ginger - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegan Coconut Caramel Energy Balls (Coconut Caramel Bites)

Vegan Red Lentil Sweet Potato Curry

Kashaya recipe | kashayam powder recipe | shunti jirige kashaya

Maa ki dal recipe | kaali dal | maa ki daal | black gram dal










ginger vegetarian recipes

Vegan Red Lentil Sweet Potato Curry

March 31 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Red Lentil Sweet Potato CurryThis creamy Thai inspired Vegan Red Lentil Sweet Potato Curry features red curry paste, healthy coconut milk and plenty of veggies. It’s all made in just one pot, gluten-free and perfect as a quick weeknight dinner! Nothing better than ending a long workday with a good book and a bowl of something cozy and comforting like this red lentil sweet potato curry. It’s easy to put together, it’s got that thick and creamy texture that coats the spoon just perfectly and has just the perfect balance of sweetness, acidity, and spiciness. We have sweet potato or potato and red lentils, both of which are hearty but wont weigh you down, and they are swimming in a creamy fragrant coconut milk broth thats rich with Thai red curry paste and spicy ginger. I think this might just be the ultimate vegan red curry! This red lentil sweet potato curry needs only 1 Pot, can be made ahead of time and is freezer-friendly. Weeknight dinner win and also naturally gluten-free!Continue reading: Vegan Red Lentil Sweet Potato CurryThe post Vegan Red Lentil Sweet Potato Curry appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Avocado Paratha

March 30 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Avocado Paratha (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Avocado Paratha Avocado Paratha, these days I'm spending a lot of time at home, so I decided to experiment in the kitchen. I had one extra avocado left after making some guacamole dip. Avocados seem to be very popular these days most often served as "Avocado Toast". I decided to put an Indian twist and use the extra avocado in delicious flavorful parathas. It actually turned out great and I enjoyed, but I think it needed a few tweaks. I added some extra spices and it turned out even better. Avocados have many health benefits, including being a "healthy" fat and they taste great! I like to serve Avocado Parathas as a snack with tea. It can also be served with any gravy-based dish; however, I think its complemented perfectly with "Aloo Tamatar" or "Spinach Raita". This is also a satisfying lunch box meal. This recipe will serve 3. Course Breakfast Cuisine Indian Keyword Avocado Pancake, Avocado Roti, Bread, Chapati, delicious, Easy Cooking, Guacamole Bread, Healthy, Homemade, Jain Food, Lunch Box, Main Meal, Onion Garlic Free Cooking, Roti, Side Dish, Swaminarayan, Teatime Snack, Unleavened Bread, Vegan, Vegetarian, Veshno Cooking, Video Recipe Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 15 minutes Total Time 25 minutes Servings 3 people Ingredients1 large ripe avocado 1 1/­­4 cup whole wheat flour use as needed 1/­­2 tsp salt 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­8 tsp asafoetida hing 1 Tbsp green chili finely chopped 1 Tbsp cilantro finely chopped 1 tsp ginger finely shredded 1/­­2 tsp lemon juice Also, need 1/­­4 cup whole wheat flour for rolling the paratha 3 Tbsp oil for cooking the parathas InstructionsSlice avocado in half, remove the pit and skins and scoop them into a mixing bowl. Then use a fork to gently mash, (avocado should be ripe). Add green chili, salt, asafetida, cumin seeds, lemon juice, cilantro and salt, mash all the ingredients together (Lemon juice is added to prevent oxidizing of the Avocados) Add the whole wheat flour gradually, how much flour you will need depends on the avocado, knead all the ingredients together and make a smooth but firm dough. Do not add any water. Grease your palm and roll the dough between your palms basically you are kneading the dough between you palms. Let the dough sit for 10 minutes before making the parathas. Divide the dough into 6 equal parts and roll them into smooth balls. Flatten them with the palm of your hand and roll them in dry flour. Roll the paratha into about 6-inch diameter. Note: if paratha is sticking while rolling sprinkle little more flour this will help rolling. Heat the flat skillet over medium heat. Note: heavy skillet works best. To check if the skillet is ready, put few drops of water on it. If the water sizzles right away, the skillet is ready. Place the Paratha over the skillet. When you see the color change and the paratha will puff in different places. Turn the paratha over. Paratha should have golden-brown spots. Wait a few seconds and put about 1 teaspoon of oil and spread with a spatula. Flip the paratha and put again half teaspoon of oil. Lightly press the paratha with a spatula. Flip again and press with a spatula making sure the paratha is golden-brown on both sides. Repeat for the remaining parathas. Parathas are best served hot and crispy. NotesServe them as a snack with cup of chai, or with a meal I like to serve with Aloo Tamatar and Spinach Raita. The post Avocado Paratha appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad

March 30 2020 Meatless Monday 

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go BadEvery food item will eventually go bad, but there are many food staples that offer a terrific value, can be prepared in big batches, and have an incredibly long shelf-life. Some of these ingredients can serve as the centerpiece of a meal, like potatoes, beans, and pasta, while others act as supporting actors, providing quick bursts of flavor to ordinary dishes. Best of all, many of these foods are completely plant-based and rich in many of the essential vitamins and minerals necessary for a healthy body. Our list of plant-based ingredients all have a shelf life of over two months (when stored properly) and are relatively inexpensive. But most importantly, these pantry staples give you the opportunity to get in the kitchen and experiment with flavors and ingredients that you may have overlooked in the past. And Meatless Mondays are always a great opportunity to start a new healthy ritual. Beans Often sold for less than a dollar a can, beans are the ultimate plant-based protein. With so many different types to choose from -- kidney, black, pinto, cannellini, pigeon peas, butter beans -- the recipe possibilities are endless. Make a stew, vegetable chili , bean salad, or these black bean meatless balls with zucchini noodles . Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. At only a buck a can, diced tomatoes will become your new secret weapon in the kitchen. Try adding them to this boldly-seasoned spicy chickpea ragout. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. When stored properly, frozen fruits and vegetables will last years (but please dont make them wait that long). Some frozen vegetables -- spinach, collards, broccoli rabe -- should be thawed and drained before cooking, while others like broccoli, peas, and peppers can be thrown into a hot pan as-is and easily transformed into a garlic-ginger fried rice. Granola A bag of granola wont run you much more than $4.00, depending on the brand, but it will impart an invaluable crunch to yogurt and oatmeal. Many manufacturers sell granola with a shelf life of up to six months, but it should be good to eat it even past that point (although it might not retain its full crunch). Lentils (dry) At $1.50 per pound, a bag of dried lentils is one of the best bargains in the grocery store. Besides an almost indefinite shelf life, the lentil contains a laundry-list of essential minerals like iron, folate, and manganese, is packed with protein, and is a great source of fiber. If youve never before cooked with dried lentils, start with a simple stew or this easy French lentil salad with cherry tomatoes. Onions When stored in the refrigerator, onions can last for up to two months (sometimes longer). Theyre pretty cheap, too, costing only around $1.00 – $1.50 per pound. Sear on the stove top for a smoky, charred flavor or cook them low-and-slow to unlock their natural, caramel-like sweetness and sprinkle them over this sweet potato caramelized onion stew. Oatmeal Think of oatmeal as a blank canvas. Costing less than a quarter per serving, let your imagination run wild when it comes to cooking breakfast. Mix in everything from peanut butter, jam, nuts, seeds, or even savory spices. Dried oatmeal can last longer than a year when properly stored. Use oatmeal in this vanilla almond milk oatmeal or try using it to make dessert, like this apple cranberry oatmeal bread. Pasta Costing only $1.00 per box, your pantry should be loaded with pasta, but we recommend going beyond the standard semolina/­­durum wheat flour varieties and experiment with pastas made from whole grains, vegetables, lentils, and chickpeas. Try some unique flavor combinations to keep things interesting, like this recipe for green tea pesto pasta . Peanut Butter Whether you like it creamy or crunchy, peanut is the ideal pantry staple . A serving of peanut butter is packed with protein and healthy fats, both of which will keep you feeling nice and satiated. Peanut butter has a shelf life of more than a year (unopened), and many brands of sell for less than $2.00 a jar. Polenta (corn meal) Polenta is made by mixing cornmeal (dried, ground corn) with either water or milk. Inexpensive and versatile, polenta can serve as the foundation of any number of meals, pairing especially well with tomato sauce, like in this recipe for Italian white beans with kale and polenta.  Potatoes These starchy staples dont last forever, but when stored in a cool dark space they can last for between 2 - 3 months. At around .50 cents per pound, the potato is an excellent source of fiber, nutrients, and calories; they can add creaminess to soups or serve as a vessel for a delicious stuffed potatoes primavera . Rice Whether its white, brown, or wild, rice costs less than a quarter per serving. Rice can serve as an accompanying carbohydrate or act as the main meal. For a new take on everyones favorite grain, try this vegetarian biryani or meatless brown rice jambalaya . Salsa Jarred salsa is an excellent (and convenient) alternative to fresh varieties. Add a tablespoon to anything bean burritos and taco bowls to spicy puttanesca pasta and gallo pinto ; mash some together with a ripe avocado and youve got a quick-and-easy guacamole. Soy Sauce Drizzle soy sauce into your stir fry, salad, sautéed vegetable, or tomato sauce for a boost of salty umami flavor. You can also use it liberally in this yummy Asian noodle bowl with spicy almond sauce . Soy sauce can cost as little as $2.00 a bottle and can last nearly two years after opening when stored in the refrigerator. Sweet Potatoes The sweet potato is natures candy; slice it down the middle and heat in the microwave for five minutes and out comes tasting reminiscent of a sugary soufflé. If you want to try making a dish that requires a little more technique, cook up this spicy and aromatic sweet potato chana or a coconut milk sweet potato white bean soup . Vegetable Broth/­­ Bouillon A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Add some beans, frozen vegetables, and seasonings and you have a clean and simple dinner for around $1.00 per serving, or add some flour, nut-milk, and noodles for a creamy vegetable noodle soup . Curious about what other plant-based ingredients you should be storing in your pantry? Check out our list of 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients . The post Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1

March 25 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1 I’ve been posting regular pantry cooking stories on our Instagram, and I thought I’d have those recipes live here in written form as well. We’ve been minimizing our grocery shopping as much as possible, mostly depending on pantry staples and some longer lasting produce for our meals. This is not your regular, well-photographed post since all the photos are just quick cellphone snapshots I took at dinner time, but hopefully you won’t mind. The recipes are also very off-the-cuff and based on what we had in the pantry, so please feel free to adjust them according to what you have on hand. That’s really what these dishes are all about! The theme here is canned tomatoes, since they are pantry royalty and can bring big flavor to all kinds of dishes, with very little effort. There are two tomato-based stews, a lush tomato pasta, a tempeh sausage recipe, and a little banana bread treat at the end. I hope to do more of these posts very soon as I continue exploring this theme. Let us know if you have any requests or need help with any particular ingredient/­­dish, etc. Sending big love as always. Few things are as easy and satisfying as a simple marinara pasta, which can be easily made with canned tomatoes. The extra garlic and extra cooking time makes this version especially lush. You can watch me make it here. Lush Marinara Pasta   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced sea salt 5 cloves of garlic - thinly sliced 1 28 oz can whole peeled tomatoes - crushed up with your hands pinch of red pepper flakes - to taste a few sprigs of fresh basil, plus more for garnish 2 teaspoons sugar (only if needed) about 10 oz pasta of choice Instructions Heat a medium pot over medium heat. Add a generous pour of olive oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic and saute for another 30 seconds or until fragrant. Add the tomatoes, red pepper flakes, basil sprigs, and more salt if your tomatoes are unsalted. Bring the mixture to a gentle simmer and simmer, stirring frequently, for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until the sauce is thickened and glossy. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. If your sauce tastes too acidic, add the sugar. Transfer about half or more of the sauce to a separate container to use later, leaving the rest in the pot. Meanwhile, boil a pot of water and cook pasta according to the instructions on the package. Save about 1 cup of the starchy pasta water. Drain your pasta and add it to the pot with the reserved sauce. Start mixing, adding small splashes of the starchy pasta water, until the sauce is well-incorporated and sticking to the pasta. Garnish with more basil and enjoy. Notes You can use leftover pasta sauce in any of the dishes in this post that call for tomatoes. 3.5.3226   Pappa al Pomodoro is a Tuscan bread and tomato soup, and it’s the coziest thing ever, plus a great way to use up stale bread. We filled this one out with white beans and kale for a more one-stop meal. You can watch me make it here. Pappa al Pomodoro with White Beans and Kale   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients 4 thick slices of crusty bread, preferably stale 2-3 slices of garlic olive oil ½ large yellow onion - diced sea salt ½-1 teaspoon dried marjoram or oregano (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes - to taste 14.5 oz can diced fire-roasted tomatoes 1½ teaspoon coconut sugar 1 15 oz can or 1½ cups cooked white beans vegetable broth 2 large handfuls of kale - chopped Instructions If your bread isnt stale, toast it. Generously rub each piece of bread with the garlic on both sides. Slice or break the bread up into smaller pieces. Mince any left-over garlic. Heat a large pot over medium heat and add a pour of olive oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the garlic, marjoram/­­oregano, if using, and red pepper flakes, and stir around for another 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes, coconut sugar, white beans, more salt to taste, and enough vegetable broth to achieve a chunky stew consistency. Bring to a simmer. Once simmering, stir in the kale. Let simmer with the lid askew for about 15 minutes. Taste for salt and spice and adjust if needed. Distribute the garlicky bread between bowls. Pour the stew over. Garnish with a drizzle of olive oil and/­­or any herbs of choice. Notes You can use any kind of canned tomatoes or even tomato sauce for this recipe, just adjust the salt and cooking times accordingly. 3.5.3226   This is not a traditional Chana Masala by any means, but it uses a similar principle of chickpeas stewed with tomatoes and spices. I think that roasted cauliflower goes really well with this dish, and the (super easy!) chutney brings a much-needed pop of green. You can watch me make this dish here. Chana Masala with Roasted Cauliflower and Cilantro Chutney   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients for the chana masala 1 head cauliflower - cut into florets avocado oil or other oil of choice sea salt black pepper 1 yellow onion - diced 1-inch piece of ginger - grated or minced 4 cloves of garlic - grater or minced 1 teaspoon curry powder, or to taste 1½ 15 oz cans or about 2¼ cups cooked chickpeas 1-1½ cups tomato sauce or other canned tomatoes purified water juice from ½ lemon for the cilantro chutney 1 bunch cilantro with stems - roughly chopped 1 serrano pepper - seeded if you prefer less spice 1 teaspoon coconut sugar sea salt juice from ½ lemon Instructions to make the chana masala Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a lined baking tray. Place the cauliflower on the tray, drizzle it with some oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast for 30 minutes, stirring halfway, or until the cauliflower is cooked through and caramelized in parts. Heat a pot over medium heat and add a pour of oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt, and saute for about 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the ginger, garlic, curry powder, and some black pepper, and saute for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the chickpeas, stir to coat, and let the chickpeas toast in the spices for 3-5 minutes. Add the tomato sauce and enough water to thin everything out to a chunky stew consistency. Add more salt if needed (this will depend on whether your chickpeas and tomatoes were salted). Bring to a simmer and let simmer for about 15 minutes, or until the cauliflower is finished roasting. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Turn off the heat and stir in the lemon juice. Serve with the roasted cauliflower and cilantro chutney (recipe follows). to make the cilantro chutney Combine the cilantro, serrano, sugar, salt to taste, and lemon juice in a high speed blender. Blend until smooth. You shouldnt need water, but add small splashes of water if your blender has a difficult time getting going. Notes If you made our freezer bouillon, you can use about 5-6 teaspoons of the fiery freezer bouillon in place of the onions, ginger, and garlic in this recipe. 3.5.3226   This is a riff on the Italian classic of sausage and peppers, except that the ‘sausage’ is made by cooking tempeh with all kinds of herbs and spices, which makes it incredibly flavorful. Feel very free to adjust the spices according to what you have on hand, you kind of can’t go wrong here! You can watch me make this dish here. Tempeh Sausage, Peppers, and Onions   Print Serves: 4-5 Ingredients avocado oil or other oil of choice 1 yellow onion - sliced sea salt 2 red and/­­or orange bell peppers - cored and sliced splash of beer (optional) 2 8 oz packages of tempeh - crumbled tamari - to taste maple syrup - to taste 2 cloves garlic - minced 1 tablespoon minced fresh sage (or use dried sage) 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 teaspoon coconut sugar ½ teaspoon garlic powder ½ teaspoon onion powder ½ teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon dried thyme ¼ teaspoon chili powder pinch of red pepper flakes pinch of smoked salt (totally optional) Instructions Heat a large pan over medium heat and add a pour of oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and saute for 1-2 minutes to give the onions a head start. Add the peppers and another pinch of salt, and saute for about 5 minutes, until starting to soften. Add a splash of beer, if using, and let it cook off for 1-2 minutes. Turn the heat down to medium-low, cover the pan, and let the onions and peppers stew for 20 minutes, or until soft and melted. If your pan gets too dry, add a splash of water. Meanwhile, put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl and drizzle some tamari and maple syrup over it. Mix to coat and let sit. Gather all your spices for the tempeh sausage by measuring them out into one bowl: garlic, sage, tomato paste, coconut sugar, garlic powder, onion powder, smoked paprika, dried thyme, chili powder, red pepper flakes, and smoked salt, if using. Once the onions and peppers are done cooking, remove them from the pan and set aside for now. Add more oil to the pan. Add the tempeh and stir to coat it in the oil. Press the tempeh into the pan in one even layer and let brown undisturbed for about 3 minutes. Stir the tempeh, press it into the pan again, and keep cooking until mostly golden brown. Stir in the prepared spice mix and cook the tempeh for another 2-3 minutes, until fragrant. Taste for salt and spices and adjust if needed. Add the onions and peppers back in, stir to incorporate, and let everything warm through together. Enjoy the sausage as is or on sandwiches, over rice, etc. 3.5.3226   In our last post, I talked about my sourdough starter and how I’ve been experimenting with recipes that use up sourdough discard from feeding the starter. So far I’ve made cookies and this banana bread, which turned out delicious, but didn’t really taste like sourdough. It’s a great way to save some flour in any case, if you have a starter. You can watch me make it here. Vegan Sourdough Banana Bread   Print Adapted from The Baking Fairy - this is a great recipe to use if you dont have sourdough! Serves: 1 standard loaf Ingredients 5 very ripe bananas - peeled, divided ½ cup sourdough discard/­­starter ¼ cup refined coconut oil - melted or soft ¼ cup non-dairy milk 2 teaspoons vanilla extract ½ cup plus 1 tablespoon coconut sugar, plus more for sprinkling generous pinch of sea salt 1½ cups all purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda Instructions Preheat the oven to 350° F (175° C). Prepare an oiled and parchment-lined loaf pan. Mash 4 of the bananas in a large bowl. Add the sourdough discard, coconut oil, milk, and vanilla. Use a fork to mix until smooth. Add the sugar, salt, flour, and baking soda. Mix to just incorporate. Transfer the batter to the prepared loaf pan. Slice the remaining banana in half lengthwise and use it to decorate the top of the loaf. Sprinkle more coconut sugar over the banana and top of the loaf. Bake for 50 minutes. Cover with a piece of domed parchment paper and continue baking for another 10 minutes, or until golden on top and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Let cool for at least 20 minutes in the loaf pan, then transfer to a cooling rack and let cool for another 20 minutes. Slice and enjoy. 3.5.3226   Other pantry-friendly recipes we’re cooking this week: - Cozy Pantry Stew - Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes - Fall-Apart Caramelized Cabbage The post Plant-Based Pantry Meals We’ve Been Cooking, Pt. 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

In Case of Quarantine: Cook the Pantry

March 10 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

In Case of Quarantine: Cook the Pantry With a possible pandemic on the horizon, I’ve stocked up on toilet paper and hand sanitizer — just in case.  But I’ve also stocked up on enough food supplies to get us through the next couple of months, in case of quarantine. I’ve been using the tips and recipes in my book, Cook the Pantry, to dictate my grocery list and keep my pantry full if the situation worsens.  The quick and easy recipes in Cook the Pantry use mostly items from your pantry and freezer (along with some optional fresh produce, if you have it on hand). One of my favorite recipes from the book is the Artichoke Muffaleta Po Boys.  It’s the best of two popular New Orleans culinary icons joining forces to create the ultimate sandwich made with artichokes and a piquant olive relish. Here’s the recipe: Artichoke Muffaleta Po Boys Makes 2 servings Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. - 3 scallions, chopped - 1 garlic clove, crushed - 1/­­3 cup pickled vegetables, well-drained - 1/­­3 cup pimiento-stuffed green olives, well-drained - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 (14-ounce) can artichoke hearts, well-drained and halved - 1/­­2 teaspoon Cajun spice blend - 3 tablespoons Creole mustard - 3 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise - 2 small sub rolls - 1 cup shredded lettuce - 1 large tomato, thinly sliced - Pickled sliced jalape?os - Tabasco or other hot sauce, to serve 1. In a food processor, combine the scallion and garlic and process until finely minced. Add the pickled vegetables, olives, and pulse to make a relish. Set aside. 2. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the artichoke hearts, season with the spice blend, and cook until nicely browned, about 5 minutes per side. 3. To assemble the sandwiches, spread the mayonnaise and mustard on the inside top and bottom of the bread. Spread the lettuce onto the bottom of each sandwich, followed by tomato slices. Top with the relish mixture, a few slices of jalape?os, and the artichokes. Serve at once with Tabasco. In case you don’t already own Cook the Pantry, below is a list of the 100 recipes in the book. Check it out — you don’t need to be quarantined to enjoy these easy and delicious recipes. Cook the Pantry: Vegan Pantry-to-Plate Recipes in 20 minutes or Less Soup, Stew, Chili Tortilla Soup Chipotle Corn Chowder White Beans and Greens Soup Hot and Sour Noodle Soup Black Bean Soup with a Whisper of Sherry Shiitake Happens Mushroom Soup Pretty Good Gumbo Minestrone Soup Curry-Spiced Pumpkin Bisque Creamy Peanut Soup Pantry Plus Gazpacho Vegetable Bricolage Everyones Favorite Black Bean Chili Red Bean Chili Moroccan-Spiced Vegetable Stew Chana Masala Bowls Salad Savvy Five-Minute Couscous Salad Amazing Technicolor Chickpea Salad Moroccan Couscous Salad Tabbouleh Salad Pantry Pasta Salad Hearts of Palm Ceviche Composed Marinated Vegetable Salad Pinto, Corn, and Red Pepper Salad Threes a Crowd Bean Salad White Bean Niçoise Salad Taco Salad with Corn and Black Bean Salsa Southwest Salmagundi Asian Noodle Salad with Peanut Dressing Zucchini Pasta Salad Suddenly Sushi Salad Asian Noodle Slaw Avocado Goddess Salad Three-Tomato Pasta Salad Sesame Soba Salad Sandwiches, Burgers, and Pizza Crab-Free Sandwiches Bean and Spinach Burritos Artichoke Muffaleta Po Boys BBQ Jack Sandwiches Homestyle Hash Burgers Black Bean and Walnut Burgers Samosadillas Artichoke Tartines Black Bean and Spinach Quesadillas Chunky Chickpea Sandwiches Texas Caviar Wraps Artichoke-Spinach Pizza Pizza Nicoise Black and White Pizza BBQ Chickpea Pizza Cheeseburger Pizza Jalapeno-Hummus Pizza Pinto Bean Nacho Pie Stovetop Suppers Hoppin John and Collards Paella from the Pantry Cheesy Grits and Greens with Smoky Mushrooms Polenta Fiesta Quick Quinoa Pilaf Asian-Style Vegetable Pancakes with Dipping Sauce Dinnertime Scramble Tofu and Broccoli Stir-Fry Layered Tortilla Skillet Lemongrass Jasmine Rice Greek Freekeh and Spinach with White Beans Pantry Bulgur Pilaf Tuscan Chickpea Fritatta Red Beans and Quinoa with Chipotle Queso Chickpea-Artichoke Cakes with Dill Aioli Black Bean Picadillo Jerk Tempeh with Coconut Quinoa Top Shelf Couscous Pilaf Pantry Pasta Plus Giardiniera Mac and Cheese Capellini with Palm-Heart Scampi Sauce Penne and Broccoli with Red Bell Pepper-Walnut Sauce Kitchen-Sink Capellini Ramen Fagiole Pasta Marinara Puttanesca in a Pinch Rotini with Creamy Pumpkin Sauce Penne with White Beans and Olivada Speedy Lasagna Rice Noodles with Spicy Peanut Sauce Spaghetti Lo-Mein Artichoke-Cannelini Pasta Manchurian Black Bean Noodles Sweet Treats Rawklava Easy as Chocolate Pie Peanutty Energy Balls Almond-Cranberry Haystacks Coconut Lime Drops No-Bake Oatmeal Cookies Bananas Foster Dessert Nachos No-Fuss Chocolate Fondue Stovetop Peach-Blueberry Crumble Ginger-Walnut Rum Balls Chocolate-Almond Truffles Pecan Pie Squares Mangos with Pistachios and Cranberries Fudgy Brownie Mug Pastry-Wrapped Chocolate and Walnut-Stuffed Dates The post In Case of Quarantine: Cook the Pantry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Aloo Matar – Easy Pea & Potato Curry (Vegan)

March 1 2020 Vegan Richa 

Aloo Matar – Easy Pea & Potato Curry (Vegan)This easy Indian Aloo Matar – Pea & Potato Curry is done in 30 minutes, requires only a few basic ingredients and is such a simple and quick plant-based weeknight meal. Gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free. Oil-free option included. Jump to Recipe Coming at you with a delicious Indian weeknight recipe that comes together quickly and needs very basic ingredients most of which you probably already have at home! One of those recipes that I can always make, even when I dont know what else to make because the fridge is almost empty! Aloo Matar! Bonus, it’s my mom’s recipe so obviously it’s the best and tested until perfect! What is Aloo Matar? Aloo translates to potato and matar to peas – potatoes and peas, that’s what we’re cooking today. But in the most delicious manner! This is a simple vegetarian Indian dish originating in the Punjab region of India. It is made of potatoes and peas in a spicy thick onion tomato gravy. The dish is made throughout the country in a few different versions. While some Aloo Matar recipes use a creamy coconut base, others simmer the potatoes in a tomato sauce. We are cooking the tomato version which is a bit lighter and lower in calories. Potatoes are used in tons of Indian recipes. Often they are paired with other vegetables like cauliflower in aloo gobi or spinach or beans! I love cooking with potatoes as they are a.) available all year long, b) cheap, c) delicious and oh so comforting. Right in the end, I listed you all my favorite Indian potato recipes. This recipe has just potatoes, green peas, onion, garlic, ginger, green chili, tomatoes, and a few basic Indian spices. A very simple and beginner-friendly recipe that you just cannot go wrong with. Its lightly spiced, so absolutely doable even for kids and/­­or sensitive tummies. Ingredients needed for making this Indian Pea & Potato Curry: - Peas: You can use fresh or frozen peas. Make sure not to overcook them or they will lose their pretty color. - Potatoes: Make sure to cut them into even-sized cubes so that they are all cooked at the same time. If you chop them too small, they will get mushy and might dissolve in the curry. As a short-cut, or if you have leftovers to use up, you could add boiled potatoes. Obviously, this takes off some of the cooking time. - Ground Spices: Cumin, coriander, turmeric, cayenne pepper, garam masala. Flavor central! - The holy trinity of ginger, onion, and garlic is added to the toasted spices to form the base of the gravy. - Fresh green chilie adds a bit of heat, but don’t worry – this dish is not spicy. Thai green chili pepper or Serrano pepper works well here. However, if you don’t tolerate any spice, leave it out. - Fresh tomato puree is added for color, body, and texture. I make it from scratch pureeing two fresh tomatoes. You could use canned diced tomatoes and puree them or  half the amount of canned tomato puree as it is more concentrated. Tips and Substitutions for making Aloo Matar: - To make this recipe oil-free, skip the first step. Saute spices in broth or water. You could also use boiled potatoes instead of raw. - Keep in mind that, as this dish sits the gravy will get thicker as the potatoes tend to absorb some of the liquid. When reheating, you might have to add a splash of water or broth. - To make the gravy even more fragrant, sprinkle garam masala into the gravy towards the end. - I also like to sprinkle some dried fenugreek leaves on top for additional flavor. How to make the best Aloo Matar: Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add potatoes and cook them for 3 to 5 mins, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile coarsely crush the seeds in a grinder or mortar and pestle and chop the onion, garlic, ginger, chili by knife or using a food processor. Transfer the potatoes to a bowl. Heat a tsp of oil over medium heat. Add the crushed seeds and cook for half a minute. Now, add in the onion, garlic, ginger, chilies and cook for 3 mins or until translucent. Mix in the ground spices and stir in the tomato puree. Let everything cook for 3-4 mins to thicken it some more. Add the potatoes, salt and water, and cover and cook for 15 mins. Check for seasoning (add salt, if needed) and add more water if it has gotten too thick. Add the peas and half the cilantro and cover and cook until potatoes are fork-tender. Garnish your vegan Aloo Matar with more chopped cilantro and crushed pepper flakes. What shall I serve with Aloo Matar? I like serving this potato and pea curry with plain Basmati rice or a bowl of fragrant seasoned rice like this turmeric lemon rice. However, this pea potato curry also pairs extremely well with roti or any vegan flatbread of choice. More delicious Indian potato curry recipes from the blog: - Instant Pot Saag Aloo (Sweet Potato and Chard) - Potato Eggplant Curry - Chickpea Sweet Potato Spinach Curry - Aloo Gobi -Baked    Mums Aloo Matar This easy Indian Aloo Matar Pea & Potato Curry is done in 30 minutes, requires only a few basic ingredients and is such a simple and quick plant-based weeknight meal. Gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free. Oil-free version included.   - 2 tsp oil (divided) - 3 medium potatoes cubed small. - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds - 1 tsp coriander seeds - 1/­­4 cup chopped onion - 4 cloves of garlic (finely chopped) - 1 inch ginger (finely chopped) - 1/­­2 hot green chile (finely chopped) - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric - 1/­­3 to 1/­­2 tsp cayenne - 2 medium to large tomatoes (pureed) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 cup water - 1/­­2 cup peas - 1/­­2 cup chopped cilantro (loosely packed divided) - optional additions: sprinkle garam masala towards the end (1/­­2 tsp dried fenugreek leaves) - Heat oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add potatoes and Cook for 3 to 5 mins, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile coarsely crush the seeds in a grinder or mortar and pestle and chop the onion, garlic, ginger, chili by knife or a food processor. -  Transfer potatoes to a bowl. Heat a tsp of oil over medium heat. Wait till it's get hot. Add the crushed seeds and cook for half a minute. - Add the onion, garlic, ginger chilie and cook for 3 mins or until translucent. - Add the ground spices and mix in. Add tomato puree and cook for 3-4 mins to thicken. - Add the potatoes, salt and water and cover and cook for 15 mins. - Check and add more water if needed. Add the peas and half the cilantro and cover and cook until potatoes are tender to preference. -  Taste and adjust salt and flavor. Garnish with more cilantro, pepper flakes. - To make this recipe oil-free, skip the first step. You could also use boiled potatoes instead of raw. - Keep in mind that, as this dish sits the gravy will get thicker as the potatoes tend to absorb some of the liquid. When reheating, you might have to add a splash of water or broth. - To make the gravy even more fragrant, sprinkle garam masala into the gravy towards the end. - I also like to sprinkle some dried fenugreek leaves on top. - The nutrition facts do not include rice or any sides.        The post Aloo Matar – Easy Pea & Potato Curry (Vegan) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste BudsUnder-seasoned food tastes of...disappointment, but you can effortlessly breathe new life into your meals with the addition of a few key seasonings and spice blends. Spices instantly elevate the subtle flavors of vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and plant-based proteins without piling on extra calories (or dirty dishes in the sink). From sea salt to shichimi togarashi, weve got the 10 spices that you need to add to your spice rack. Adobo (all-purpose seasoning) Adobo is the ultimate all-purpose seasoning, and, although its traditionally used with animal proteins, its salty-garlicy flavor can give that same savoriness to any number of plant-based dishes -- from crispy tofu to vegetarian stews. Adobo seasonings vary in their composition, but they generally include a blend of granulated garlic, salt, oregano, black pepper, and turmeric. Ancho Chile Ancho chile, known as a poblano when fresh, has a deep, smoky, slightly sweet flavor comparable to a spicy chocolate-covered raisin. Its mild-to-medium heat makes it an appropriate addition to moles, enchilada sauce, soup, traditional chili, or even pasta. Black Peppercorns (in pepper mill) Pre-ground black pepper tastes vapid and boring compared to the fresh stuff; thankfully, many spice brands offer miniature grinders complete with whole peppercorns ready to be crushed. A couple rotations of the pepper mill adds a sharp, citrusy flavor, floral-like aroma, and crunchy texture to the tops of salads, soups, pastas, and these delicious tempeh fajitas.  Cumin The fragrant seed is a member of the parsley family, but its often sold as a powder rather than in its whole form. Cumin is aromatic and complex and can add a powerful smoky flavor to black bean burgers, curried potatoes, vegetarian chili, and lentil soups. Just remember to use this strong spice sparingly. Curry Powder Curry Powder is a mixture of different seasonings that differs slightly based on what brand you buy. That being said, many contain some combination of coriander, mustard, cumin, fenugreek, cayenne, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, and turmeric, which gives curry powder its iconic yellow-orange color. Add some to roasted vegetables, blend into hummus, sprinkle on popcorn, or use as the base of this Thai tofu pumpkin curry. Everything Bagel Available at Trader Joes and a spattering of other retailers, the Everything Bagel spice blend is the ultimate compliment to any roasted potato or sautéed vegetable. Add some to a tahini dressing or sprinkle some on an avocado half with a squeeze of lemon and a squirt of sriracha. The spice mixture is a combination of all the wonderful bits youd find on the outside of an everything bagel: sesame seeds, sea salt, dried minced garlic, onion, and poppy seeds.  Red Pepper Flake Although it probably already exists somewhere on your spice rack, the raw, uncalibrated heat of red pepper flake brings a brutish pop to roasted cruciferous vegetables and elegant pastas. Sea Salt Dont roll your eyes just yet. In terms of utility in a dish, sea salt offers the same taste-enhancing qualities as traditional table salt, but when it comes to look, flavor, and texture, sea salt is in an ocean of its own. Its slightly richer flavor and crunch make it a natural fit for both savory entrees and desserts. Shichimi Togarashi Adorning the table of many ramen soup shops, shichimi togarashi is a complex spice blend that includes a combination of red chile pepper, orange peel, sesame seeds, Japanese pepper, ginger, and seaweed. Sprinkle this on literally anything -- noodles, fried rice, stir-fried tofu, soups, marinades, rubs, dressings, tempuras, roasted vegetables, etc. -- to instantly add a flurry diverse flavors and tastes. Star Anise Star anise is often sold in its ornamental whole form, but its much easier to incorporate into dishes as a powder. Its flavor is somewhere between licorice, cinnamon, and clove. Try adding it to broths, chutneys, mulled wine, or desserts, like this warm cranberry poached pear.  Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds appeared first on Meatless Monday.

carrot ginger soup recipe | carrot and ginger soup | ginger carrot soup

January 27 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

carrot ginger soup recipe | carrot and ginger soup | ginger carrot soupcarrot ginger soup recipe | carrot and ginger soup | ginger carrot soup with step by step photo and video recipe. soup recipes are not native to indian cuisine, but has gradually developed large fan base. with respect to indian meal, it is generally served just before the meal to improve appetite. one such simple and easy soup variation is carrot and ginger soup recipe known for its flavour. The post carrot ginger soup recipe | carrot and ginger soup | ginger carrot soup appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Apple Custard Squares

January 16 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Apple Custard SquaresThese Vegan Apple Custard Squares have a shortbread like base topped with apples, then creamy custard and cinnamon sugar on top. Use a pie pan to make Apple Custard Pie. No added Oil. Vegan Soyfree Recipe. Jump to Recipe These custard bars came about when I had to use up some non dairy yogurt. The shortbready crust at the bottom is topped with apples and then topped with a tangy custard mixture which is sprinkled with cinnamon sugar and baked to make slices of custard bars with various flavors and textures! You can use just cashew cream for the custard layer as well. Add some lemon zest for fresh zesty flavor. Change up the flavors  to use winter spices such as gingerbread or pumpkin pie spice. Make this into a pie (use a pie pan and double the crust).Continue reading: Vegan Apple Custard SquaresThe post Vegan Apple Custard Squares appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Coconut Noodle Soup

January 2 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Coconut Noodle Soup Oh man is this the perfect recipe for getting back into the swing of things after the holidays! I think that we’re all ready for some deeply nourishing, veggie-heavy meals right about now. I recently made something similar to this noodle soup for dinner and shared it on IG Stories, and got so many inquiries about the recipe. So here it is but a little more intentional and less off the cuff (directly inspired by the Thai soup Tom Kha Gai). It’s seriously my favorite thing to eat right now – the balance of coziness from the noodles and coconut milk and the healthfulness from all the ginger, garlic, mushrooms, and veggies gets me every time. Don’t let the list of ingredients deter you, this soup is very easy to make. It’s all about building flavor in the broth, which starts with the power combo of onion, chili, garlic, and ginger. The broth gets finished off with a touch of coconut milk, which really rounds out its gingery and garlicky intensity and makes it perfectly creamy. It is SO GOOD – I could seriously drink it for every meal this January. We then cook some veggies and mushrooms directly in the broth and serve everything over noodles, garnished with tons of cilantro, scallions, squeezes of lime juice, and crushed nuts. We hope that you’ll give this a try, it’s a real winner! Coconut Noodle Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil or avocado oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 small chili pepper - sliced and seeded if preferred sea salt 2 piece of ginger - minced or grated 6 garlic cloves - minced 4-5 kaffir lime leaves (optional but highly recommended) zest from 2 limes 4 cups (1 quart) low-sodium vegetable broth + 1 cup purified water (or 5 cups broth) 1 medium sweet potato or winter squash, or 2 medium carrots - cut in medium chunks 3.5 oz shiitake mushrooms - stemmed and sliced 1 teaspoon coconut sugar 1 13.5 oz can full-fat coconut milk juice from 1 lime, plus more lime slices for garnishing 8 oz vermicelli rice noodles or other noodles of choice green onion - sliced, for serving cilantro - for serving crushed cashews or peanuts - for serving (optional) chili flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Heat the oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, chili, and a pinch of salt, sauté for 8-10 minutes, until soft. Add the ginger and garlic and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the kaffir lime leaves, if using, lemon zest, vegetable broth, and water. Cover and bring to a boil. Add the sweet potato/­­squash/­­carrots and shiitake mushrooms, bring back up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 10-15 minutes, until the sweet potato/­­squash/­­carrots are cooked through. Add the sugar and coconut milk. Bring back up to a boil and turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice. Discard the kaffir lime leaves, if using. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Cook the noodles according to the instructions on the package. Distribute the noodles among bowls. Ladle the broth over the noodles, making sure to catch some vegetables and mushrooms when ladling. Garnish generously with green onion, cilantro, lime slices, crushed nuts and chili flakes, if using. Enjoy! Notes - If you are sensitive to spice, omit the chili pepper and flakes. - Kaffir lime leaves are a life-changingly delicious ingredient, and we really recommend seeking them out. Look for them at Asian/­­Indian markets - they are often sold frozen. You can also find them dried. - This recipe is highly customizable! You can add all kinds of veggies. Here are some ideas: -baby bok choy or spinach -zucchini -spiralized daikon radish -bell pepper -basil -other mushrooms like maitake or crimini, etc. 3.5.3226 Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Coconut Noodle Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Anja Schwartz Rothe

December 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Anja Schwartz Rothe Anja Schwartz Rothe is an herbalist, gardener, medicine maker, and writer, based in New Yorks Hudson Valley. Anja is the alchemist behind Fat of the Land, a small batch herbal apothecary with a focus on cultivating connection to self, environment, and the cycles by which we live. We interviewed Anja about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, her work and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? A nice balance of both! I need to exist inside a structured, but flexible container. A little bit of routine allows me to make the most of my time, while feeling free and inspired. -- Do your routines change with the seasons? Definitely, it is one of the biggest factors that informs the way I live – acknowledging the seasonal shifts within and without and using that information to alter how I show up to take care of myself. -- What do your mornings look like? I dont like alarms, so I usually wake up naturally, somewhere between 6:30 and 8, depending on the time of year. Then I drink a bunch of water, sometimes with lemon and sometimes not. I try to get out in nature almost immediately. I live right next to a bird sanctuary on the Hudson River, so I bring a hot bevvie and do a long walk there. I always leave my phone at the house so I have a chance to really check in with myself, do some breathing, and connect before the day starts. After that, its breakfast and usually emails. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I usually wash my face and do some facial gua sha. Its so relaxing and helps me unwind. Then, I have little ritual of turning down the house, where I close the curtains, turn off the lights, and say goodnight to everything. It sounds like a small detail, but its a gesture I really like, acknowledging the animacy of the home energies, thanking them, and setting it all to rest for the day. In my bedroom, I try to keep good sleep hygiene, which for me means low technology and minimal artificial lighting. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice? Honestly, I think my whole life is a mindfulness practice. Isnt that what mindfulness is all about, practicing showing up in the mundane of the day-to-day in the fullest capacity? Sustenance -- Describe your typical or favorite meal for each of these: Breakfast – Usually some combination of eggs and ferments. In the summer, hard-boiled with smoked salmon and sauerkraut. Right now, Im on a scallion and ginger congee kick – a simple Chinese rice porridge served with a soft boiled egg and miso. Its so good. Lunch – Sometimes an open-face sandwich or leftovers from the night before. Lately, Ive been working through lunch and having an early dinner. Snack – Fruit and chocolate. Its apples, pears, and citrus right now. Dinner – Currently: soup and sourdough bread with lots of ghee. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I make myself a matcha latte with oat milk and a couple droppers of our brain tincture almost every day. On weekends, I might have a cup of coffee and I sometimes do a mushroom tea/­­dandy blend/­­cacao mixture as an afternoon pick me up. I really try not to have too much caffeine though, it makes me a bit of a mess and dehydrates me way too much, always trying to find that balance. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your basket? Its pretty broken up between farmers markets, the local food shop, and the co-op in the next city over. In the summer, primarily farmers markets for that good good fruit and veg. Right now, my staples are eggs, potatoes, citrus, oatly, broccoli, and cauliflower. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? Definitely. I like to keep my kitchen stocked with what I call hippie treats and lots of fruit. I dont buy a lot of packaged food, which means if I want to have sweets in the house I have to prepare them myself. I love baking, and will usually make a treat at least once a week – recently, its been sticky apple ginger date cake and berry crisps from a stocked freezer of gleaned summer berries. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do, but with much variability. In the past, I’ve been really into running, yoga, and rock climbing — and these things come back in waves. In the summer, I’m cycling a lot, and right now I’m getting back into my ephemeral winter gym flow. Sometimes, my exercise is just doing squats in the kitchen while waiting for the kettle to boil. Thats actually my favorite kind. Beauty -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I definitely subscribe to the less is more skincare model. I wash with just warm water, am very liberal with hydrosols, and then use a serum and/­­or balm. I make all my own hydrosols in my garden during the summer and offer some of them in the apothecary. Im currently really loving Dragon Balm by Apis Apotheca, a farm and skincare line run by my friend Aviva, who really knows her shit. Most days I also do a quick little gua sha facial massage afterwards – I always see instant results and it feels too good. -- Do you have any beauty tricks that you’ve found to be especially useful? Drinking lots of water and herbal infusions. My present go-to is nettle, raspberry leaf, goji berry, and fresh ginger root. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress? Big Calm tincture in every pocket, purse, and drawer. I lean heavily on nervines and deep breathing. Getting outside is also really important — and socializing! -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? To be honest, I havent gotten so much as a cold in more than ten years! I owe this mostly to a naturally strong constitution, but also a pretty large emphasis on tonic, preventative medicine and lifestyle. Cooking with medicines, like infused vinegars, dank broths, and elderberry syrup, are big, but getting enough rest is the biggest. Im constantly doing micro check-ins throughout the day to see how I can best give myself what I need to prevent burnout, fatigue, and illness. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Theyre so fluid in my life. I enjoy the hell out of the work I do, and I’d probably be doing most of it even if it wasnt my job, but Im also pretty good at allowing myself to turn off when I’m tired and not place undue expectations on myself all the time. I find allowing myself to take frequent mini vacations is the most helpful — getting out of my environment is the only thing that really turns off my work brain, plus it brings in a fresh influx of new inspiration and perspective. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist? My first job in high school was at the local health food store. There were a couple older women who worked there and would walk me through the vitamin and bulk aisles, teaching me all about the different herbs and supplements. This was a sort of epiphany for me, viewing plants in this way. I then studied anthropology in university, focusing mostly on traditional sustenance and healing practices. After finishing school, I knew I needed to immerse myself in plant medicine, so I enrolled in an herbal medicine program in Appalachia. -- How do you approach foraging the ingredients for your apothecary and seasonal wellness boxes? Do you have a plan in mind for each season or is it more about going with the flow? I definitely have a plan in mind, but I usually have to surrender it while remaining open to new inspiration. It can be a challenge to have expectations for a season, nature doesnt really work that way, and thats been both a constant source of inspiration for me, as well as a lesson in boundaries and respect. I could be inspired to make one thing, but if its not a particularly fecund year for a certain plant, I have to cede to that. Making things from intuition and by listening to the seasons and cycles is probably not the best business model, but its the only way I want to work with plant medicine. -- What are some offerings youre working on currently? Im getting ready to re-release a little book I wrote last year, Always Coming Home: a guide to seasonal wellness, with some edits and new content. Im also refining the 2020 Seasonal Wellness Box subscription that will soon be available. -- How were you able to grow a business with your interests and loves in mind? Its been a very slow chipping away for me to remain really clear on the things that matter and the things that dont in growing my business. It turns out, remaining true to creating medicine that is intimate, small batch, and well cared for is much more important than being able to mass produce things or being on every shelf in the country. I want my values to be foremost and my business to be second. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Going full hibernation this January. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Put my legs up the wall, get a massage, go hiking with a friend, sweat, travel, in the summer I go swimming multiple times of day in various bodies of running water, thats my favorite. -- We love the Catskills so much. What are some of your favorite places to visit in the area? Montgomery Place farm stand for all your fruit and veg needs, there are so many great trails in the mountains, Colgate Lake for a swim, Talbott and Arding picnic at the Saugerties lighthouse for lunch and Lil Debs Oasis for dinner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Im reading The Overstory by Richard Powers right now, and it is SO GOOD. A vignette of short stories written about trees and so much more. Song/­­Album – Hildegard von Bingen forever. Movie – Fantastic Fungi! Just saw and highly recommend, mushrooms will save the world. Piece of Art – All things Andrew Wyeth. Photos by Jenn Morse, Gabrielle Greenberg and Anja herself. The post Anja Schwartz Rothe appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegetable Curry

December 12 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegetable Curry If this cold weather makes you want to cozy up to a curry, but you dont have a lot of time to spend in the kitchen, this curry is for you. This fabulous looking curry is from a new book called Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook by Dianne Wenz. As a vegan lifestyle coach, Dianne is adept at showing how to prepare well-balanced meals that taste great. The opening chapter of the book is loaded with great tools and tips for eating a healthy vegan diet.  Enticing recipes such as Carrot Cake Oatmeal, Cauliflower Banh Mi, Chickpea Pot Pie, and Key Lime Bars, insure that your menus will be as flavorful and fun to eat as they are good for you. Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook is ideal for the new vegan trying to navigate their way through unfamiliar territory.  Its also great for anyone looking to fine-tune their eating habits by eliminating processed ingredients and getting back to basics - including eating more vegetables. This cookbook features easy to find ingredients that are used to make simple and delicious recipes such as this Vegetable Curry. About this recipe, Dianne says, Vegetable curries are a favorite warming meal on cold days. I tend to make them with whatever stray bits of vegetables I have on hand to clean out the produce drawer of the fridge, but this combination of cauliflower, green beans, and carrots is my personal favorite. This is a Thai-style curry that uses red curry paste, but it can also be made with the green variety. Vegetable Curry Serves 6 /­­ Prep time: 10 minutes /­­ Cook time: 20 minutes 1 teaspoon neutral-flavored oil (such as grapeseed or avocado), vegetable stock, or water 1 medium-sized yellow onion, diced 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon grated or minced fresh ginger 1 (14-ounce) can light coconut milk 1 cup vegetable stock 3 tablespoons red curry paste 4 cups chopped cauliflower florets 1/­­2 pound green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces 2 carrots, chopped 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed 2 cups spinach Sea salt Black pepper Heat the oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onion, garlic, and ginger and cook until they begin to brown, about 5 minutes. Add the light coconut milk, vegetable stock, and red curry paste to the pot and stir to combine. Add the cauliflower, green beans, carrots, and chickpeas. Bring the mixture to a boil, and then reduce the heat to medium-low. Cover the pot and simmer for 15 minutes, or until the vegetables have softened. Uncover the pot and stir in the spinach, continuing to simmer, while stirring frequently until the spinach wilts. Season with sea salt and black pepper to taste. From Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook, by Dianne Wenz, published by Rockridge Press. Copyright (C) 2019 by Callisto Media. All rights reserved. The post Vegetable Curry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Dominosteine (Layered Gingerbread Candy)

November 27 2019 seitan is my motor 

Dominosteine (Layered Gingerbread Candy)This year I finally wanna share my favourite German Christmas treat with you. Its called dominosteine. Its a piece of lebkuchen (gingerbread) that is layered with jelly (apricot in most cases) and marzipan and covered in chocolate. The post Dominosteine (Layered Gingerbread Candy) appeared first on seitan is my motor.

Aquafaba Pumpkin Pie

November 23 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Aquafaba Pumpkin Pie photo by Kate Lewis Makes a 9-inch Pie Pumpkin Pie just got lighter, airier and way, way easier! Aquafaba (that’s cooked chickpea liquid) fluffs up as you puree literally every single ingredient together in the blender. So while it works, you can lean against the kitchen counter scrolling through Instagram and giggling at all the sillyheads that are still using eggs. Come on, it’s 2020, get with the program. But anyway, this pie is full of ginger and spice and everything nice; simply put it tastes the exact way you want pumpkin pie to taste. It also sets beautifully as you can see from those luscious fork marks. Long story short: cancel any other pies and get this on your table. Notes ~You will need 1/­­2 a cup of aquafaba. I highly recommend aquafaba from an organic can of chickpeas. That is what we tested it with and it worked beautifully! Homemade aquafaba will give you varying results in flavor and texture so experiment some time but if you’re new to this just buy the can. I am sure you will figure out some way to use those chickpeas. ~More about that can! I would suggest a 28 oz can because then you won’t need to scrape the bottom of a small can to make sure you get that full 1/­­2 cup. ~For crusts, you can use one off this site, or a storebought one, or a gluten-free crumb crust or whatever you want. No need to parbake. ~If you are using a high-speed blender (like Vitamix) then put it on a low setting. 2 sounds good. If it’s a regular old blender, do a 5 or 6. Ingredients 3 cups pumpkin purée 1/­­2 cup pure maple syrup 1/­­2 cup aquafaba (see notes) 2 tablespoons coconut oil at room temp 2 tablespoons organic cornstarch 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1/­­4 teaspoon ground nutmeg Pinch of ground cloves 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt 1 (9-inch) pie crust, unbaked and chilled Directions - Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Add the pumpkin, maple syrup, aquafaba, coconut oil, cornstarch, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves and salt to a blender. Blend for about 3 minutes (less if using a high-speed blender), until light and fluffy. It should increase by 20 percent to 25 percent in volume. - Pour into prepared pie crust. Bake for about an hour, until the top is crackly, the filling is a little jiggly in the center and pulling away from the sides slightly. - Let cool for about 30 minutes at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 3 hours. Slice and serve with whipped cream!

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this)

March 12 2020 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Chocolate Chunk Blondies (somehow I must've known it would come to this) I threw these blondies together as I prepped a big batch of black bean burgers to freeze for later. (Yes, I am food prepping.) Probably made over a dozen batches of these cookies over the past few months. As usual, I took a break from sugary carb-craving in February. Things are much different now. Even though the grass is beginning to green up and my daffodils are blooming, the urge to bake and soothe my soul with comfort foods normally reserved for dark, winter months has returned with a vengeance.  (As a news-obsessed individual, I'm sure you can guess why.) My cookbooks lining the kitchen walls are more precious to me than ever right now. I've collected hundreds over the decades. I drop into flea markets looking for Pyrex and instead find myself with a two-dollar cookbook I'd wanted years ago. One more for the collection. Call me crazy, but in my Marie Kondo cleaning frenzy last spring--very few cookbooks left this house. Very. Few. One of my old stand-by cookbooks, an Alice Medrich classic, stands the test of time.   Published in 2010, my dog-eared, taped-page and post-it noted guides indicate the cookbook's utility.  Here's my vegan version blondie--and don't bake these in an 8" square pan. Use instead a rectangle if you can. Mine is 10 x 6" pan I purchased for eight bucks at the grocery store. Once you add the batter to the pan, you may look at it and think: this cannot be right--there's barely enough batter to cover the bottom of the pan. Trust the recipe, they bake up beautifully. And after a night in the fridge, even better.  Vegan Blondies (adapted) 3/­­4 cup unbleached AP flour 1/­­4 cup whole wheat flour 1/­­2 t. baking powder 1/­­4 t. fine sea salt 1 stick vegan butter 3/­­4 cup light brown sugar 1 t. vanilla extract 2 T. ground flax, plus 3 T. water, 1 t. olive oil (vegan egg) 2/­­3 cup walnuts or pecans 1/­­2 cup chocolate chunks Preheat oven to 350. Line pan with parchment paper, lightly spray. Mix dry ingredients together, set aside. Place small saucepan over low heat, add butter and sugar and stir until butter melts and sugar is mostly dissolved. Remove from heat. Add vanilla extract and flax egg. Mix well. Add dry ingredients to butter mixture. Mix just until flour is mostly incorporated. Add half nuts and half chocolate. Spread batter in pan, then sprinkle remaining nuts and chocolate over. Bake for about 20 minutes or just until the sides begin to turn golden. Let cool completely, then cut into squares and store in fridge. With all the bleak AF stuff out in the world lately, my own version of self-care includes a nice vitamin rich juice first thing in the morning. I've had my juicer for a dozen or so years now. It's come in very handy lately (even though it sat literally unused for about eight of these). If you think, "Hey, nice blondie recipe, but then juicing...how's that work?" Um, resistance is futile. I will always have chocolate in my life in one form or another. This is my favorite juicing recipe: 1 beet 1 carrot 1 celery stick 1 knob ginger 1 granny smith apple juice of half a lemon When I can, I make enough for two small pints (one before I eat oatmeal for breakfast, another to drink later in the day--you know, around three in the afternoon when I'd rather scarf down a whole package of M&Ms). I've been a believer in juicing for ages...has it helped? I have no damned idea. It makes me feel good. So yes. It "helps". Also been intermittent fasting. So basically the day goes like this: Eat between nine and five. Stop.  Went to my local WM on Tuesday, just as a precaution, trying to get my hands on bleach cleaner. Wow. I happened to turn the corner and spotted an out of place single bottle left. I was like: "Thank you retail-eagle-eye for helping me spot the thing that wasn't like the other things."

Gallo Pinto

March 9 2020 Meatless Monday 

Gallo pinto is a traditional rice and beans dish native to Costa Rica and Nicaragua. Although definitely meatless, the name translates to “spotted rooster” and is thought to reflect the speckled appearance of the dish. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 3-4 - 3 cups cooked rice - 2 cups cooked black beans - 2 tablespoons coconut oil or grape seed oil - 1 onion, finely chopped - 1 red pepper, finely chopped - 2/­­3 cup corn kernels (fresh or frozen) - 2 cloves of garlic, minced - 1 teaspoon ground cumin - 1 teaspoon ground coriander -  1/­­2 teaspoon ground ginger - 1 tablespoon vegetarian Worcestershire Sauce - 1 tablespoon soy sauce - 1 tablespoon Costa Rican Lizano sauce or salsa - several grinds salt and pepper Serve with (optional): - fresh cilantro - 1 egg per person, sunny-side up - corn tortillas, 1-2 per person Heat oil in large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and sauté until softened and translucent. Add pepper, sauté 1-2 minutes. Add corn and garlic. Add spices and sauces and mix thoroughly. Stir in rice and beans until mixture is heated through and well combined. Add salt and pepper to taste. In a separate skillet, fry one egg per person. Serve warm topped with an egg, and garnished with plenty of cilantro and additional sauces to taste. The post Gallo Pinto appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sesame Ginger Cabbage with Tofu and Shiitake

February 23 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Sesame Ginger Cabbage with Tofu and Shiitake Cabbage is a pretty underrated vegetable I think. It was a total staple growing up in Russia, making its appearance in everything from borscht to savory pies. I can’t say that I loved it back then, not unless it was framed by some kind of dough (like in pirozhki), but my whole view of cabbage has changed completely as an adult. I enjoy the fact that it’s super affordable and keeps in the fridge forever. I also love that it’s versatile and can be eaten both raw and cooked, and I think that we don’t cook it nearly enough. Cooked cabbage takes on a whole new life – it becomes sweet and silky soft, and gets the best caramelized bits when cooked long enough. This skillet with tofu and shiitake is a little tribute to the humble cabbage and all that it can do! It’s been on serious repeat in our kitchen lately. We quickly marinate tofu in a gingery sesame marinade and brown it in a pan, followed by leeks and shiitake. We then slowly sauté the cabbage and carrots until tender and caramelized, and flavor them with the remaining marinade. We serve the cabbage mixed with the leeks and mushrooms, studded with the golden tofu, and showered with toasted sesame seeds. This dish is surprisingly filling and can definitely be a main, but it can also make a nice side or a component of a multi-course meal. Have a great Sunday! Sesame Ginger Cabbage with Tofu and Shiitake   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2-inch piece ginger - grated 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon tamari, plus more for the vegetables 1 tablespoon rice vinegar 2 teaspoons Sriracha or other hot sauce 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 1 teaspoon maple syrup juice of 1 lime 14 oz extra-firm tofu, pressed and cut in cubes or triangles 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons avocado oil or refined coconut oil - divided 1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil - divided 1-2 leeks - white and light green parts only, sliced 8 oz shiitake mushrooms - stemmed and sliced 1 small head green cabbage - sliced thinly 1 medium carrot - julienned, cut into sticks or grated sea salt freshly ground black pepper toasted sesame seeds - for garnish green onions and/­­or cilantro - for garnish Instructions Combine the ginger, tamari, vinegar, Sriracha, sesame oil, maple syrup, and lime juice in a shallow dish or large bowl. Add the tofu and toss gently to coat. Leave to marinate while slicing the leeks, mushrooms, cabbage, and carrot. Warm 1 tablespoon of each avocado/­­coconut and sesame oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the tofu, leaving the marinade behind in the dish. Fry the tofu for 5-6 minutes, flipping every minute or two, until browned on most sides. Remove the tofu from the pan and set aside in a bowl. Wipe the pan if needed. Add 1 teaspoon of each avocado/­­coconut and sesame oil to the pan, followed by the leeks and shiitake. Add a generous splash of tamari and sauté for 10-12 minutes, until the leeks are soft. Remove from the pan to the same bowl as the tofu and set aside. Add the remaining 1 teaspoon each avocado/­­coconut and sesame oil to the pan, followed by the cabbage and carrot. Add a couple pinches of salt and freshly ground black pepper, stir to coat. Sauté for about 5 minutes, until the cabbage wilts down by about ⅓-1/­­2 in volume. Add 1 tablespoon of purified water, cover the pan, and reduce the heat to a medium-low. Cook, stirring periodically, for 10-15 minutes or longer, until the cabbage is soft and caramelized in parts. Add the remaining marinade, increase the heat to a medium and sauté until its absorbed, a minute or so. Add the reserved tofu and vegetables/­­mushrooms to the cabbage, toss gently to combine and let everything warm back through. Taste for salt and add another splash of tamari if needed. Serve sprinkled with sesame seeds and sliced green onions/­­cilantro. 3.5.3226 The post Sesame Ginger Cabbage with Tofu and Shiitake appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet and Sour Guava Curry

February 13 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Sweet and Sour Guava Curry (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Amrood Ki khati Methi Sabji (Sweet and Sour Guava Curry) Guavas, or "amrood" in Hindi, are simply delicious and probably one of my favorite fruits! This year I have an abundance of guavas growing in my backyard. I like to sprinkle chaat masala on guavas. The spiciness really brings out its flavor. Since I have so many delicious guavas, I decided it was time for me to make Guava Sweet and Sour Curry (Amrood Ki khati Methi Sabji). In case you are not familiar, this is a popular North Indian dish which I believe tastes best with fresh hot puris or parathas. This was a staple sabji when I was a child growing up in India, provided guavas were in season. My brother especially enjoyed this dish. He simply relished this sabji and could enjoy eating it every day. However, there was catch – he would only eat this dish with puris! Rotis or parathas simply did not do this dish justice! My brother would pretend to read a book while eating so no one would disturb him so he could truly enjoy eating in peace! Whenever I make this recipe, I remember our sweet, innocent childhood memories. Guava Sweet and Sour Curry has the best flavors – spicy, sweet and sour – all in one dish! This recipe will serve 2. Course Main Course Cuisine Indian Keyword Amrood, cooking shows, Gourmet food, Guava Fruit, Home Cooking, Home Made, Indian food, Jain Food, Kadoo Ki Subji, Khatta Meetha, Main Dish, Mandir Food, No Garlic, No lahsun, No Onion, No Pyaj, North Indian Recipes, Recipe videos, Satvik Food, Spicy, Swaminarayan, Tropical Fruit, Vegetarian, Veshno Cooking Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 15 minutes Total Time 20 minutes Servings 2 people Ingredients2 cups guavas amrood, cut into bite size pieces 2 Tbsp oil 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­4 tsp fenugreek seeds mathi dana 1/­­8 tsp asafetida hing 2 tsp coriander powder dhania 1 tsp fennel seed powder saunf 1/­­4 tsp turmeric haldi 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder 1/­­2 tsp salt 1 Tbsp ginger adrak, thinly sliced 1/­­2 tsp mango powder amchor 1 tsp lemon juice 2 Tbsp sugar adjust to the taste 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro hara dhania InstructionsHeat the oil in a saucepan. Oil should be moderately hot. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil. If the cumin seed cracks right away, the oil is ready. Add the cumin seeds, asafetida, fenugreek seeds, fennel seeds powder, coriander powder, turmeric, and red chili powder stir for few seconds. Add ginger and guava mix it well add 1 cup of water and cover the pan. Lower the heat and cover the pan cook for about 5-8 minutes until guavas are tender. Add mango powder, lemon juice and sugar stir and add cilantro. Turn off the heat and cover the pan for few minutes. Amrood Ki khati Methi Sabji is ready to serve. NotesIf Guava seeds are hard then remove them, adjust the sugar to taste depends how sweet are guava. The post Sweet and Sour Guava Curry appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways

January 26 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways Here’s something fun that you can make to set yourself up for endless future wins in the kitchen. This freezer bouillon is a great thing to have on hand for those times when you don’t have veggie stock or just don’t want to buy any. Add a few teaspoons to your soup or sauce, and you’ll end up with a rich flavor base with very minimal effort. Inspired by both curry paste and a brilliant ‘Souper Mix’ recipe from The River Cottage Preserves Handbook, this freezer bouillon is essentially just a combination of different, whole food aromatics that you’d typically find at the base of any soup or broth, plus salt. The beautiful thing about this recipe is that there are no strange preservatives or weird ingredients that you might find in store-bought bouillon – just good old veggies and a few other, non-sketchy flavor enhancers. Today we’ve got two variations on the theme: a ‘classic’ freezer bouillon, based on the mirepoix trio of onion, celery, and carrot, and a ‘fiery’ variation, kind of like curry paste but without all the spices, starring, ginger, shallots, garlic and more. To make both of the bouillon variations, you just pulse up veggies and salt into a fine, pesto-like paste in the food processor. Distribute the bouillon among containers, label, and keep in the freezer. Because of the fair amount of salt in the recipe, the paste doesn’t completely freeze in the freezer and is easily scoopable. The salt also helps it keep for a really long time – pretty much indefinitely in my experience. This is a concentrated product and a little is meant to go a long way, so if you taste it as is, it will taste very salty and strong. I like to use the ‘classic’ bouillon variation in all kinds of legume-based soups like lentil soup and minestrone, and in rich sauces like mushroom bolognese. The ‘fiery’ version is really lovely in all kinds of curries and healing soups, meant to help clear the sinuses. But really, there are no rules for how and where you can use this bouillon, it’s really fun to experiment with. Just the other day, I cooked up a pot of plain chickpeas (just chickpeas and salt) and wanted to make a quick, single serving of chickpea soup for lunch. I heated up some olive oil in a small pot, added about a teaspoon of the classic bouillon, and let it get fragrant for about a minute. I then added the chickpeas to the pot with about 2 cups of their cooking water, brought everything up to a simmer for a few minutes, and wilted in some spinach at the end. I ended up with the coziest bowl of soup and a very flavorful, warming broth in just a few minutes. Hope you’ll give this a try this year! Classic Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 yellow onion - peeled, roughly chopped 1 leek - white and light green part only, roughly chopped 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 3 celery ribs - roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 1 bunch parsley - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste (optional) 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the tomato paste, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 Fiery Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 2 shallots - peeled, roughly chopped 6-8 total of ginger pieces - peeled if not organic, roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 1 jalape?o or serrano pepper - seeded, roughly chopped (optional, include for more heat) 1 bunch cilantro - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon white miso (optional) 1 teaspoon turmeric powder (optional) 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the miso and turmeric, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers, and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 The post Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Jamaican Jerk Tofu

January 13 2020 Meatless Monday 

Makes 6 servings This is the kind of miracle dish that can convert anyone to tofu. The Jamaican “jerk” seasoning is sure-to-please. It’s sort of like barbeque and sort of like curry, savory and sweet at the same time. Just make sure you allow plenty of time for the pressing and marinating. The drier the tofu gets before you put it in the marinade, the better. It will soak up more flavor and be nicely chewy. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! - 1 pound extra firm tofu, drained, sliced and pressed (see directions) - 1/­­2 large sweet onion, roughly chopped - 4 cloves garlic - 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, grated - Juice of 2 limes - Zest of 1 lime - 2 tablespoons soy sauce - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon dried thyme - 2 teaspoons allspice - 1/­­2 teaspoon cayenne - 1 teaspoon nutmeg - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped (you can cut back to one or omit entirely if you don’t like it spicy) Directions Slice the tofu into thick slabs then lay the slices on several layers of paper towels or on a clean dish towel and place a heavy plate or skillet on top. Let it sit for an hour or two. Pressing the tofu is a way to get the extra moisture out – and the drier you can get the tofu, the more of the flavorful marinade it can absorb. Puree all the rest of the ingredients in a blender or food processor to create the marinade. Place the tofu slices in a bowl, pour in the marinade, making sure to coat all the slices, and cover. Let it sit for an hour or two, flipping the slices about halfway through Heat a skillet with a small amount of olive oil over medium high heat. When the pan is hot, lay the tofu slices in a single layer and saute until crispy and browned. That will take 8-10 minutes on each side. (Photo credit: Vegan Style) The post Jamaican Jerk Tofu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Gingerbread Baked Oatmeal (No Oil)

December 19 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gingerbread Baked Oatmeal (No Oil)Easy Vegan Gingerbread Baked Oatmeal. Oats tossed with gingerbread spices, molasses, candied ginger and non dairy milk and baked to make moist gingerbread oat bars. Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe, can be nut-free. Jump to Recipe These past few months can be labelled as he baked oatmeal months on the blog. Since I started making baled oatmeal, I’ve fallen in love with the texture and love to play around with the flavor options. Be it PB&J baked oatmeal, Pumpkin Baked Oatmeal or Banana Bread Baked Oatmeal. Just a few everyday ingredients, No added Oil, no added refined sugar(omit candied ginger) and takes just 10 minutes to put together. Bake, slice and serve warm or cold! No gummy Oatmeal! Its fluffy and just the right amount of soft. Top the oatmeal with nuts or spices, and serve with maple syrup or whipped coconut cream.Continue reading: Vegan Gingerbread Baked Oatmeal (No Oil)The post Vegan Gingerbread Baked Oatmeal (No Oil) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Candied Pecans Stovetop (Oil-free)

December 14 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Candied Pecans Stovetop (Oil-free)5 Ingredient Vegan Candied Pecans. Stovetop Candied Pecans with gingerbread spice or pumpkin pie spice! No Bake! Easy Crunchy Snack and great for gifting. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Oil-free Recipe Jump to Recipe Spiced Candied Pecans are always a hit in the holiday season. These Vegan candied pecans need just 5 ingredients, a skillet and no oil. Toast the pecans on the skillet for a few minutes. Add the coconut sugar, salt, spice mix and maple syrup and continue to cook until dry. These pecans are crunchy, sweet, spicy and just delicious tasting. Add other nuts for variation. Different nuts take different roasting time, for eg almonds would take much longer to roast. Adjust the time accordingly. The recipe is easily doubled, you can use a tbsp less sugar when doubling.Continue reading: Vegan Candied Pecans Stovetop (Oil-free)The post Vegan Candied Pecans Stovetop (Oil-free) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Lisa O’Connor

December 8 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Lisa O’Connor Lisa O’Connor is a Toronto-based Holistic Nutritionist, Healing Alchemist, and host of the Glow Deep Podcast. We interviewed Lisa about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, healing and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Both! Im a naturally disciplined soul, so I have no problems at all committing to something. I thrive off of routine, but Ive been learning to be way more in flow these past few years. Especially with creating my own schedule and building my business /­­ practice, and now with the arrival of our puppy. My schedule got shifted around quite a bit, as he needs A LOT of attention and training at this moment! Im learning to find my own rhythm between routine, and free flow. Which I believe is always a dance for us as we transition through different seasons, and times of our lives. -- What do your mornings look like? Now with a puppy things have shifted! -We are morning people – getting up anywhere between 5-6am -A liter of water first thing -A walk in nature with the pup -A little play time with him & then putting him in his crate for a nap, so I can have me time -Kundalini -Meditation -Matcha latte -Reading – I commit to 30-45 min daily reading in the morning -Smoothie or whatever else Im feeling -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? To be honest, I dont have a lot of bedtime rituals, as I dont really have a problem with sleep. Whats important for me is turning my phone on airplane mode a good 45min- 1 hour before sleep, having a shower to shift my energy, magnesium cream, and reading a book in bed with my husband, or sometimes we watch a little something on Netflix to just switch completely off! -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  -Meditation -Walking in nature and being present -Kundalini -Im not a massive journal writer, but when it calls I listen! Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Smoothie & homemade matcha latte (I have the matcha first, and probably wait an hour or so and then have the smoothie!) Lunch – Honestly on client days I often keep it light and just snack – green juice here, smoothie there, some veggies, coconut water! And some days I just have liquids (juices, smoothies, water until dinner) on other days it could be a light salad, or a lunch out with a friend at a local healthy restaurant Snack – Im not too much of a snack person! But I would say nuts /­­ seeds, green juice, maybe a piece of fruit in the summer Dinner - Green salad, roasted veggies, curries, soups, brown rice -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do :) I drink matcha during the week, and on the weekend when I can savour a beautiful organic Americano when Im at a cafe with my husband, its just that much more special. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your cart? We do our big haul on Saturdays at a place here called Organic Garage. Everything is organic, and is so reasonable in price. In the summer I also add in local markets, and farmers markets. That being said, I feel like Im always grocery shopping on the daily, as Im always picking up fresh greens, or picking up supplemental things for dinner that we didnt get during our big shop on Saturday morning. Things that we always include: -Variety of leafy greens -Olives -Bananas -Apples -Mushrooms -Celery -Lemons -Frozen berries -Avocados -Brown Rice -Fresh herbs -Variety of proteins -Cucumbers -ACV -Pumpkin seed butter -Zucchinis -White & Sweet potatoes -Garlic -Ginger -Dates -Variety nuts & seeds -Seasonal vegetables -Hemp seeds +++ More but those are always staples!  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I know people wont like this answer, but I actually dont! I can eat 95-100% chocolate, and feel super satisfied. If Im sweetening anything I use dates, bananas, and/­­or a touch of raw honey. -- Are there any particular foods that you find to be helpful with your energy levels and general wellness? Greens!!! I am a greens monster, and feel so deeply connected to them. I love to consume their liquid sunshine properties. Potatoes are also a huge staple for me, as they are easily digested, high in fiber, and the natural sugars are burned as energy for me. Berries – I love wild blueberries and raspberries Spices /­­ herbs – Ginger, garlic, cayenne, nettle, turmeric Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I dont have anything particular right now! My favourite form of exercise is walking! Its highly underrated in my opinion. I live in a big city, without a car, so my mode of transport is Me. I find it meditative, calming, and great exercise. I also practice Kundalini yoga, and will sometimes do some resistance work (P.Volve). -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I find it to be an extension of me, and I dont ever have to force it. I trust my body and flow with what it wants and feels in the season of life that Im in. At the moment Ive been the least active Ive ever been, but its what feels best for me, and my body is welcoming it, and responding beautifully to it. In other seasons of my life Ive done intense and hard workouts at least 4 -5 x per week, and other times Ive done daily exercise. If there is anything Ive learnt along the way, is that nothing good comes from force. When we practice, and learn to tune- in, we will always be guided to what our body needs. In 2020 I want to get back into doing Ballet Beautiful though, as I did it for over two years and felt so graceful, feminine, yet toned. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty, both internal and external? My idea of beauty will always be that is stems from within. And not just the foods that we eat, or supplements we take, but the thoughts we think, our mood, mental state, stress levels, how kind we are...etc. I struggled with really bad acne for years, and addressing all of the above, with nutrition + curated herbs /­­ supplements, actually brought my skin back better than before! Beauty in my eyes is always a projection, and energetic force with regards to whats going on inside. When things are aligned within, I feel beauty just radiates regardless of how we *think* we look. This beautiful energetic force truly knows no bounds. I do still enjoy to take care of my external skin, and body, but I would say its only about 10% of my regime. Everything else stems from internal work! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? MINIMAL. People are so surprised how little I do, as I really do practice what I preach. When we focus on the internal, the external will always reflect that. I use all natural products – Face wash, rose spray, and oil (I rotate a few of my favourite brands – including Living Libations, F. Miller & Marie Veronique) In the summer I mask more (May Lindstrom or just the Aztec Clay mask) I find them too harsh for the winter, so I love a good Manuka honey mask during the winter. -- Do you have any beauty tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Less is more. When I was healing my skin I tried EVERYTHING. I used too many products, stripped my skin, and it all just made it worse. I find my skin is the best the less that I do. Sweating is key, so are hot /­­ cold (contrast showers), kundalini (breathwork) and again coming back to nurturing and feeding (Physical & Mental) your Internal Self, which then shows up Externally. The key is to get things moving & flowing. Digestion, lymph, liver, as this ultimately shows up on the skin. No flow, no glow. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress?  -Meditation (nothing fancy, or prescriptive, just sitting with myself) -Dog walks in nature -Kundalini Yoga -Reading -Nutrition -Seeing loved ones -Spending time with my husband, and puppy -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? -REST /­­ SLEEP – seriously the simplest thing one can do, I just believe we feel as a society that we cant just Be, or cant just take a break -Green juicing -Hot /­­ cold showers to stimulate lymph flow and detoxification -Ginger tea -Broths /­­ soups Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Im quite simple, easy-going, yet Ive always been disciplined, and my husband might say stubborn (my Ukrainian genes :) ). I dont find it that difficult to honour my body, mind, and soul. Ive also been on a deep healing journey since 2006 (got diagnosed with Lyme Disease in 2012), so truly these arent even actions or steps I take, they are just Me. I dont force anything, and allow for flow, ease, while still knowing, and honouring when I need to heal something deeper, take a new direction, and take care of my inner child. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Hmmmm I dont think there is just one thing, as I see things very holistically, and connected. I would say mind work. Focusing on mental strength, vitality, and honouring my subconscious mind, as this is where all of our habits, programs, and deep belief systems live. Our mind is everything, as the body is the unconscious mind.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Take a break! It could be an afternoon, a day or even a few. I have a tendency to force things, and when I do nothing flows. Ive learned this the hard way many times over, so I create space to go within. On the other hand, I can get inspired easily via images, nature, people, environments, so its always there for me. Its cheesy, but inspiration can hit at any moment, so I stay open. But when Im stuck, I take a step back or I schedule a brainstorming session with my husband. Just so I can talk things through, get a different perspective ( hes very smart, yet practical). In my business its just me, myself, and I, so it can get pretty insular. Although my goal for 2020 is to hire my first employee!  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. To be honest, nothing outside of myself influenced this or my view. It was losing my health, and healing on a deep level that has brought me to where I am with self-care. Its never been anything to do, if anything its how I practice Being. Ive come to see, and know deeply that our relationship to Self – On a body, mind, and soul level is everything. If we dont show up for ourselves, than we cant for others. But if I were to pick anything in terms of external energy, I would say the book Magdalen Manuscript, its a channeled script of Mary Magdalen. It speaks about Ka energy (life force), and the power of energy that courses through all of Us. The only way to channel this energy, is to nourish ourselves from the inside out. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a holistic nutritionist? When I started to become ill in 2006, it set me on my path. At first it started with my own experiments, lifestyle changes, and reading /­­ self-knowledge for close to six years. Then from there, I took it further to get certified, and study formally. While Im a HN, Ive expanded my view of my work, as I go *much* deeper than just food. My story is WILD, so I wont go into all the details, but when you experience something so deep, intense, and beautiful on your own, you want to help others heal via your journey, knowledge, and gifts (which I believe we all have! Its just up to us to cultivate them). I dont believe I chose this profession, as Ive never felt more called to something. Knowing how crazy, and wild it is to lose one’s health, its my mission to help others tap themselves into their own innate healer. -- What is your healing philosophy? How do you approach working with clients? Ive come to see healing as alchemy. As a society weve been taught that we should just focus on one body part, one thing, one pill, and weve become so singular in our view point and scope of healing /­­ practice. I.E. if we are having back pain, focus on the back. Where as I see everything, and I mean everything holistically. I see the alchemy, and connection between it all – Body, Mind, and Spirit. While we might be having physical pain some place (i.e. back), yes we must look and take care of the cellular body (which I do), but we also have to look at our emotions, trauma, history, and deeper work into the soul, and subconscious. While this isnt the easy work, to me its the only way I know! So when taking on a client, this is where we go. I look at each soul as a unique and individual being. No one is alike, so there isnt a pill or protocol that fits just because someone has been diagnosed with X, and so has their friend. Those two people are so different, have been raised uniquely, have most likely experienced trauma in their own way, and are navigating different life pathways, and stressors. We navigate the deeper parts, so we can heal holistically, sustainably, and in connection with our whole Self. We arent just a body, we are so much more. When we focus on just the body, I dont believe we do ourselves any favours. This is whats often missing in chronic care of  humans and why so many people are just living and coping with pain and dis-ease. We are seeking greater depth, purpose, and fulfilment, yet were left confused, hopeless, and overwhelmed. If I can just bring someone to see that they DO have the power to heal, than man oh man, it just means everything to me! Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Our new puppy Rumi! Hes a Rhodesian Ridgeback, so he will grow to be a big boy, but we are soaking up all the puppy cuddles right now. Also ending off a decade, ushering in a new one , and entering into the year 2020. There is a lot of potent energy coming forth, and Im feeling really charged, clear, and ready for it all. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Nothing really special, I love just the simple things in life. A hot shower, getting into my robe or a grey sweat suit, eating a nourishing dinner, and cuddling with my husband & puppy! Sometimes I will treat myself to a facial, and when I can infrared sauna sessions.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit and Course in Miracles Song/­­Album –   Anything by Bon Iver or Ben Howard or White Sun Movie –   Dirty Dancing (forever & always my favourite) Piece of Art –  I adore a lot of art  /­­ creative work, but some of my favourites include: Renaissance art, Matisse, Unconditional Magazine, Picasso, Christiane Spangsberg. This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Lisa O’Connor appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Biryani Rice

November 27 2019 VegKitchen 

Biryani Rice Dont let the number of ingredients stop you--this Biryani Rice is easy to make, and its amazing scents deserve the effort. Save Print Biryani Rice Serves: 8   Ingredients ¼ cup canola oil ½ cup cashews 2 large onions, sliced thinly 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 tbsp biryani curry paste or other Indian curry paste 1 tbsp ginger, minced 1 tsp salt 1 tsp ground cumin ½ tsp ground cinnamon 3¼ cups vegetable broth ¼ cup plain yogurt 3 seeds cardamom, crushed 2 stars anise 1 stick cinnamon 1¾ cup brown basmati rice 2 small hot peppers, chopped Instructions Heat the oil in a large frying pan. The post Biryani Rice appeared first on VegKitchen.

Cranberry Spice Oatmeal Cookies

November 22 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Cranberry Spice Oatmeal Cookies Picture by VK Rees Makes 2 dozen Oatmeal cookies just remind you of home. If you come from a home that deprived you of chocolate chip cookies. Just kidding! These are gorgeous little clusters of oats studded with ruby cranberries. Crispy on the edges, chewy inside with a hint of spice.  Just the perfect thing for the holidays if you can forget about the war on Christmas and enjoy a cookie for a minute. This recipe is from Superfun Times. Notes ~ If you dont have pumpkin pie spice, 3/­­4 teaspoon ground ginger, 3/­­4 teaspoon ground cinnamon and a pinch of cloves oughta do it! Ingredients 1/­­3 cup refined coconut oil, softened at room temp 1/­­3 cup packed brown sugar 1/­­3 cup granulated sugar 3 tablespoons unsweetened almond milk or your fave non-dairy milk 1 tablespoon organic cornstarch 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 1/­­2 cup all-purpose flour 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda 1 1/­­2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1 1/­­2 cups rolled oats 1/­­2 cup dried sweetened cranberries 1/­­2 cup chopped walnuts Directions Preheat oven to 350 F. Lightly grease 2 large baking sheets.  In a large mixing bowl, use a handmixer or strong fork to cream together oil and sugars. Mix in the vanilla. Add the cornstarch and milk, and mix until the cornstarch is dissolved.  Sift in the flour, baking soda, spices and salt and mix to combine. Add the oats, cranberries and nuts, and use your hands to form a stiff dough. Scoop cookies out with a tablespoon or server, using about two tablespoons of dough per cookie. Place about 2 inches apart. Flatten a little with your hand. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, until edges are lightly browned. Remove from oven and cool for about 5 minutes then transfer to cooling rack to cool completely.


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