grain - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Awaken the Seasonal Spirits with These Fall Cocktail Recipes

Vegan Richa’s Instant Pot Cookbook Cover Reveal and Preorder links

Best Classic Plant-Based Restaurants

Thai Pumpkin Curry Vegan










grain vegetarian recipes

Wild Rice and Butternut Blessings

October 5 2021 My New Roots 

Wild Rice and Butternut Blessings Hello friend. Its been a while. I sincerely hope that these words find you getting by as best you can in this strange world we find ourselves in. Staying centered and grounded these days is no small feat, and Im grateful to find myself here again, with the energy and space to share.  This post is actually two years in the making. The experience Im about to tell you about deserves thought, healing, and humility, and though I made a delicious recipe, I needed ample time to learn from, and honour the situation. Almost like with rich decadent food, your body and mind needs time to digest emotion and experience, and over the past 20 months of intense turmoil, discovering and uncovering, and worldly change, there is no better occasion or cultural climate than this moment to share one of my lifes most potent experiences. I hope youll join me on the entirety of this journey and take the time to read and digest it for yourself too. I welcome conscious comments and will receive your words gracefully and with humility in regards to my personal history and ask kindly that the inevitable missteps, mistakes, and /­­ or insensitivities in my story shared below are highlighted with respect and with the intention of learning, inspiring community and healing, and are supportive of a better and more just future.   The People Ill begin by introducing the people of the story that span many generations, many places of origin, and many cultures: The Anishinaabeg – an Indigenous community made up of the Ojibwa, Odawa, Potawatami, Chippewa, Mississauga, Algonquin, and Delaware peoples who stewarded the Great Lakes Basin before and through the late 1600s. A man named James Whetung of the Black Duck clan, Anishinaabe who has called this land home for his lifetime and the many generations before him. My European ancestors who arrived in this same area (Upper Canada then, and what is now known as Southern Ontario) in the early-to-mid 1800s. A young man named Mossom Boyd, my great-, great-, great-grandfather, who landed in 1833. He purchased 100 acres of land and cleared it himself in the hopes of building a prosperous life. After farming for a few years, he wasnt making the income hed hoped for, and sought work at a local sawmill, eventually taking it over, on the site which is now Bobcaygeon, Ontario.   As Boyd continued to work the land, benefitting from the abundant natural resources, he experienced great success with his lumbering enterprise. He later went on to cut forests in great swathes across Ontario, then moved out west to Vancouver Island with his son, Martin Mossom Boyd, who eventually took over the business. Needless to say, the familys enterprise had an indelible impact on the Canadian landscape and the Indigenous peoples. Me, a white, privileged woman who benefits from this history in seen and unseen ways with a mission to inspire health to the people of this world through conscious choices. Heres one of my many stories...  My Family I spent my summers in the Kawartha Lakes, just 12 kilometers upstream from the reserve where James lived and lives. My grandparents lived on the canal at the mouth of Pigeon lake, on the Trent-Severn Waterway. My grandfather owned a substantial portion of the land there (how we understand owned in our modern world), and a 1085-acre island just off the shoreline.  I was a very lucky kid to have so much wild land to explore, play with, and learn from. To say I feel connected to nature, to the earth and water, to the elements there, would be an understatement. That forest and lake are inside of me, just as much as I am inside of it – I knew every rock, nook, cranny, and crevice. I knew the plants, the poison ivy, the lichen, the cedar; the shallow soil, dry and bare rocks, the limestone; I can evoke the alchemical aroma of it all in an instant. My hideaways along the shoreline in giant rock fractures were coated in moss and gnarled cedar roots, and there I would live in worlds of my imagination, connected to natures creations and its magnetic energy. The sensation of being there, on every level, is burned into my being. It is cellular memory.    Mossom Boyd 1814-1883 /­­ My father and I canoeing on Pigeon Lake /­­ Fishing on Pigeon Lake, 1990 There is a museum in town, named after my great-great-great grandfather Mossom, honouring his vision and entrepreneurial genius (as our culture recognizes). This history was one to celebrate, an empire that spanned the country, a legacy to be proud of. We would visit the museum almost every summer when I was growing up, so that I could better understand where I came from. These truths coexisted within me — nature and empire. As I began to see the complexities of this place that is deeply a part of me, I sought out a way to understand the same land, water, air, forest through the eyes, hands, and hearts of the people with a completely different history to the shared nature and to the empire of my lineage.  The Whetungs James family has been living with the land known as the Michi Saagig Anishinaabeg territory for approximately 4,000 years, dated by wild rice fossils found by geologists. This being the same land, that Mossom Boyd purchased 3,780 years later.  When I drove up to Curve Lake First Nations to experience a wild rice (known as manoomin) harvest two years ago, I met James Whetung and his family. The man whose name I had heard before, but was admittedly afraid to come face to face with, as I had some idea of how my lineage had impacted his. At least I thought I knew. When the group of us had all arrived and settled, James introduced himself, and told his story – the side that I had never heard before. They cut all the trees, floated them down river using the highways of my people. They needed clearer waterways, so they dredged the lakes and removed the rice beds that had provided our food. The First Nations peoples were forcefully moved to reserves, and confined there, needing written permission to leave, and only in order to work for local farmers at slave wages. You had to be Christian to live on the reserve, and Natives were not allowed to practice their own spirituality or pass it on to subsequent generations. The people were starving. Listening to James, and hearing first-hand what his ancestors had gone through because of my ancestors, was heartbreaking, and it filled me with bitter shame and confusion. What was once a celebrated history of my family, became tainted and disgraceful. When he was finished, I raised my hand to speak, compelled to admit that I came from the family he was talking about. The lineage and industry that changed the landscape of his ancestors’ home. That I was deeply remorseful. He responded graciously by inviting me to canoe out with him to harvest manoomin. He said that those on the reserves eventually were able to take the remaining rice seeds and plant them. By 1920, the yields were up but only until the 1950s when destructive colonial farming practices began using chemicals (many of which still are in use today), which created chemical run-off causing imbalances in the lakes, soil, air, and water, further affecting the aquatic grasses; the nutritious, traditional food source.   Wild Rice on Pigeon Lake Canadian cottage culture took off in the area around this time as well, motor boat traffic increased destroying the rice beds, and leaked oil and gas into the water. Septic beds were added for sewage treatment, but none were regulated and leaching into lakes was a regular occurrence. In the years between 1950 and 1980, the Trent Severn Waterway underwent a weed eradication program using agent orange (a highly toxic herbicide) to make swimming more enjoyable for the cottagers. Shortly after, James started planting seeds to feed his family and community despite the many cultural and environmental concerns out of his control. Wild rice as a traditional food source is highly nutritious and is known to help prevent diabetes — a huge problem within Indigenous peoples due to a forced disconnection from their traditional practices and nourishment sources. James started sowing seeds on Pigeon lake, where his grandfather had seeded and harvested for many generations. He was healing his people, and as demand increased, he started to invent technologies to make his work easier and faster. The increased production meant that he could not only feed his community, but start selling his wild rice at local farmers markets.  Unfortunately, not everyone is as enthusiastic about the wild rice increase in Pigeon and surrounding lakes. Since 2007, a group of cottagers have been fighting against Whetungs seeding of wild rice, claiming that the shoreline is their property and that the rice beds impede recreational boating. Theyve gone so far as to form a protest group, called Save Pigeon Lake, which asks James to harvest without the use of a motorboat (he did this to increase efficiency) and to stop seeding the rice.  Canada and Curve Lake First Nation are both signatories to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. This Declaration states that Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain and develop their political, economic and social systems or institutions, to be secure in the enjoyment of their own means of subsistence and development, and to engage freely in all their traditional and other economic activities (Article 20). And further, that Indigenous peoples have the right to maintain, control, protect and develop their cultural heritage, traditional knowledge, and traditional cultural expressions, as well as the manifestations of the sciences, technologies and cultures, including human and genetic resources, seeds, medicines, knowledge of the properties of fauna and flora... (Article 31). The rice beds run along the TSW in the tri-lakes area, which includes Buckhorn, Chemong and Pigeon lakes. Despite the concerns of waterfront property owners, Whetung says the land falls under Treaty 20 and is therefore not under the jurisdiction of the TSW, which is operated by Parks Canada.  About James Im going to keep doing what I am doing. Why would I stop? Our people have starved for thousands of years. This is food; this is a livelihood, says Whetung. And personally, as an advocate for healthy food access for all, for a thriving world, and supported communities, I whole-heartedly agree. For more about James and his community’s work, please visit the Black Duck Wild Rice website. I am deeply grateful for James time, energy, heart, perseverance, and spirit. This is a forever healing journey and one I intend to continue with the peoples intrinsically linked to my own familys history here in Canada. Wild Rice Harvesting and Preparation Let’s talk about this beautiful offering, manoomin, or wild rice. Having always been drawn to this remarkable plant, I knew that when I moved back to Ontario, Canada, I had to learn more about it firsthand, and perhaps even how to harvest and process it. That is what led me to James and Black Duck Wild Rice. Every year around the September full moon, the manoomin harvest takes place, and he and his community welcome those who want to join and learn. Harvesting James taught us the traditional way, in canoes, all by hand. With two people per boat, one navigates and steers, while the other uses two long, thin sticks (bawa’iganaakoog); one to bend the rice into the canoe and the other to beat the grasses until the rice seeds fall into the hull of the canoe. Once you get the hang of it, it’s rhythmic and meditative, but still a physical and time-consuming ritual that requires community. As with most traditional food cultivation practices its a closed loop cycle, for whatever rice that doesnt fall into the canoe to be processed falls into the water, planting next years crop at the same time! Curing Once on shore, the canoes are emptied by hand onto large sheets which are transferred to a cool dark place so the rice can cure. Two or three times a day for a week or so, the rice is turned and aerated, left to dry.  Toasting /­­ Parching The rice was traditionally toasted in a cast-iron cauldron over an open fire. James showed me how to use an old canoe paddle to turn the rice constantly so as not to scorch it — its texture and scent slowly transformed. This takes about an hour of constant stirring with a keen eye on the fire so it remains at the perfect temperature for toasting. If you stop for even a second, the rice will burn. James could tell from the smell, and how the rice felt between his fingers when it was ready the mark of a true artisan, energetically connected to his craft. Nowadays, James uses a machine that he designed and built himself, that stirs the rice automatically over open flames and gets the rice toasty faster and with less manual labour. Toasting the rice increases the flavour, and helps preserve it. If properly toasted and dry, wild rice can last in storage for five years or more (a necessity to help balance the yearly ebbs and flows of the harvest).  Dancing /­­ Jigging This was my favourite part of the process because it involved several people working together, and having the pleasure and honour of wearing beautiful, specially-designed moccasins just for this process. The toasted rice is put into another large cauldron (or sometimes a hole in the ground lined with leather cloth or a tarp) while three people sit around it, with our feet in the center. Once we had our soft shoes laced all the way up, we vigorously twisted and swooshed our feet around on the rice to loosen some of the chaff from the rice kernels — this was extremely hard work! We rotated through the group as people got tired, and eventually we were ready for the last step. Winnowing The danced rice is then turned out onto a large fabric sheet, with everyone holding the edge with both hands. Count to three and up the rice goes into the air, the breeze blowing the chaff away. This needs to be repeated countless times to separate the rice from the chaff completely. This is unbelievably time-consuming work and experiencing it first hand made me appreciate every grain so much more! At the end of a grounding day of traditional work, you are gifted a few cups of cleaned wild rice. The appreciation I felt to see the yield of the countless hours by many people, not to mention the effort and contribution of this Earth truly became overwhelming. The experience solidified how food has the unparalleled ability to bring people together — requiring many enthusiastic, hard-working hands (and feet!) to get the job done, start to finish. At the end of the journey, everyone is rewarded with delicious food, straight from the Earth, her waters, her people. It is so simple, and so powerful. Wildly Nutritious Wild rice is not related to true rice nor is a grain at all in fact, but the seed of aquatic grass that grows along the shores of freshwater lakes in Canada and the Northern US. Its a little more expensive than other varieties, as it is often harvested by hand.  Wild rice is also, of course, wildly nutritious and is no surprise that Indigenous peoples made a point to cultivate this true super food. Containing high levels of protein, fiber, iron, and calcium, wild rice is also gluten-free. It is extremely high in folic acid, an essential B-complex vitamin lacking in many peoples diets. Just half a cup of cooked wild rice yields 21.3 mcg of folic acid – necessary for cardiovascular support, red blood cell production, brain and nervous system health, and of particular importance during pregnancy – where brown rice by comparison offers only 3.9 mcg. The niacin content of wild rice is also notably high with l.06 mg for every 1/­­2 cup cooked rice. Potassium packs an 83 mg punch, and zinc, which is usually available in trace amounts, registers 1.1 mg. Wild rice is a wonderful alternative to any grain that you would use in either hot or cold dishes. My favourite is to enjoy it in veggie bowls, soups and stews, as well as hearty salads. Its rich, nutty flavour pairs well with other earthy-sweet foods like beets, sweet potato, pumpkins and squash, making it the perfect ingredient to add to your fall recipes, already full of abundance and gratitude. It lasts for about a week after cooking, so making a large batch at the beginning of the week will give you the honour to grace your meals with a serious boost of nutrition and spirit with every grain! Wild Rice & Butternut Blessings This recipe was born from the desire to combine the elements that James and I had a hand in growing: wild rice from his lake, and butternut squash from my garden, coming together for one beautiful meal. Stacking the squash rounds makes for a grand, dramatic, and eye-catching presentation where the simple ingredients are made into something very special. This would be the most stunning main dish for a harvest celebration meal, or even into the winter holidays. It has the perfect balance of flavours, textures, and nutrition, so youll feel satisfied on every level. Try to find a butternut squash with a long and hefty neck. Since we are after nice big rounds, the longer your neck, the more rounds youll have! And try to source your wild rice from a local reserve or farmers market, if possible. There are several components to this recipe, but Ive written it in a way that you can juggle all the elements with seamless management of your time.    Print Wild Rice and Butternut Blessings with Mushrooms, Toasted Walnut Garlic Sauce, and Sumac Author Sarah Britton Ingredients4 lb. /­­ 2kg butternut squash about 1 large, try to find one with a long neck! 1 cup /­­ 175g wild rice soaked for at least 12 hours 9 oz. /­­ 250g mixed wild mushrooms or any mushroom of your choice 3 cloves garlic minced a couple sprigs fresh thyme and rosemary 1/­­2 cup /­­ 13g chopped flat-leaf parsley 1 batch Toasted Walnut Sauce recipe follows 1 Tbsp. sumac divided freshly cracked black pepper handful of walnuts for garnish if desired Toasted Walnut Garlic Sauce1 cup /­­ 125g raw walnuts 1 garlic clove 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 tsp. apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. pure maple syrup 2 generous pinches of fine sea salt plus more as needed InstructionsStart by cooking the wild rice: drain and rinse the soaked rice well, place in a pot. Add 3 cups /­­ 750ml of fresh water, a couple pinches of sea salt, then bring to a boil, and reduce to simmer. Cook until rice is chewy-tender - about 45 minutes. While the rice is cooking, preheat the oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Spread the walnuts in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Toast for 7 to 10 minutes, watching them carefully so they do not burn, until they are golden and fragrant. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly. Turn the oven heat up to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Give the butternut squash a good scrub, making sure to remove any dust or dirt. Leaving the skin on, slice the squash neck into rounds about 1 /­­ 2.5cm thick. Place on a baking sheet, sprinkle with a little salt, and roast in the oven for 20-30 minutes, flipping once halfway through cooking, until the squash is fork tender. Remove from the oven and drizzle with olive oil and a little more salt, if desired.  While the squash is roasting, make the Toasted Walnut Sauce. Place the toasted walnuts, garlic, olive oil, apple cider vinegar, and maple syrup in a blender. Blend on high, adding up to 1 cup /­­ 250ml of water to thin the dressing as needed--you are looking for the consistency of melted ice cream. Season with salt. Store in an airtight glass container in the fridge for up to 5 days. Lastly, prepare the mushrooms. Clean and cut the mushrooms as desired (I used king oyster mushrooms, sliced in half lengthwise and scored diagonally). Add a knob of your favourite cooking fat to a large skillet, and once melted add the mushrooms and a couple pinches of salt. Cook the mushrooms without crowding them, and do not move them about in the pan too much. Youre looking for a nice sear and that comes after the mushrooms have been in constant, direct contact with high heat. Once golden on one side, flip, and continue cooking until golden on the other. In a large bowl, combine the wild rice and parsley. Drizzle a touch of the sauce and about 1/­­2 Tbsp. of the sumac, a few grinds of black pepper, and fold to incorporate. To assemble, drizzle or puddle some sauce on the bottom of your serving plate. Add a round of butternut squash, followed by the wild rice mixture, a couple mushrooms, then repeat the layers of squash, rice, mushrooms. Drizzle remaining sauce over top, sprinkle with additional sumac and black pepper, and a handful of walnuts. Say thank you and enjoy each bite, each grain. NotesServes 4 Makes approximately 1 cup /­­ 270ml of Sauce In Closing I would love to hear your thoughts about how we can better respect and heal our pasts culturally, together. I wanted to open up the conversation here, not try to offer some kind of solution. This is a complicated, complex, deeply layered issue that has deep roots, well beyond us here today. I feel really lucky to have had the opportunity to be in a canoe with James himself, to witness how to harvest with intention and gratitude. It felt deeply meaningful to be there with him, the place our two family lines have crossed in many ways for many years, finally converging in a peaceful, cooperative, and hopefully reciprocal way. This extends far beyond James and I, and takes many more hands and hearts. The first step of many, I am forever grateful to James for sharing the story of his family and community as it has been silenced for too long. Thank you for taking the time to read this today. Id also like to add for those who havent seen Canadian news over the past few months, that there has been uncovering of more extreme darkness in this country in relation to the Indigneous people of this land. The residential school system removed children from their Indigenous culture, communities, families, and ways of being. These Anglo-Saxon, Christian boarding schools are sites of mass unmarked graves where thousands of children’s bodies were found, taken from their families. There are many agencies working towards healing, remediation, and reconciliation in response to these unfathomable atrocities in our history. One of them is the Downie Wenjack Foundation, which aims to to aid our collective reconciliation journey through a combination of awareness, education, and action. This link will take you to their page about Reconcili-ACTION, and a list of ways to catalyze important conversations and meaningful change, recognizing that change starts with every one of us and each person can make an impact. The post Wild Rice and Butternut Blessings appeared first on My New Roots.

Easy Vegan Almond Flour Pie Crust (Low-Carb, Gluten-free, Grain-free)

September 21 2021 Vegan Richa 

Easy Vegan Almond Flour Pie Crust (Low-Carb, Gluten-free, Grain-free)This easy Vegan Almond Flour Pie Crust is naturally gluten-free, grain-free, refined sugar-free and dairy-free, and made with just a few simple ingredients. No chilling needed! The perfect crust for practically any pie! There’s something intimidating about making your own pie crust – especially when it comes to rolling out a pie crust. For some reason, we all tend to prefer graham cracker crusts, where you simply crush store-bought crackers together with vegan butter and press the mixture into a pan. If you feel the same way, I am here to tell you that with the right recipe, everyone can make their own vegan pie crust from scratch! Give this easy pie crust a chance and you will be pleasantly surprised. This almond flour pie crust is so easy to make. Its only made with a handful of simple ingredients that you probably already have stocked in your gluten-free pantry. But there’s more to this vegan pie crust! Apart from being simple, this is also a gluten-free and grain-free pie crust recipe. Due to the absence of gluten, you dont need to worry about overworking the dough and ending up with a tough crust. As we are using oil in this vegan pie crust, you dont need to worry about chilling and cutting in butter. Also, theres no need to chill the dough so not only is this an easy pie crust but also a quick one! I have used variations of this almond flour pie crust in several of my favorite recipes, like this Vegan Chocolate Pumpkin Pie.  It is so versatile and you can season it with your favorite herbs and spices. Continue reading: Easy Vegan Almond Flour Pie Crust (Low-Carb, Gluten-free, Grain-free)The post Easy Vegan Almond Flour Pie Crust (Low-Carb, Gluten-free, Grain-free) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Barrio Bread Is Helping to Revive Arizona’s Nearly-Forgotten ‘Grain Chain’

August 3 2021 Vegetarian Times 

Barrio Bread Is Helping to Revive Arizona’s Nearly-Forgotten ‘Grain Chain’ Although grains have long been part of the regions gastronomic heritage, Arizona grains arent widely known. Don Guerra is changing that with his community-supported bakery and education programs. The post Barrio Bread Is Helping to Revive Arizona’s Nearly-Forgotten ‘Grain Chain’ appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Vegan Date Nut Cake (Eggless)

July 18 2021 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Date Nut Cake (Eggless)This easy vegan date nut cake is moist, fluffy, and packed with chewy dates and crunchy pecans and walnuts! So simple to make and the perfect sweet treat to bring to a potluck or bake sale. Gluten-free option. Tired of making banana bread over and over again? Try this Vegan Date and Nut Cake instead. It’s moist yet light and fluffy and packed with dates and nuts. You could probably get away with calling this a vegan date and nut bread, or snack cake. I love this date cake with a mix of pecans or walnuts and pistachios but you can use any nut you have in your baking pantry – or a mix of nuts and seeds. Think hazelnuts, pistachios, almonds, pumpkin seeds – anything you want!  The batter is so wonderfully moist thanks to the addition of almond flour.  I used AP flour for this and while I did not design this to be a gluten-free cake, you could totally change this by using a gluten-free flour mix of oat flour, almond flour, and potato starch. This is one of those easy cake recipes you can make whenever there is a “cake emergency” – meaning your kids let you know they need to bring something to school the next day. Or you have spontaneous visitors and want to whip up something sweet and easy. As this cake travels really well, you can also bring it to any potluck or picnic. Everyone will love it so keep the recipe ready! MORE VEGAN CAKE RECIPES - Eggnog Pound Cake - 1 Bowl Banana Apple Bread. Can be made into muffins - Peanut Butter Chocolate Marble Cake - Lemon blueberry pound cake - GF Cashew Butter Chocolate Marble Cake.  - Gluten-free Cinnamon Roll Bread yeast-free. - Carrot Banana Bread - Also grain-free. - Sweet Potato Crumb Cake. GF Continue reading: Vegan Date Nut Cake (Eggless)The post Vegan Date Nut Cake (Eggless) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Gluten-free Chocolate Cupcakes – Grain-free

May 1 2021 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gluten-free Chocolate Cupcakes – Grain-freeThese easy vegan Chocolate Cupcakes are fluffy and light yet rich and chocolatey at the same time! Perfect for birthday parties or bridal showers! Gluten-free, grain-free, and made in one bowl! Doesn’t the look of these vegan chocolate cupcakes make you want to hop in the kitchen and bake a batch? This recipe is one of my favorite things to bake whenever there is a birthday party or a potluck! They are such a crowd pleaser! I mean, who doesn’t like chocolate? What I love about these cupcakes is that they provide a deep,  rich chocolate flavor while being perfectly light and fluffy in texture. The secret ingredients? Club soda – yes fizzy drinks are my secret baking weapon when it comes to getting that perfect rise for your vegan muffins and cupcakes. These vegan chocolate cupcakes can be made with just a couple of basic ingredients that you most likely already have at home. You can just top these with coconut whipped cream or go for any of the vegan frostings I added in the end! MORE GLUTENFREE CAKES AND BAKES FROM THE BLOG - GF Cashew Butter Chocolate Marble Cake.  - Gluten-free Cinnamon Roll Bread yeast-free. - GF Carrot Banana Bread - Also grain-free. - Sweet Potato Crumb Cake. GF - GF Christmas Cake - Lemon Donuts grainfree - Pumpkin Bars grainfree Continue reading: Vegan Gluten-free Chocolate Cupcakes – Grain-freeThe post Vegan Gluten-free Chocolate Cupcakes – Grain-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Rice Pudding

March 19 2021 Oh My Veggies 

You only need seven ingredients to make this tasty recipe. This creamy vegan rice pudding is made with almond milk and flavored with orange, maple, and warm cinnamon spices.  When you take a bit of this dairy-, coconut-, and gluten-free rice pudding, you’ll find that it doesn’t lack any flavor. Whip up this vegan pudding for a delicious dessert today.  This Vegan Rice Pudding is… Easy to Make  Simple (Few Ingredients)  Coconut-Free  Dairy-Free  Gluten-Free Vegan Friendly  Vegetarian  Loaded with creamy flavors  How to Make Vegan Rice Pudding  Grab a pot and place it on the stove. Add in all your ingredients.  Whisk together the mixture and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally.  Once the rice thickens, stir continuously until the rice is fully cooked.  Remove from the stove and add your favorite rice pudding toppings.  Scroll down for the full recipe with measurements and detailed instructions. Tips & Tricks  Variety Of Rice  I find a long grain white rice does best with this recipe. You will find that other varieties, like brown rice, etc., won’t produce the same creamy, flavorful texture.  Heavy-Bottom Pot  You will find that investing in a great heavy-bottom pot is important. A nice heavy-bottom pot is […]

Savory Chickpea Flour Waffles – Pakora Waffles

February 2 2021 Vegan Richa 

Savory Chickpea Flour Waffles – Pakora WafflesPakora Waffles! Chickpea Flour Waffles are a fun savory vegan breakfast treat or snack! Pakora’s are a staple at most Indian restaurants and now you can have them for breakfast – unfried! Gluten-free too! So it was definitely time for me to come up with another creative savory use for a waffle iron. Enter Pakora Waffles. What are Pakoras? Pakora is a spiced fritter originating from the Indian subcontinent, often sold by street vendors and consisting of vegetables such as potatoes and onions, coated in spiced gram flour and then deep-fried. These waffles are a fun play on the popular Indian snack. Light crispy waffles made with chickpea flour with plenty of veggie goodness and spices in them! Is gram flour the same as chickpea flour? Besan (gram flour) and Chickpea flour are not the same! Besan or gram flour is a flour of chana dal or split brown chickpeas. Chickpea flour or garbanzo flour is ground up white chickpeas. Similar flavors, but not the same flour. Besan is Brown Chickpea flour, is finer and milder flavor. Garbanzo bean flour (white Chickpea flour) is coarse, dryer, more bitter flavored and needs more moisture. Read this blog post for differences and where to use which flour. MORE CHICKPEA FLOUR RECIPES - Chickpea flour tofu  - firmer and sturdier with chickpea flour - Omelet with Chickpea flour  - Chickpea flour frittata - no soy - Socca is better with chickpea flour. - My Gluten-free Naan is better with chickpea flour - Breakfast Scramble with Chickpea Flour - Gluten-free flatbread - Cheese slices! no nuts. Continue reading: Savory Chickpea Flour Waffles – Pakora WafflesThe post Savory Chickpea Flour Waffles – Pakora Waffles appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Brown Rice Pilaf with White Beans, Shiitakes, and Spinach

January 19 2021 VegKitchen 

Brown Rice Pilaf with White Beans, Shiitakes, and Spinach This homey brown rice pilaf is loaded with nutritious flavor from white beans, shiitake mushrooms, and fresh spinach. This simple dish makes a delicious vegan dinner or hearty lunch. This brown rice pilaf is: A hearty vegan meal – comfort food at its best! Packed with protein and fiber Ready in under an hour Easy to make ahead, so it’s perfect for meal prep. Variations This recipe is infinitely versatile. Instead of rice, you can swap in your own favorite grains like quinoa, wheat berries, or bulgur. You can also swap out the white beans for cooked lentils, black-eyed peas, or chopped seitan to add an extra dose of protein. Or add some heat with a minced jalape?o chile! One-Dish Vegan This recipe is from the amazing vegan cookbook, One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson. You can find it listed in the book as Brown Rice with White Beans, Shiitakes, and Spinach. It has been shared with permission of The Harvard Common Press. For more ways to use brown rice, explore these Classic Rice Dishes. This article was first published in 2013. It has since been updated. The post Brown Rice Pilaf with White Beans, Shiitakes, and Spinach appeared first on VegKitchen.

The 5 Best Foods for a New Year

January 6 2021 Vegetarian Times 

The 5 Best Foods for a New Year Awaken your taste buds with these unfamiliar -- but healthy -- foods you should include in a plant-based diet The post The 5 Best Foods for a New Year appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Sorghum Dosa (Jowar)

December 11 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Sorghum Dosa (Jowar) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Sorghum Jowar Dosa Sorghum Jowar Dosa a tasty twist to Rava Dosa. Lately, I am trying gluten free recipes and exploring the grains I rarely used. Sorghum Dosa is one of those recipes. This is a good alternative to regular dosa it is quick and easy to make. Sorghum Dosa batter does not need to be fermented. Sorghum dosa also vegan and gluten free. It is crispy and has a lacy look like Rava Dosa. You can serve this with traditional Samber and coconut Chutney or serve for a snack with cilantro Chutney. This recipe will serve 3. Ingredients 1/­­2 cup sorghum Jowar flour 1/­­4 cup rice flour Chawal ka atta 1/­­2 tsp cumin seed jeera 1/­­8 tsp asafetida hing 1/­­4 tsp salt 1/­­8 tsp crushed black pepper 1 Tbsp finely chopped cilantro hara dhania 1 1/­­2 cup water 3 Tbsp of oil for cooking dosa InstructionsMix all the dry ingredients together, sorghum flour ( Jowar), rice flour, cumin seeds, asafetida, salt, black pepper. Add water slowly to make a thin batter and avoiding any lumps. Batter should have pouring consistency like buttermilk. Let the batter stand for about 30 minutes. Before making dosa add cilantro. Mix it well. Heat the skillet on medium high. To check if the skillet is ready sprinkle a few drops of water over the skillet water should sizzle. Wipe the skillet with few drops of oil. Pour the batter with a ladle, keep the ladle about 4 inches high from the skillet in a circular motion starting from the center. Keep pouring the batter till it is the size you will like the dosa. Notes: dosa will no be perfectly round. Do not try to spread the batter, Dosa should have holes like swiss cheese or have lacy look. Drizzle 1 teaspoon of oil around dosa. Cook Dosa over medium heat for about 2 minutes or until Dosa becomes golden brown. Turn the Dosa using spatula. Let Dosa cook for about 1 minute from another side. Dosa will be golden brown on one side and light color on other side. Thin and crispy Sorghum Dosa is ready to serve. Dosa has a look of Rava dosa but Sorghum Dosa is also gluten free and vegan. NotesServing Suggestions Traditionally Rava Dosa is served with Sambar (lentil soup cooked with vegetables), and coconut chutney, or serve for snack with cilantro Chutney. I have the recipes for Sambar, Coconut Chutney, and Hari Cilantro Chutney on my web site. The post Sorghum Dosa (Jowar) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Jowar (Sorghum) Dosa Recipe coming soon

December 8 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Jowar (Sorghum) Dosa Recipe coming soon I am one of those who enjoys cooking and eating, a real foodaholic. About three months back when our family got together, Alex, my husband, was given the challenge to see if he can go on a gluten free diet for 10 days. He agreed to do so if I also joined him. They knew for me and Alex no meal is complete without any kind of bread: my favorites are roti and paratha. I decided to take the challenge with him anyway. After ten days, Alex went back to his normal diet, but I decided to continue. I was feeling better and more energetic. But after 10 days when my challenge time was over, I decided occasionally I will cheat a little bit. Surprisingly, I am glad I did that; it was difficult in the beginning, but now I am liking it. Being gluten free has opened a wide selection of grains for me to experiment with new recipes. I knew about them but did not use them much. I started reading about these grains my grandmother raved about and learning about their nutritional values. Knowing all that has made it easy for me to try these grains in my recipes. I do have many gluten free recipes of bread like Dosa, Oat Dosa, Moong Dal Dosa, Besan Puda, but these were part of our regular diet anyway. When making them, I never considered that I was making these recipes because they were gluten free. One of the gluten-free grains I began using was millet. My last recipe for millet (bajri) soup was one of those recipes. My family enjoyed this soup and suggested millet soup can be a part of our winter menu. My next recipe that is coming up is Sorghum (jowar) Dosa. I have already tried this recipe a few times. It is quick, easy, and tasty. Sorghum Dosa is also a good alternative to regular dosa because this dosa batter does not need to be fermented. An added benefit is that Sorghum Dosa is also vegan and gluten free. The post Jowar (Sorghum) Dosa Recipe coming soon appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

How a Plant-Based Diet Can Affect Your Mood

December 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

When most people hear the phrase, You are what you eat, they think about it in terms of body size or physical medical issues -- such as being overweight or underweight or having Type 2 diabetes. But research shows your food choices also affect your mental health, mood, and temperament. Eating a healthy diet containing fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds --with the addition of fortified foods and supplements when indicated -- can support mental well-being, says Reshma Shah, M.D., a plant-based pediatrician and coauthor of Nourish: The Definitive Plant-Based Nutrition Guide for Families. Phytonutrients, which have a protective effect, and fiber, which is responsible for the health of our gut microbiome, are exclusive to plants and have been associated with improved mental health outcomes. Mental Health Benefits of a Plant-Based Diet Theres no shortage of research being done on the mood-boosting and mental health effects associated with the consumption of fruits, vegetables, and other plant-based fuel. These include: - Anxiety and stress. The arachidonic acid, found only in animal products like eggs and chicken, sets off multiple chemical reactions in the body that eventually lead to an increase in inflammation, says Dr. Kasey Nichols, NMD, licensed physician and member of the Arizona Naturopathic Medical Association (AzNMA). When this inflammation reaches the brain, it subsequently can cause feelings of anxiety and stress, as well as depression. People who avoid foods with arachidonic acid typically report a more positive mood and improved mental health. One survey-based study found decreased rates of stress and anxiety in those eating a vegan vs. omnivorous diet, and that vegetarians had reported better mood than non-vegetarians. - Depression. Research suggests eating more plant-based foods can improve quality of life, mood and reduce symptoms of depression. A study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry analyzed the dietary patterns and risk of depression in 3,486 participants over a five-year period. Individuals eating whole foods reported fewer symptoms of depression compared to those who ate mostly processed foods. - ADHD. Although diet isn’t the driving cause or cure for ADHD, Dr. Nichols says some research has shown that switching to a plant-based diet could help with its symptoms. One study showed that preschoolers who chose processed dietary patterns were significantly and positively correlated with ADHD symptoms, while those who chose vegetarian dietary patterns were negatively correlated with ADHD symptoms. Cognition. Some research has shown that eating more plant foods can prevent a cognitive decline later in life, says Dr. Nichols. One study found that those who consistently ate more plant-based foods were 18-33% less likely to develop cognitive impairment than those who didn’t. - Focus. Looking to improve productivity in the workplace? One study showed that employees who ate plant-based foods reported improved job performance and missed fewer workdays. Related: 8 Ways to Improve Your Gut Health & Mood 2 Things to Watch on a Plant-Based Diet While eschewing animal products is a healthy lifestyle choice, it requires a thorough understanding of how to create balanced and complete meals. There are a couple areas youll need to pay special attention to, to ensure youre reaping all of the healthy benefits: - Nutrient deficiency. If done improperly, a plant-based diet could lack important nutritional needs that can negatively affect mental health. A deficiency in nutrients found in animal products -- like choline, vitamin B-12, folate, omega-3 fatty acids and amino acids -- have been linked to depression, poor mood regulation, poor metabolism, low energy, as well as memory and attention span difficulties. Plant-based eaters in developed countries need to be the most concerned about lacking brain-healthy nutrients like DHA, vitamin B12, vitamin K2, zinc, iron, riboflavin, and vitamin D3, says Dr. Nichols. It is usually common knowledge that vegan diets need to be supplemented with B12, but many people are under the impression that colorful fruits and vegetables are excellent sources of most other vital nutrients. Dietary supplements are a great way counter any deficiency. - Caloric deficiency. Switching to a plant-based diet may end up resulting in a significant reduction in calories. Many find that they lose a few pounds, but if the reduction becomes too extreme and lacks key nutrients and carbohydrates, you may become more irritable, or hangry, and easily distracted, says Dr. Nichols. If youre losing too much weight, add some more healthy fats (such as coconut oil and avocados) into your diet. Related: Plant-Powered Brain Health Boost Your Mood with These Plant-Based Must-Haves Its easy to fall into a rut during meal prep and planning -- many people are creatures of habit who gravitate toward the same menu week after week. But if your go-to meals arent well-rounded, this could leave you lacking in essential nutrients. In order to ensure youre getting the full spectrum of nutrition your body and mind need to thrive, make sure youre including the following: - Omega 3s. Omega 3 fatty acids have been implicated in improved mental health outcomes, says Dr. Shah. Plant-based diets generally limit or exclude fish, which is a major source of omega 3 fatty acids, so they may be low in this key nutrient. Instead, youll find your omega 3s in foods such as chia seeds, hemp seeds, flax seed, and walnuts. - Tryptophan. The brain uses the amino acid tryptophan to produce serotonin, the feel-good neurotransmitter. Its found in chicken, eggs, cheese and fish, but plant-based sources of tryptophan include leafy greens, sunflower seeds, watercress, soybeans, pumpkin seeds, mushrooms, broccoli and peas. - B vitamins. Known to boost mood by increasing such neurotransmitters as serotonin, dopamine, and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), B vitamins may be the key to boosting your spirits, too. Choose from beans, legumes and lentils, fortified cereals and sunflower seeds. The effects of going plant-based vary from person to person, so it’s best to consult your doctor first to make sure it’s the right move for you, says Dr. Nichols.   The post How a Plant-Based Diet Can Affect Your Mood appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Vegan Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice (Instant Pot)

November 28 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice (Instant Pot)Smoky Vegan Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice made within minutes using the Instant Pot! A seasonal twist on restaurant-style fried rice your whole family will love! Glutenfree soyfree Nutfree, stove top option in notes Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice – a seasonal twist on traditional Chinese Fried Rice Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice is definitely not the traditional fried rice. It’s not even fried per se as we prepare it in the Instant Pot but let me tell you, this seasonal twist is amazing. Its what I call, use up the veggies and remaining pumpkin fried rice! Its so finger-licking good, I might have made it several times even when I didnt have any pumpkin to use up! The best thing – it’s all made in the Instant Pot within just 5 minutes of cooking time and 10 minutes of natural steam release. The prep work is minimal – just remember to soak the rice before you add it to the Instant Pot to get the perfect “fluffiness”. The slight heat from the chipotle chili powder goes to well with this dish. I use a chipotle chili blend and also add some cumin and thyme to seal the deal – all spices that pair beautifully with the sweet pumpkin puree, FOR MORE VEGAN RICE DISHES CHECK OUT THESE RECIPES: - Turmeric Lemon Rice - Vegetable Carrot Fried Rice - Instant Pot Black Eyed Peas Rice Pulao - Masala Fried Rice with Turmeric Onion Raita - Peanut Sauce Fried Rice Which rice shall I use for making fried rice? Use long grain rice for making this fried rice recipe.Why? Because long-grain rice holds its shape better and stays separate when cooked. Basmati rice is my top choice but you can also go for Jasmine rice which has a delicate and light floral aroma. You can also use long grain brown rice. Pressure cook for 20 mins and use hearty veggies as otherwise they will be too soft and overcookedContinue reading: Vegan Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice (Instant Pot)The post Vegan Pumpkin Chipotle Fried Rice (Instant Pot) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Chocolate and Pumpkin Pie Spice Snickerdoodles (Glutenfree)

November 20 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Chocolate and Pumpkin Pie Spice Snickerdoodles (Glutenfree)These easy Vegan Chocolate Pumpkin Spice Snickerdoodles are everything you love about snickerdoodles with a punch of pumpkin pie magic. A Glutenfree Vegan fall-tastic spin on a classic holiday cookie your whole family will love! Jump to Recipe Prepare to “fall” in love with these marbled Vegan Snickerdoodles! These Pumpkin Spice Snickerdoodles should really come with a warning label because they are so good. I mean, we are in a season that should be all about gratitude and sharing the goodies, but these are SO good they could trigger a spot of the old “food greed”. This can be easily solved by just making a huge batch and keeping some all for yourself. Baker’s privilege, right? A classic snickerdoodle cookie is a type of holiday sugar cookie rolled in cinnamon sugar. This fall-centric pumpkin spice version adds a pinch of pumpkin pie spice aka. our favorite fall drug. While baking, the pumpkin pie spices will fill your whole kitchen with the most comforting cozy scent and will give you all those fall feels. The other half is chocolate which complements the cookie and the season perfectly. Dont like pumpkin pie spice? Use just cinnamon or just vanilla and skip the cinnamon sugar coating. More cookie Recipes from the blog - Cinnamon Roll Cookies.  - PB J thunbprints - grainfree Brownie cookies  - Lemon Chia Cookies. GF - Peanut oatmeal Chocolate chip cookies - Paleo Chocolate Chip Cookies. GF - Breakfast Cookies gf - Ginger Tahini Cookies GF option They are Glutenfree, have amazing texture and flavor, theyre perfectly pumpkin spicy...AND they have added chocolate so they are extra awesome! I am fully bandwagon-ed up with these babies and I think you should do the same!Continue reading: Vegan Chocolate and Pumpkin Pie Spice Snickerdoodles (Glutenfree)The post Vegan Chocolate and Pumpkin Pie Spice Snickerdoodles (Glutenfree) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

The Salad Sandwich

June 3 2021 Golubka Kitchen 

The Salad Sandwich Beach sandwich season is finally here, and doesn’t everything taste better on the beach? Today’s recipe is a tribute to a sandwich you might find at a health food store or co-op that’s been around forever, has an impressive bulk section, an overwhelming assortment of natural bar soap, a tiny juice bar, and a soup/­­salad/­­sandwich takeout operation. This kind of sandwich usually comes on sprouted grain bread, slathered with hummus as the sauce of choice, most definitely has lots of alfalfa sprouts packed inside, and somehow always perfectly hits the spot. This is my version of that – basically a salad, deconstructed and served as a sandwich. It’s super flavorful, filled with all kinds of textures, and makes for such a refreshing, summer meal! The Salad Sandwich   Print Serves: 2 sandwiches Ingredients ½ garlic clove juice from ½ small lemon 1 small-medium carrot, grated 1 small-medium beet, grated ½ teaspoon apple cider vinegar ½ teaspoon sugar sea salt 1 large avocado, pitted and peeled ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard freshly ground black pepper hummus 4 slices of sourdough or sprouted grain bread, toasted if needed 4-6 lettuce leaves sauerkraut or kimchi 1 small cucumber, sliced handful alfalfa sprouts or other sprouts/­­microgreens of choice Instructions Grate the garlic into a medium bowl using a microplane or a fine grater. Pour the lemon juice over the garlic and let sit while preparing the rest of the ingredients, for the garlic to mellow. Put the carrots and beets in another medium bowl, drizzle with the vinegar, sprinkle with sugar and salt to taste, mix to coat. Add the avocado to the bowl with the garlic and lemon juice, mash with a fork. Add the mustard, salt, and pepper to taste, mix to combine. Start assembling the sandwiches. Generously spread the hummus on all 4 bread slices. Distribute the mashed avocado between the two sandwiches, followed by the lettuce, sauerkraut/­­kimchi to taste, cucumber, carrots and beets, and sprouts. Close the sandwiches and enjoy right away, or wrap them up and keep in a cooler. This sandwich is best enjoyed within the first few hours of making it. 3.5.3226 The post The Salad Sandwich appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

How to Cook Any Grain in the Instant Pot

April 21 2021 Vegetarian Times 

How to Cook Any Grain in the Instant Pot This handy guide will make cooking whole grains in the Instant Pot a cinch. The post How to Cook Any Grain in the Instant Pot appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Vegan Baked Lamington Donuts & Donut Holes

February 21 2021 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Baked Lamington Donuts & Donut HolesIf you love Lamingtons but find them fuzzy to make, try these easy Vegan Lamington Donuts and Donut Holes instead. They’re simple to make, baked, covered with chocolate and coconut, filled with raspberry jam and bake up in just 15 minutes. Coming at you with a fun alternative to a traditional lamington! Vegan Lamington Donuts! You could call these a lazy cooks Lamington – because they are well easier to make than the original. These vegan donut holes have all the hallmarks of the Aussie dessert classic; A fluffy cakey donut filled with jam, then covered in chocolate and finally rolled in coconut. All the flavor of a lamington, but without the fuss and bother. Theres much debate between Australians as to whether a lamington should contain jam or not. My focus for these donuts is on taste, not tradition. I mean, what’s not to love about the combination of tart raspberry jam, chocolate, and coconut. Imagine a fresh, fluffy, perfectly cooked doughnut hole, filled with still warm raspberry jam and dipped in a rich vegan chocolate glaze, then tossed in shredded coconut. Trsut me, these are seriously good. I give you two options here! I know that not everyone has a donut baking tray, so you will be happy to lear that a mini muffin tray or a mini bundt cake tin can be used instead. Maybe even a cake pop tin. You can make these Glutenfree by using my Glutenfree Vegan Vanilla donuts recipe MORE VEGAN DONUTS AND MUFFINS RECIPES FROM THE BLOG - Pumpkin Donuts - Spiced Sweet Potato Doughnuts with Cinnamon sugar SF - Gluten-free Lemon Donuts - Pumpkin Cream Cheese Muffins - Classic Donuts. - Glutenfree Vegan Vanilla donuts  - Turmeric Carrot Muffins Continue reading: Vegan Baked Lamington Donuts & Donut HolesThe post Vegan Baked Lamington Donuts & Donut Holes appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Cabbage and Lemon Risotto

January 20 2021 Golubka Kitchen 

Cabbage and Lemon Risotto I find risotto to be incredibly fun to cook. I like to have something nice to sip by my side, some good music on, and all the ingredients measured out in advance. It’s a preparation process that really gets you in the zone, an almost meditative state of tending to the rice, and watching it magically transform from dry to beautifully creamy. Risotto has a reputation of being fussy, and although it requires constant attention, the ingredients it calls for couldn’t be more modest: alliums like onions and garlic, rice, wine, hot broth, and whatever other items you’d like to add to make it your own. In this recipe, it’s cabbage and lemon, both abundant in the depths of winter. Once you get the hang of it, the preparation becomes second nature as well. We gently stew the cabbage in lemon juice until incredibly tender, so much so that it completely melts and disappears into the risotto. It’s a great way to eat a whole head of cabbage almost without noticing. The bright and assertive flavors from the lemon juice and zest complement the starchiness and richness of the rice really nicely. A small warning: this risotto is quite lemony, so if you’re sensitive to sour flavors, I recommend reducing the amount of lemon (this is detailed in the recipe as well). Also, the lemon mellows out as it sits and in the leftovers. Since this is a vegan recipe, there’s no cheese, but we throw together a quick, ‘cheesy’ cashew dust, a cashew Parm of sorts, and stir it through the risotto. The result is so incredibly cozy and comforting, we hope you’ll give it a try one day this winter! Cabbage and Lemon Risotto   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients ¼ cup raw cashews 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast sea salt freshly ground black pepper olive oil 1 medium head white cabbage, thinly sliced with a knife or mandoline zest and juice from 2 small lemons (see note) 1 yellow onion, diced 4 garlic cloves, minced 1½ cups Arborio rice ¼ cup dry white wine 6 cups hot vegetable broth, plus more if needed parsley or other herbs for garnishing (optional) Instructions Pound the cashews in a mortar and pestle or process in a mini food processor, until finely ground. Add the nutritional yeast, a generous pinch of salt, and plenty of black pepper. Mix to combine. Set aside for now. Heat a large skillet over medium heat and add enough oil to generously coat the bottom. Add the cabbage and a pinch of salt, and cook for 10 minutes, until the cabbage is just wilted. Add the juice of 1 lemon and stir it in. Turn the heat down to low, and cover the skillet. Cook the cabbage, covered, for 45 minutes, stirring periodically, until very soft. Transfer the cabbage to a bowl and wipe the skillet if needed. Heat the same skillet over medium heat and add more oil to coat the bottom well. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, saute for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and stir it around until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the rice and mix well to coat it with the oil. Cook, stirring constantly, until the rice grains are translucent, about 3-5 minutes. Add the juice of 1 remaining lemon and the wine, bring it up to a simmer and cook, stirring often, until the liquid is completely absorbed, about 2 minutes. Start adding the hot broth, one ladleful at a time. Bring the broth to a simmer and let it absorb into the rice, stirring often, about 2-4 minutes. Once absorbed, add another ladleful of broth and keep repeating this process of letting the broth absorb, then adding more. Stir the rice frequently and vigorously - this will help develop the starches/­­make the rice creamy. Add about half of the cabbage during the 4th addition of broth. Add the rest of the cabbage at the next addition of broth, and continue cooking, until the rice is creamy and al dente, and until the cabbage has collapsed completely into the risotto. The whole cooking process should take 25-30 minutes total from the first addition of broth. Turn off the heat, mix in the lemon zest and most of the cashew mixture, saving some for garnishing. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve the risotto right away, garnished with more of the cashew dust and herbs, if using. Notes This dish is quite lemony, so if you are sensitive to sour flavors, use 1 lemon, divided between the cabbage and the rice, instead of the 2 lemons that the recipe calls for. 3.5.3226 The post Cabbage and Lemon Risotto appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Glutenfree Vanilla Donuts Recipe

January 11 2021 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Glutenfree Vanilla Donuts RecipeThis Vegan Glutenfree Donuts recipe features a blend of oat and almond flour and results in super moist and fluffy baked vanilla donuts that taste a bit like Snickerdoodle Cookies. Dipped into cinnamon sugar – the perfect sweet afternoon or breakfast treat! Meet my favorite Glutenfree Donuts Recipe! This vegan and gluten-free Vanilla Donuts recipe is going to rock your world and your tastebuds. Trust me, these are one of the best baked gf +v donuts I have ever made and they are super simple to throw together, too. WIN! I love making donuts on a lazy Saturday Morning and these ones are especially great if you want to get the kids involved! They can help to make the batter, and then dip the donuts into the cinnamon sugar mix. I recommend you make a double batch and freeze some vanilla donuts for quick snacking whenever those afternoon sugar cravings hit. No Yeast! The donut batter does not use any yeast for rising. We only use baking powder and baking soda. Therefore it can also be baked into regular size muffins or mini vanilla muffins. Hello, Valentines Day Breakfast! You could also use a mini donuts pan but you would have to reduce the baking time. The secret to gluten-free and vegan baking is adding air to the batter before it even goes into bake. You can do this several ways such as adding some whipped aquafaba , adding in citric acid in the dry ingredients, Or adding in aerated club soda! I like to use club soda these days because living up Aquafaba just takes too much time. Any freshly open fizzy drink makes these really soft and moist. MORE DONUTS AND MUFFINS RECIPES FROM THE BLOG - Pumpkin Donuts - Spiced Sweet Potato Doughnuts with Cinnamon sugar SF - Gluten-free Lemon Donuts - Pumpkin Cream Cheese Muffins - Classic Donuts. - Turmeric Carrot Muffins Continue reading: Vegan Glutenfree Vanilla Donuts RecipeThe post Vegan Glutenfree Vanilla Donuts Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

German Chocolate Cookies

December 31 2020 Vegan Richa 

German Chocolate CookiesThese Vegan German Chocolate Cookies are like small individual German Chocolate Cakes! A soft, chewy chocolate oatmeal cookie with a rich caramel coconut pecan filling in the middle! Trust me, these wont last long on the cookie plate. No added Oil! These German Chocolate Cake Cookies have become a delicious household staple in no time. Think of them as little vegan German chocolate cakes that have all the flavor of German Chocolate Cake but are gone in two bites! I love all things pecan and chocolate! Especially around the holiday season! Have you tried my Pecan Chocolate Pie? SO good! In my book,  German Chocolate Cookies would make a perfect snack year-round, but with that festive nut & chocolate combo they are an especially great gift during the holidays! If you love German Chocolate Cake these little chocolate cookies are the perfect treat to add to your baking list! They have that classic winning combination of chocolate, coconut, and pecan all piled up on top of soft, rich, and chocolatey oatmeal cookies with no added oil! More Vegan Desserts for the Holidays - Chocolate Pumpkin Tart with Almond Crust. GF SF Grain-free. - Salted Caramel Chocolate Pie. GF No Bake - Classic Baked Pumpkin Pie with Rustic Crust. Cashew-free SF - Dark Chocolate Silk Pie. GF SF  - Sweet potato Pie Bars. GF option You often see German chocolate cookies that are frosted or topped with a caramel filling after baking. These are slightly different from your regular German Chocolate Cake Thumbprint cookies, as these are baked with the caramel coconut-pecan filling already in the cookies.  I find these are way easier to store and less messy to eat that way.Continue reading: German Chocolate CookiesThe post German Chocolate Cookies appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Baked Red Lentil & Vegetable Fritters with Maple Mustard Sauce

December 9 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Baked Red Lentil & Vegetable Fritters with Maple Mustard Sauce I made this recipe on a whim when cooking dinner about a month ago and shared the process on our IG stories. It seemed to resonate, and we absolutely loved how it turned out. I’m finally getting around to sharing the recipe here. These fritters are inspired by the Bengali piyaju, as well as the Korean bindae-tteok, both fritters/­­panckes that are made with legumes in the batter. Soaked and blended red lentils act as a binder in these fritters. No chia or flax, or any other binders needed! We pack the red lentil batter with a bunch of veggies: grated carrot, onion, broccoli, garlic, as well some spices. We then bake the fritters instead of frying them. If I can avoid frying, I always do, to save time and avoid smoking up the kitchen. I think that these guys come out just as golden, crispy, and lacy-edged when baked at a high temperature, as they do when fried. We are just letting the oven do the frying :)  The final product is so savory and addictive, it’s impossible not to eat them all in one sitting. To serve with, there’s a really easy and quick maple mustard dipping sauce that really takes this whole recipe over the top. We hope that you’ll give these fritters a try! Baked Red Lentil & Vegetable Fritters with Maple Mustard Sauce   Print Serves: about 12-13 3½ fritters Ingredients for the fritters 1 medium carrot, grated 1 small yellow onion, peeled and grated florets from 2 very small or 1 medium-small head broccoli, grated ½ teaspoon salt, plus more for sprinkling the vegetables 1 cup red lentils, soaked in water overnight 1 garlic clove, roughly chopped ¼ teaspoon smoked paprika pinch chili flakes avocado oil or olive oil for the sauce ⅓ cup vegan mayonnaise 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard (or 1 tbsp Dijon and 1 tbsp grainy mustard) 2 tablespoons maple syrup Instructions to make the fritters Preheat the oven to 425° F (220° C). Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Put the grated carrot, onion, and broccoli in a colander, set over a bowl. Sprinkle with a generous pinch of salt and mix to coat. Let the vegetables sit and release water while preparing the batter. Drain and rinse the lentils. In a food processor, combine the lentils, ½ teaspoon salt, garlic, paprika, and chili flakes. Process until smooth. Transfer the batter to a medium bowl. Using your hands, squeeze as much excess water out of the vegetables as you can. Transfer the vegetables to the bowl with the batter and mix to combine. Start forming the fritters on the prepared baking sheet by putting dollops of the batter on the sheet and flattening them out with a spoon. Flatten out from the center to achieve the uneven fritter-like edges, and leave at least an inch between the fritters. Aim for fritters about 3½ in diameter and just under ¼ in thickness. Brush generously with oil and bake for 20 minutes. Carefully flip the fritters using a flat spatula, brush with more oil, and bake for 10 more minutes, until the undersides are golden, and the edges are crispy. You will likely need to bake the fritters in a few batches. to make the sauce In a small bowl, combine the mayo, mustard, and maple syrup. Mix until smooth. Serve as a dipping sauce for the fritters. Notes If your food processor has a grating attachment, its very convenient to use to grate the vegetables for these fritters. 3.5.3226 The post Baked Red Lentil & Vegetable Fritters with Maple Mustard Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

White Chocolate Peppermint Torte

December 7 2020 My New Roots 

White Chocolate Peppermint Torte   Hi friends. It feels good to be back in this blog space. Since the beginning of this year, Ive been focusing my attention on my latest project, My New Roots Grow – an online universe of wellness education – which will launch soon. Grow is the most energy-intensive and large-scale project since my cookbooks, and once again it feels like birthing something major. The blog has been on the back burner giving more space for Grow to, well, grow, but I thought Id pop in with this stellar holiday dessert because tis the season! I actually developed this recipe last winter, but wasnt sure what to do with it. I thought about keeping it exclusively on Grow (since that is where a lot of my recipe content will live from now on!), but because it is so special and delicious, I felt that it should just be out in the world. Inspired by the Spiced Chocolate Torte that I make on the retreats in Mexico (remember places?!), I wanted to make a festive holiday version with white chocolate and peppermint. The crust is dark chocolate and pecan, so rich and delicious with just the right amount of salt. The interior is velvety smooth and beguilingly creamy, made with cashews, coconut oil, and white chocolate. I love the kiss of peppermint in the filling, which is definitely present but not overwhelming. I didnt want anyone to feel like they were eating dessert and brushing your teeth at the same time!   Some notes on the recipe… If youre using peppermint essential oil to flavour the filling, I find it helpful to measure it out on a spoon first, just in case the bottle is in a giving mood – one too many drops of this stuff will ruin a good torte with too much minty-ness! I like to use about 6 or 7 drops total, but if it comes out too fast, I have no way of controlling the amount. If youre using peppermint extract, start at a quarter of a teaspoon and work your way up to the flavour that suits you. If you eat a vegan diet, you can use maple syrup instead of honey in the filling, but the colour is going to be more brown /­­ beige than creamy. Also, make sure to find dairy-free white chocolate, since the vast majority of commercially-made white chocolate contains milk solids. And then, if you do find vegan white chocolate, read the ingredient list to make sure that is doesnt contain any hydrogenated oils or weird emulsifiers (or just pick your battles!).   The torte decorating is entirely up to you, although pomegranate seeds create a striking display of holiday cheer! Other options include fresh mint leaves, cacao nibs, or shaved dark chocolate. You could even include them all, if youre feeling extra festive. Store the torte in the freezer until youre ready to enjoy it, then bring it out about 15-20 minutes before serving so that its not rock hard. Its easier to slice and eat when its warmed up a tad. Use a smooth, very sharp chefs knife, and run it under hot water before cutting into the torte to make it glide. If you’re not in the mood to make a crust, you can turn this dessert into freezer fudge by preparing only the filling. Pour the filling into an 8-inch /­­ 20 cm square pan lined with plastic wrap; top with 1/­­2 cup /­­ 65g toasted pecans, cacao nibs, or chocolate shards, and freeze until solid (about 2 hours). Slice into squares and enjoy straight from the freezer!     Print recipe     White Chocolate Peppermint Torte Serves 10-14 For the crust: 1 cup /­­ 100g pecans 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil, preferably flavour-neutral 3 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1/­­4 tsp. fine-grain sea salt 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 150g rolled oats, divided, gluten-free if necessary 2 Tbsp. cocoa powder For the filling: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 200g cashews, soaked for at least 4 hours 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175 ml creamed honey (sub with maple syrup, but be warned the colour of the filling will be brown) 1/­­2  cup /­­ 125 ml coconut oil 75g /­­ 2.6 oz. white chocolate, melted (dairy-free /­­ vegan if desired) 2 tsp. pure vanilla extract 1/­­2 tsp. fine-grain sea salt a few drops peppermint essential oil or extract, to taste pomegranate, mint, cacao nibs, shaved dark chocolate, for garnish, optional Directions: 1. Make the Crust: Preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C). Lightly grease a 9-inch (23 cm) spring form pan or pie dish with coconut oil. 2. In a food processor, blend 1/­­2 cup (50g) of the rolled oats on high until you have a rough flour, place a small bowl and set aside. Without cleaning the machine, process the pecans into a fine crumb with the texture of sand. Add the coconut oil, maple syrup, salt, oat flour and cacao powder, and process again until the dough comes together. Finally, add the remaining 1 cup of rolled oats and pulse until the oats are chopped, but still have some texture to them. The dough should stick together slightly when pressed between your fingers. If it doesnt, try adding a bit more maple syrup or processing a bit longer. 3. Crumble roughly half of the dough evenly over the base of the pan. Starting from the middle, press the mixture firmly and evenly into the bottom, moving outward and upward along the side of the pie dish. The harder you press the crumbs into the dish, the better the crust will hold together. Taking a small section at a time, use the remaining crust to go up the sides, all around the form until complete. Poke a few fork holes into the bottom of the crust to let the steam escape. 4. Bake the crust, uncovered, for 10 to 15 minutes, until fragrant and slightly darker around the edges. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. 5. Make the filling: Drain and rinse the cashews. In a high-speed blender, combine the soaked cashews, honey, oil, melted chocolate, vanilla, salt, and peppermint, then blend on high until the filling is completely smooth. It can take a few minutes of blending to get it smooth, depending on your blender. If the blender needs more liquid to get it going, add a tablespoon (15 mL) of plant-based milk (or a bit more) to help it along. 6. Pour the filling into the prepared crust, smoothing out the top evenly. Place the torte on an even surface in the freezer, uncovered. Freeze for a couple of hours, and then cover the dish with foil and freeze overnight, or for a minimum of 4 to 6 hours, until the torte sets. 7. Remove the torte from the freezer and let it sit on the counter for 10 minutes before slicing. It is meant to be served cold. Garnish with mint leaves, pomegranate seeds, cacao nibs, melted or shaved chocolate, if desired.   I hope that wherever you are and whatever youre celebrating this month, you are safe, healthy, and grateful. This year has thrown us all for the biggest loop of our lives, and finding the small joys and tiny triumphs (like getting out for some fresh air, putting dinner on the table) is enough to make me feel proud, anyway. The holidays will undoubtedly look different this year, but I know that I am just thankful to have a roof over my head and a torte to share with the ones I love. I hope the same for you, dear friend. In light and love, best wishes for the season ahead. Sarah B The post White Chocolate Peppermint Torte appeared first on My New Roots.

Vegan Gingerbread Cookies – Gluten-free & Grain-free

December 1 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gingerbread Cookies – Gluten-free & Grain-freeGrain-free and gluten-free vegan gingerbread cookies that are perfectly spiced, and crisp. Make them with your kiddos and have them help with icing them! Look at that gingerbread goodness. Don’t they look jolly? They are crisp and melt in your mouth at the same time, and perfectly spiced – everything you’d expect from a holiday cookie but they are gluten-free and grain-free. You can totally get the kids involved with this easy gluten-free gingerbread men recipe. The dough comes together quite easily but it’s really the decoration part where the fun’s at! For my gingerbread men frosting, I went with a simple mix of powdered sugar and coconut cream! This is the perfect and most simple frosting for these little festive fellows. You will find the smell hard to resist whilst baking! Really, impossible not to get all the cozy feels. Put on some festive tunes, don the apron and let’s get baking! These guys are: - Crispy on the edges - Soft the center if you bake for shorter time  – so addictive - Packed with those holiday spices -molasses, ginger, cinnamon, allspice, clove and nutmeg - Begging to be frosted but hey they also taste amazing as they are MORE HOLIDAY RECIPES FROM THE BLOG: - Marbled Chocolate pumpkin spice Snickerdoodles Gf - Triple Ginger Molasses cookies - Gingerbread cake Mix in a jar. GF - Pumpkin ginger snaps  - Chocolate dipped sugar Cookies. GF - Ginger tahini cookies - Gingerbread Biscotti  If you do not have gingerbread cookie cutters but still want that gingerbread magic in your mouth, you could just bake them into little rounds! Happy holidays, friends!Continue reading: Vegan Gingerbread Cookies – Gluten-free & Grain-freeThe post Vegan Gingerbread Cookies – Gluten-free & Grain-free appeared first on Vegan Richa.

5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats

November 23 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Choose Whole Grains Theres a reason the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend to make at least 50% of your grains whole: theyre packed with essential vitamins and minerals that keep your body running at its peak! When gearing up to bake that family favorite sugar cookie or bread loaf, consider swapping half of the all-purpose flour for a whole-wheat flour until you can make the full switch (this Healthy Chocolate Chunk Pumpkin Loaf is a great recipe to start with!) Traditionally, when you start small like this its an easy way to slowly get your pallet to adjust to the change while boosting the fiber of the entire slice (or cookie) too! If youre gluten-free, consider using a recipe that calls for gluten-free oat flour or almond flour (like these Healthy Pumpkin Muffins) so you also reap the benefits of the fiber. Amp Up Those Omegas with Walnuts Pumpkin, pecan, or apple pie calling your name this season? Consider swapping out that white flour and butter crust for a delicious (and nutritious) walnut-based crust. Walnuts pack 2.5 grams of the plant-based version of the omega-3 fatty acid known as alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), in addition to 4 grams of protein and 2 grams of fiber in a one-ounce portion. While many name brands have begun selling their own walnut crusts in the baking section at your local market, they often contain flour and butter in small amounts to help hold the crust together. Not a deal-breaker if youre tight on time, but defeats the purpose of the swap if youre trying to keep this treat gluten-free and vegan. Consider making your own (check out a simple recipe idea here) by pulsing walnuts with a date paste or syrup in your food processor, then shaping into a pie crust and freezing until ready to bake. Related: 7 Tips for Shaking Sugar Think natural When It Comes to Sugar Its no secret most people eat WAY more added sugar than recommended (for reference, on average Americans eat about 17 teaspoons of added sugar a day when the recommendation is closer to 12 teaspoons or below for a 2000 calorie diet!) And friends, beware, coconut sugar, maple syrup, honey, and good ole cane sugar are ALL just different types of added sugars (one isnt better than the other.) To help satisfy that sweet tooth, consider using the natural sugars found in sweet fruits and vegetables, like apples, dates, and sweet potatoes, in your baked goods. Depending on the type of recipe youre making, you should be able to reduce the added sugar by at least a third when you sub in unsweetened applesauce (like these Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bars do!) Note you will also need to modify the fat amount (like the oil or butter used) so the texture continues to be the same. Boost Fiber with Beans Chocolate is abundant this season and for good reason: its delicious and its packed with flavonoids. But what if you took that decadent chocolate and brought it up a notch to boost the fiber and create a decadent dark chocolate dip to serve alongside graham crackers, gingerbread, or fresh fruit? Youd be the hostess with the most-ess for sure! Begin by pureeing a cup of beans alongside melted dark chocolate or dark cocoa powder, dates for natural sweetness, and your favorite nut or seed butter of choice. Blend until its a smooth, hummus-like consistency and enjoy! (Use this Sweet Hummus Recipe as your guide.) Power Up with Protein Cream pies and bundt cakes are certainly popular around the holiday season, but that doesnt mean you cant do over the dairy! Swapping in a portion of reduced-fat Greek or skyr yogurt for sour cream helps to boost the protein while minimizing the saturated fat of your treat. If youre still not a big fan of Greek yogurt, then ease into it by starting small with the swap, with roughly a third used in place of the sour cream. In no time youll be adjusted and making the full swap, pinky promise! (Try this Butterscotch Cheesecake Pie for a nice addition to your menu this year!) The post 5 Vegetarian Swaps to Boost Nutrition in Sweet Treats appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet

November 19 2020 Vegetarian Times 

With the new year just weeks away, the media is honing in on the top nutrition trends we can expect to see in 2021, and to no surprise increasing plant-protein remains at the top. Whether youre eating more plant-based for sustainability, health, or just because, rest assured there are a variety of whole food options you can choose from to meet your protein needs. But, before you head straight into the freezer department at your local grocer to pick up the latest faux meat product, lets take a look at 10 whole food sources of plant-based protein you may just want to toss into your cart instead! Reader beware, you may end up saving a few bucks once you realize how convenient and affordable many of these options are. Lentils Just one cup of cooked lentils provides nearly 18 grams of plant-protein and 16 grams of fiber for just 225 calories. Lentils also contain many important nutrients, like iron, potassium, zinc and choline (a nutrient that 90% of Americans arent getting enough of!) Plus, theyre budget-friendly with a 16-ounce bag of dried lentils coming in at just $2.99.  Registered Dietitian Kim Rose of www.kimrosedietitian.com recommends making a pot of seasoned lentils on the weekends. Divide them into individual 1 cup servings, and then add them to different meals throughout the week!  Youll find me turning lentils into meatballs, or for a really quick fix, adding a little bar-b-que sauce to them to make tasty, vegan sloppy joes. Hummus This plant-based spread can be made from a variety of beans and legumes, not just the traditional garbanzo bean you may think! Depending on the bean used, the protein content will vary slightly, but a standard 1/­­4 cup serving (or about 70 grams by weight) has roughly 6 grams of protein for just 180 calories. Plus, it often packs heart-healthy unsaturated fatty acids that help keep you fuller for longer too! Brynn McDowell, Registered Dietitian and cookbook author of The Mediterranean Diet Made Easy recommends using hummus in place of mayo on sandwiches or spreading it on bagels or toast! She suggests thinning it out and using it as a creamy salad dressing to add more plant-based protein to meals. Pistachios Pistachios are a good source of plant-based protein with a 1-ounce serving of the nut (shelled) providing 6 grams of it! Plus, they pack dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants that help keep your body in tip-top shape. While the shelled variety tends to be a tad pricier, you can still pick up a 10-ounce in-shell bag for about $5.49 at most markets. Lauren Manaker, Registered Dietitian, and author of Fueling Male Fertility, recommends to use shelled pistachios as a salad topped in place of grilled chicken or shrimp. The plant-based protein boost that also gives you fiber and healthy fats for staying power. You can also toss pistachios in trail mixes and in oatmeal as a topping for added nutrition and crunch! Related: Healthy Late-Night Snacks Chickpeas One of the most common forms of plant-based protein on the market is the good ole chickpea (aka, the garbanzo bean!) With nearly 7.5 grams of protein, 6.5 grams of fiber, and 3.7 mg of iron in just 1/­­2 cup serving of cooked chickpeas, its a great way to increase the total nutrient density of your diet. The best part: a pound of chickpeas (dried) often comes in at less than $3.00! NYC-based Registered Dietitian, Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD, is a big fan of adding chickpeas to both meals and snacks! From grain bowls to veggie burgers, or roasted as a protein-filled snack, chickpeas offer a convenient and affordable plant-based protein to nearly every diet. Edamame (Soybeans) Edamame is the immature form of the soybean that is often eaten from the shell (or shelled) alongside traditional Asian dishes. Regardless of the form of soybean you eat, they can easily be incorporated into a balanced diet with two servings being a reasonable goal for adults. A half-cup of shelled edamame packs nearly 9.5 grams of plant-based protein and 4 grams of fiber, as well as iron, potassium, folate, and choline! Sarah Koszyk, Sports Nutritionist and author of 25 Anti-Aging Smoothies for Revitalizing, Glowing Skin, recommends pureeing edamame in a hummus, dip, or pesto. Spread the edamame purees on a sandwich or wrap, add it to a burrito, or toss it with a salad, pasta, or rice dish. If youre looking to venture into the other forms of soybeans (like tofu), Registered Dietitian Sylvia Klinger of Hispanic Food Communications suggests blending silken tofu with oil, spices and herbs makes for a delicious high protein dressing, or adding a soy-based curd to pancakes to boost the protein there as well! Tempeh Tempeh is a fermented product made from soybeans in addition to some whole grains, seasonings and other flavorings. A 4-ounce serving of this soy-based protein packs nearly 20 grams of protein, in addition to a host of nutrition benefits. For starters, tempeh is filled with nutrients like manganese, magnesium, phosphorus and B vitamins in addition to its role as a probiotic. Jenna Braddock, Florida based at MakeHealthyEasy.com recommends spending a little bit of time prepping it to make the perfect dish! Braddock suggests crumbling the tempeh, then marinating it and finishing with a sear in a hot pan to add instant protein to salads, wraps, bowls and tacos. Pill Nuts Pronounced peel-y, this nut is native to the pili tree often found in Northern Australia and the Philippines. While lower in protein comparatively speaking per serving size (a 1/­­4 cup serving provides 3 grams in comparison to some of the other nuts), it packs a nutritional punch in that it contains essential amino acids the human body needs. This nut is harder to find at local markets, and you will need to likely shop online and be willing to spend about $16.99 for a one-pound bag. Maya Feller, nationally recognized nutrition expert and author of The Southern Comfort Food Diabetes Cookbook, recommends enjoying this mildly flavored nut in yogurt form (yes, brands are now popping up incorporating this nut into their yogurts!) smothered over a stack of pancakes or in their raw form as a crunchy snack. Hemp Seeds Three tablespoons of hulled hemp seeds provide nearly 10 grams of plant-based protein to your meal for just 170 calories. Plus, theyre full of iron and unsaturated fats while offering a great nut-free alternative for crunch. While a bit more pricey than other seeds (a 12-ounce bag is roughly $12.99), theyre an easy addition to boost plant-protein on simple foods. Plant-based sports dietitian, Kelly Jones of kellyjonesnutrition.com recommends adding them to oatmeal, sprinkling them onto pancakes, using as a topper for soups and salads, and incorporating into homemade energy bites! Lupini Beans Lupini beans are a staple of the Mediterranean diet and making a name for themselves in the US due to their high protein content. In just a 1/­­2 cup cooked serving of the bean it packs nearly 13 grams of plant-based protein. But, where it packs in protein it lacks in fiber, with that same 1/­­2 cup serving providing only 2 grams. Found traditionally in the jarred food section of the market, there are a few ways you can cook with them! Amy Gorin, a plant-based registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats recommends draining and rinsing the beans as you would do with any other canned beans. Then, use them in your favorite dishes, like her delicious plant-based lupini salad! Quinoa One of the only whole grains that is a complete source of protein (containing all 9 essential amino acids), this is an excellent (and affordable) gluten-free, plant-based protein addition to nearly any diet! One cup of cooked quinoa contains nearly 8 grams of protein for just 220 calories (plus nearly 5 grams of fiber.) Quinoa also contains many important B vitamins as well as potassium and antioxidants. Registered Dietitian Tamara Hoffman of Unbeetable Nutrition and Wellness recommends adding quinoa to your taco Tuesday menus with a spicy Mexican seasoning or sauteing it into your stir-fry dishes with a soy sauce. The post 10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!