grain - vegetarian recipes

grain vegetarian recipes

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad

March 30 2020 Meatless Monday 

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go BadEvery food item will eventually go bad, but there are many food staples that offer a terrific value, can be prepared in big batches, and have an incredibly long shelf-life. Some of these ingredients can serve as the centerpiece of a meal, like potatoes, beans, and pasta, while others act as supporting actors, providing quick bursts of flavor to ordinary dishes. Best of all, many of these foods are completely plant-based and rich in many of the essential vitamins and minerals necessary for a healthy body. Our list of plant-based ingredients all have a shelf life of over two months (when stored properly) and are relatively inexpensive. But most importantly, these pantry staples give you the opportunity to get in the kitchen and experiment with flavors and ingredients that you may have overlooked in the past. And Meatless Mondays are always a great opportunity to start a new healthy ritual. Beans Often sold for less than a dollar a can, beans are the ultimate plant-based protein. With so many different types to choose from -- kidney, black, pinto, cannellini, pigeon peas, butter beans -- the recipe possibilities are endless. Make a stew, vegetable chili , bean salad, or these black bean meatless balls with zucchini noodles . Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. At only a buck a can, diced tomatoes will become your new secret weapon in the kitchen. Try adding them to this boldly-seasoned spicy chickpea ragout. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. When stored properly, frozen fruits and vegetables will last years (but please dont make them wait that long). Some frozen vegetables -- spinach, collards, broccoli rabe -- should be thawed and drained before cooking, while others like broccoli, peas, and peppers can be thrown into a hot pan as-is and easily transformed into a garlic-ginger fried rice. Granola A bag of granola wont run you much more than $4.00, depending on the brand, but it will impart an invaluable crunch to yogurt and oatmeal. Many manufacturers sell granola with a shelf life of up to six months, but it should be good to eat it even past that point (although it might not retain its full crunch). Lentils (dry) At $1.50 per pound, a bag of dried lentils is one of the best bargains in the grocery store. Besides an almost indefinite shelf life, the lentil contains a laundry-list of essential minerals like iron, folate, and manganese, is packed with protein, and is a great source of fiber. If youve never before cooked with dried lentils, start with a simple stew or this easy French lentil salad with cherry tomatoes. Onions When stored in the refrigerator, onions can last for up to two months (sometimes longer). Theyre pretty cheap, too, costing only around $1.00 – $1.50 per pound. Sear on the stove top for a smoky, charred flavor or cook them low-and-slow to unlock their natural, caramel-like sweetness and sprinkle them over this sweet potato caramelized onion stew. Oatmeal Think of oatmeal as a blank canvas. Costing less than a quarter per serving, let your imagination run wild when it comes to cooking breakfast. Mix in everything from peanut butter, jam, nuts, seeds, or even savory spices. Dried oatmeal can last longer than a year when properly stored. Use oatmeal in this vanilla almond milk oatmeal or try using it to make dessert, like this apple cranberry oatmeal bread. Pasta Costing only $1.00 per box, your pantry should be loaded with pasta, but we recommend going beyond the standard semolina/­­durum wheat flour varieties and experiment with pastas made from whole grains, vegetables, lentils, and chickpeas. Try some unique flavor combinations to keep things interesting, like this recipe for green tea pesto pasta . Peanut Butter Whether you like it creamy or crunchy, peanut is the ideal pantry staple . A serving of peanut butter is packed with protein and healthy fats, both of which will keep you feeling nice and satiated. Peanut butter has a shelf life of more than a year (unopened), and many brands of sell for less than $2.00 a jar. Polenta (corn meal) Polenta is made by mixing cornmeal (dried, ground corn) with either water or milk. Inexpensive and versatile, polenta can serve as the foundation of any number of meals, pairing especially well with tomato sauce, like in this recipe for Italian white beans with kale and polenta.  Potatoes These starchy staples dont last forever, but when stored in a cool dark space they can last for between 2 - 3 months. At around .50 cents per pound, the potato is an excellent source of fiber, nutrients, and calories; they can add creaminess to soups or serve as a vessel for a delicious stuffed potatoes primavera . Rice Whether its white, brown, or wild, rice costs less than a quarter per serving. Rice can serve as an accompanying carbohydrate or act as the main meal. For a new take on everyones favorite grain, try this vegetarian biryani or meatless brown rice jambalaya . Salsa Jarred salsa is an excellent (and convenient) alternative to fresh varieties. Add a tablespoon to anything bean burritos and taco bowls to spicy puttanesca pasta and gallo pinto ; mash some together with a ripe avocado and youve got a quick-and-easy guacamole. Soy Sauce Drizzle soy sauce into your stir fry, salad, sautéed vegetable, or tomato sauce for a boost of salty umami flavor. You can also use it liberally in this yummy Asian noodle bowl with spicy almond sauce . Soy sauce can cost as little as $2.00 a bottle and can last nearly two years after opening when stored in the refrigerator. Sweet Potatoes The sweet potato is natures candy; slice it down the middle and heat in the microwave for five minutes and out comes tasting reminiscent of a sugary soufflé. If you want to try making a dish that requires a little more technique, cook up this spicy and aromatic sweet potato chana or a coconut milk sweet potato white bean soup . Vegetable Broth/­­ Bouillon A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Add some beans, frozen vegetables, and seasonings and you have a clean and simple dinner for around $1.00 per serving, or add some flour, nut-milk, and noodles for a creamy vegetable noodle soup . Curious about what other plant-based ingredients you should be storing in your pantry? Check out our list of 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients . The post Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Recipe | Kale & Sweet Potato Quesadillas

March 27 2020 Oh My Veggies 

There are two things you should know about this recipe: 1. The name is a lie. There’s no queso in these quesadillas. But calling them “dillas” makes them sound like something cutesy off of a children’s menu, doesn’t it? 2. Yes, if it sounds familiar, it’s because I made these with leftovers from my Sweet Potato & Kale Wraps. I decided to save the recipe for a rainy day and its day has finally come! So yeah, about #2. We had tortillas and fillings leftover after making those wraps. But, as you saw, I am no burrito wrapper, so the second night around, I made these Kale & Sweet Potato Quesadillas for dinner. Instead of binding everything together with cheese like in a traditional quesadillas, I used mashed sweet potatoes. Is this weird? Okay, fine, maybe it sounds weird, but sweet potatoes and kale go really well together (this is one of my most popular posts, after all!) and so do sweet potatoes and black beans. Oh, and one note about the chorizo: if you can purchase Field Roast locally, use their Mexican Chipotle sausage. Their sausage is made with real vegetables, grains, and spices and it’s minimally processed. (Yes, […]

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating

March 10 2020 Meatless Monday 

Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward EatingThe recent COVID-19 outbreak has caused concern across the world, and many people are taking measures to make sure they do not fall sick. Besides washing your hands and staying home if youre sick, theres a lot you can do from a nutrition standpoint to boost your immune system  – eat more vegetables and fruits, legumes and whole grains .  Vegetables and fruits especially, have nutrients and special natural compounds called phytochemicals that serve as antioxidants to neutralize damage to cells and fight nasty pathogens like COVID-19, the flu and the common cold. Will they prevent you from getting sick? Maybe not. But a healthy diet can help strengthen your immune system to help fight the virus and recover quickly. Below are some nutrients found in plant-based foods that are vital for a strong and robust immune system: Vitamin C An antioxidant that increases production of white blood cells, is key to fighting infections. Citrus fruits, papaya, dark green and yellow vegetables, red bell pepper, strawberries, tomatoes and watermelons are great sources of Vitamin C. Try this recipe.  Vitamin E An antioxidant that protects your cells from free radical damages, enhances the immune system to fight off bacteria and viruses. Foods high in vitamin E are sunflower seeds, nuts and green vegetables. Try this recipe. Vitamin A Functions mainly by keeping the skin, vision, and tissues of the mouth, stomach, intestine, and respiratory system healthy. Its anti-inflammatory properties enhance the immune system. Good sources of vitamin A are sweet potatoes, spinach, pumpkins, carrots, peppers, cantaloupes. Try this recipe. Zinc An important mineral that helps in wound healing, functions in the development of immune cells, which is needed for the immune system to work properly. Food sources of zinc are legumes, whole grains, nuts and seeds. Try this recipe.  Dietary protein Plays a major role in the bodys immune response. They activate cells that help fight off infections in the body. Good plant sources of dietary protein are: legumes, beans, peas, soy, and nuts. Try this recipe.    Overall, if pondering about which vegetable or fruit to eat, think of colors – purple, blue, red, yellow and orange, because it usually means they are packed with antioxidants that are great for your health and immune system.     Resources: 1. Zinc in Human Health: Effect of Zinc on Immune Cells. https:/­­/­­www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/­­pmc/­­articles/­­PMC2277319/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 2. Health Professional Fact Sheet. NIH, Office of Dietary Supplement. https:/­­/­­ods.od.nih.gov/­­factsheets/­­VitaminA-HealthProfessional/­­ . Accessed March 5, 2020 3. Li P, Yin YL, Li D, Kim SW, Wu G. Amino Acid and Immune Function. Br J  Nutr, 2007 Aug:98(2):237-52.  4. Protect your Health with Immune-Boosting Nutrition. https:/­­/­­www.eatright.org/­­health/­­wellness/­­preventing-illness/­­protect-your-health-with-immune-boosting-nutrition . Accessed March 5, 2020 The post Boosting Your Immune System with Plant-Forward Eating appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Minty Apple-Apricot Chutney

March 6 2020 VegKitchen 

Minty Apple-Apricot Chutney A spoonful of this sweet-tart minty apricot chutney, made with fresh apple and dried apricots, adds a graceful note both to spicy curries as well as mild grain and bean dishes. Fresh mint gives it a nice flavor, so add as much as you’d like. Makes: The post Minty Apple-Apricot Chutney appeared first on VegKitchen.

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste BudsUnder-seasoned food tastes of...disappointment, but you can effortlessly breathe new life into your meals with the addition of a few key seasonings and spice blends. Spices instantly elevate the subtle flavors of vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and plant-based proteins without piling on extra calories (or dirty dishes in the sink). From sea salt to shichimi togarashi, weve got the 10 spices that you need to add to your spice rack. Adobo (all-purpose seasoning) Adobo is the ultimate all-purpose seasoning, and, although its traditionally used with animal proteins, its salty-garlicy flavor can give that same savoriness to any number of plant-based dishes -- from crispy tofu to vegetarian stews. Adobo seasonings vary in their composition, but they generally include a blend of granulated garlic, salt, oregano, black pepper, and turmeric. Ancho Chile Ancho chile, known as a poblano when fresh, has a deep, smoky, slightly sweet flavor comparable to a spicy chocolate-covered raisin. Its mild-to-medium heat makes it an appropriate addition to moles, enchilada sauce, soup, traditional chili, or even pasta. Black Peppercorns (in pepper mill) Pre-ground black pepper tastes vapid and boring compared to the fresh stuff; thankfully, many spice brands offer miniature grinders complete with whole peppercorns ready to be crushed. A couple rotations of the pepper mill adds a sharp, citrusy flavor, floral-like aroma, and crunchy texture to the tops of salads, soups, pastas, and these delicious tempeh fajitas.  Cumin The fragrant seed is a member of the parsley family, but its often sold as a powder rather than in its whole form. Cumin is aromatic and complex and can add a powerful smoky flavor to black bean burgers, curried potatoes, vegetarian chili, and lentil soups. Just remember to use this strong spice sparingly. Curry Powder Curry Powder is a mixture of different seasonings that differs slightly based on what brand you buy. That being said, many contain some combination of coriander, mustard, cumin, fenugreek, cayenne, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, and turmeric, which gives curry powder its iconic yellow-orange color. Add some to roasted vegetables, blend into hummus, sprinkle on popcorn, or use as the base of this Thai tofu pumpkin curry. Everything Bagel Available at Trader Joes and a spattering of other retailers, the Everything Bagel spice blend is the ultimate compliment to any roasted potato or sautéed vegetable. Add some to a tahini dressing or sprinkle some on an avocado half with a squeeze of lemon and a squirt of sriracha. The spice mixture is a combination of all the wonderful bits youd find on the outside of an everything bagel: sesame seeds, sea salt, dried minced garlic, onion, and poppy seeds.  Red Pepper Flake Although it probably already exists somewhere on your spice rack, the raw, uncalibrated heat of red pepper flake brings a brutish pop to roasted cruciferous vegetables and elegant pastas. Sea Salt Dont roll your eyes just yet. In terms of utility in a dish, sea salt offers the same taste-enhancing qualities as traditional table salt, but when it comes to look, flavor, and texture, sea salt is in an ocean of its own. Its slightly richer flavor and crunch make it a natural fit for both savory entrees and desserts. Shichimi Togarashi Adorning the table of many ramen soup shops, shichimi togarashi is a complex spice blend that includes a combination of red chile pepper, orange peel, sesame seeds, Japanese pepper, ginger, and seaweed. Sprinkle this on literally anything -- noodles, fried rice, stir-fried tofu, soups, marinades, rubs, dressings, tempuras, roasted vegetables, etc. -- to instantly add a flurry diverse flavors and tastes. Star Anise Star anise is often sold in its ornamental whole form, but its much easier to incorporate into dishes as a powder. Its flavor is somewhere between licorice, cinnamon, and clove. Try adding it to broths, chutneys, mulled wine, or desserts, like this warm cranberry poached pear.  Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds appeared first on Meatless Monday.

mango jelly recipe | mango halwa recipe | mango coconut jelly

February 14 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

mango jelly recipe | mango halwa recipe | mango coconut jellymango jelly recipe | mango halwa recipe | mango coconut jelly with step by step photo and video recipe. halwa recipes are ultra popular across india and are made with different types of ingredients, vegetables and fruits. the south indian generally make it with fruit, grains or vegetables. whereas north indian make it with flour like besan or plain flour. however this recipe of mango jelly or mango halwa is unique and has a fusion of both the cuisine flavour and texture. The post mango jelly recipe | mango halwa recipe | mango coconut jelly appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

soya fried rice recipe | soya chunks fried rice | meal maker fried rice

February 5 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

soya fried rice recipe | soya chunks fried rice | meal maker fried ricesoya fried rice recipe | soya chunks fried rice | meal maker fried rice with step by step photo and video recipe. fried rice recipe is one of the most popular rice items in india, if not in most of the countries. it is generally made with choice of vegetables and meat with a long grain rice. yet there are many variations to it, with some additional toppings in it and soya fried rice recipe is one such popular variation. The post soya fried rice recipe | soya chunks fried rice | meal maker fried rice appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Recipe | Lemony Wheat Berries with Roasted Brussels Sprouts (+ Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Wheat Berries!)

January 31 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Did you make any food-related resolutions this year? I don’t have resolutions--I have goals. (I like to pretend there’s a difference and that somehow, goals are much more achievable.) I want to eat less sugar. I’m trying to eat more fruit--I’ve always liked veggies more than fruit, and sometimes it’s a struggle to get myself to eat it. (Unless it’s in pie form. But I’m cutting down on sugar, remember?) And I want to eat more grains. Yes, grains! Delicious, nutritious whole grains. So you might see some more grains around here this year. And if you don’t see more grains around here, it means that I’m a big failure. I guess grains aren’t the most exciting thing to see on a food blog, are they? I mean, if I told you that you’d be seeing more Rolos on Oh My Veggies this year, you’d probably be pretty jazzed. But instead, I’m telling you to be on the lookout for... bulgur! Barley! Wheat Berries! Ooooh. Okay, so what are wheat berries? I discovered wheat berries by accident last year. I needed farro for a recipe and it was crazy expensive. Sitting next to the farro were bags of wheat berries--much […]

Vegan Tuscan White Bean Soup in the Instant Pot

January 25 2020 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Vegan Tuscan White Bean Soup in the Instant PotFarro, an ancient grain similar to barley, adds texture and creaminess to this vegan version of Tuscan white bean soup with carrots and kale. Use Alubia Blanca or any small white beans, such as navy beans. I’ve had a bag of Alubia Blanca white beans from Rancho Gordo sitting on my “bean shelf” for longer than I care to admit. I was overly optimistic a while back about turning myself from a canned bean user to a dried bean connoisseur and bought a bunch of Rancho Gordo beans, but as it turns out, old habits are hard to break. In order to cook with dried beans, you need to plan ahead to give them time to cook (and perhaps pre-soak), and I’m a last-minute kind of cook. The only times I plan ahead are holidays and (some) blog posts.(...) Read the rest of Vegan Tuscan White Bean Soup in the Instant Pot (1,064 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2020. | Permalink | 2 comments Post tags: Greens, Soy-free The post Vegan Tuscan White Bean Soup in the Instant Pot appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Your Fool-Proof Guide to Eating More Plants in 2020…Start with Meatless Monday!

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Your Fool-Proof Guide to Eating More Plants in 2020…Start with Meatless Monday!Theres no better time to commit to healthier habits than the New Year. But making a resolution is easy; keeping it, now thats the hard part. We believe going meatless on Monday should be as simple and delicious as possible. Thats why were offering up our top 20 tips for incorporating more plant-based foods into your diet. Armed with this toolbelt of tricks, techniques, pantry staples, swaps, gadgets, and apps, youll be able to approach every Meatless Monday with the confidence and culinary gusto of a seasoned gourmand. And remember, you can sign up for our Meatless Monday newsletter to receive weekly recipes, tips, articles, and food-industry updates that will help keep you focused, full, and on track.   1. Always keep an avocado on hand. Add to sandwiches instead of cheese, top your toast or bulk up a smoothie. 2. Learn to love your oven; it has a magical effect on vegetables - roast, bake or crisp! 3. Use condiments (pesto, salsa, hummus, harissa, tapenade) LIBERALLY! 4. Stock your freezer with frozen fruits, vegetables, and plant-based burgers. 5. Try different legumes (black beans, lentils, chickpeas, pigeon peas, butter beans, cannellini beans). Tip: dried legumes are very inexpensive and go a long way. 6. Go with whole grains like brown and wild rice, farro, quinoa, and bulgur. 7. Fortify your cupboard with plant-based snacks like popcorn, nuts, roasted chickpeas, dried fruit, granola, and dark chocolate. 8. Get familiar with tofu. When prepared properly (press it before cooking), its an excellent source of plant-based protein. You can also blend it into smoothies or batters. 9. Experiment with plant-based meats and burgers. Its usually pretty hard to tell the difference vs beef burgers. 10. Find a favorite nut-milk and try using it in your coffee, cereal, and recipes. There are plenty to choose from. 11. Keep coconut oil close by and use it as an alternative to butter. 12. Stock-up your spice rack. Spices from different regions of the world will add flavor and complexity to ordinary recipes and ingredients. 13. Working out? Invest in some plant-based protein powders. 14. Find fast-food and quick-service restaurants that offer up a variety of plant-based options. 15. Expand your culinary scope: Many global cuisines put greater emphasis on plant-based dishes. Look at some Indian, Thai, Mediterranean, Chinese, or Japanese cookbooks for inspiration. 16. Pump up pasta with a mix of vegetables and legumes. 17. Keep a bag of corn meal in the cupboard and use for sweet polenta, polenta fries, cornbread, and griddle cakes. 18. Invest in gadgets: Tofu press, immersion blender, juicer, spiralizer, and mandolin can add some flare to traditional vegetables. 19. Download apps for meatless eating. Happy Cow, Fork Over Knives, Vanilla Bean, and Food Monster are all great ways to find meatless options and get some recipe inspiration. 20. Catch a meatless movie like The Game Changers, What the Health, Cowspiracy, or Food Inc to learn more about the food system and plant-based eating.   Want more of tips, hacks and recipes? Follow us at @MeatlessMonday on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter! Find great plant-based recipes in our recipe gallery!   The post Your Fool-Proof Guide to Eating More Plants in 2020…Start with Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Happy New Year Hoppin John

January 1 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Happy New Year Hoppin John If it’s January 1st, it must be time for Hoppin’ John.  I love the tradition of making black-eyed peas with rice and collards so much!  I first discovered it when we moved to Charleston SC from Pennsylvania in 1983.  It’s been a New Year’s Day tradition ever since.  Most people serve the collards on the side, but I love to combine them. I sometimes add diced tomatoes just because. My favorite way to serve them is topped with vegan sour cream, Tabasco, sliced jalapenos, with cornbread on the side. I like to cook the collards and black-eyed peas a day in advance and then add them to the rice on New Year’s Day. Here is my basic recipe (and more photos of Hoppin’ John variations from previous years).  Happy New Year to all my friends. I wish you all the best in 2020! Hoppin John with Collards 1 tablespoon olive oil or 3 tablespoons water 1 sweet yellow onion, chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 cup long-grain brown rice 2 cups  vegetable broth or water Salt 3 cups cooked or 2 (16-ounce) cans black-eyed peas, drained and rinsed 3 cups chopped cooked fresh or frozen collard greens, well drained 1 (14-ounce) can fire-roasted diced tomatoes, drained (optional) 1 teaspoon Liquid Smoke 1 teaspoon Tabasco sauce, plus more to serve 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Vegan sour cream, to serve Sliced pickled jalapenos (optional)   Heat the oil or water in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the rice and broth or water and bring to a boil. Add salt to taste (the amount of salt needed depends on the saltiness of your broth or if you use water). Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, covered, until the rice is tender, about 30 minutes.  About 10 minutes before the rice is tender, stir in the cooked black-eyed peas, the cooked chopped collards, tomatoes (if using), Liquid Smoke, Tabasco, and black pepper. Add more salt, if needed. To serve, spoon into bowls and accompany with vegan sour cream, jalapenos (if using) and Tabasco at the table. Here are pics of two other favorites from my Hoppin’ John gallery: Made in a slow cooker with a cornbread topping…. and Hoppin’ John Collard Rolls…. (serve with Tabasco-Sour Cream)… The post Happy New Year Hoppin’ John appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Mushroom and Bell Pepper Scrambled Tofu

December 27 2019 VegKitchen 

Mushroom and Bell Pepper Scrambled Tofu Soft tofu is a good choice for dishes in which it is crumbled, as in this veggie-filled, egg-free scramble. While this would certainly also make a good brunch or lunch dish, it also makes a wonderful light dinner with whole grain toast or sautéed potatoes, and some sliced oranges or other seasonal fresh fruit. Photos by Evan Atlas. The post Mushroom and Bell Pepper Scrambled Tofu appeared first on VegKitchen.

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil

December 18 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil Every day, around 4pm, my husband and I start texting about dinner. If there aren’t any leftovers or a previously thought-through dinner plan, my most common proposition is ‘greens and beans?’ Those two are such staples and always leave us feeling really nourished. I have a million variations on the subject that I can throw together super quickly. Sometimes, for a quick and lazy lunch, I’ll just crisp up cooked chickpeas and kale in a pan with lots of salt and pepper and be totally satisfied. I always push off from there for our dinners, then add more vegetables, a sauce, a grain, crunchy toppings, etc. etc. I vary the kinds of greens and beans I use depending on season and mood, and what’s on hand. These one pot creamed beans and greens are my cozy, wintery version of our staple meal, and they definitely hit the spot every single time. The beans of choice here are white beans, since they are extra creamy in texture and go so well with lemon and pepper – both key ingredients. The green of choice is chard. I kind of think chard doesn’t get enough love? I love it because it wilts quickly, usually costs less than kale, and the stems are totally edible. The secret with the stems is cooking them first until they soften. Usually they’ll end up melting into a dish and become almost indistinguishable, but will still contribute some substance and extra plant power. If you use rainbow chard, the stems will give some of their color to whatever you’re cooking, so that’s fun as well. Chili oil is the component that takes this meal to that extra special place. I don’t recommend skipping it. We just quickly crisp up some red pepper flakes in olive oil and let it infuse while making the meal. A generous drizzle of that will really make everything sing. Hope you’re enjoying this sometimes crazy pre-holiday time! Let’s all remember to be nice to ourselves and stay warm and nourished. Sending you lots of love. One Pot Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the chili oil ¼ cup olive oil 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes pinch of sea salt for the creamed beans and greens avocado oil or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 medium-large bunch of chard - stems thinly sliced, leaves chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves of garlic - minced a few 1 strips of lemon zest (from 1 lemon) 2 15 oz cans or 3½ cups cooked white beans 2 cups vegetable broth 2 bay leaves (optional) 1¼ cup oat milk or cashew milk juice from 1 lemon Instructions to make the chili oil Combine the oil and red pepper flakes in a saucepan over medium heat, cook, swirling, for 3-4 minutes until the pepper flakes are crispy. Add a pinch of salt. Set aside to infuse while making the beans and greens. to make the creamed beans and greens Heat oil over medium heat in a soup pot. Add the onion and chard stems, along with a pinch of salt and plenty of black pepper, and sauté for 10 minutes, or until the chard stems are very soft. Add the garlic and lemon zest, and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the beans, vegetable broth, bay leaves, if using, and another pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, establish a simmer and let simmer and reduce, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and lemon zest strips (this should be easy, since they should float up to the top). Add the chard leaves and cover the pot for a few minutes for the leaves to wilt. Remove the lid and stir in the wilted leaves. Add the milk and bring everything back up to a boil, then turn off the heat. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve warm, drizzled with the chili oil (recipe above). Notes We prefer to use original Oatly oat milk or homemade cashew milk (1 cup cashews, 3 cups water) in this recipe, it does best with something really creamy and rich. 3.5.3226   Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mediterranean Spinach with Pine Nuts and Raisins

December 2 2019 VegKitchen 

Mediterranean Spinach with Pine Nuts and Raisins Spinach with pine nuts and raisins is a traditional Mediterranean side dish that’s both elegant and easy. Its mild and slightly sweet flavor provides a nice counterpoint to boldly-flavored Italian pasta dishes. But really, this Mediterranean side dish goes well with most any kind of meal, including those featuring grain dishes and curries. The post Mediterranean Spinach with Pine Nuts and Raisins appeared first on VegKitchen.

Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based Foods

March 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based FoodsFats and carbohydrates have faced their fair share of scrutiny over the decades, but protein has managed to coast through years of fad diets and conflicting-nutritional recommendations unscathed. Protein is essential for healthy body functions, responsible for growing and repairing muscle tissue, aiding in digestion and energy production, and helping bolster your immune system. With a lengthy list of benefits, its no surprise that getting enough protein is a dietary priority. Thankfully, theres an abundance of this crucial macronutrient in a variety of plant-based foods and ingredients. This Monday, kick-start a healthy week with delicious high-protein, plant-based foods.   Almonds A handful of almonds is a satiating snack that will keep a grumbling tummy at bay, but the tree nut is also a good source of protein. A quarter cup of almonds contains 6 grams of protein and plenty of fiber. Eat them on their own or incorporate them into your own custom snack mix . Black Beans Easy to prepare, cheap to buy, versatile, and nutritionally dense, the black bean is the ultimate pantry staple for people looking to incorporate more plant-based protein into their diet. Cooked black beans contain 8 grams of protein per half cup. Purchase them canned, or, if ambitious, dried, and transform them into plant-based burgers, taco fillings , soups, or meat balls . Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food : One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar . A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Peanuts A staple of almost every pantry, the peanut (and peanut butter) is a tremendous source of plant-based protein and health fats. With nearly 10 grams of protein per quarter cup, the peanut is a great snack to take to the office or incorporated into this sweet and spicy Sweet Potato Peanut Stew.   Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal . A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based Foods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

This warming soup features a host of veggies, a touch of flavorful white wine and Parmesan cheese, and millet, a whole grain that cooks up quickly and gives the soup a hearty consistency. This recipe comes to us from Maria Tadic, RD, who blogs at Bean A Foodie. Serves 4-6 - 2 tbsp olive oil - 2 carrots, diced - 1 medium onion, diced - 2 ribs celery, diced - 1 head roasted garlic, minced - 28 oz can crushed tomatoes - 1/­­3 cup dry white wine - 1 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp pepper - 15.5 oz can white beans, rinsed and drained - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 bag baby spinach, roughly chopped - 6-7 cups vegetable broth (add more or less depending on your desired consistency) - 2 bay leaves - 1/­­2 cup grated Parmesan cheese (or vegan parmesan cheese) - 1/­­4 cup parsley, chopped Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium high heat.  Add in the carrots, onion and celery and sauté for about 5-7 minutes or until the vegetables start to soften and brown slightly. Add in the roasted garlic and sauté for another 2-3 minutes.  Add white wine and scrape the bottom of the pot with a wooden spoon removing any browned bits.  Cook for 3-5 minutes or until wine has reduced by half. Add in the all the ingredients from crushed tomatoes to Parmesan cheese.  Bring soup to a boil.  Cover and reduce heat to low.  Simmer soup on low for 30-45 minutes. Before youre ready to serve, stir in the chopped parsley.  Serve hot soup with extra Parmesan cheese and parsley if desired. The post Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls Recipe

February 6 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls RecipeThis Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls recipe is perfect for entertaining. Homemade pizza dough topped with dairy-free pesto and herbed mushrooms, all rolled up, sliced and baked. Add vegan cheese if needed. Serve with marinara or creamy dips of choice. Vegan & Soy-free with a Nut-free option. Jump to Recipe Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls – the perfect recipe for entertaining! These Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls are a great appetizer or fun alternative to regular pizza if you want to change things up and surprise your guests with something special yet familiar. You can eat them as-is or dip them into some homemade marinara or pizza sauce. Either way, theyre like a mini-trip to Italy! Super flavorful, packed with Mediterranean flavor and soft and pillowy on the inside. INGREDIENTS USED IN THESE VEGAN PIZZA ROLLS RECIPE AND SUBSTITUTIONS - The dough for the pizza rolls uses active dry yeast, water, flour and semolina as the main ingredients. - As a short-cut, you can use any plain pre-made pizza dough here too. - The filling is a flavorful combination of homemade vegan pesto and sauteed mushrooms, flavored with onion, garlic, and oregano.  I like to add some crushed red pepper,  for a bit of heat. The thick mixture tastes amazing and is not very chunky, making it easy to roll the dough up and slice it like cinnamon rolls. You can also some vegan cheese for that pizza feel. Optional but 100 % recommended. - As a recipe variation, you could add some cooked lentils, coarsely chopped walnuts, or any chopped vegan meats or sausages. Amp up the umami by adding some chopped olives to the filling along with the mushrooms. - Oil-free version: Saute the mushrooms in some vegetable broth when making the filling. Use warmed creamy nondairy milk instead of oil in the dough. - Gluten-free version: Use a gluten-free pie crust and make pizza pockets instead. Or use my gluten-free naan bread batter, fill it in a lined muffin pan (about half the liner). Swirl the filling lightly into the batter to create rolls like swirls. Top generously with shredded vegan cheese and bake for 15 to 18 mins. How to make this Vegan Pizza Rolls Recipe – Step by Step: Start with the pizza dough: 1. Warm the water until warm to touch. Add yeast and 1 tbsp flour and mix and let the yeast activate for 5 mins. 2. Stir the salt into the semolina flour. Add the semolina flour and 1.5 cups flour to the yeast mixture. Add 2 tsp olive oil. and mix to just bring together the dough. Add flour 1 tbsp at a time as required. 3. Cover the bowl and let it sit to rise for 30 mins. Make the fillings while the dough is resting: 4. Meanwhile, heat a skillet over medium heat. Add oil, onion, and mushrooms and mix. Cover and cook for 5 mins. Add salt, oregano, garlic, and water and mix well. Cover and continue to cook for 5 to 8 mins or until dry and tender. 5. Make the vegan pesto if you haven’t made it already using this recipe.  6. Uncover the dough. Add oil and a tbsp of flour and punch the dough down and make a flat disc. Use flour to roll it out to 15 by 10 inches. 7. Spread the pesto all over the rolled out dough. 8. Sprinkle the dough with the mushroom mixture. Top with some red pepper flakes for a bit of heat and sprinkle with vegan shredded mozzarella, if you like your rolls cheesy. 9. Roll the dough up into a roll, like when making cinnamon rolls, and seal the ends. Slice the dough roll into pizza rolls using a sharp kitchen knife and place them in a greased baking dish. 10. Sprinkle with some more cheese if needed. Bake the rolls at 400 F for 22 to 24 mins.  Tip: Check the center of one of the middle rolls, and if the middle does not still feel soft and doughy, then remove the pan from the oven. 11. Cool the rolls for 5 mins, then sprinkle with some red pepper flakes and fresh basil if needed. Serve warm with olive oil or pizza sauce What goes well with Pesto Pizza Rolls? But what can you serve alongside that delicious pizza that plays the perfect supporting role? What about some roasted greens – like green beans, caramelized brussels sprouts, asparagus or a light and a bright side salad? Can I make these Vegan Pizza Rolls ahead of time? Yes, these vegan pesto pizza rolls can be made ahead. Once sliced and placed in a baking dish, you can keep the rolls refrigerated overnight. Cover tightly and store. Remove from the fridge and let sit on the counter for an hour to warm and rise. Then bake and serve. To store them, place in the fridge for up to 5 days or freeze them in the back of your freezer for up to a month.   More vegan bread and rolls recipe from the blog: - Vegan Pizza Rolls - Sweet Potato dinner rolls - Pumpkin Cornbread - Pull-Apart Pizza Bread - Pumpkin Sage Biscuits - 100% Whole Grain Dinner Rolls - Gluten-free Jalapeno Pepperjack Biscuits GF - Gluten-free Garlic Dinner Rolls GF Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls This Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls recipe is perfect for entertaining. Homemade pizza dough topped with dairy-free pesto and herbed mushrooms, all rolled up, sliced and baked. Add vegan cheese if needed. Serve with marinara or creamy dips of choice. Vegan & Soy-free with a Nut-free option. - 3/­­4 cup warm water - 2 tsp active dry or instant yeast - 1 tbsp flour - 2 tbsp semolina flour - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 2 cups flour - 1 Tbsp olive oil (divided) Mushroom Mixture: - 1 tsp oil - 1/­­2 cup sliced onion - 7 oz sliced mushroom - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp dried oregano - 1/­­2 tsp garlic powder Other Toppings - 4 tbsps vegan pesto (see notes ) Optional - fresh basil - vegan mozzarella (shredded) - red pepper flakes -  For the rolls: -  Warm the water until warm to touch. Add yeast and 1 tbsp flour and mix and let the yeast activate for 5 mins. -  Stir the salt into the semolina flour. Add the semolina flour and 1.5 cups flour to the yeast mixture. Add 2 tsp olive oil. and mix to just bring together the dough. Add flour 1 tbsp at a time as required. -  Cover and let the dough sit to rise for 30 mins. Make the fillings: - Meanwhile, heat a skillet over medium heat. Add oil, onion and mushrooms and mix. Cover and cook for 5 mins. Add salt, oregano, garlic and water and mix well. Cover and continue to cook for 5 to 8 mins or until dry and tender. -  Make the pesto using this recipe if you haven't prepared it already. Assemble: -  Uncover the risen dough. Add oil and a tbsp of flour and punch the dough down and shape it into a flat disc. Use flour to roll it out to 15 by 10 inches thick. -   Spread the vegan pesto all over the rolled out dough. -  Sprinkle the dough with the sauteed mushroom mixture. Add some red pepper flakes and vegan shredded mozzarella, if you want. -  Roll it all up and seal the ends. Slice the dough roll into pizza rolls and place them in a greased baking dish. Sprinkle with some more cheese if needed. Bake the rolls at 400 F for 22 to 24 mins. Check the center of one of the middle rolls, and if its not doughy, then remove the pan from the oven. -  Cool the rolls for 5 mins, then sprinkle with some red pepper flakes and some fresh basil if you like. Serve warm with olive oil or pizza sauce - As a short-cut, you can use any plain pre-made pizza dough here too. - For a recipe variation, you could add some cooked lentils, coarsely chopped walnuts, or any chopped vegan meats or sausages. Amp up the umami by adding some chopped olives to the filling along with the mushrooms. - Oil-free version: Saute the mushrooms in some vegetable broth when making the filling. Use warmed creamy nondairy milk instead of oil in the dough. - Gluten-free version: Use a gluten-free pie crust and make pizza pockets instead. Or use my gluten-free naan bread batter, fill it in a lined muffin pan (about half the liner). Swirl the filling lightly into the batter to create rolls like swirls. Top generously with shredded vegan cheese and bake for 15 to 18 mins.     The post Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart Disease

February 3 2020 Meatless Monday 

Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart DiseaseHeart disease (also referred to as cardiovascular disease) is a term that covers an array of health conditions affecting the heart such as coronary artery disease, heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias), and congenital heart defects. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States for both men and women, with half of all Americans (47%) qualifying for at least one of the three key risk factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking cigarettes). For more information about the relationship between diet and heart disease, check out our Meatless Monday heart-health guide . The good news is that you can manage two of these risk factors -- high blood pressure and high cholesterol --by making a few simple adjustments to your daily diet, without missing out on flavor. In honor of American Heart Month, weve put together a list of tips to help you eat your way to a reduced risk of heart disease. Eat More Fruits and Vegetables Fruits and vegetables contain the nutrients your body needs to function properly and ward off disease. Many fruits and vegetables, regardless of how theyre prepared (sans the deep fryer), are low in calories and contain vitamins, minerals, and fiber that help prevent heart disease. Focus on the Right Fats The American Heart Association emphasizes the importance of eating the right type of fats and oils. Saturated fats from animal products, trans fats, and hydrogenated vegetable oils should be replaced with healthy fats like olive oil and canola oil. Go with Whole Grains Whole grains provide the body with fiber and other nutrients that regulate blood pressure and promote heart health. Improve your diet by swapping out white rice, bread, and pasta for brown rice and whole-wheat varieties of your favorite carbohydrates. Maintain a Healthy Weight Excess weight and a large waist size have been found to raise the risk of developing heart disease. Reaching a healthy weight doesnt require an extreme diet, but rather a commitment to weekly exercise and an eating plan rooted in fruits, vegetables, legumes, and other minimally processed foods. Limit Consumption of Red and Processed Meats Processed meats contain high amounts of additives, chemicals, and sodium. These foods, which include deli meats, hot dogs, sausages, and bacon, should only be consumed in moderation. Think Mediterranean Studies show that a Mediterranean-style diet which includes a balanced proportion of fruits, vegetables, legumes, healthy oils, and monosaturated and polyunsaturated fats, reduced incidences of major cardiovascular disease. Avoid Too Much Sugar and Processed Carbohydrates Foods of minimum nutritional value like sugar-sweetened carbonated soft drinks, white breads, pastas, and other heavily processed carbohydrates are major sources of excess calories and can lead to weight gain and insulin resistance. Control Portion Size Moderation is key to any healthy diet. Reducing serving sizes grants you the flexibility to eat a wider variety of foods you enjoy. For more information on meat reduction and heart health: Reduce your risk of heart disease by starting healthy habits on Monday Check out the Meatless Monday Recipe Gallery for healthy, tasty recipes Join the community and share photos of your own plant-based creations by using the hashtag #MeatlessMonday and tag @MeatlessMonday. The post Eat Your Way to a Reduced Risk of Heart Disease appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Plant-Based ProteinsWill I get enough protein? is one of the most common questions asked by people looking to add more plant-based foods to their diet. The short (and long) answer is -- YES. Check out our Plant Protein Power Kit for downloadable social media graphics, plant-protein GIFs and printable posters. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the recommended dietary allowance for individual daily protein intake is 0.8 grams per of protein per every 2 pounds of body weight. Although this is an approximate calculation -- other factors such as age, sex, body type, and lifestyle must be considered for a precise nutrient recommendation -- it provides a reliable benchmark to measure your daily protein requirements.  This amounts to around 56 grams of protein per day for the average sedentary man and 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman. So, how do you reach that daily number eating only plant-based foods? Easy, check out our guide below and discover which seeds, nuts, legumes, vegetables, and plant-based products pack the biggest protein punch. Still have questions? Learn more about plant-based protein from the nutritional experts at Johns Hopkins University. Broccoli One of the most popular vegetables is also one of the most protein dense, with one cup of cooked broccoli containing 6 grams of protein. Roast it, sauté it, or steam it for a quick and nutritious side dish. Chia Seeds Small but mighty, 1 ounce of chia seeds packs nearly 5 grams protein. Drop a spoonful into a smoothie or combine with a liquid like juice or nut milk to make a fun-textured chia pudding. Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food: One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar. A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Frozen Veggie Burgers There are tons of different types of pre-made frozen veggie burgers varying in ingredients, texture, and flavorful, and although their nutritional profiles differ, you can generally expect between 10 - 15 grams of protein per patty. Try a range of brands and see which one(s) fit your palate. Hemp Seed Heralded as a superfood, hemp seeds have a subtle, nutty flavor similar to pine nuts. In baking, hemp seeds can be used as a nut replacement, but it can also be added to smoothies, with 2 tablespoons containing over 6 grams of protein. Jackfruit Jackfruit is often marketed as a plant-based alternative to pulled pork, with a meaty, stringy texture fit for faux barbecue platters and sandwiches. Jackfruit is rarely sold whole, but there are a handful of brands selling products made with jackfruit in the refrigerated section of supermarkets. Jack fruit is not the most protein-dense item on this list, but it still contains 3 grams per cup. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Mung Beans Mainly cultivated in East and Southeast Asia, the mung bean is often used as the foundation of stews, vegetable patties, or dal. One cup of cooked mung beans contains 14 grams of protein. Note: mung beans are easier to find dry rather than cooked and canned. Nut Butters Although not all nut butters are considered equal when it comes to protein content (or flavor), they generally contain around 4 grams of protein per tablespoon. Oatmeal A cup of cooked oatmeal contains 6 grams of protein; pair it with a scoop of peanut butter and a sprinkling of hemp or chia seeds for a protein-packed breakfast. Plant-Based Meat Thanks to plant-based meat, sources of vegan protein are all the rage. A typical plant-based burger patty contains 20 grams of protein. Many quick-service restaurant chains now offer versions of their classic menu items featuring some variety of plant-based meat. Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal. A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Seitan The original plant-based meat replacement, seitan -- which is made from wheat gluten -- is packed with protein and can be quite tasty when properly prepared. A 3-ounce serving of seitan includes between 15 - 20 grams of protein, a number that is comparable to most animal proteins. Soy Milk The market for non-dairy nut milks has exploded in recent years, but soy milk remains the most nutritious option. One cup of soy milk has 8 grams of protein, which makes it a nice base for smoothies and shakes. Sprouted Bread Sprouted bread is a certain category of bread made from grains that have been allowed to germinate (aka sprout) before being milled into flour. Ezekiel Bread -- a common brand of sprouted bread -- contains 4 grams of protein and only 80 calories per slice. Sunflower Seeds Who wouldve thought that the innocent little sunflower seed could pack such a protein punch? A half-cup of sunflower seeds has 15 grams of proteins. Bring some in a little baggy and keep with you for a quick and nutritious snack. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Below, weve curated a sample a menu to demonstrate how easy it is to hit your daily protein target eating only plant-based foods. Breakfast: Overnight Pumpkin Pie Oats (17 grams of protein) Lunch: Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast (13 grams of protein) Dinner: Veggie Meatballs (27 grams of protein) No time to cook? No problem. Meatless Monday On-the-Go is easier than ever. Creating a plant-based Meatless Monday masterpiece? Let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?A properly-stocked pantry is essential for creating delicious plant-based dishes on the fly. But what does properly-stocked really mean? Sure, you need the basics -- olive oil, white flour, rice, pasta, etc., but there are some additional ingredients that you should consider adding to your collection. Alternative flours, exotic spices, seeds, nut butters, beans (butter beans will change your life), broths, and grains can all add extra levels of depth, dimension, and texture to any variety of plant-based dishes.   Youll likely be familiar with many of the items on this list, but there are also a few lesser known ingredients -- agar-agar, tahini, nutritional yeast, etc. -- which can be used to replace many traditional animal-based ingredients. So, grab a paper and pen, and make sure these items are on next weeks shopping list. Agar-Agar The perfect vegan gelatin replacement for your puddings, jellies, or gelées, agar-agar flakes are derived from seaweed and function similarly to animal-based gelatins. Alternative Flours Were not talking your run of the mill (went there) all-purpose, bleached white flour. Play around with some alternative flours like almond, chickpea, rice, or buckwheat. Many alternative flours are also gluten-free. Beans (canned) Explore the world of beans, and reap the benefits of a healthy, satisfying plant-based protein. Lentils, black beans, butter beans, kidney beans, chickpeas -- doesnt matter; theyre all easy to use, shelf-stable, healthy, and inexpensive. Broth A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Coconut Oil A shelf-stable saturated fat, coconut oil is a healthy alternative to other vegetable oils. In most cases it can be substituted 1:1 for other oils and butters. Its got a laundry list of benefits that range from weight loss to improved cognitive functioning. Chocolate All vegetables and no sweets make everyone hangry. A little bit of chocolate can go a long way in baking as well as a post-dinner night cap. If youre feeling adventurous try some exotic bars that contain a higher percentage of cacao. Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. Theyre every home cooks secret weapon. Tip: fire-roasted tomatoes add even more flavor to your meals. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some inexpensive nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. Grains Theres an endless variety of grains available for your experimenting pleasure. Whole grains are best (think brown rice), but theres also a number of lesser-known grains that have their own unique texture and flavor profile. Try getting a bag of quinoa, amaranth, or farro and simply follow the cooking instructions on the back. Granola You can make your own or buy it for cheap at the store, but theres truly an endless combination of potential granola mixes. Bring it in a baggy as a post-lunch snack or use it to top your morning yogurt. Nut Butter High in protein and healthy fats, nut butters can add complexity to savory dishes and a nutty richness to sweets. Keep a range on hand -- almond, cashew, pistachio -- to add variety to baked goods, sandwiches, and sauces. Nutritional Yeast Just trust us with this one; we swear it tastes almost exactly like Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle on pasta, popcorn or use in macaroni and cheese if youre looking to cut out the dairy or need a boost of umami flavor. Olives Olives, especially the sliced green ones in a jar, add the perfect pop of brininess to pastas, rice bowls, and stews. Theyre a great value and can seriously elevate the flavor of ordinary dishes.  Pasta Thankfully, pasta has evolved to incorporate more alternative flours into its base. Now, you can get high-fiber, high-protein pasta made of anything from lentils to chickpeas to black beans. Pesto It is one of the most versatile condiments/­­sauces out there. A jar of pesto can last unopened in your pantry for months, and it can be your saving grace if you need to whip something up in a hurry. Add some to roasted vegetables or use it to top a tomato soup. Seaweed Snacks Low in calories and nutritionally-dense, seaweed is the ultimate snack food. Oh, and cats love it too. Spices Well, this one goes without saying, but having a pantry (or cupboard) thats properly stocked with all your necessary spices will make cooking (and eating) a whole lot more enjoyable. Some lesser known spices to add are aamchur (unripe mango), star anise, zaatar, or Aleppo pepper. Seeds Seeds are powerhouses of nutrition, texture, and flavor, and there are so many different varieties to choose from -- chia, flax, hemp, sesame, sunflower. Make chia pudding, a flax egg, or toss some hemp or sunflower seeds into your next salad or smoothie. Soy Sauce Umami in a bottle, soy sauce adds an earthy meatiness to dressings, sauces, and stir-fries. Some chefs even recommend adding a dash to tomato sauce for a boost of richness. Tahini You know it from every hummus youve ever eaten, but what might surprise you is that tahini paste is made entirely from pulverized sesame seeds. Combine a tablespoon of tahini with a dash of water, a sprinkle of cumin, and some salt for a quick and creamy dressing for salad or roasted vegetables.   If you decide to make one of these delicious recipes, let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Banana Strawberry Oatmeal Muffins

January 3 2020 Oh My Veggies 

These Banana Strawberry Oatmeal Muffins are the perfect breakfast. They have everything you need to start your day: whole grains, fruit, and yogurt. Oh! And guess what else? They freeze beautifully.

Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19.

December 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19.Youve probably heard of Meatless Monday. Maybe youve even considered giving it a try. Well, weve got your motivation right here -- the 19 reasons to go meatless on Monday in 2020. With the human population set to reach 10 billion by as early as 2050, the current approach to food production is no longer sustainable. Studies show that a reliance on animal products like dairy, beef, pork, and poultry is doing irreversible damage to the environment and is having a negative impact on personal health. Pretty heavy issues, but Meatless Monday can be part of a delicious solution to tackle these global problems. For 2020, we are encouraging everyone to ditch meat one day a week to help preserve the planet and live a healthier life. Improve Your Health Eating animal products has shown to increase instances of a myriad of metabolic and chronic health problems. Cut out meat one day a week to improve your wellbeing:   1. Reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. 2. Lessen the probability of developing type 2 diabetes. 3. Lower chances of having a stroke. 4. Preserve your kidneys. 5. Maintain a healthy weight. Save the Environment  Theres an inextricable link between livestock production and environmental degradation. For a number of reasons (many of which are listed below), a reduction in the consumption of animal products can help stall the destruction of our oceans, forests, and atmosphere. Enjoying plant-based meals instead of meat on Mondays can be help address climate issues including: 6. Forests are cleared for livestock production. 7. Animal feed production requires intensive use of water, fertilizer, pesticides, and fossil fuels. 8. Animal waste is a leading factor in the pollution of land and water resources. 9. Beef, pork, and poultry emit large amounts of carbon dioxide, methane, and other harmful greenhouse gases. 10. Livestock production uses 75% of the earths agricultural land. 11. Industrial livestock production displaces small, rural producers. 12. A quarter-pound of beef requires 425 gallons of water to produce (enough to fill 6,800 glasses of fresh drinking water). 13. Livestock manure can contain a variety of pathogens such as coli, growth hormones, and antibiotics. 14. Livestock waste streams contaminate drinking water and groundwater. Plant-based Goodness   Feel good about the food youre eating while saving money and exploring new ingredients. Thanks to the boom of flexitarian and plant-based eating, its never been easier, more convenient or delicious to go Meatless Monday. 15. Abundance of delicious plant-based meats to satisfy any of your cravings. There are so many high-protein meatless products now available at grocery stores, restaurants and fast food chains - making it easier than ever to enjoy your favorite foods - entirely plant-based. 16. Make Meatless Monday a reason to get the team together. Round up your friends and family to enjoy plant-based meals with on Mondays. 17. Almost all of your favorite restaurants offer a hearty plant-based option. So you can still frequent your favorite local, just explore new parts of the menu on Mondays. 18. Provides an opportunity to explore new ingredients. There are so many fruits, vegetables and grains to choose from, every Meatless Monday meal can be a new culinary adventure. 19. Youll likely save money on your grocery bill!   Interested in learning more about why you should give Meatless Monday a try? Weve got all the information (and plant-based recipes) that youll need to get started. The post Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19. appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Brownie Cookies Grain-free Oil-free

December 22 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Brownie Cookies Grain-free Oil-freeVegan Brownie Cookies Grain-free Gluten-free Oil-free and so decadent. These nut-butter Chocolate Brownie cookies are fudgy, chewy, easy and perfect for everyone. Vegan Grain-free Recipe. No added refined oil. Jump to Recipe Let’s wrap up the Holiday Cooking Baking, with this cookie that tastes like a brownie! These double chocolate cookies are chewy and crispy on the edges and fudgy in the middle like a brownie. They need just a few ingredients, no grain and no added oil and disappear from the sheet very quickly. You can adjust the ingredients to adjust the texture to more crispy with extra almond flour and extra fudgy with less bake time. Top with fun toppings of choice!Continue reading: Vegan Brownie Cookies Grain-free Oil-freeThe post Vegan Brownie Cookies Grain-free Oil-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Chai Spice Tahini Cookies Nut free Oil-free Grain-free

December 10 2019 Vegan Richa 

Chai Spice Tahini Cookies Nut free Oil-free Grain-freeChai Spice Tahini Cookies Nut free Oil-free Grain-free. These Chewy and fudgy Tahini Cookies have tahini, sweetener, chai spice and coconut flour. They are vegan gluten-free grain-free nut-free soy-free and oil-free! Jump to Recipe This year I have been experimenting a lot with tahini and grain-free baking! So here’s another tahini cookie which is mostly just tahini. The key to liking tahini is getting a good brand that is not too bitter. I love cookies which are scoop and bake, no hand messyness! These cookies bake into fat soft cookies. You can lave them like that or flatten with a spoon and continue to bake for crispy chewy cookies. For these cookies, get a good brand of tahini such as Soom or Whole foods brand, add a lot more spice to mask some of the bitterness, adjust baking time for the kind of texture you prefer, a few mins longer for crispier and and get to a cookie you love! Don’t like tahini, just use smooth nut butter or sunbutter. WHAT IS TAHINI? Tahini is just blended up toasted hulled sesame seeds. The seeds are blended/­­processed until smooth and fluffy sesame seed butter. The flavor and texture of tahini varies with brand. Tahini adds a nutty, slightly bitter (but pleasing bitter) profile wherever you use it. However, depending on the brand, it might add a lot more bitter. This bitter especially will show up in sweet things like this cookie. For best results use a brand that you generally like the flavor of.Continue reading: Chai Spice Tahini Cookies Nut free Oil-free Grain-freeThe post Chai Spice Tahini Cookies Nut free Oil-free Grain-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Omelet with Mung Bean “Egg”

December 1 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Omelet with Mung Bean “Egg”Vegan Omelet with Delicious Breakfast Potatoes. Mung Bean egg mixture makes a great soy-free egg substitute. Easy Moong Dal Batter for omelets or savory pancakes. No Chickpea flour! Vegan Gluten-free Grain-free soy-free Recipe Nut-free option. Jump to Recipe  Mung bean is used in Indian cuisine to make pancakes, crepes format snack or breakfast. Moong Dal, which is split and skinned green Mung bean, has a nutty flavor (milder than chickpea flour) and makes for a great option to use to make egg-free omelets. I posted a moong dal omelet way back in 2013. At that time Moong dal was available in Indian stores and some other stores, hence the recipe didn’t get as many remakes. Mung bean dal is much more easily available now and is used in many of my recipes. As with any vegani-zed version of dishes, they are dependent on personal preference. Everyone prefers various textures and format of the egg and omelet. This moong dal batter is very flexible to flavor and texture. Play around with additional flavors and adjusting the consistency and cooking time for your preferred vegan omelet.Continue reading: Vegan Omelet with Mung Bean “Egg”The post Vegan Omelet with Mung Bean “Egg” appeared first on Vegan Richa.


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