in the coffee industry, and we became friends with a roaster, James. Eventually, our passion for it grew to the point that we had the thought: why not start our own company? It really was a natural culmination. The moment we decided we wanted to do it, we just never looked back. -- What is your process when choosing beans for Canyon Coffee? Are there certain growing practices, flavor profiles, or geographical locations that are important to you? The universal practice of tasting different beans is called cupping. It involves preparing small roasted samples of different beans exactly the same way and trying them at the same time. For Canyon, our parameters narrow down our options. We usually decide on a country first, and then see what organic, seasonal beans grown at high altitudes are available through the network of importers near us in California. Then we order samples, cup, and choose the bean that smells and tastes best to us. High altitude is important because the elevation makes the coffee plant grow slower and put more energy into producing cherries. The slow growth results in cherries (and coffee beans) that are much more flavorful and vibrant. To start Canyon, we focused on Latin American coffees and wanted to find amazing-tasting beans in the chocolatey /­­ caramel flavor profile. We went with beans from Guatemala and Colombia first, because theyre known for these flavor profiles and they have great infrastructure for small coffee producers to process and export their beans. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love going to the movies :) And a nice dinner out before or after. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit .. anything from Krishnamurti & Ram Dass Song/­­Album – Paul Simon – Graceland, Feist – Let it Die, Lord Huron – Lonesome Dreams Movie – Beginners Piece of Art – Robert Lango Men In the Cities, Alfred Stieglitz’ Portraits of Georgia OKeeffe -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Gjusta/­­ Gjelina, Honey Hi, Amara Kitchen, Pace, Botanica, Necco, Destroyer, Erewhon -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Im actually in the process of moving out of my house right now! Were taking advantage of the end of our lease to do some traveling and try out living in some new neighborhoods. As a result, Im having to put a lot of my stuff in storage. Its been really nice to get rid of a lot of things and simplify to the essentials. But as far as traveling goes, I always have with me.. – new book and magazines – headphones – Jesse Kamm pants – Nikes – journal – Bodha rose water spray – probiotics – magnesium and ashwaganda  – sparkling water – ursa major rings – eye mask – almond butter packets -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily LAmi of Bodha, and Lacy Phillips at Free & Native! Both these women are a constant inspiration! You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Bánh M? Tostadas

July 11 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Bánh M? Tostadas East meets West in this tasty fusion combo. Tostada means toasted in Spanish and is the name of a Mexican dish in which a toasted tortilla is the base for other ingredients that top it. Bánh m? is a popular Vietnamese sandwich that features crisp pickled vegetables, fragrant cilantro, chiles, and zesty hoisin and sriracha sauces. In this iteration, bánh m? ingredients find themselves on toasted tortillas instead of in a baguette to make Bánh M? Tostadas. Corn tortillas are usually used for tostadas, although wheat tortillas may be used if you prefer. Bánh M? Tostadas - 1 large carrot, shredded - 1/­­2 English cucumber, peeled, seeded, and chopped - 2 cups finely shredded cabbage - 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves - 1 to 2 tablespoons chopped pickled jalape?o chiles ((optional)) - 1 teaspoon dark (toasted) sesame oil - 1 tablespoon neutral vegetable oil - 2 garlic cloves, minced - 1/­­4 cup minced scallions - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger - 1 (8-ounce) package baked tofu, cut into thin strips - 3 tablespoons soy sauce - 3 tablespoons hoisin sauce - 2 tablespoons rice vinegar - 1 to 2 teaspoons sriracha sauce - 1 teaspoon sugar Tostada shells: - 4 to 6 corn or flour tortillas - 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil Toppings: - In a large bowl, combine the carrot, cucumber, cabbage, cilantro, and jalape?os, if using. Drizzle on the sesame oil and toss gently to combine. Set aside. - Heat the vegetable oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic, scallions, and ginger and cook for 1 minute. Add the tofu and 1 tablespoon of the soy sauce and mix well to coat the tofu. Set aside to cool. - In a small bowl, combine the remaining 2 tablespoons soy sauce, the hoisin, vinegar, sriracha, and sugar, stirring well to blend. Tostada shells: - Preheat the oven to 400°F. Arrange the tortillas in a single layer on two baking sheets. Brush both sides of each tortilla with oil. Bake for 5 minutes on one side, then flip the tortillas over and bake for 2 to 3 minutes longer, until crispy. Watch carefully so they dont burn. To assemble: - Evenly divide the tofu among the tostada shells. Top each with some of the vegetable mixture, then the sauce. Serve immediately. Excerpted from 100 BEST VEGAN RECIPES, (C) 2016 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by Lucy Schaeffer. The post Bánh M? Tostadas appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Grilling on Meatless Monday

July 3 2017 Meatless Monday 

Grilling on Meatless MondayIts that time of year again, when we fire up the grill and take our dinners outside! Usually, meat is in the spotlight for a cookout, but if youre looking for a lighter spread for the hot weather, seek out the produce section! Many seasonal vegetables turn out great after some time on the grill - sometimes they even produce some unexpected flavors! This Monday, for the July 4th holiday weekend, follow these tips for great vegetables on the grill! Think outside the box. When it comes to grilling vegetables, you cant go wrong with the usual suspects - peppers, eggplant, onions, and zucchini. But many more vegetables - and fruits - are delicious after being grilled. Try artichokes and romaine lettuce or avocados and cucumbers! Experiment with seasonings. While the combination of olive oil, salt, and pepper is a classic way to bring out the flavor of grilled veggies, seasonings provide flavor options from around the globe! You can go as mild, savory, or spicy as you want with Caribbean-style jerk seasoning, Italian seasoning, Mexican-style, Indian-style… be creative! Use stand-ins for meat. Sometimes people will still miss burgers and hot dogs despite the best veggie platter, but those cravings can still be satisfied with meatless options. Swap out burgers for portabella mushrooms, or use vegetarian versions of hot dogs, meat crumbles, and bacon to add a savory flavor. Grilling firm tofu or tempeh will not only provide protein but also absorb the flavor from the veggies and smoke. Download our Meatless Monday Burger Cookbook for even more ideas. Try different delivery systems. Veggies are great on their own, but they can be even better when served as part of a meal. Grilled veggies are perfect for tacos - fajitas, anyone? - and dont rule out grilling pizza! Try skewers for shish kabobs or throw grilled veggies in a salad. Dont forget dessert! Vegetables dont own the grilling game. Several fruits take on great new flavors after being grilled when the heat makes them caramelize. Pineapples and stone fruits, like peaches, plums and apricots, are perfect for grilling. But less expected choices like watermelons, grapes, apples, strawberries, and bananas also work great on the grill. Just be careful - fruits will cook a lot faster, so keep an eye on them and let them rest a bit before eating! The post Grilling on Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pumpkinseed Caramel ‘Twix’ Bars

June 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Pumpkinseed Caramel ‘Twix’ Bars This post was created in partnership with Nuts.com Wow, am I excited to finally be sharing these bars here today! They are sort of like a much healthier, more colorful and plant-based version of Twix bars, they’re also no-bake and easy to make at home. The recipe was born out of a collaboration with Nuts.com, our favorite online bulk foods supplier that carries pretty much every magical whole food ingredient, from nuts to dried fruit, spices to superfood powders and snacks. They sent me a mystery ‘Pantry in a Box,’ and I had the fun challenge of coming up with a recipe using the ingredients in the box. The stand-outs were plump pumpkin seeds, the freshest coconut flour, electric pink beet powder, and flaky sea salt. It took me a while to simmer on the recipe. First, I wanted to go savory and tested out a few dishes in that direction, but I ended up arriving at these bars, and I’m so glad I did. The bottom, ‘shortbread’ layer is made with coconut flour and colored pink with beet powder, which is totally optional, but contributes to the bars’ stunning appearance (and nutrition!). No baking required there. The green ‘caramel’ layer is made with sweetened, homemade pumpkinseed butter, but you can pretty much use any nut or seed butter in its place. Everything is covered with chocolate and generously sprinkled with flaky salt. So good! The recipe looks long because I give directions for making your own seed butter and chocolate coating, but those two can easily be store-bought for a quicker prep time. We made a step-by-step video to show the fun of the process, too :) Pumpkinseed Caramel Twix Bars   Print Serves: 16 Ingredients for the shortbread cookie layer ½ cup coconut flour small pinch of sea salt (optional) 2 teaspoons beet powder (optional, you can also use any colorful berry powder) ½ cup coconut butter/­­manna (not oil) ¼ cup maple syrup for the pumpkinseed caramel layer 1½ cups pumpkin seed butter (recipe follows) or any nut/­­seed butter of choice ¼ cup maple syrup ⅓ cup toasted pumpkin seeds (optional) 1-2 tablespoons bee pollen (optional) for the raw chocolate coating 100 g (about 1 cup) shredded raw cacao butter 2 tablespoons maple syrup ½ cup raw cacao powder ¼ cup mesquite powder (optional) 2 tablespoons maca powder (optional) flaky sea salt - for sprinkling (optional) for the homemade pumpkinseed butter 2 cups raw pumpkin seeds 1 tablespoons neutral coconut oil, melted ½ teaspoon sea salt 2 teaspoons moringa or matcha powder - for color, (optional) about ¼ cup olive oil Instructions to make the shortbread cookie layer Line an 8 x 8-inch rimmed pan with parchment paper and set it aside. Combine the coconut flour, salt and beet powder, if using, in a medium bowl. Set aside. Combine the coconut butter with the maple syrup in a small saucepan and melt over low heat, stirring until mixed thoroughly. Add the coconut butter mixture to the bowl with the coconut flour and mix until combined, using your hands towards the end. Transfer the mixture into the prepared pan and press against the bottom into an even layer. Set aside while making the caramel layer. to make the pumpkinseed caramel layer Combine the pumpkinseed butter with the maple syrup in a small saucepan and warm it over low heat, stirring, until thoroughly mixed. If your butter is quite soft and creamy, you can mix in the maple syrup without heating it up. Evenly spread the pumpkinseed butter mixture over the cookie layer. Sprinkle with the toasted pumpkin seeds and bee pollen, if using, slightly pressing them into the caramel. Place the pan into the freezer until firm to the touch, for about 2 hours. to make the raw chocolate coating Gently melt the cacao butter in a medium heatproof bowl on a double boiler. Whisk in the maple syrup, sift in all the powders, if using, and whisk to combine thoroughly. Allternatively, melt about 1½ cups chopped dark chocolate or chocolate chips in a medium heatproof bowl on a double boiler. Add 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil and whisk to combine until smooth. to make the bars Remove the pan from the freezer. Pull the bar cookie out of the pan onto a cutting board by the sides of the parchment paper. Slice in half lengthwise and crosswise and continue slicing each piece in half until you have 16 slim bars. Working with one bar at a time, dip them into the melted chocolate using two forks. Turn to coat evenly, remove from the coating and gently shake over the bowl to let most of the chocolate excess drip back into the bowl. Place the coated bars on a drying rack over a piece of parchment paper. Optionally, drizzle with more chocolate and sprinkle with flaky salt. Transfer the coated bars into the freezer for about 10 minutes, until the chocolate is set. From here, you can enjoy them right away or store in an airtight container in the freezer. Remove 5 minutes prior to enjoying. to make the pumpkinseed butter Preheat the oven to 350° F (180° C). Line a rimmed baking tray with parchment paper. Combine the pumpkin seeds with the oil and salt and toss to coat. Toast for 7 minutes, until slightly golden. Transfer the pumpkin seeds into a food processor, add the moringa/­­matcha powder, if using, and grind into a fine meal. With the motor still running, add the olive oil, 1 tablespoon at a time, until a smooth, slightly runny butter forms. Stop the processor and scrape the sides periodically during the process. Keep refrigerated in an airtight glass container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Black and White Chocolate Pudding

June 18 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Black and White Chocolate Pudding Out of all the desserts in the world, I crave the pudding/­­mousse-kind the most. A tiny cup full of something light, creamy and porous to finish off a meal is my idea of dessert heaven. I’m always on the lookout for new pudding/­­mousse ideas and constantly searching for ways to revolutionize my own tried and true recipes in one way or another, mostly to simplify the process or ingredients. I freestyled these black and white pudding cups the other day, when I made a fresh batch of almond milk and had all the other ingredients on hand. They turned out perfect and were gone within a day. I had no problem repeating them to photograph and share here :) There are some weekend links below, enjoy your Sunday! Amy’s Love Letter to Miso Soup – that recipe sounds amazing Best Books for Wellbeing – love this list Eye + I – Satsuki Shibuya (you’ve probably seen her intuitive watercolors) now has a podcast La Muralla Roja – I want to stay here If Sex and the City Came Out in 2017, Miranda Would be the Protagonist :) The Beguiled – on our list of things to watch Black and White Chocolate Pudding   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients 3 cups plus 4 tablespoons unsweetened almond milk (preferably homemade) - divided ¼ cup maple syrup or more to taste 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped out, or a splash of vanilla extract 3 tablespoons agar agar flakes (not powder) pinch sea salt 4 tablespoons arrowroot powder 3-4 tablespoons shaved raw cacao butter - optional, but highly recommended 2-4 tablespoons raw cacao powder Instructions Combine 3 cups of almond milk with the maple syrup, vanilla seeds and bean, agar agar flakes and salt in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Combine the arrowroot powder with the rest of the almond milk in a small bowl. Slowly pour the arrowroot mixture over the agar-agar milk, whisking, until thickened. Discard the vanilla bean. Remove the mixture from the heat and pour into an upright blender. Add the cacao butter and blend until smooth. Taste for sweetness and add more maple syrup, if desired. Pour half of the pudding into small serving cups. Add the cacao powder to the remaining mixture in the blender (I added 4 tablespoons for a more intense chocolate flavor) and blend until well combined. Pour between serving cups. Cover and refrigerate until set, about 1 hour. Serve cold, garnished with berries, if desired. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Chocolate Truffles and Mango Sorbet on Palomas Birthday Chocolate Avocado Truffles and Concord Grape Sorbet Summer Greek Salad Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Black and White Chocolate Pudding appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate

May 31 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate I’m so excited to talk bit about Heather Crosby’s new cookbook Pantry to Plate today. When I received my copy and took a scan from cover to cover, I was immediately blown away by the way this book kindly invites the reader to be both spontaneous and practical in the kitchen by working with the ingredients that are already on hand. With thirty clever recipe templates, Heather demonstrates how to improvise your way to delicious, plant-based meals. For example, Dense Veggies + Protein + Herbs + Binder + Spices = Vegan Meatballs (or Veggie Burgers)! The templates specify the required amount for each component, as well as which components are a must and which ones can be skipped altogether. In addition to the templates, the book is full of other useful tools that help make intuitive cooking a breeze: besides a regular recipe index, there is a cook by ingredient index, as well as mini-templates for creating flavor with aromatics, a whole bit on pairing spices, and a dressing and sauce section that has pretty much every staple sauce recipe you’ll ever need. If you don’t have a particular ingredient for a recipe, chances are you have something on hand that could act as a substitute, and there is a whole chart of interchangeable mix-and-match ingredients in the book to help you work through that. I’m quite terrible at sticking to recipes myself, since I always want to play, add, subtract and find alternative ingredients, so it’s as if this book was made for me. How Heather managed to define freestyle cooking in such clear, comprehensive terms, will remain a mystery to me :) Some more sections/­­recipes I’m most excited about: Coconut Yogurt, Dairy-Free Milks, Probiotic Cream Cheese, Veggie Fries, Cheesy Comfort Food, Hand Pies, Sneaky Brownies, Nice Cream. YUM! Onto the (not) meatballs. These Italian-style veggie meatballs come from the Veggie Burger section of the book and can be easily shaped into burgers or sliders, as Heather points out. They get their substance and ‘meatiness’ from lentils and portobello mushrooms, and a bit of sweetness from carrots and onions, while herbs like oregano, parsley and thyme, and spices like fennel and pepper give them that characteristic Italian flare. We enjoyed them two ways, the first day with zucchini noodles and pesto (pictured here), and the second day, a bit more traditionally, with real pasta and tomato sauce. Both were equally delicious. Heather also suggests to serve the meatballs in a sub roll, or even as an appetizer, along with some tasty sauce. Whether you live and breathe freestyle cooking, or you want to learn a bit more about being intuitive in the kitchen, check out Pantry to Plate, I have a feeling it will earn an important place on your bookshelf :) Italian Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate   Print Serves: 20 to 24 Meatballs or 5 to 6 Full-Sized Burgers Ingredients 2 tablespoons unrefined coconut oil, grapeseed oil, or avocado oil 2 cups (260 g) diced carrots 1 cup (70 g) chopped portobello mushrooms 1 cup (160 g) diced yellow onion 2 cups (400 g) cooked green, brown, or French green lentils (roughly 3/­­4 cup/­­140 g dry) 2 tablespoons water 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme 3 garlic cloves, minced 2 teaspoons ground psyllium husk 2 teaspoons rough-chopped fennel seed 1 teaspoon fresh-cracked black pepper 1 teaspoon sea salt, plus more to taste 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika Instructions In a skillet heated to medium, add 1 tablespoon of the oil and sauté the carrots for 20 minutes, until easily pierced with a fork but firm, not mushy. Add the mushrooms and onion and sauté over medium heat for 5 to 10 minutes, until softened and browning a bit. Transfer to a food processor with the remaining ingredients. Pulse together 30 to 35 times, until just broken up and sticky with texture and bits of color intact. Taste--if needed, season with more salt or seasonings. Pulse or stir to incorporate. Form 1 1/­­2 -inch (4 cm) meatballs with your hands. Heat a skillet to medium and add the remaining oil. Slow-cook the meatballs, rotating often, for 10 to 15 minutes, until browned on all sides. Serve warm. Notes Recipe from YumUniverse Pantry to Plate (C) Heather Crosby, 2017. Photographs copyright (C) Heather Crosby, 2017. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment. Available wherever books are sold. theexperimentpublishing.com 3.5.3226 You might also like... A Salad for the Weekdays Roasted Pepper Lasagna Melon Basil Summer Rolls Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sorghum Beet Risotto

March 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sorghum Beet Risotto Ive been seeing a lot of why not just make it with rice reactions to alternative grain risotto recipes. I have a few reasons. Trying to get a variety of potentially more nutritious grains into my meals is one. Making a risotto-like dish with any grain makes it taste delicious and a little more special than just a bed for the more dominant stuff on your plate. Its also a creative challenge, and I welcome those when they occur in the kitchen. The flavor will always be a bit more new and unexpected than traditional risotto, but the creamy grain dish format will keep it in cozy territory, which is nice. Of course, no grain will quite replace starchy Arborio rice, which is what usually gives risotto that wonderfully creamy consistency. I like to incorporate blended roasted root vegetables, beans or coconut milk to achieve that sought-after texture. In this risotto, I went with coconut milk, which integrates seamlessly with the flavors of the beets, ginger, garlic and chili. Though the spicy, sweet and earthy flavors in this dish are a bit far from the classic, its absolutely delicious in its own right, and kind of perfect for this transitional time of year. Ive tried sorghum in salads and bowls in the past, but always found it to be a bit too chewy for my liking. That toothsome texture works perfectly in risotto, though, so I was very happy to rediscover this nutritious, gluten-free grain with this dish that I developed for Nuts.com. There are some weekend links below, have a great Sunday! Chani Nicolas – been loving her weekly horoscopes Jesse Kamm, Living Off the Grid – that house! Slicing Pretty Avocados – can’t stop doing this now Georgia OKeeffe: Living Modern – this exhibition sounds amazing, love that they are making an emphasis on her clothing. Tea Blends for Healthy Skin, Digestion and Energy Za’atar Swirl Bread – so beautiful and sounds delicious Follow this link to see the recipe for the Sorghum Beet Risotto :) You might also like... Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles Clementine Fudge Cake Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sorghum Beet Risotto appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy

January 8 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy It’s interesting how motivating the tiniest tips from people you care about or respect can be. I was recently on a short flight and read the autobiography of a certain Soviet-era singer, whose music I grew up with. It was a thin, throwaway paperback that I read back to back during the flight, but something about her positivity really made an impression on me. This singer is almost eighty years old, but looks great and has stayed incredibly active, and the book is studded with small, often old-school tips of how she believes she’s managed to keep up her health. She walks everywhere she goes, covering large distances on foot in Saint Petersburg, Russia, and her two drinks of choice are carrot juice in the morning and chamomile tea at night. Sure enough, I’ve been noticing myself drinking both of those with more frequency and taking longer walks whenever possible. And it doesn’t matter to me how silly of a motivation that was, if it helps me get from point A to point B in taking more care of myself, I’m all in. So here’s the carrot-based tonic I’ve been inspired to drink more often. Since I don’t love pure carrot juice, I doctor it up with ginger, turmeric, lemon and honey, which makes it a true remedy and a preventative for winter colds and flu. It’s delicious – potent, refreshing, spicy and sinus-clearing, and a little goes a long way – I like having a shot or a small glass at a time. Some weekend links after the jump, stay warm this Sunday :)   Yvon Chouinard of Patagonia on the How I Built This Podcast (scroll down a few) Mark Bittman on Changing the Food Industry and Living Dangerously – on Tim Ferriss’s podcast Ron Finley, Gangsta Gardener Amy Revier, Weaving Worlds Beyond Words   Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy   Print Serves: 1 large glass Ingredients 8-10 large carrots - peeled if not organic 1 piece ginger or more - peeled if not organic 1 piece fresh turmeric root - peeled if not organic 1 lemon 1 teaspoon raw honey Instructions Run the carrots, ginger, turmeric and lemon through a juicer. Pour juice into a blender, add the honey and blend until the honey is incorporated. Enjoy. Notes 1. I like to use organic lemons for this juice, so that I can run the peel through the juicer and get its oils and benefits into the tonic. 2. I generally use a bit more than 1 of ginger for this amount of juice, but I like things really fiery. If you are the same way, add some more ginger. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Jujube Ginger Tea Quinoa Collard Wraps from the Sprouted Kitchen Cookbook Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Saturday Six | Roasted Grape Pizza, Vegan Alfredo & Butternut Quinoa

October 22 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Were rounding up some of our favorite recipes from this weeks Potluck submissions, including pizza topped with roasted grapes, secretly healthy fettuccine Alfredo, and one-pan butternut squash quinoa that cooks up in 20 minutes.

Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake

September 21 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Concord Grape Fruit and Nut CakeThis post was created in partnership with Nuts.com I have a whole lot of cozy fall and holiday recipe ideas bouncing around in my mind, even though it’s still warm out and even though we are still enjoying the sweetest of summer tomatoes daily (I swear the yellow cherry tomatoes truly taste like candy this year). This transitional time is always exciting to me – all the fall produce brings back so many new or forgotten possibilities. I think autumn is much more of vegetable territory than summer – all the stone fruit and berries come in a quick, bright and happy flash, and before we know it, we are left with squash, roots, and sturdy winter greens. But there are still a few sweet gems like apples, pears, figs (fig recipe hopefully coming next week), and grapes to grace our fall cobblers, salads and such, and I plan to take full advantage of them this fall. If you’ve been sticking around this space for a while or have my cookbook, you might know about my love for Concord grapes. I can never resist them at the store or market, being completely mesmerized by the stunning, cloudy berries. Their flavor is lovely too – deep and concentrated, much like the color. The main issue with Concord grapes lies in their prominent seeds. There is no way around them, so I usually end up making juice or compote with Concords – anything where the seeds can be strained out. I did so for this fruit and nut cake, where a myriad of dried fruit is gently cooked in Concord grape juice to soften the fruit’s skin and infuse them with the grape flavor. It’s worth mentioning here that, in the absence of Concord grapes, you can use all kinds of fruit juice for this cake – regular grapes, oranges or even apples would make for a fine juice substitute. This cake is dense and punctuated by comforting flavors of toasted nuts, along with aromatic sweetness from dried fruit and Concord grape juice. A small slice goes a long way. There is no added sugar, as the dried fruit and grape juice bring plenty of sweet to the plate. This is the kind of cake that can serve many purposes. It would make for a perfect edible holiday present, whether brought whole to a festive potluck, or divided into smaller, rectangular cakes, wrapped, tied with a ribbon and gifted. Little squares of this cake would also make a nice addition to a fancy cheese plate, if you’re into that kind of thing. Or it can simply be enjoyed as a dessert at home – it keeps well refrigerated for a good amount of time, and a slice makes for a good component to a kid’s school lunch (or adult’s work snack!). You can get crazy with the decorating like I did here, or not decorate it at all, depending on the occasion. I’ve been shopping on nuts.com for years (since the days when they were still called nuts online) and was thrilled to collaborate on a post with them. All the dried fruit and nuts in this cake came from their online store, which made for extra-delicious results, because their products are consistently fresh and delicious. If you aren’t familiar with nuts.com, they are a family-owned, premium bulk nut and dried fruit supplier, and so much more than that, really. The business has been in the family for three generations now, starting with a stand at a farmer’s market back in 1929,  and they’ve built up an amazingly extensive catalogue of natural bulk foods. In addition to nuts/­­dried fruit, they carry grains, beans, flours, teas, snacks, superfood powders, spices, and more. I feel like a kid in a candy store when I’m on their website. Their dried fruit are the juiciest I’ve ever gotten anywhere, and both Paloma and I are hooked on their dried mango. They also freshly roast their nuts the same day they are shipped out to customers, which is just so cool. The best news is that Nuts.com has a great offer for GK readers – follow this link and choose four free gifts (like chia seeds, goji berries, hemp protein powder, habanero pistachios and more) to receive together with an order of $25 or more. Enjoy :) Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake   Print Serves: one 10 cake Ingredients for the cake (inspiration from At Home in the Whole Foods Kitchen) 4 cups mixed dried fruit - figs, prunes, apricots, raisins - chopped (no need to chop raisins) 4 Medjool dates or 6-8 regular dates - pitted and chopped 1½ cups freshly squeezed Concord grape juice or other fruit juice - hot 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg other spices such as ground cardamom, cloves and allspice - to taste (optional) 1 tablespoon vanilla extract (optional) 1¼ cup toasted almonds - ground ½ cup toasted hazelnuts - chopped ½ cup toasted pecans or walnuts - chopped neutral coconut oil or other vegetable oil for oiling parchment paper for the decoration (all optional) cashews pumpkin seeds pistachios pecans dried apricots dried lemon slices dried cantaloupe dried mango Instructions to make the cake Preheat oven to 300° F (150° C). Place 1½ cup of mixed dried fruit and all the dates into a medium bowl. Pour hot Concord grape/­­fruit juice over them, cover and let soak for 15 minutes. Place the remaining 2½ cups of dried fruit into a medium saucepan and set aside. Drain the soaked fruit into a strainer, over the saucepan with the dried fruit, pouring the soaking juice into the saucepan. Bring contents of the saucepan to a boil over high heat, adjust the heat to a simmer and cook until most of the juice is absorbed, about 8-12 minutes. Transfer the cooked fruit into a food processor, add spices and vanilla extract, if using, and blend until smooth. Transfer into a large bowl, add ground almonds and mix to combine. Stir in soaked fruit, chopped hazelnuts and pecans/­­walnuts, mixing well. Line a 10 cake pan with well-oiled parchment paper and press the fruit-nut mixture into the pan, evening it out with a spoon. Optionally, decorate with nuts and dried fruit to your liking. Bake for 1 hour, until firm. Let cool completely before slicing. The cake stores very well refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 2 weeks. Notes 1. In the absence of Concord grapes, any other grapes, oranges or apples can be used to make juice for this cake. 2. If you dont have a juicer for juicing grapes, blend them in a blender and strain through a fine mesh strainer to get rid of any seeds and skins. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Purple Kale, Aubergine & Blackberry Salad

September 7 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Purple Kale, Aubergine & Blackberry Salad At first, it was a coincidence. When we looked at the vegetables we had brought home from the market this weekend, many of them just happened to have purple, violet and dark lavender tones. We talked about how that huge bunch of purple kale could make a beautiful salad base together with the rainbow chard, mint flowers and purple sugar snaps. It was at that point my obsessive side took over. “Let’s ONLY DO purple ingredients!” I shouted into Luise’s ear. She turned her head towards me with that hesitant look she always has when I get one of my “brilliant” ideas: “Ok, slow down now, let’s talk about the flavours first”. Of course I didn’t hear her as I was already writing a list with all the purplish ingredients I could think of: “aubergine, purple cauliflower, plums, figs, olives, blackberries, grapes, beetroot, red onion, …”. Some recipes are born out of genius flavour combinations or new preparation methods, this one simply started out as a colour. Luise did however quickly gain back control and started shifting focus to the flavour and combination of vegetables as well. In the end, I think we managed to combine both flavour, colour and texture in a great way. We roasted aubergine and purple spring onion in warm spices until soft and sweet. Massaged the kale with a flavourful dill, mint, lemon and honey dressing to round off its flavour and make it less sturdy. Cooked black lentils were added as a filler, along with rich and creamy avocado (even though it’s more black than purple - and green inside!). Hazelnuts are not purple at all but they added a nice crunch to the texture. Juicy blackberries made a perfect topping. The result was beautiful, a true harvest salad. Maybe not as purple as I originally imagined it (basically because most vegetables loose their colour when they are cut/­­baked/­­cooked), but still with lovely deep hues and so many interesting flavours - a mix of herby, sweet and tangy. When the salad was assembled it still felt like we missed a creamy element, so we tried the honey roasted feta that we had seen on New York Times Cooking last week. It was perfect. Burnt and caramelised on the outside and almost melted on the inside. It completely ruined the dark purple theme but flavour- and texture wise, it was worth the sacrifice. You’ll notice that I smudged it in mashed blackberries as a poor attempt to camouflage it.   We should perhaps add that this wasn’t our kids favourite dish. They picked out the blackberries, avocado and feta cheese from the salad, leaving the raw kale to us. I guess purple isn’t their colour… Purple Kale & Blackberry Salad with Roasted Honey Feta Vegans can just skip the feta cheese or replace it with hummus. And replace honey with maple syrup. Baked vegetables 1 aubergine /­­ eggplant 4 spring onions or 2 red onions 2-4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 1/­­2 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp ground cumin 1 pinch ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1 handful hazelnuts Cooked lentils 1/­­2 cup uncooked lentils (we used black lentils) 1 1/­­2 cup water 1 pinch sea salt Dressing 1/­­3 cup extra virgin olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice 2 tsp honey or more to taste sea salt & pepper 1 large handful mixed fresh dill, parsley and mint Other salad ingredients 4 stalks curly kale, green or purple 4 stalks rainbow chard or spinach 2 avocadoes 1 small handful snap peas 1 punnet fresh blackberries, halved Roasted feta with honey (from NYT) 1 block feta cheese, patted dry 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp honey Start by preparing the baked vegetables. Preheat the oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Wash and cut the aubergine into large cubes and trim and slice the onions, then place in a mixing bowl. Stir together oil and spices in a small bowl, pour the oil mixture over the aubergine and onions and toss to combine. Transfer to a baking tray covered with baking paper. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes or until very soft and golden, check every now and then to prevent from burning, the baking time depends on the size of the vegetables. Add the hazelnuts halfway through. Meanwhile, cook the lentils in a saucepan with the water for 15 minutes or until tender and can be mashed easily between two fingers. Add sea salt towards the end of the cooking time. Drain any excess water and leave to cool. Prepare the dressing by mixing oil, lemon juice, honey, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Chop the herbs finely and add to the oil mixture. Taste and adjust to your liking. Remove the stems from the kale and coarsely chop the leaves. Finely slice the chard. Place all in a large mixing bowl, add 2 tbsp of the dressing and massage for a couple of minutes until soft. Transfer to a large serving bowl. Mix the lentils with the remaining dressing and pour them over the kale and chard mixture. Cut the avocado into cubes, slice the snap peas and roughly chop the hazelnuts. Add to the salad bowl together with the roasted  aubergine, onions and hazelnuts. Toss slightly to combine and then scatter blackberries on top. If you like to serve the salad with the baked feta cheese, follow the instructions below. Keep the oven at 400°F /­­ 200°C. Place the feta cheese in a small ovenproof dish covered with baking paper and cover with oil. Bake in the oven for about 8 minutes, until soft but not melted. Melt the honey. Remove the cheese from the oven and turn the heat to broiler. With a baking brush, paint the cheese with the melted honey. Place back in the oven and broil until the top starts to brown. Use a spatula to immediately and carefully transfer the cheese to the salad, or serve it on the side.


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