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Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby

January 7 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby Beth Kirby is a photographer, cookbook writer, entrepreneur, and the creator of Local Milk, her food, travel, and lifestyle blog. We are endlessly amazed by Beth’s ability to present her work with both authenticity and style, and we were completely blown away by each one of her thoughtful and inspiring answers in this interview. It’s a true gem. In this dialogue, Beth tells us about self-care as the foundation for happiness, having a schedule as a way to avoid stress, why she doesn’t believe in the idea of work-life balance, and how her routine has changed since becoming a mother, as well as her newfound love for weight training, the adaptogens and herbs she incorporates into her everyday potions, beauty, motivation, sustenance, and much more. There’s some amazing business advice here, too! Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Routine is so very important to me. Routines ensure that time is carved out for the important things in my days & life. Im super flexible with my routines so theres no such thing as failing, but the closer I adhere to the routine, the more impact I tend to make in my day. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I actually just wrote a little guide to a slow morning routine that details mine! I usually wake up when my baby wakes up, between 6:30-7:30 AM. The first thing I do every morning is make the bed because I feel this sets the tone for the rest of my day. My husband takes the baby to give me 10 minutes to meditate (I love the Headspace app) and do a few sun salutations to wake my body + mind connection up. After that I brew my morning elixir, a simple lemon, ginger, and turmeric tea, and then I do some journaling while I drink it. After that comes breakfast & a matcha potion, a shower & getting dressed for the day, a quick tidy of my space if I need it, and then Im down to work! I dont always do every single thing, but the more of them I hit, the better my morning! -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Im so exhausted at the end of the day, I dont usually need much help sleeping! I love making moon mylks with sleep promoting herbs as a little night time luxury. We keep the bedroom a sleep only zone with no television or computers, so its quite easy to pass out once Im in my own bed (or whatever bed I happen to be in!) -- How has your routine changed since you had your daughter? Its gotten a lot more flexible! If shes having a bad morning, things like preparing breakfast can take a lot longer or maybe I skip the shower (truth time!), but in a lot of ways, its made me more routine because if I dont have a plan and stick to it, the day can slip away a lot more easily when you have kids. I kinda floated through my days doing whatever I wanted whenever I wanted before she was born because I had all the time in the world. Now its make hay while the sun shines or forget having any hay! Haha. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  Miso Soup, 7 minute veggie & egg steam, and rice. After spending a fair amount of time in Japan, this has become my breakfast of choice. I keep dashi in the fridge for a quick miso soup so it takes literally minutes, and I steam a few veggies, whatever is on hand, in my steamer with an egg in its shell for 7 minutes. It all, including the egg, comes out perfectly! We cook rice in a rice cooker or donabe depending on where we are. I usually have a little miso dressing in the fridge to dip my veggies and eggs in and enjoy them alongside the rice & soup. Its so comforting and healthy, but its also really quick and easy as long as you throw the rice in a rice cooker and have dashi on hand. Lunch –  Smoothie! I usually hit my work stride during midday, and I dont like to take a massive amount of time (or make a big mess!) for lunch, so my favorite thing to do is whip up a super food adaptogen rich smoothie. I love pineapple and avocado as a base, and if its after a workout I make sure to throw some hemp & moringa in there for a plant based protein punch. Snack –  Ume plum onigiri. I almost always have leftover rice on hand, so I make rice balls with pickled plums in the center and wrap them with toasted nori for a quick snack. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Coffee makes me crazy, so I only have it on special occasions (like if Im near a really, really amazing café I might have a cappuccino), but when Im at home Ive started making a morning matcha potion.   -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I used to! But its lessened over the past couple of years as I cut back on candy & sweets. I love sugar, but I like to save it for feast days like holidays and celebrations instead of consume it as part of everyday life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I incorporate adaptogens & tonic herbs--particularly rhodiola, ashwaghanda, he shou wu, astragalus, maca, and reishi--into a lot of my food like smoothies, mylks, and matchas. I also love Wooden Spoon Herbs tinctures, especially Anxiety Ally (anxious lady over here!) as well as her Green Protein Powder after workouts. Ive also recently discovered tocos and MCT oil, which I work into either my smoothie or matcha each day. -- Youve spent significant amounts of time in both Japan and France. How have those cultures influenced your cooking? For sundry reasons, Japan has definitely had a bigger impact on my cooking than France even though we live in Paris about half the year. I love to eat French food, but I find a lot of it is richer than I care to eat on a daily basis, and because I cook vegetarian at home 99.9% of the time, Japanese cuisine is, in my experience, much easier to adapt to that. And I just love Japanese flavors. I would say I cook Japanese inspired meals more than anything else (even when in Paris!) -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Weve done baby led weaning which simply means offering solids around 6 months and letting her decide what and how much shed like to eat of what we offer. We try to make sure shes offered a wide variety of whole food options, and dont worry about it after that. She eats what we eat, and at 16 months shes still breastfed, and thats fine by me. We are super, super laid back about it. She eats what and when we eat, and she can still have mom milk whenever she wants. That said, those organic baby food pouches are a lifesaver on the go because she can hold them! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I see a personal trainer for an hour a day, five days a week. On my days off I do one day of cardio and one day of rest. I do mainly resistance training with weights and bodyweight and a little cardio. I think a lot of women do a toooonnn of cardio and are afraid of weights because they think theyll bulk up when in reality getting big is incredibly difficult. Instead weights make you stronger, toned, healthy, and able to eat more…which I love! Before Eula I ate very few calories and did lots of cardio, and while I was thin, I never felt healthy. Now I eat as much healthy food as I want when Im hungry and lift weights. While Im not where I want to be post-baby yet, Im on the road! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I freaking hate cardio. Especially running. I dont run. Unless something is on fire. I actually like weight lifting and resistance training. Its hard, but the time flies, and I can feel my body getting stronger. Having a trainer, while an investment, has been the trick for me. I need that accountability, and I needed to feel like someone who knew my goals for my body was guiding me towards them as opposed to me just randomly doing things. What motivates me is freedom from issues around food, being fit for the first time in my life, being a good example to my daughter, keeping up with my fit husband, and getting a toned butt! Haha! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? This is probably cliché but confidence. When someone is confident in their own skin and in who they are as a person, confident about where they are in the journey whether theyre only beginning or years down the road, that is beautiful. When you love yourself inside and out, you glow. Easier said than done, I know, but when we work towards banishing self loathing we arent only more beautiful to ourselves, we are more beautiful to others as well.   -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? As for my face, I keep it super simple: I wash and exfoliate with Aesop, and then I tone with Thayers Rose Tonic and hydrate with Evan Healy moisturizer. I love her formula because its natural and it isnt greasy like so many. It goes on so light. I also get a HydraFacial every couple of months. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I drink tocos daily in my smoothie or matcha, as its amazing for skin. He Shou Wu is another herb I take for beauty, again usually stirred into tea or a smoothie since I have one of those two things almost every day. I also take an ultra collagen supplement by Reserveage.   -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Dont wash your hair everyday! This strips hair of its oils and can dry it out and make it brittle. I wash mine once every 3-4 days, and I use a dry shampoo by Oribe on the days in between as needed. And if nothing else, if I can throw on a bit of Benefit Porefessional, mascara, and do my brows, I feel done. But the truth is, I hardly ever do my make up unless I have an event or am going to be on camera. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Not taking on more than I can handle, delegating, saying no as often as needed, having a schedule, and planning help me avoid stress. As a very DIY spirited entrepreneur, I constantly have to fight the temptation to just do it myself, and as a person who really likes to do what I feel like doing when I feel like doing it, I have to fight the urge to float through my days working on whatever catches my eye. Instead, batching days and time blocking (i.e. Mondays are for marketing & meetings, Tuesdays are for client work, Wednesdays are for editing & writing, Thursdays for content creation, Fridays are for finance, Saturday is for family, and Sunday is for weekly food prep, etc...) helps keep me on track. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Meditation is my not-so-secret weapon. And exercise. And sleep. If Im meditating, sleeping at least 7 hours a night, and getting my work-outs in, I can field whatever stress comes my way with reasonable grace. And it does come. I also find the simple belief that everything happens for a good reason calms down the stresses of life, big and small. Whether Im stuck at a red light when Im running late, or I didnt get something I thought I wanted, this belief frames it as a blessing. I choose to believe the universe knows better than I do what should happen and when. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic! I immediately start sucking on cloves of garlic. More than 50% of the time this knocks it out. It smells strong, but hey, it works! It has antibiotic properties (they called it Russian Penicillin during the war!), and it can kill bugs. I also start drinking a lot of herbal tea. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This may sound strange to say, but I dont believe in work life balance. Balance implies everything has equal weight all the time. I believe in boundaries, but not balance. I dont believe anything great was ever created meting out time to it in a stingy way. Passion is going all in. Its long days and late nights. Its a pendulum swing. Whats important to me is not living these perfectly balanced days where everything gets equal weight, but rather in knowing when to swing back. You have to define your non-negotiables, and then the rest of your time is fair game. My non-negotiables are my weekly workouts, morning routine (though I shorten it as needed depending on the day), and an hour or so at the end of the day to cuddle and connect with my family. When Im in a season of intense work, say launching something new or writing a book, people know they will see less of me. I will spend less time on other things. And when I need a break or when its complete, I will just the same pour myself all into to rest and enjoying the people I love. Its about knowing your own limits, setting boundaries so that the priority gets to be the priority, pushing it to the boundary, and then stepping back when its time. Thats my approach. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself. When you truly, fully grasp that if you dont take care of yourself all the other things you want will forever remain out of your grasp, then it becomes really easy to stay motivated and prioritize yourself. We all have different goals and dreams, but what most people have in common is that they quite simply want to be happy. You can make seven figures and be perfectly miserable if you dont take care of yourself. Its the foundation the rest is built on. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Working out, specifically weight training. I have spent my entire life avoiding exercise. I always really hated it, and it felt like a waste of time when I could be working. Which was so silly! It gives me more energy, better focus, elevates my mood, and helps me make better food choices because when you make one good choice it becomes easier to make others. Also, full disclosure, it really helps with libido! As a woman who is crazy about her husband but definitely suffered from sloth like tendencies post baby, this has been awesome! Intimacy is such a priority for me, and working out has totally reenergized our relationship. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Ha! Story of my life. Honestly, I lean into it. What those periods mean, usually, is that Im burnt out or theres some big issue in my life or business that isnt working, and Im not dealing with it. In those periods, I let myself rest. And I take a look at whats not working, and I try to develop a solution. If Im simply burnt out, a good rest will leave me totally inspired. And if theres something that isnt working in my life or business, taking time to figure it out becomes the priority. Once the problem is solved, motivation and inspiration return. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Tools of Titans, The One Thing, and Essentialism are all books that deeply influenced my routines and my general philosophy on life. While largely geared towards entrepreneurs, I think their principles can apply to anyone. Knowledge -- Your home birth story was incredibly inspiring and touching. How did you come to the decision to have a natural home birth? Do you have any resources to recommend to future parents thinking of doing the same? Well, Id actually planned to give birth at the hospital for the majority of my pregnancy. I decided to have a home birth weeks before she was due! It was kind of crazy. In the process of writing my birth plan, I realized how against the grain I was going for a hospital birth by simply wanting no medication or unnecessary medical interventions. I didnt want to be swimming upstream while doing the hardest thing I would ever do. If someone is thinking about doing the same, I would say do a lot of research on the quality of midwifery care in your area. Not every area of the world is created equally when it comes to available care. The Farm Midwifery Center has lots of great resources for people considering the option! -- Do you have any tips for surviving or minimizing jetlag, and for dealing with a jetlagged baby? I actually have a whole blog post on traveling with baby! If you are traveling across many, many time zones and its at all possible, build a few extra days into your schedule to take it easy and recover from jetlag. When she was under one year old, we took turns getting up with her those first few nights, and tried to keep her awake as long as possible near bed time. And while I know a lot of people might not be comfortable with this, once she was over one year old we gave her a small, weight appropriate dose of benadryl the first two to three nights to help reset her clock. It was an amazing life saving discovery that our pediatrician approved, and we felt comfortable with after lots and lots of research. If you dont want to do that, you can try melatonin or herbal remedies like No Jet Lag. In the end whether you use anything or not, the baby adjusts much quicker than the adults in my experience! -- Youve masterfully created your own brand, and your photography style is instantly recognizable, yet weve read that you are completely self-taught. What was your path to building such a successful lifestyle brand? What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out? Oh man! I have WAY too much to say about this. Im writing e-courses for 2018 that deal with this very topic. So! My path was to embrace the public learning curve. I didnt wait until I had it all figured out to start. I just started, and I got better as I went along. The better I got, the more readers and opportunities I had. There was no overnight success. There was passion, hard work, and showing up everyday for years. I have ALWAYS focused on two things above all else: content and relationships. I dont deal in mediocre and always strive to produce the best content I possibly can, and I aim to treat everyone I come in contact with love and respect. Those are the foundations, in my estimation, of any successful enterprise. The advice I would give to someone starting out, the short version, is this: First, you need to figure out what youre passionate about and be super specific, start with one thing. For me, that was cooking. You can branch out into other niches later, but start with one. Then you need to figure out the core values of your brand. For instance beauty, mindfulness, and authenticity are some of the core values of Local Milk. This is going to set the tone for all that you do. The next thing, the most important thing, you need to figure out is who youre talking to. Who is you dream customer, client, audience? What do they love? What are their hopes, dreams, fears, struggles? How can you make their lives better? This is where youll get ideas for content, revenue streams, copywriting, and everything. Its so important. You cant skip it. You cant hit a target you arent aiming for, and you need to know what your target audience looks like (eg: is it magazine editors or stay at home moms? or both? why?) and responds to before you go on to create your brand. I could keep going! But Ill leave the nitty gritty details for the e-course! The biggest advice I can give is: Just start! There is ALWAYS room at the top, and NO ONE starts there. -- You are a true believer in the fact that a dream life and dream job is achievable for anyone, even those at their lowest point. Can you tell us a bit more about how you were able to come to this realization? Well, Im living proof, so its an easy thing for me to believe. I spent the first decade of my adult life in the throes of bipolar and drug addiction. Im a high school AND college drop out. I started this business when I was 29 on VERY little money. The only thing Id ever done before this was wait tables. I had to heal myself before I could start this journey, but once I did that, I didnt quit, and I didnt look down. Every small win felt like a huge win to me. I was grateful for the first $20 I was ever paid for a photo. And to be honest, it was probably only worth $20. I have the unshakeable belief that if you work hard at something youre truly passionate about, you cannot fail. But you have to work hard. And you have to be passionate, you have to love it. Before you can do any of it, however, you must take care of yourself spiritually and physically. That was the key to all of my success. Ten years of failure because I could not and would not take care of myself. Once I started, it all just flowed. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? In no particular order: sailing anywhere with clear blue water, Netflix and chill with my husband, and playing Warcraft. Haha! I try to make it to the sea at least once a year, and I love to hang out with my husband doing anything or nothing. When work is done for the day, I like to relax with a good series. And Warcraft is my secret pleasure. Especially when Im really burnt out, and I just need to get away”. I absolutely love video games, specifically WoW, and while I cant play full time anymore, whenever Im taking one of those breaks from work to rejuvenate, Ill get on there for a few days. Im hoping to find time soon to play! Its great because it has NOTHING to do with work. And when you have a lifestyle brand, EVERYTHING can be turned into work! But I think its safe to say the World of Warcraft remains and always will remain firmly off brand! -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Nabokovs Lolita (topic notwithstanding its some of the best writing in the world) Song/­­Album – Songs of Leonard Cohen Movie – The Empire Strikes Back (its my favorite movie, so you know...it sure feeds my soul!) Piece of Art – anything by Cy Twombly -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are a few essential objects that would be in yours? This is actually labeled my minimalist packing list in my evernotes! camera laptop external hard drive phone earphones passport/­­visas wallet medicine dry shampoo brush Cosmetics aesop face wash + exfoliant thayers rose tonic deodorant toothbrush + paste underwear black boots blockshop scarf sunglasses 1 oversized necklace 1 pair earrings 1 hat 2 trousers 2 elizabeth suzann linen tunics 1 over sized sweater 1 silk shift dress 1 pair black tights lauren manoogian capote coat socks -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Heidi Swanson, Jenna Kutcher, Alison Wu, and Melyssa Griffin are my current woman crushes. Photos by Beth Kirby. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes

January 4 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes Happy New Year, friends! We wanted to stop by with a round-up of 18 vegan and gluten-free New Year reset-friendly recipes that are vegetable-forward and deeply nourishing, but also satisfying and delicious. We’ve got you covered on healing soups and stews, vibrant mains, energy-boosting breakfasts and snacks, a powerful cold remedy drink, and even a minimally sweetened dessert that still very much tastes like a treat. Wishing you all the health and happiness in 2018 :) No-Recipe Healing Soup (v, gf) One of our most popular recipes of 2017. This is a highly customizable soup, built on a powerful broth made with immunity-friendly ingredients. It’s delicious and warming, but especially helpful to those under the weather or low on energy. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices (v, gf) A deeply nourishing and simple stew recipe, heavily influenced by South Indian cuisine, with a high potential for customization. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew (v, gf) The ultimate, cozy stew from our Fall Meal Plan, loaded with so many star ingredients of fall/­­winter fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. Check out the whole meal plan, too – it has all kinds of other great ideas for a new year reset menu for a whole week. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup (v, gf) A soup that’s both creamy and chunky, full of grounding, winter-appropriate ingredients. Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip (v, gf) Mango season is coming soon, and this curry is the perfect way to celebrate the sunny fruit’s arrival. Besides the mango, it’s loaded with all kinds of other nutritious, health-promoting produce like broccoli and fennel. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Mung Bean Falafel (v, gf) Mung beans make for a great alternative falafel base. They are incredibly nutritious and affordable, and their cooking time is a lot shorter than that of chickpeas. This falafel is very simple to prepare, and it makes for a perfect component to complete a bright and flavorful veggie bowl. Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas (v, gf) An incredibly savory, alternative polenta recipe made with millet instead of corn. Simple in looks, but surprisingly complex in flavor. Taco Collard Green Rolls (v, gf) All the flavors of a great veggie taco, contained in a collard green roll. A crowd-pleaser through and through. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans (v, gf) If you happen to have access to good zucchini this time of year, try out this light, plant-powered dish. One of my favorites to prepare when I’m feeling sluggish and non-vibrant. Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango (v, gf) Another great recipe for ushering in mango season. Cucumber noodles are a life-changing discovery, and the glazed tofu technique is our absolute favorite way to prepare tofu. Quick Marinated Beans (v, gf) A great thing to make on the weekend, to have in the fridge throughout the week. These marinated beans are able to transform any salad or bowl into a complete, satisfying meal. Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut (v, gf) Incorporating more fermented foods into your diet is always a great idea, especially during a new year reset. Gut health is everything! If you are up for a home fermentation project, consider making this colorful sauerkraut. Omit the blueberries if you can’t find any this time of year. Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways (v, gf) Taking a break from grains or bread? Sweet potato toast might be the perfect thing to curb any toast cravings or withdrawals you may be having. It’s also just a really delicious dish in its own right. Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl (v, gf) Raw beet, avocado, cranberries, camu camu: these are just some of the ingredients in this powerful, immunity-boosting bowl. Makes for a perfectly vibrant breakfast. Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways (v, gf) These are truly healthy pancakes, made with nutritious, protein-rich, gluten-free grains, and vibrant veggies. The blender technique makes them very easy to put together, too. Sweet and Savory Energy Bites (What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp) (v, gf) Having healthy snacks on hand is the key to success, in our opinion. These energy bites are one of our favorite things to make with leftover nut milk pulp, and they make healthy snacking easy and delicious. Almost Savory Raw Chocolate (v, gf) We know that a lot of people take a break from sugar after all that holiday indulgence. This chocolate recipe is a life-saver for any true chocoholics having a hard time with that idea (aka us). You can make it with zero sugar, but still feel like you’ve had your chocolate fix after having a square or two of this stuff. It’s gold! Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy (v, gf) If you or anyone around you is thinking of getting sick, MAKE THIS! It’s helped us and countless friends of ours fight off colds in their beginning stages. It’s also an invigorating and firey tonic, perfect for any bitter winter day. You might also like... Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Favorite New Year Reset Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes

January 1 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes Lauren Haynes is a folk herbalist, medicine maker, plant enthusiast, and the founder of Wooden Spoon Herbs, a small apothecary line based in the Appalachian mountains. Take a look at Lauren’s shop offerings, and you’ll be immersed in a world of plant-powered tinctures, salves, oxymels, and teas, each one more magical than the other. In this interview, Lauren tells us about self-care as a form of self-respect, kindness as a form of beauty, her favorite plants for stress, beauty, and colds (and more!), the importance of sourcing her ingredients locally and working with what’s available, as well as exercise, sustenance, inspiration, procrastination, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Oh, open and free, absolutely. Since I work from home, things end up being pretty routine: tea, emails, breakfast. But if I have my way I love to see how the day unfolds uninhibited. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Most mornings start with a hot tea or something creamy with raw milk and occasionally marshmallows. I check and return emails first thing, then Ill meditate and make some breakfast and get to work. On lazier mornings well go into the small town nearby and eat eggs benedict and read the paper. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My new favorite nighttime tool is the Flux app for my computer. It gradually turns your screen from blue light to orange with the arc of the day, so the blue light doesnt deter melatonin production come bedtime. Other than that, just reading a great book until my eyes get tired. Living out in the county where its dark and quiet helps me sleep soundly every night. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – smoked salmon omelette with sauteéd greens Lunch – egg salad sandwich with a bowl of good soup Snack – fruit or hummus or a little chocolate Dinner – soul food: pinto beans, cornbread, a baked sweet potato and collard greens, topped with hot sauce and ferments and a slice of blue cheese -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink tea most mornings. Sometimes matcha or Earl Grey, or sometimes just ginger and lemon balm, to ground and calm myself before a hectic day. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Um... yes, check. I have a major sweet tooth and Lilys stevia-sweetened chocolate bars save my life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Right now my regimen includes fish oil, Mothers Best beef liver pills, a tincture of medicinal mushrooms, and evening primrose oil. I also love using lymphatic herbs steeped in vinegar throughout the year. Every spring I steep whatever edible herbs are coming up naturally in raw apple cider vinegar: plantain, violet leaf, dead nettle, dandelion greens, chickweed and cleavers. That lasts me all year and keeps me feeling vital, just a spoonful a day. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I try to exercise but if I have a full schedule its the first thing I cut out. I live on a tract of wilderness, so walking a few miles a day is super easy and I do that interspersed with yoga when Im feeling too tired to get outside. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? A little bit of both! Its definitely hard to make the time for it since I work from home and just go, go, go. I definitely find walking in the woods pleasurable, so that keeps me motivated to exercise. I cant even imagine going to a gym... Maybe someday. Exercise is something Im starting to get excited about. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? True beauty is when someone makes you feel like your soul is illuminated by the way that they treat you. Thats what is beautiful to me. If I want external beauty, Ill just scroll Instagram for a bit, you know? But true kindness is actual beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Laidback is how I would describe my skincare routine. See also: erratic. I use a rosewater and witch hazel toner daily (Poppy & Someday), followed by a blend of rosehip and carrot seed oil (Zizia Botanicals). Sometimes I use a gentle rose quartz scrub on my face (Aquarian Soul), followed by oil cleansing, but usually Im pretty lowkey. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! Nettle and alfalfa infusions, and also evening primrose oil internally. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Drink tons of water, sleep as much as you can, and wear red lipstick. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Consistent routines are hard for me, but I am constantly checking in to make sure I dont get overwhelmed by stress, even if that means five minutes of yoga in the middle of the day. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I really love regular acupuncture treatments and massage, as well as daily meditation and moxibustion. Calming teas that ease tension, like ginger and chamomile. Also just goofing off as much as I can get away with. You cant be silly and stressed at the same time. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? My first line of defense is a few dropperfuls of fire cider. I make one called Sunshine Cider with turmeric and rosehips, but my friend Gretchen made me some with habanero peppers and that always helps me stay on the right side of health. Fire cider, a shot of elderberry syrup and then some red root tincture, an amazing lymphatic herb that relieves a sore throat. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely bleed together, as I work from home and run my business with my partner. I try to take the weekends off and get out of the house daily to break up the work mode, even if its just a drive to the post office. Luckily, I love my work because its a huge part of my life. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Honestly, mindfulness is key. Just checking in with myself constantly to see how Im feeling, why Im feeling that way and what I need. I just take little tea or chocolate breaks or go put some sun on my face or make a nourishing meal. A hot shower if Im feeling cold. Self massage if Im feeling anxious. Shutting the computer if Im getting tired. And making time for the little things that make me happy, like reading a book. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Cleaning up my diet was key for me in resolving a lot of health issues. In college I was just eating garbage and drinking alcohol and doing all the teenage things. Once I realized that youre literally what you eat, and started treating my body with respect, a lot shifted for me. I really feel like that small change helped align me with the path Im on now, which is 100% what Im supposed to be doing. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Im usually brimming with ideas and running myself ragged trying to make them all happen, so if I struggle with anything its occasional procrastination. Usually this looks like doing the easier things on my to-do list before the hard-hitting work chores, which isnt such a bad thing. I just kind of let myself have some slower times, because I work really hard. I may sip tea and pull tarot cards and then eventually get a burst of energy. Or sometimes I do nothing for like two full days. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So, so many. I love The Gift of Healing Herbs by Robin Rose Bennett and Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz, as well as so many books from the 70s by obscure hippies and natural living advocates. Living on the Earth by Alicia Bay Laurel, for example. Knowledge -- What was your path to studying herbology and founding Wooden Spoon Herbs? I came to herbs when looking for a path to self-sufficiency. I romanticized living off the land, providing all that I would need for myself through my connection to the earth. And thats basically how it happened. I got all the books I could find about herbalism, read them, and started making herbal remedies. I started selling them slowly and it just kind of took off. Then I got to put my business hat on and thats been such a rewarding challenge. -- Can you talk a little bit about your decision to work only with herbs native to your home region of Appalachia? Theres so much to say about this. When I started opening my eyes to the bounty that surrounded me, it struck me as absurd to order herbs from suppliers that sourced from the far corners of the earth, when we had so many of the same herbs that could be sourced from the bioregion of Appalachia. For example, why am I going to order nettle that comes from Croatia when my friend has an acre of it on her farm? And no offense to Croatia or the herbalists that use those sources, but it just wasnt for me. I saw the opportunity to create a righteous supply chain and source from local farmers and forage my materials. To this day I still source directly from small organic farms around the country. Appalachias medicinal herbs are legendary: ginseng, goldenseal, bloodroot. People from all over the world use these herbs exclusively. And many of the herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine grow in Appalachia, because when the continents were Pangea parts of what is now China and parts of Appalachia were the same land. The geography of these regions is still very similar, and that is really special. So I wanted to learn about these plants for myself, because they are my neighbors and we share the same space. Not to mention that my family has been on this land for at least five generations, probably more. Its my most recent ancestral tradition, and I think its really important to learn about the traditions of your own ancestors so that youre not co-opting someone elses. Our pasts are precious. Finally, I believe in slow, local medicine for the same reasons I believe in slow, local foods – because theyre more potent and they taste better. -- What are some of your best-selling products and what herbs is your customer most excited about at the moment? My bestsellers are the Anxiety Ally, Brain Tonic, Moontime Magic and Migraine Melter tinctures. Elderberry Sumac Syrup is always a hit, as well as the Golden Cocoa (adaptogenic golden milk meets hot chocolate). I also have some new, more esoteric offerings based on the elements, and the Spirit one has been selling really well. I think my customers are just always after herbs that ground and expand the spirit, which is super beautiful. That and herbs for stress, always. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment?  Podcasts! All the podcasts: Medicine Stories, Thats So Retrograde, So You Wanna Be A Witch, Being Boss. That and the color cobalt blue. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love seeking out hot springs, getting massages and acupuncture, going to the movies with my partner and eating at good restaurants. In the summer, swimming in the river behind my house and lying in the sun. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Caravan by Stephen Gaskin Song/­­Album – Tried So Hard by Gene Clark Piece of art – the entire Motherpeace tarot deck -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? My favorite mohair cardigan, a striped shirt, high-waisted leggings and denim, Poppy & Somedays Gypsy Rose Toner, whatever books Im reading, a notebook and Uniball pen, magazines, calming tinctures, bagged tea, thermos, Ricardo Medina botines, charcoal toothbrush -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jess Fuery, Beatrice Valenzuela, Shiva Rose, the founders of Cap Beauty, Ashley Neese, Connie Matisse of East Fork Pottery, jeweler Annika Kaplan, Erica Chidi Cohen, Rachel Craven, Beth Kirby of Local Milk, Rachel Budde of Fat and the Moon, Kristen Dilley of Nightingale Acupuncture, and, naturally, Ilana Glazer Photos by Beth Kirby and Lauren Haynes You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust

December 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Since this is our last recipe of 2017, we wanted to make sure that it’s a special one. It needed to check all the boxes we usually try to check with our recipes: nourishing, delicious, seasonal, beautiful, convenient, and a little bit unexpected. This veggie and lentil-centered one pan pie is all of those things. It’s very cozy and fun to prepare, too. If I had a choice, most of my savory dishes would be one-pan dishes :) Convenience is hard to beat. That little bit of initial effort you put into assembling all the ingredients for a single-pan dish pays off incredibly well when you end up with a big meal, plus a ton of leftovers for the week, having only used one pan or pot in the process. This one-pan dish is something like a vegetable pot pie, but the crust is made up of thinly mandolined winter roots – potatoes, sweet potatoes, and celery root. The filling is shredded Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and red lentils (you can add barley, too, for a grain component) that cooks in a mixture of healing spices and coconut milk. The whole thing is packed with a great variety of plants. It’s perfect for those looking to up their intake of vegetables after the holidays, but still wanting to keep their cooking hearty and cozy. The ingredient that takes this dish into the complete meal category are the red lentils. Vegetable dishes are great on their own, but adding any kind of pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas, dry peas) to your plant-centric meals will up their nutrition and ability to satisfy quite a bit. Pulses are incredibly nutrient-dense, like superfoods, but they are also very affordable, unlike most other superfoods, so it’s a win-win all around. Try adding about a half a cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – your cooking will greatly benefit from them, and you’ll be on your way to discovering a whole new world of deliciousness (of you haven’t already, of course). Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Happy New Year! Thank you so much for visiting GK, trying out our recipes, and reading up on the self-care series. It all means so much to us .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Moon Milk & 2018 Moon Phase Calendar Giveaway

December 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Moon Milk & 2018 Moon Phase Calendar Giveaway Hey friends, we made a 2018 lunar phase calendar that’s as much an art print as it is a calendar (it’s for sale here!), and we are giving away three of them in this post. Read on for giveaway details. We’ve always had a fascination with the cosmos, especially the moon, and over the years we’ve learned to notice how it influences our mind (it really does!). When I was a little girl, I often had a hard time sleeping during the full moon, though I was otherwise a great sleeper. I would feel awake and hyper, with my mind going into overdrive with endless thoughts and ideas. This is when my grandma would make me valerian tea, and I sipped on it until I could finally fall asleep. Nowadays, instead of the valerian, I drink something by the magical name of moon milk to chill out during the full moon, and that recipe is below. The more I study the moon, the less I’m surprised by the fact that the full moon has the tendency to disrupt my sleep. The moon has a profound effect on the Earth. We all know that it creates tides, but it also affects the speed at which the Earth spins around its axis, impacts the growth of seeds and plants, influences the behavior of animals, and some even theorize that life on earth would appear at a later time without the moon’s gravity. It’s a powerful energy that has an effect on us all. The next time you have a chance to look at the night sky, take a minute to notice the moon and what it looks like. You may learn something about the state of your own mindset. New Moon energy generally signifies new beginnings, and it’s a good time to go inward and find clarity. Meanwhile, the Full Moon often delivers heightened creative energy and intensified emotions. The phases in between the New and Full moons have their own characteristics as well. It’s all endlessly fascinating. Whether you are in the know about all the moon happenings or not, we think you will love our moon phase calendar. The calendars come in two colors, and each one is 18″ x 24″ in size. They are printed by hand at Sawtooth Editions in Providence, RI on 320 gsm Coventry Rag paper, which is the cr?me de la cr?me of fine art paper. The calendar indicates every full and new moon in 2018, as well as all the phases in between. We poured our hearts into the design, and tried to make a really cool object that also happens to be useful, and will look great on any wall. It would make for a very nice New Year gift :) 2018 is a really special year in terms of moon events, too. The year will start off with a Supermoon at the beginning of January, followed by another Supermoon at the end of the same month. Both January and March will have two full moons. The second full moon in a month is called a Blue Moon, and it’s an incredibly rare event, as the name suggests. On January 31st, there will be a Full Lunar Eclipse, as well as a Supermoon that’s also a Blue Moon (!). Because we have two Blue Moons in January and March, February will be without a full moon, an occurrence sometimes called the Black Moon. Another Full Lunar Eclipse will then occur at the end of July. Now on to the moon milk! The main goal of this drink is to calm and soothe, and you can drink it before bed on any day, it doesn’t just have to be during the Full Moon. I often change up the ingredients depending on how I feel, and my moon milk is not always pink (sometimes it’s yellow, other times it’s white), but there are a few ingredients that remain constant. Let’s break those down: nutmeg is a natural sleep aid, ashwagandha is an adaptogen proven to help deal with stress, cardamom and ginger are great for digestion, ghee/­­coconut oil are full of healthy fats. That whole cocktail will tuck you into bed relaxed and supported. Beet powder, though optional, is a superfood in its own right, full of antioxidants and more, but if you don’t have beet powder, try adding the same amount of ground turmeric to your moon milk. You’ll color your drink a beautiful golden color and get all of turmeric’s anti-inflammatory benefits. G I V E A W A Y: We are giving away 3 lunar phase calendars to our readers worldwide. The winners will get to choose the color of the calendar they’ll receive. To enter the giveaway, leave a comment here telling us about your favorite sleep aid drink, or how the moon affects you personally, until January 1st, 2018. Moon Milk   Print Serves: 1 Ingredients your favorite cups worth of plant milk 3-4 cardamom pods - outer green shells removed ¼ teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon ground ginger ½ teaspoon ashwagandha ¼ teaspoon nutmeg 1 teaspoon ghee or coconut oil ¼ teaspoon beet powder or turmeric Instructions Warm up the plant milk in a small saucepan over medium high heat until hot but not boiling. Pour the hot plant milk into a high-speed blender. Add the rest of the ingredients to the blender, and blend on high speed until smooth and frothy. Enjoy right away. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Almond Milk and Almond Pulp Cookies Quick Persimmon Eggnog Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Strawberry Cardamom Milk .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Moon Milk & 2018 Moon Phase Calendar Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Gluten free Christmas Cake – Fruit Cake

December 18 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Gluten free Christmas Cake – Fruit CakeVegan Gluten free Christmas Cake Fruit Cake full of nuts, dried fruits, candied ginger. Soft, Flavorful and great for gifting. Vegan Soyfree Recipe.  I am not sure why fruit cakes have a bad rap. They used to be a treat we would wait for around Christmas. Soft, Sweet, full of fun stuff for us kids I guess. Maybe we just lucked out with a fabulous bakery. I make versions of my Spelt spiced fruit cake if not baking a load of cookies every year. This version is adapted from spelt flour version. I use almond flour and rice flour to keep it gluten-free. The cake keeps well refrigerated for a few weeks if you use liquor or a week with orange juice. Serve as is or with a bourbon/­­rum glaze! Add nuts or seeds that you like, some dates, apricots, cherries. I also added some roasted sunflower seeds and chia seeds, so the cake is also great to snack on. Continue reading: Vegan Gluten free Christmas Cake – Fruit CakeThe post Vegan Gluten free Christmas Cake – Fruit Cake appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Gingerbread Biscotti (Vegan & Gluten-Free)

December 6 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Here’s a treat from Something Vegan that will really get you in the holiday spirit — gingerbread biscotti! This crunchy, sweet snack goes perfectly with a nice mug of hot cocoa or coffee. It’s also an easy food to send as a gift to someone you love! We love that Something Vegan not only made this vegan, but also gluten-free. This recipe is a definite crowd pleaser! Check out the video below to see how to make your very own gingerbread biscotti: Read the full recipe in the video description here. The post Gingerbread Biscotti (Vegan & Gluten-Free) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

7 recipes for Vegan Gingerbread Cookies for the Holidays

November 28 2017 VegKitchen 

7 recipes for Vegan Gingerbread Cookies for the Holidays This article takes a look at recipes for vegan gingerbread cookies in an attempt to help you find the perfect one for your holiday celebrations. The post 7 recipes for Vegan Gingerbread Cookies for the Holidays appeared first on VegKitchen.

Green Peanut Butter Sandwich + Smoothie

November 21 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Peanut Butter Sandwich + Smoothie Hey! First of all, thanks for all your cheering words on the news of our marriage. That was fun! Secondly, I promised a lot of persons on instagram that we would share a chocolate recipe which currently goes by the working name Taco Brownies. But all the interest in them made me a little anxious so I’m heading back into the kitchen today to test another round before we’re ready to post them. Here is something to snack on while you wait. A peanut butter sandwich and a green smoothie. Technically, a sandwich hardly qualifies as a recipe. But what we want to say with this point is really just that you should try peanut butter on a savory sandwich. I love all kind of nut butter sandwiches and even if I usually top it with sliced bananas, apples, strawberries or a sweet compote, this savory version is my most recent addiction. Crispy lettuce and cucumber add a nice textural contrast to the sandwich without competing with the peanut butter flavor. The cottage cheese makes it moist and yummy and the chickpeas ... well I don’t know why the chickpeas are there actually. I guess I just like chickpeas inside my sandwiches. This sandwich is yummy, sticky, crunchy, rich and yet fresh somehow. We usually make it with a good quality rye bread but anything goes. I just realized that this is a green sandwich without avocado so we should perhaps call it “the-death-of-avocado-sandwich-sandwich” or something catchy like that. Anyway, it’s good. And it’s not impossible that you already have the ingredients at home. So, try it! For the other recipe, I’ll let Luise do the talking. It was her idea to pair the sandwich with a smoothie and since she is queen Latifah of green smoothies I am sure she has something clever to say. /­­David Here’s something clever for you. Make this smoothie. It’s that good. It has lots of green vegetables and a mild and fresh taste with tones of lemon and ginger. Just the way I like it. Also, using frozen vegetables makes the smoothie creamy and more nutritious and you can skip the ice. It also works really well paired with a sandwich as well because (most of) you have two hands and now you can have a good snack in each hand. We actually wrote a “In The Other Hand” chapter for our smoothie book with lots of great snacks, but we couldn’t fit it in the book. Lots of love! /­­Luise Green Peanut Butter Sandwich Makes 2  Just one note on peanut butter. Read the ingredient list in the supermarket and go for the brands that only list peanuts (and maybe salt). You can of course use other types of nut butters as well, I’d especially recommend cashew butter for this, but it’s usually a lot pricier. 4 slices rye bread 4 tbsp peanut butter a few leaves crispy lettuce 5 cm /­­ 2 inches cucumber 4 tbsp cottage cheese 4 tbsp chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans 2 tsp olive oil  pea shoots thyme Spread peanut butter on each bread slice. Rinse the lettuce and cucumber. Tear the lettuce into smaller pieces, slice the cucumber thinly and place both on top of each peanut butter sandwich. Top with cottage cheese, chickpeas, a drizzle of olive oil, pea shoots and thyme. Put the sandwich together, wrap with sandwich paper and dig in. Broccoli & Ginger Smoothie 2 normal glasses or 1 very large If you don’t have a super powerful blender, start by mixing all ingredients except broccoli and banana (because they are thicker and will slow down the blender blades). When mixed until smooth, add the last ingredients and mix again. If you like it a little sweeter, you can add a fresh date or more banana. 4-5 florets frozen broccoli (or frozen cauliflower) 1 large banana 1 large handful fresh spinach 1 large handful fresh kale 1 large knob fresh ginger 1 slice lemon, peeled 1-2 cups plant milk, (oat milk /­­ rice milk /­­ almond milk) Add all ingredients to a high speed blender and mix until smooth. Taste and adjust the flavor and consistency if needed. Pour into two glasses or bottles.

Olive Oil Loaf with Hibiscus Beet Icing

November 9 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Olive Oil Loaf with Hibiscus Beet Icing Checking in really quickly with this olive oil loaf that we haven’t been able to get out of our heads. We knew that we wanted it to be vegan and naturally sweetened, with a pink, plant-based icing, but the rest took a bit of debate. Should it be gluten-free or not? Should we aim to make it golden yellow like traditional olive oil cake? We finally decided on a simple, spelt version (maybe we’ll tackle a gf one later?), sweetened with coconut sugar, and thus darker in color than your average olive oil batter. It is still moist and hearty, and the icing is so easy and very special :) I love baking with spelt flour, especially sprouted spelt, which I used quite a bit for the baked goods in our new cookbook. The batter here is very simple, and yields a nice, crumbly yet moist dough, perfect for baking projects like this one. I would usually use coconut oil in this batter, but decided to go the traditional route and use olive oil. I love the subtle, earthy flavor that it brings to this loaf. I discovered that coconut butter makes an excellent base for vegan icing back in my raw food days. It melts well, but maintains shape, which makes it easy to work with. I love hibiscus tea for its color, pleasant, sour flavor, and myriad of health benefits. We used it here to offset the sweetness of the icing with some sour notes, as well as to color it pink. The beet came in because we wanted the icing a bit more electric in color, since hibiscus only colors the icing a dirty pink (which is pretty in its own way). You can completely omit the beet here, or use a fresh beet if you don’t have beet powder. Just grate about a half of a small beet and squeeze it through a cheesecloth to extract some juice. Then add the juice to the icing little by little until you have the color you like. Hope you’ll give this one a try! Olive Oil Loaf with Hibiscus Beet Icing   Print Serves: one 8½ loaf Ingredients for the olive oil loaf coconut oil for oiling the loaf pan 1½ cups (150 g) sprouted spelt flour or whole spelt flour 1/­­3 cup coconut sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda pinch of sea salt 5-7 cardamom pods - green shells removed, ground (optional) 1 teaspoon ground ginger (optional) 1 cup warm water or strong hibiscus tea 1/­­3 cup olive oil 1/­­2 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice or apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract for the hibiscus beet icing ¼ cup raw coconut butter (not oil) ¼ cup strong hibiscus tea ½ teaspoon beet powder (for color, optional) 2 tablespoons maple syrup a splash of vanilla extract Instructions to make the olive oil loaf Preheat oven to 350° F (180° F). Thoroughly oil an 8½ loaf pan with coconut oil and line the wide side with parchment paper. In a bowl, combine the flour, coconut sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cardamom and ginger, if using. Mix well with a fork. Add the warm water, olive oil, lemon juice/­­acv, and vanilla extract. Mix to combine and pour the batter into the loaf pan. Carefully lift and drop the pan a couple of times to eliminate air bubbles. Bake for 50-55 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool before icing. to make the hibiscus beet icing While the the loaf is baking, combine all the glaze ingredients in a small saucepan over low heat. Whisk until the coconut butter is melted, and the icing is smooth and creamy. Remove from heat and allow to cool, until thickened to an icing consistency. You can refrigerate the icing to speed up the thickening process, but be very mindful, as it might turn too thick very quickly when refrigerated. Once the icing has cooled to a good consistency, glaze the loaf, allowing some of the icing to drip down the sides. You might have a little bit of left-over icing - spread that on top of your loaf slices and enjoy :) 3.5.3226 You might also like... Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated Beans Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Root Vegetabe Chickpea Flour Quiche .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Olive Oil Loaf with Hibiscus Beet Icing appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chilli Paneer (Indo-Chinese Dish)

November 3 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Chilli Paneer Chilli Paneer is a popular Indo-Chinese dish. Chilli Paneer makes a spicy flavorful starter especially for many of my friends who enjoy the spicy food. Chilli Paneer can also be served as a side dish. This is absolutely delicious and easy to make. - 6 oz paneer (cut into bite sized pieces) - 1 cup bell pepper (sliced, capsicum, Shimla mirch, I am using yellow and green bell pepper for color) For Batter - 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour (plain flour, maida) - 2 Tbsp corn starch or arrow root powder - 1/­­2 tsp salt For Sauce - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1 Tbsp ginger (shredded, adrak) - 1 Tbsp green chili (chopped) - 1 tsp chili flakes - 2 Tbsp soy sauce - 1 Tbsp vinegar - 1 Tbsp tomato paste - 1-1/­­2 tsp corn starch or arrow root powder - 1/­­2 cup water -  I am using store bought paneer, texture is not very soft to give the paneer softer texture soak the paneer for at least 10 minutes in hot water with few drops of lemon juice. -  To make batter mix flour, corn starch, and salt in a bowl. Add the water slowly to make a smooth batter (batter should be consistency of pancake batter or dosa batter). -  Heat at least 1/­­2 inch of oil in a frying pan over medium high heat. Oil should be moderately hot. -  Dip the paneer into the batter, making sure it is completely covered by the batter. Then drop the paneer pieces slowly into oil in the frying pan. (do not overlap them) -  Fry the paneer in small batches. Fry them turning occasionally, until they are very light golden brown. Take them out over paper towel. -  Do same with bell pepper. -  For sauce heat the oil in sauce pan over medium heat; add ginger, and green chili stir for about one minutes. Add all the ingredients for sauce except corn starch, (soy sauce, vinegar, chili flakes, and tomato paste), Stir for 1 minutes. mix water and corn starch and add to the sauce. Cook for another two minutes, sauce should be thick consistency. Sauce gets thicker as it sits. -  Add paneer, and bell pepper into sauce and serve hot. The post Chilli Paneer (Indo-Chinese Dish) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1

November 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 This summer, we set out to share one practical, budget-friendly, and non-boring plant-based meal plan per season. Here is our meal plan for the Fall of 2017! We are really excited about the recipes in this one. It all starts out with cooking a pot of lentils and a pot of rice, roasting some winter squash, and prepping some kale. Those foundations then make their way into breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes that will take you through a whole week of nourishing and cozy fall meals. As usual, we are splitting this meal plan into two parts. This first part will focus on weekend prep, as well as breakfast and lunch recipes. Part 2 is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert recipes. Here we go! Menu (see Part 2 for dinner and dessert recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 large and 1 medium butternut squashes - 2 medium delicata squashes - 1 lb Brussels sprouts - 2 bunches kale (or 1 very large bunch) - 4 cups baby spinach - 1 jalape?o pepper - 1 lb crimini mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 3 large yellow onions - 2 heads of garlic Fruits - 2-3 green apples - 1 lemon - 1-2 limes (if using in place of brown rice vinegar for the marinated delicata) - 8 ripe plums Herbs  - rosemary - sage - green onions (optional) - thyme (optional) Other - 3 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice - 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 28 oz can or box crushed tomatoes - 1 cup brown rice flour or other gluten free flour - sesame tahini - white sweet miso - burger fixings like buns, lettuce, or anything else you like w/­­ your veggie burgers - vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt to serve with the roasted plums (optional) - crackers to snack on with the hummus or sourdough bread to eat with the hummus, soup or stew (optional) Bulk - 2 1/­­4 cups dried green lentils - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 1/­­2 cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for the grain bowl) - 1 cup other grain of choice for the grain bowl, or 1/­­2 more cup of brown rice - 5-7 Medjool dates - 2 cups pumpkin seeds – toasted - unsweetened coconut flakes (optional) - cacao nibs (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - neutral coconut oil - apple cider vinegar - brown rice vinegar (if not using limes for delicata marinade) - balsamic vinegar (optional) - tamari - olive oil - toasted sesame oil - tomato paste - coconut sugar - sea salt - maple syrup or honey - sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice - baking soda - baking powder Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - green cardamom pods - smoked paprika - black peppercorns - turmeric - red pepper flakes - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking grains and lentils helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the grains and lentils more nutritious. - Soak 3/­­4 cup of dried millet overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 2 1/­­4 cups of lentils overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups of brown rice (2 cups if you are using it for the grain bowl) overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - If not using brown rice for the grain bowl, soak 1 cup of another grain of choice for the grain bowl in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners for the coming week. - Roast the butternut and delicata squashes to be used in Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. - Cook the lentils to be used in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. - Cook the brown rice to use in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl, if that’s your grain of choice for the bowl. - If you chose another grain for the grain bowl, cook it now as well. - Cook the kale and coconut kale to be used in the Grain Bowl and Veggie Burgers. - Make the Lentil and Squash Hummus to be used in the Grain Bowl, on the Veggie Burgers, and on crackers/­­bread as a snack throughout the week. - Marinate the roasted delicata squash to use in the Grain Bowl. - Make the Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup. - Bake the Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins. - You can also cook the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash for your breakfasts ahead of time, but I suggest making it in the morning. It’s pretty quick. Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the Veggie Burgers, Brussels Sprout Stew and the Roasted Plums are in Part 2.  - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. The recipe for the stew is in Part 2.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Prep 1. Winter squash is a beautifully versatile vegetable that can be used in millions of ways in both sweet and savory dishes. It’s always a great idea to roast a bunch of squash on the weekend, to use in all kinds of dishes throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use Butternut and Delicata Squashes in the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. See what I mean? It really is a super-vegetable. Roasted Butternut and Delicata Squashes   Print Ingredients 1 large and 1 medium butternut squash - cut in half lengthwise and seeded 2 medium delicata squashes - seeded and sliced into ½-inch rings neutral coconut oil - soft sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2-3 parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Arrange all the squashes on the baking sheets in a single layer. Oil them with the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and paper. Roast the delicata squash for 10 minutes, then flip all the rings and roast for another 15-20 minutes, until cooked through and golden on both sides. Delicata squash skins are edible, so no need to peel off the skin. Roast the butternut squashes at the same time, for about 40 minutes or until soft throughout. You should end up with about 3 cups of roasted mashed squash flesh from the large butternut squash, which you will use for the hummus, muffins, porridge and burgers. The remaining 1 medium butternut squash will be used for the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of lentils, cooked on the weekend, can easily take you through a week of meals. They are nourishing, affordable, and can work as a base for so many meals. In this meal plan, we use French lentils in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. Pot of Lentils   Print Ingredients 2¼ cups dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Place them into a medium-large pot, cover with purified water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 15-20 minutes, or until soft, but still intact. Add salt at the last 5 minutes. Drain and use in recipes right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   3. Similarly to lentils, a pot of rice or any other grains, prepared on the weekend, can help you pave the way to quicker and better meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use brown rice in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl (if that’s the grain you chose for your bowl). Serve any leftover rice with the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. If you chose a different grain for your grain bowl, cook it now as well. Pot of Brown Rice   Print Ingredients 1½ cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for your grain bowl) - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2½ cups filtered water (3½ cups if cooking 2 cups of rice) sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the rice. Combine it with the water and plenty of sea salt in a medium pot, cover with a lid and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 25-40 minutes, until all the water is absorbed and the rice is cooked. Use in recipes right away or store refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   4. Blanching kale is one of my favorite, low maintenance ways of prepping a whole bunch of it for the week. In this meal plan, it will be used for the Coconut Kale and the Veggie Burgers. I also like to use the leftover kale cooking water for soups, stews, etc. In this meal plan, you can use the leftover kale broth for the Coconut Kale, the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew and even the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. Half of this blanched kale gets stored away for later use in the Veggie Burgers, while the other half becomes the Coconut Kale for our grain bowl lunch. You’re going to love the coconut kale – it’s velvety, creamy, and keeps well throughout the week. Blanched Kale and Coconut Kale   Print Ingredients 2 bunches (or 1 very large bunch) kale of choice sea salt 1 can unsweetened Thai coconut milk Instructions Separate the kale leaves from the stems. Wash and tear the leaves into roughly bite-sized pieces. Reserve the stems to use in homemade vegetable broth in the future, if desired. Place the torn kale leaves in a large pot and cover with purified water. Add salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Drain the kale, reserving the cooking liquid for the Coconut Kale and the Brussels Sprouts Tomato Stew. Return half of the kale to the same pot. Squeeze the other half of the kale dry and store it away in an air-tight container, in the refrigerator, to use later in the veggie burgers. Add ½ cup of the reserved kale cooking liquid and 1 can of coconut milk to the pot. Bring to a strong simmer and cook for 10-20 minutes, until creamy. Add more of the kale cooking liquid throughout the cooking time, if needed. Taste for salt and adjust, if needed. Eat right away or store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   5. The good news is, you already have all the important ingredients prepared for this hummus – you’ve cooked the lentils and roasted the squash, which you’re going to puree with autumn herbs, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and olive oil. Though for efficiency’s sake, we use lentils instead of the traditional chickpeas here, the spread still very much tastes like hummus. And not just any hummus – it’s fresh, savory, earthy hummus that’s better than anything you can get at the store. Use it throughout the week in the Grain Bowl, on top of the Veggie Burgers, or as a quick snack with some crackers. Lentil and Squash Hummus   Print Ingredients ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 4-5 cloves of garlic - peeled and sliced 1-2 tablespoons chopped herbs, such as rosemary, sage and thyme 1 cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1½ cups cooked green lentils (from above) juice from 1 lemon ¼ cup sesame tahini 3-4 tablespoons cold water toasted pumpkin seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Add garlic and herbs and sauté for about a minute, until garlic is fragrant and cooked, but not burnt. Add the squash, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Stir around for a minute or so for the flavors to mix. Add the mixture to a food processor or a high-speed blender like a Vitamix. Add the lentils to the food processor/­­blender, followed by the lemon juice, sesame tahini, and more salt, to taste. Process until smooth, scraping the walls if needed. With the motor still running, pour in ¼ cup of the olive oil through the funnel, followed by the cold water. Pour in the water 1 tablespoon at a time until you achieve a desired, creamy consistency. Sprinkle the hummus with the toasted pumpkin seeds when serving, if using. Store the hummus in the refrigerator in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   6. Marinating vegetables is one of my favorite preparations, especially if I’m cooking ahead. It’s as easy as mixing up a marinade, and the veggies will only get more flavorful with each passing day. This miso-marinated delicata squash has got it all – it’s a little sweet, a little savory, and a bit spicy. It’s the perfect, powerful component to a memorable grain bowl, which is how it’s utilized in this meal plan. If you are planning on eating this squash at work/­­social settings, you might need to be cautious with the garlic – the squash is still really good without it! Miso-Marinated Delicata Squash   Print Ingredients 2 sliced and roasted delicata squashes (from above) 2 tablespoons white sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey (not vegan) 2 teaspoons chili sauce, such as sriracha 4 tablespoons brown rice vinegar or lime juice 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons sesame oil 1 garlic clove - minced (optional) 1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion (optional) Instructions Place the sliced and roasted delicata squash in a shallow dish. In a small bowl, combine the miso with the maple syrup and sriracha, and mix until smooth. Add the rice vinegar/­­lime juice, tamari, and sesame oil, and mix until smooth. Mix in the sesame seeds, garlic and green onion, if using. Pour the marinade over the delicata squash and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes 1. These gluten-free muffins make for a great breakfast or snack. They are very subtly sweet – sweetened only with dates – and get their soft, crumbly texture from the roasted squash that’s hiding in the batter. There are pockets of cubed apple throughout, and the pumpkin seeds on top add a nice bit of crunch. Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins   Print Serves: 10 medium-sized or 12 small muffins Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan ¾ cup brown rice flour or other gluten-free flour pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda 5-7 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes ½ cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1-2 Granny Smith apples - peeled and finely cubed (optionally slice some of the apple to decorate the tops of muffins) 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves (optional) pumpkin seeds - for sprinkling Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a muffin pan by thoroughly oiling the holes or lining it with paper muffin liners. Combine the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda in a medium bowl. Put the dates in an upright blender, together with their soaking water. Add the squash and blend until smooth. Add the coconut oil and vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and quickly stir to mix. Fold in cubed apples and sage, if using. Fill the muffin holes with the batter until each hole is about ⅔ full. Sprinkle each muffin with pumpkin seeds and decorate with apple slices, if using. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool a little, then remove the muffins from the pan and let them cool on a cooling rack. Enjoy right away or store in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   2. This millet porridge is warming, cozy, satisfying, and overall perfect for chilly fall mornings. Millet is a humble and affordable gluten-free grain, but it has the potential to be quite creamy and luxurious when cooked in plant milk with turmeric and squash. The porridge is pictured here topped with some of the roasted plums from Part 2 of this meal plan, which makes it even more special. Turmeric Millet Porridge   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons coconut oil or ghee (not vegan) 1 teaspoon turmeric a few grinds of black pepper (to activate the turmeric) ¾ cup millet - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 1½ tablespoons coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 4 cups almond milk or other plant milk (or 3 cups milk and 1 cup water) - divided 1 cup roasted butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the turmeric and black pepper, and stir around for about a minute. Add the millet, coconut sugar, salt and 3 cups of plant milk (or 2 cups of milk and 1 cup of water). Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent the porridge from sticking to the bottom. In the meantime, blend the squash and the remaining 1 cup of plant milk in a high-speed blender. Mix the blended mixture into the porridge after the 20 minutes of cooking and stir to combine. Simmer everything for another couple of minutes. (Alternatively, skip blending the squash and the remaining plant milk in a blender and add both the squash and the rest of the milk to the porridge, stirring to warm everything through. This will result in a less smooth porridge with some pockets of squash, which I like as a nice change from a smooth porridge). Serve the porridge topped with toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes, if desired. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. Reheat gently over medium low heat with more ghee/­­coconut oil and a splash of plant milk or water. 3.5.3226   3. This grain bowl will come together very quickly during a weekday lunch, since you’ve already gotten all the components ready during prep day. As an alternative to the bowl, you can spread the hummus on some sourdough bread and top that with the squash for an open-faced sandwich, with the coconut kale on the side. Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Grain Bowl   Print Ingredients cooked brown rice or another grain of choice (from above) coconut kale (from above) miso-marinated delicata squash (from above) lentil and squash hummus (from above) toasted pumpkin seeds Instructions Heat up the rice and coconut kale in a pan or saucepan with a bit of oil or water. You can also gently heat the miso-marinated squash, but be careful not to heat it too much because of the miso. Serve all the components together in a bowl, sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds. 3.5.3226   4. Our second lunch option is a very lovely and very simple pureed fall soup, with flavors of butternut squash, green apple, and autumn herbs. Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 green apple - peeled, cored and chopped 2 garlic cloves - sliced 1 teaspoon coriander seeds - preferably freshly ground about 1 tablespoon chopped sage and rosemary sea salt freshly ground black pepper flesh from 1 medium roasted butternut squash (from above) Instructions Warm the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, apple, garlic, coriander and herbs, if using, and sauté everything for 10 minutes. Scoop the flesh out of the roasted squash and add it to the saucepan, followed by the sea salt, pepper and 3 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes, until all the flavors are combined well. Carefully blend everything in an upright blender until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 Continue to Dinner and Dessert Recipes > > >  You might also like... Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots... Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Grandma’s Danish Apple Cake

October 26 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Grandma’s Danish Apple Cake I know what you are thinking. Where is the cake and what is that red sauce? In most other countries this would be called a trifle or a parfait, but in Denmark we call this an old-fashioned apple cake (although our version is modernized). I have the fondest memories leaning over a huge bowl of Gammeldags aeblekage at my grandmother’s kitchen table. It’s made of smooth apple sauce (our version is red) topped with crushed cookie crumbles and whipped cream and it was my favorite dessert in the world. Me and my twin brother spent every other weekend and school holiday at my grandmother’s house. She was the warmest and calmest person we knew, always smiling. My memories are fading but whenever I think of her I can smell the cigarillos she loved to smoke and the hair spray she always wore. And I remember her huge black & white marble coffee table that we often sat around and her warm hugs. She had a big house and rented out one room in the basement, one on the top floor and one in the garden to various tenants. On weekends she baked for everyone in the house. Large batches of spiced pound cake, chocolate cake or her famous (in my world) old-fashioned apple cake. I never thought of it back then but - damn! - she must have been the best landlord. When my twin brother and I were 10 years old she sadly passed away, two days after Christmas, and she left a big hole of emptiness in me. I have been thinking about her so much lately as I have been making this recipe for our kids and telling them stories about her. So this cake and this video is for you grandma. /­­Luise We have actually changed quite a few things from my grandmother’s recipe. We ditched the sugar in the apple sauce (because it’s really not needed if you use sweet apples), replaced cookie crumble with a simple nut and date crumble and used whipped coconut cream on top to make it vegan. But it still tastes a lot like the ones she made. And the texture is ace! It’s sweet and tangy and soft and rich and crunchy. And it’s pretty easy to make as well. 1) Cook apple sauce (or use readymade). 2) Chop toasted nuts and mix with sticky dates. 3) Whip cream. 4) Layer. 5) Dive in. While testing the first version of the recipe, David’s main concern was that it didn’t look pretty enough (typically him). I peeled the apples and didn’t blend the sauce so it did look rather yellow/­­brownish. But he figured out that by using the most deep red apples we could find, kept the peel on, cooked on low heat and then blended the sauce, it got a beautiful pink/­­red color. I’ve never seen an apple sauce looking radiant like that before. Make sure to cook a double batch of the sauce. It’s crazy good on top of yogurt and porridge bowls. We are definitely not experts on whipped coconut cream. We have failed at making it numerous times as different brands behave differently and some simply don’t work at all. Key is keeping it chilled to get the cream to separate from the liquid and the chilling is also essential when whipping. Usually, the cream solidifies so you scoop it out with a spoon, but when making the video above, we used a brand that separated without solidifying so we could simply pour the cream into the bowl while the rest of the liquid stayed at the bottom of the can. If you want to learn more about Whipped Coconut Cream (and which US brands that work best), go read Ashlae’s post on Coconut Whipped Cream. I should also mention that if you are not vegan or too fond of coconut cream, regular whipped cream is just as delicious. Grandma’s Danish Apple Cake Serves 4 If you cant find red apples like ours, you can add a little pomegranate juice or grated beetroot to the apple sauce while mixing to make it more red. Red Apple Sauce 1 kg /­­ 2 lb red apples (use local produce if available) 250 ml /­­ 1 cup water 1 tbsp fresh ginger, grated 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla powder 1 tsp ground cinnamon (or cardamom) 1 tbsp lemon juice Date & Nut Crumble 180 g /­­ 1 cup almonds 100 g /­­ 1 cup walnuts 8 dates Whipped Coconut Cream (or regular cream) 1 can coconut milk, placed in the fridge for a few hours (or coconut cream or heavy cream) Rinse the apples and chop them in bite size pieces, discarding the core. Place in a large sauce pan along with water, fresh ginger, vanilla powder and cinnamon. Let simmer on low heat for approx 20 minutes or until soft. Meanwhile, place the nuts on a tray and roast at 150°C /­­ 300°F for approx 15 minutes. Remove the stone from the dates and use a knife to chop them or a fork to mash them. Chop the nuts medium fine, reserve a handful a nuts for topping and mix the rest with the date paste into a crumble. Set aside. When the apples are done, use a hand (immersion) blender to mix into a smooth apple sauce. Stir lemon juice into the sauce,  leave to cool or scoop into a large jar and place in the fridge. Scoop out the solid cream from 1 can of chilled coconut milk. Use a hand mixer to whip the coconut cream until it’s fluffy and forms soft peaks. If it feels too runny, place the bowl in the freezer for 10-15 minutes and then try whipping again. If you like it sweetened, you can fold in some maple syrup or vanilla into the cream after it is whipped. If using regular cream, simply whip it until soft peaks form. Place apple sauce as bottom layer in 4 glasses or jars (or use 1 big glass bowl). Top evenly with nut and date crumble and then scoop over whipped cream. Sprinkle chopped nuts on top. Enjoy! They sit quite well in the fridge so they can be prepared a few hours ahead. PS! Yesterday also happened to be Noah’s first birthday! Happy day little man! David usually post a little letter to the kids here on their first birthday but he’s been a little busy lately but promises that he will write it in a later post. Oh, one more thing! The Dutch edition of Green Kitchen At Home has been nominated for Cookbook of the Year in Holland. There are two awards, one is decided by a jury and the other is people’s choice. We’d be super happy if our Dutch readers (or anyone) would like to vote for us. It only takes 30 seconds. Here is the link!

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte

October 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte This happens to me pretty much every day at around 3 o’clock, providing that I’m working from home. I get up from my desk, put on the teapot, throw a bunch of things in the blender, whirl it all together, and end up with a cozy and satisfying latte-ish drink that gets me through to dinner time. I don’t drink caffeine anymore, because I’ve always been very sensitive to it, and found that avoiding it altogether really helps with even energy levels (I may have made a few exceptions in Italy :)). But this little ritual takes me back to the days when 3 o’clock meant a cup of really good tea or a matcha. There’s really nothing better. I end up making a different drink every time, based on my mood and the ingredients I have on hand, but the general formula is the same. There’s always something for creaminess, something for flavor, something for an energy boost… So I thought I’d give a ‘no-recipe’ recipe here, as well as a few of my favorite combinations. Midday super-latte making is a really fun routine to add to your day if you’re around a blender, and it’s good for your in a number of ways: it gets you out of the busyness of the day and nudges you to take a break, it’s creative, and the beverage you’ll end up with will likely be good-for-you, warming and tasty. Tahini Hot Chocolate This was one of our most popular recipes last winter. It’s an incredibly satisfying blender hot chocolate that comes together in seconds. Rosemary Hot White Chocolate Another hot chocolate, but this one is a white hot chocolate infused with rosemary. A great case for using cacao butter in drinks, which lends both its chocolatey flavor, as well as a richness and a froth. Spirulina Latte Another blender latte, but this time boosted with all the green benefits of spirulina, without the swampy taste. Chamomile Latte The most grounding and delicious latte to drink before bed. Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca Playing off New Orleans-style coffee, this herbal mocha is a great option for those trying to take a break from coffee and missing it dearly. Chicory brings a coffee-like richness, while maca and cacao boost energy. Honey Miso Latte This is basically a golden milk latte, but boosted with the flavor and health benefits of miso and raw honey. I like to drink this one before plane journeys, since miso might be helpful when it comes to countering the radiation we are exposed to on any given flight. Hibiscus Ginger Latte This latte gets is beautiful color and a pleasant sour note in the flavor from steeped hibiscus flowers. Pear Cranberry Chai Any modesty aside, this is the best chai I’ve ever had or made in my life. A great example for how creative you can get with your beverages, this one uses both fruit and a bunch of healing spices to achieve an otherworldly flavor. No-Recipe Vegan Cozy Latte Start With: This is your base liquid, which will determine what other ingredients you will add to your blender. Choose one or a couple. Hot water is a blank canvas, while herbal coffee and tea will give you a base flavor, which you can play off off with your other ingredients. - hot water - chicory coffee or Dandy Blend - tea – herbal, black, green, etc. - hot plant milk – coconut, almond, cashew, oat, etc. Creamy: Add one of these ingredients or a combination of a few of them for a rich, extra-creamy latte, especially important to include if you are just using hot water as the base. - coconut butter - tahini - almond butter/­­cashew butter/­­any other nut butter - tocos - cacao butter Frothy: This is optional if you already have a creamy element, but adding some extra fat to your latte contributes to the most beautiful froth. Also, if your base is something with caffeine like a black or green tea, this will help slow the absorption of caffeine for a more even boost of energy (like in Bulletproof coffee). - Coconut oil/­­MCT oil - Ghee Sweet: Add as much sweetness as you need, tasting as you go. - dates - raw honey - maple syrup - date syrup Flavor: Play off your drink base while adding some flavor. Both cacao powder and turmeric do well in creamy, milky drinks, while spices, herbs and vanilla can be used millions of ways (just see the drink round-up above). - cacao powder - cacao butter - turmeric - other spices like cinnamon, cardamom, nutmeg, ginger - vanilla - herbs - miso Extras & Boosts: My absolute favorite energy-boosting ingredient for drinks is maca powder – it instantly wakes me up and tastes so delicious. But there are a ton of other boosters you can add to your lattes, some ideas below. - maca powder - cacao butter - other adaptogens: chaga, reishi, lion’s mane, cordyceps, ashwagandha - more: pearl powder, tocos, mucura pruriens, spirulina, etc. etc. Blend all your components until frothy and enjoy :) You might also like... Berry Kombucha Float Peach and Zucchini Smoothie Avocado Kiwi Smoothie and a Jus by Julie Cleanse Giveaway Honey Miso Latte .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Rice and Potato Cutlets

December 23 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Rice and Potato Cutlets These Rice and Potato Cutlets are a tasty treat as a tea time snack or you can also serve them as an appetizer. They are crispy outside and soft inside. This is a quick and easy recipe and a good way to use left over rice. - 1 cup rice (cooked) - 1 cup potatoes (boiled, peeled, and shredded) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1 Tbsp green chili (chopped) - 1 tsp ginger (finely chopped) - 2 Tbsp cilantro (finely chopped, hara dhania) - 1/­­4 tsp fresh lemon juice - In a bowl mash the rice, rice should be semi mashed add potatoes mix it well now add all the other ingredients, salt, cumin seeds, green chilies, ginger, cilantro and lemon juice. Mix should be firm and will be consistency of a sticky dough. - Grease your palm and divide them into 12 pieces I wanted to make them in small size. Roll them in patties. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium high heat. Frying pan should have about 1 of oil. Oil should be moderately hot. Test the oil putting a small piece of mix, this should up right of way. Drop the cutlets slowly into it, taking care not to overlap them. - Fry the cutlets until they are golden brown, turning occasionally. This should take about 5 minutes. Take them out over a paper towel. - For best taste serve them hot. Cutlets taste great with cilantro chutney. - Potatoes should be not over cooked, that will make mix soft and cutlets can break in the oil while frying. - If oil is not hot enough cutlets will be greasy. Rice and potato min should not be very soft otherwise cutlets will break in oil. The post Rice and Potato Cutlets appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Big Batch Golden Milk

December 18 2017 My New Roots 

Big Batch Golden Milk So we moved. Across the ocean. Its been a wild ride so far with plenty of excitement and relief coupled with awkward transitioning, and astronomical culture shock (small town Ontario is preeeeeetty different from Copenhagen). Were also renovating a very old home by Canadian standards, and the hidden surprises lurking under every lifted floorboard are creating a project slightly larger and lengthier than predicted. But wouldnt it all be so boring and predictable without those fun discoveries?! Right! Who needs a kitchen anyway? Oh wait. Amongst the self-inflicted chaotic state of affairs, Ive actually found some peace in the simple living weve got going on. Since we dont really have any friends in our little village yet, theres been plenty of time to actually take care of myself and our family. Afternoons are spent building toy train sets, cooking big batch meals, and making snacks for the days ahead. Ive started taking aerial yoga and NIA, going for nature walks every day, and having candlelit baths on the regular. Funny what removing ones social life will make room for! An important part of my self-care routine these past weeks is my simple ritual of making golden milk. Warm, comforting, and satisfying, this drink has everything needed to combat winter blues and movers remorse (I kid, I kid). Usually I make golden milk on the fly, one cup at a time, but recently I realized how handy it would be to just make a huge batch and have it ready to spoon into some hot milk when the mood strikes. Genius. For those of you that arent yet familiar with this wonder drink, Im excited for the vibrant, spicy world that is about to open up to you. Golden milk, or haldi ka doodh, actually dates back thousands of years in Ayurvedic tradition where it has been used to aid digestion and respiration, prevent colds and flu, decongest the liver, ease sprained muscles and joint pain, purify the blood, clear the skin, and aid sleep. The main ingredient in golden milk responsible for all of this awesomeness is the curcumin in turmeric, a compound that is responsible for its vibrant hue. Curcumin has been widely studied for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties, but it is also supports detoxification, helps balance blood sugar, and lowers the overall risk of cancer. How do we get the most out of this powerful phytonutrient? Simply by combining it with black pepper and fat - two important ingredients in golden milk! A compound in black pepper called piperine actually helps the body absorb curcumin, and shows to increase the bioavailability of it by up to 2,000 percent. And the good news is, you only need a very small amount to reap the synergistic benefits. Then melt a little coconut oil in, and the curcumin can be directly absorbed into the bloodstream through the lymphatic system. That’s a cooperative one-two punch of absorption and deliciousness. Once mixed, your Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend will last for up to six months. Keep it in a cool, dry place out of direct light - a closed cupboard is perfect. Do not store it right next to the stove or on top of the fridge, where the warm environment will speed spoilage. We wanna keep our medicine fresh! The Big Batch Golden Milk recipe below makes about 120 servings, so there is plenty to divvy out to your most beloved, and even save some for yourself. Make sure to include the directions so that your lucky recipients can make golden milk themselves. Ive divided them below so that you can print out just the single serving instructions for your friends and family. I’ve also included a recipe if you want to sample just one cup for yourself before committing to an entire jar. My version of golden milk has a few more spices than some blends that Ive tried, but this unique combination just tastes that much better. If youre on a tight budget, or you simply cannot find some of the spices listed, leave them out. The main ingredients you need are the turmeric, ginger, cinnamon and black pepper. The others are there for added health benefits and of course flavour, but the recipe will still be delicious without them. The milk for this recipe is totally flexible. Coconut is classic, but almond, cashew, or hemp are tasty options. You can also do half milk, half water if you like. It will be less creamy, but its great if youre trying to make your milk stretch a little farther! The most important thing to remember when making golden milk is to not overheat the spices, as they will become bitter-tasting and therefore not all that enjoyable. If you choose to use milk in your recipe, warm it gently on the stove, then remove from heat and gently whisk in the golden milk spice blend. If youre going with water, do NOT pour boiling water over the spice blend, but instead pour the recently-boiled water into a cup, let it cool for 30 seconds or so, then whisk in the golden milk spice blend. I also advise you not to add the honey or coconut oil until the spices have been stirred into the liquid youre using, as theyll incorporate easier if the spices have dissolved. If you want to use a vegan sweetener, maple syrup is my favourite choice, but brown rice syrup, coconut palm sugar, and stevia are also good options. I also love adding a sprinkling of vanilla powder right at the end for some extra va-va-voom. I recommend enjoying your golden milk first thing in the morning (right after your lemon water, of course!), or right before bed. If its a particularly cold day outside, this intelligent spice combo will warm your cells up from the inside out. Or, if youre looking for a luxurious way to unwind down after a long day, I find that golden milk is also a very effective sleep tonic. Whatever the time you choose to enjoy this drink, you will absolutely love its warm, and satisfying vibes. Make it a ritual yourself: spoon lovingly, stir consciously and sip gratefully. One more thing I should mention, is that the Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend is not only delicious as a drink, but that it can also be incorporated into a number of your favourite recipes. Toss a teaspoon into a smoothie, stir some into your morning porridge or pancake batter, fold it into a basic cookie dough or cake batter, and even try it in curries, soups and stews. The flavour is warming and pungent, so use it anywhere youd like a burst of sunshiny spice that is as good as gold.     Print recipe     Big Batch Golden Milk Spice Blend Makes approx. 120 servings Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200g ground turmeric 2/­­3 cup /­­ 70g ground ginger 1/­­3 cup /­­ 35g ground cinnamon 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground black pepper 2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cardamom scant 3 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cloves 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground nutmeg 3 Tbsp. 20g ground star anise 1/­­4 cup 20g ground coriander Directions: 1. Combine all spices in a large bowl. Stir well, then transfer to a large jar or several smaller ones, and seal with an airtight lid. Keeps for up to 6 months.     Print recipe     Golden Milk Ingredients: 1/­­2 Tbsp. golden milk spice blend 1 cup milk of your choice (coconut milk is classic, but I also like cashew milk or hemp milk) 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. virgin coconut oil 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. sweetener of choice (I like raw honey) Directions: 1. In a small saucepan over medium heat, warm milk until just before it simmers. Whisk in golden milk spice blend until smooth. Remove from heat and stir in coconut oil and sweetener, if desired. Enjoy!     Print recipe     If you want to make just one batch of my golden milk, heres the single-serve recipe. Single-serving Golden Milk Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 tsp. turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. ginger 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon pinch black pepper pinch cardamom pinch cloves pinch nutmeg pinch star anise pinch coriander I wish you all a super sweet holiday with tons of delicious food shared amongst family and friends, and that your 2018 is bursting with health and happiness. Much love to all out there, from my chilly, but cozy, little corner of the world to yours. xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * In wrapping up 2017, I cannot help but look on the Wild Heart High Spirit retreats with deep gratitude and pure joy. I had a strong vision for the endeavor from the beginning: gather women in a beautiful and serene space, teach them how to reconnect to their bodies through food and movement. But I never imagined just how deep these lessons would go, how profound the changes would be, and how much fun we would have! After three this year, I can confidently say these experiences are incredibly special, and I feel very lucky to work with such a talented partner to create them. Thank you to all of the women who have traveled from all corners of the earth to join us. We love you! Here are some highlights from our trips to Bali, Ibiza, and Portugal. Click on the images below to see photos from each of our magical locations. .       We also have some very special community partners who have generously made our experiences even more abundant! Big thanks to: Naturgligolie Coconut Bowls Jukserei Pachamama Raw Bite Four Sigmatic Gourmet Print Shop We are now weaving plans for future retreats. If you are interested in learning more or joining us one day, please sign up to our mailing list to be kept up to date. We hope to see you one day soon! The post Big Batch Golden Milk appeared first on My New Roots.

Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion Garlic

December 10 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion GarlicVegetable Korma – Veggies in Spiced Ginger Chile Sauce. Creamy Indian Korma Recipe made without Onion and garlic. Vegan Indian Gluten-free Soy-free  Can be made nut-free. No Onion No Garlic Recipe. Instant pot option Weekends always have me craving Indian food, so here is this quick Korma Sauce with vegetables of choice.  There are several different types of kormas. Some are decadent, some light. Some use lots of whole spices, some use just a few and some use coconut. This korma sauce is a simple sauce made with whole spices, ginger and chili and then thickened with cashews. The sauce does not use onion and garlic as is used is many korma sauces. Some regional cuisines in India do not include certain root veggies like onion and garlic, or allium. This delicious and easy sauce has a similar flavor punch of my restaurant style Navratan korma sauce (from my first book), but simpler and without any onion and garlic. Use whichever whole spices you have and Use other nuts or coconut as sub for cashews. Lets get to this delicious Clean up the fridge Veggie Korma. Also in other news, get both my books on Kindle Matchbook DEAL, ebook version 88% off for only 2.99 on amazon US, when you get the print copy. If you already bought the print copy at any time past or present (for yourself or for gifting), you get this deal too! Head to the book page and it will automatically show you the deal if you have a print copy order in your account. Take the ebook with you on kindle, computer or your phone!Continue reading: Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion GarlicThe post Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion Garlic appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Wilted bok choy and peanuts fill a flavorful, savory broth alongside chewy noodles for a hearty one-dish meal. Look for fresh rice noodles in the pasta or Asian food section of most grocery stores. This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 4 - 1 teaspoon sesame oil - 1 tablespoon peanut oil - 1 red onion, sliced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon peanut butter - 3 tablespoons soy ginger dressing - 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce - 2 tablespoons orange juice - red pepper flakes, to taste - 1 (12 ounces) package fresh rice noodles - 6 (6-ounce) heads baby bok choy - 1/­­4 cup peanuts Place the oils in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for about 5 minutes, or until the vegetables soften and become fragrant. Add the peanut butter, dressing, soy sauce, orange juice, red pepper flakes and 1-1/­­2 cups water to the skillet. Stir until bubbly and smooth. Cover and cook while you prepare the noodles. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil over medium-high heat and cook the rice noodles according to package directions. Drain and rinse with water. Transfer the cooked noodles to the skillet and stir to combine. Add the bok choy and peanuts to the pan and let cook for 1 minute, or until the bok choy is slightly wilted. Enjoy! The post Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spicy Potato Curry

November 23 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Spicy Potato Curry Spicy Potato Curry is a flavorful side dish. This curry can be served with Roti, Paratha, Puri any way you serve, this taste delicious. - 2 Cup potatoes (boiled and roughly mashed) - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable) - 1 tsp ginger paste - 1 Tbsp coarsely ground coriander (dhania) - 2 tsp coarsely ground fennel seeds (saunf) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1-1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 1 Tbsp ginger (thinly sliced) - 1 Tbsp green chili (thinly sliced into rounds) - Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add ginger paste, coriander, fennel seeds, and red chili powder, stir for about 1 minute - Add potatoes and salt mix with spices, lower the heat to low medium, let it cook for about 3 minutes stirring occasionally. - Add about 1-1/­­2 cups of water and mango powder stir and change the heat to medium high. As potatoes come to boil cover the pan and lower the heat to medium low and let it cook for about 4-5 minutes. - Adjust the water in gravy to your liking; gravy will thicken as it will cool. - Turn off the heat and add sliced ginger and green chilies and cover the pan. Serving Suggestions Serve Spicy Potato Curry with Samosa instead of chutney and let your guest says wow! I like to serve this over papdi, mathries, crackers, for that I like to keep gravy thick. The post Spicy Potato Curry appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married!

November 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married! Hey guess what, we just got married! In a beautiful greenhouse in Rosendal’s Garden in Stockholm, surrounded by our closest family and friends (+ ALL their kids) and accompanied by live jazz music and gorgeous food. Even though I proposed to Luise in the back of a campervan on New Zealand almost three years ago, we pulled this wedding together - from idea to I do - in less than five weeks. With three young kids, constantly overflowing mailboxes and an unhealthy always-need-to-be-in-control tendency, we realized that if we don’t do a quick and spontaneous wedding we probably won’t get hitched until we are retired. So instead of our dream wedding going on for three days and nights in the Italian country side, we aimed for an informal and cosy autumn gathering in one of our favorite Stockholm locations. It turned out so much better than we could ever have hoped for and we are now officially mr and mrs. We let the chefs at Rosendal take care of all the food (which was a huge relief). Our only instructions for the lunch buffet (lunch is much easier if you want friends with kids to attend) was that we wanted hearty salads and food roughly in line with our own philosophy. Typically, we didn’t get any photos of the whole buffet table, but there were roasted vegetables, butter tossed potato and chanterelles, slaw with pickled mustard seeds, hummus, sourdough bread, sauerkraut, a goat’s cheese salad with shredded beets, herb sauces and lots and lots of cake. All seasonal and local, pretty decorated with fruit and flowers. And so good! Another salad that they prepared was made with roasted pumpkin, cavolo nero and buckwheat and we have recreated our own version of it here below. We never got the exact recipe from the chef so this is a pretty loose interpretation of how we remembered it (after a couple of glasses of champagne). We are sharing that today along with a few snaps that David’s sister took at the wedding. Forget everything I’ve previously stated about marriage. This was fun! And I feel damn fortunate to marry the most beautiful woman I know. Lots of love from us! The kids were more interested in the fireplace than the camera ... These two guys were so good! Send me an email if you need Chet Baker-style jazz musicians in Stockholm and I’ll forward their contact info.        This is a gorgeous and rustic recipe perfect for this season. It would also be ideal for Christmas, maybe with some cinnamon added to the dressing. One of the things we really love about this is that you don’t need to peel the pumpkin (which always is a hassle), just cut into wedges and you can even keep the seeds on. Some of the seeds might get a little burnt but the one hanging on to the slices add a nice crunch. We cover the pumpkin wedges in dressing both before and after roasting to give them a delicious coating. Roasted Pumpkin Salad with Cavolo Nero & Buckwheat Serves 4 1 Hokkaido squash, Kent pumpkin or other small winter squash/­­pumpkin variety 200 g /­­ 4 cups dinosaur kale (cavolo nero) or regular kale, thick stems removed  1 cup /­­ 250 ml /­­ 170 g raw buckwheat groats, rinsed Dressing 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil 3 tbsp maple syrup 1-2 lemons, juice + zest 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch fresh ginger, finely grated Sea salt & pepper To serve Pomegranate seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75 g toasted pumpkin seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 150 g feta cheese Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F fan mode. Divide the pumpkin in half and then cut it into wedges. Leave any seeds that are hanging on to the wedges and discard the rest. Stir together the dressing, taste and adjust the flavors. Pour about half of it in a bowl and toss the pumpkin slices in it (keep the remaining dressing in the bowl). Place on a baking tray and roast for about 25-30 minutes. We like it a little burnt towards the edges. When roasted, carefully loosen the wedges from the tray and brush them with the remaining dressing in the bowl. While the pumpkin is roasting, cook the buckwheat groats in 2 cups water for 7-8 minutes until soft but not mushy. Drain any remaining water and leave to cool off a bit. Add the remaining half of the dressing to a large bowl. Tear the kale leaves into smaller pieces, place in the bowl and use your hands to massage them until they soften up. Add the buckwheat to the bowl and toss so it’s all mixed. Arrange the kale and buckwheat on the tray (or a serving plate) together with the pumpkin wedges. Scatter with pomegranate seeds, pumpkin seeds and crumbled feta cheese. Enjoy! Wedding photos by Johanna Frenkel.

Eatin Good in Granada

November 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Although I dont think it formally deserves this title, so far Spain feels like the meat capital of the world. However, Granada (in the south of Spain) has a booming vegan scene thats growing every year!  I didnt get to spend much time in Granada, but I did have the opportunity to work with an incredible little vegetarian restaurant that offered a heap of superb vegan dishes by the name of AlLaurel. This cozy veggie bistro is centrally located by the famous Catedral de Granada and welcomes you in with chic styling, a delicious menu del día, and local artisanal wines and cervezas. While there I got to sample a few of their famous dishes including a leek and ginger soup, seitan skewers (drooling), and traditional tomato and avocado salad. The cuisine was fantastically fresh, obviously organic, and perfectly plated by Ále (short for Alejandro), the restaurants lead chef. I left AlLaurel with a happy tummy and a newfound respect for seitan. The next day, while in search for some lunch in town, I stumbled upon a little vegan tapas bar called El Ojú. You heard me right, a vegan TAPAS bar. You know, where you buy a drink and you […] The post Eatin Good in Granada appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2

November 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 Here comes Part 2 of our Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, complete with cozy dinner and dessert recipes for the week. There are stellar homemade veggie burgers, a nourishing stew, and beautifully simple roasted plums for dessert. To see the breakfast and lunch recipes, as well as the grocery shopping list for the entire meal plan, head to Part 1. We hope you’ll find this entire thing useful, and we’d love to hear any feedback you have, as always :) Menu (see Part 1 for breakfast and lunch recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Day by Day Prep List Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Recipes 1. These veggie burgers utilize the lentils, brown rice, squash, and kale that you already cooked during prep day. They are nourishing, satisfying, and cooked in the oven, which means that you won’t have to spend any time frying them on the pan. The flavors are earthy and warming, and the burgers develop really nice, crispy edges as they bake. Enjoy them for dinner with any fixings of choice, on burger buns, inside lettuce wraps, or even alongside a green salad. Make sure to try them with the Lentil and Squash Hummus from Part 1 as well. Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers   Print Serves: 9 veggie burgers Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes about 2 tablespoons chopped sage, rosemary and thyme (optional) 4 garlic cloves - minced blanched kale (from part 1) - chopped roughly sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup toasted pumpkin seeds 1½ cups cooked brown rice (from part 1) 1½ cups cooked lentils (from part 1) remaining ½ cup roasted butternut squash (from part 1) 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar or apple cider vinegar Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm the coconut oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion, red pepper flakes and herbs, if using, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and cook for another minute, then add the kale, salt and pepper, and stir around for another minute. Add the tomato paste and toss to mix well. Remove the pan from heat. Transfer the pumpkin seeds to a food processor and pulse into small pieces. Add the rice, lentils, squash, vinegar, and the sautéed onion and kale mixture to the food processor. Pulse until well-mixed and combined into a chunky mixture. Taste for salt, add more if needed. Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Use a ½ cup measurement to form burger patties and finish shaping each patty with your hands. Arrange the patties on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 25-35 minutes, until the burgers look nicely toasted. Serve on burger buns, lettuce wraps, or alongside salad with any burger fixings of choice. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. These burgers also freeze very well. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of good stew is such a great solution to the weekday dinner problem, especially during the colder months. It doesn’t take too long to make and lasts a while in the fridge, only getting better with time. This one is made with so many star ingredients of warming fall fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. There’s smoked paprika, too, which ensures a bit of piquancy and depth of flavor. Serve this stew with crusty sourdough bread or over any brown rice, left over from the veggie burgers. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced freshly ground black pepper 6 garlic cloves - sliced 1 jalape?o - seeded and chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1 lb Brussels sprouts - trimmed and halved (quartered for larger ones) 1 teaspoon smoked paprika kale cooking water from part 1, veggie broth or purified water 2-3 bay leaves (optional) remaining cooked lentils from part 1 - about 1½ cups 28 oz box or can crushed tomatoes 4 cups baby spinach Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium saucepan. Add the cumin and sauté for about 1 minute, until fragrant. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 5 minutes, until translucent. Add the mushrooms and black pepper and cook for about 8 minutes, until all the liquid thats released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the garlic, jalapeno, carrots, Brussels sprouts and paprika, and stir to coat for about 2 minutes. Add enough of the reserved kale cooking liquid (from part 1), veggie broth, or purified water to achieve a thick stew consistency (keep in mind that youll also be adding crushed tomatoes). Add the bay leaves at this point too, if using. Bring to a simmer. Cook, partially covered, for 10 minutes. Add the cooked lentils and crushed tomatoes, bring everything back to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Discard the bay leaves, if using. Add the spinach at the end, and stir it in until wilted. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Serve over rice or with crusty sourdough bread. 3.5.3226   3. Roasting up a sizable batch of fruit is a great way to ensure that you’ll have beautiful, healthy dessert for the week. Add a little dollop of ice cream or yogurt (have you tried this coconut one?!), and you’re in business. These plums are roasted with coconut sugar, which brings out their sweetness, and rosemary, which contributes its piney, earthy notes. Besides ice cream/­­yogurt, I love serving the plums with a sprinkling of toasted pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs. Another idea: try topping the millet porridge from Part 1 with some of the roasted plums for one of your breakfasts. If you can’t find plums, try a similar roasting technique with apples or pears (and include cinnamon in your sprinkle). Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle   Print Ingredients 8 ripe plums - sliced in half and pitted 2 tablespoons coconut sugar 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary ¼ cup toasted pumpkin seeds - roughly chopped 2-3 cardamom pods - shells discarded, ground in a mortar and pestle 1 tablespoon cacao nibs (optional) vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt - for serving Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet. Place the plums on the baking sheet, cut side up. Generously sprinkle each plum with the coconut sugar and rosemary. Put in the oven and roast for 20-30 minutes, until soft throughout. Meanwhile, combine the pumpkin seeds, cardamom and cacao nibs in a small bowl. Serve the plums with ice cream/­­yogurt, sprinkled with the pumpkin seed cardamom mixture. 3.5.3226   < < .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 2 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh

October 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh Ally Walsh is a model and co-founder of Los Angeles-based organic coffee company, Canyon Coffee. Though we’ve never met, we love Ally’s easy-going approach to wellness, her beautiful instagram, and what her and her partner are doing over at Canyon. It’s an all-around girl crush :) In this interview, Ally tells us about her transition from a vegetarian diet to a feel-good, intuitive diet, the tonic she always takes before bed, the books she’s found to be instrumental to her well-being, exercise, beauty, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I love routine, but that probably has a lot do to with the fact that my schedule is constantly changing! I really enjoy my morning routine, waking up early and making coffee at home. But its always nice to switch things up and come back to that. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning.  I definitely try to ease into my morning. I used to grab my phone first thing when I woke up--now I keep it out of the bedroom. Instead, the first thing I do when I wake up (on a good day!) is sit upright and do a 20 minute meditation. To me, theres no better way to start off the day. Meditation is always followed by some Canyon Coffee. At home, I typically make a pour-over, which is another little opportunity to be mindful as I start my day. On a day off its so nice to sit outside on the porch with some friends and read and have coffee together. We get the New York Times delivered to our house on Sunday mornings and I could spend the whole day reading and relaxing outside in the sun. Its honestly one of my favorites things to do. If I’m shooting though, or out of town for a job, most days start early and end late. The schedule for modeling is often last minute--I sometimes dont know my schedule until the day or night before. In contrast, its nice to have Canyon, where I make my own schedule. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I make a glass of calm/­­magnesium before bed every night! I take that with me wherever I go--security always pull me aside at the airport to ask about what this white powder is ha :) Aside from magnesium, Ill sometimes make a warm tonic with some ashwaganda. And reading always helps me to fall asleep. I guess I wouldn’t call it a ritual, but I do love watching a show or movie before sleep, too. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast: I have a cup of black coffee and almond butter or avocado toast with gluten-free bread every morning. Im a creature of habit... I have my favorite go-tos, and Im happy eating them every day. If I have to work super early sometimes i like to make overnight chia seed oatmeal. Ill mix in some oats, chia seeds, almond milk, maca and flax seeds, and then in the morning top it off with some fruit and almond butter. Lunch:  Usually a salad with quinoa, avocado, kimchi, roasted seasonal vegetables, seeds, lemon and different oils like grapeseed, olive, and white wine vinegar. I would also be very happy with just roasted kabocha squash and pesto :) Snack: Cashews, pumpkin seeds, Dates and almond butter, green juice, avocado toast, and currently addicted to Honey Mamas Chocolate! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Well, it kind of comes with starting a coffee company ;) Some people are surprised to learn, though, that I only drink one cup of black coffee in the morning! Thats pretty much it. I cant do too much caffeine. Only on rare occasions, like when Im on vacation, will I have an afternoon espresso or cortado. I was in Copenhagen and Stockholm recently, and fell in love with oatmilk cortados! Definitely pushed my caffeine limit there! -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I honestly don’t! I love raw chocolate, but Im really sensitive to sugar! So Im kind of weird in that I really dont love sweets. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? In addition to magnesium at night (for sleep), Ill take ashwaganda at any time of the day for my adrenals, and probiotics daily. I feel such a difference when I take b12, too. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Yes. Yoga has been such an important practice to me, for years. I usually go to a class a couple times a week. I intersperse that with hiking in the Santa Monica mountains and walks on the beach. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I actually look forward to exercise. I dont really partake in any forms of exercise that arent enjoyable. For example, Ive never really gotten into spinning or boot camp-style workouts. I love getting out in nature for hikes, and I find an hour-and-a-half in the yoga studio to be very meditative. After a long work day, I really look forward to being able to do something nice for my body. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really think the most beautiful people are those that feel confident in their skin and are who they want to be--not what society expects them to be. Someone thats naturally comfortable in any setting. As a model, so much emphasis is put on the external, and thats important for a photograph or video. But in person, beauty really does come from within. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I think the most important thing for healthy skin is to eat and drink clean. Especially drinking lots of water. As for products, I use the most natural that I can find. I love Earth tu Face, True Botanicals, Osea and Linne! I use oils for moisturizing and just use water to wash my face in the morning. I love using Bodha and CAP Beauty rose water spray, too. Ill try to do a face mask once a week from Wildcare while taking a bath! Its very relaxing :) -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water! I also think getting a good night of sleep is just as important! -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Stay hydrated. My mom is 59 & has the most beautiful skin – not one wrinklel! And she swears by drinking lots of water! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Im trying to get better at this, but acupuncture has been a life saver! Its a place to relax and reset. I see Maria at Elysia Life Care and she is life-changing! I think getting into a regular routine of acupuncture and meditation can help so much with stress. After having a consistent routine with both, you start to notice things that used to stress you or make you upset no longer have the same power or effect on you. You can laugh it off, or just observe it and not be affected by it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Going on a walk always helps. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Lycopene vitamin C packets, lots of ginger and tea tree oil (usually just put it in my water!) -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This has been a learning process for me, how to balance everything. Modeling, Canyon Coffee, relationship with my partner, my friends, and time for myself. Especially with starting a company with your partner, that start-up grind can be all-consuming because theres always more work you can do! So weve had to learn how to turn off- and make sure to make time for a date night! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? My goal is to maintain a state of love (as opposed to state of stress, or lack, or anger, etc.). I was lucky to learn from a qi gong master named George Falcon for a couple years before he passed, and I feel like his teachings provided me with tools to help stay in this mindset throughout the stressors and obstacles of daily life. One of the big ones is to take responsibility for our actions and state of being. Its easy for us to blame, to say he, she, or it made me feel this way. But really its our decision. Of course, we sometimes fall out of that consciousness of love. When Im not feeling well, my first step is to take a break. To meditate, listen to a recorded guided meditation of George, go on a walk or a hike. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Ive made different changes throughout my life that have been substantial in terms of my wellness. I stopped eating meat when I was 19, then introduced fish (mainly salmon!) back in years later. Acupuncture has perhaps been the most substantial in helping me maintain balance and wellness. All of these changes or decisions are really informed by just listening to my body. You can get caught up in the mindset and identity of, say, Im vegan. But its important to check in with yourself and ask, Am I feeling good? Is this helping live a balanced and vibrant life? If not, then its important to make a change! -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So many books! If I had to pick two, Id say Anatomy of the Spirit by Caroline Myss and Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert. Anatomy really opened me to the power of our bodies to heal and self-nourishment. It helped me connect my mental and spiritual state to my health and well-being. Its a book you can go back to, re-read and continue to learn from over time. Big Magic was instrumental in motivating me to start Canyon Coffee. It made me feel like I had more to give, creatively, and pushed me to start something with a greater purpose. It brought clarity to the creative process for me, breaking it down in a way that makes it approachable and applicable to my own life. Its one of those books that really inspires you to follow your dreams, and what could be more important for self-nourishment? Knowlegde -- You run Canyon Coffee together with your boyfriend, Casey. What was your path to starting your own coffee company? Personally, I was feeling uninspired. I felt like I wasnt making the most of my creativity and talents. Ive always been grateful for my modeling career, but I had also always wanted to start something of my own, and I was feeling that itch. Casey and I had both fallen in love with coffee over the years... through making it at home together and visiting coffee shops in our travels and around LA. Casey actually started working in the coffee industry, and we became friends with a roaster, James. Eventually, our passion for it grew to the point that we had the thought: why not start our own company? It really was a natural culmination. The moment we decided we wanted to do it, we just never looked back. -- What is your process when choosing beans for Canyon Coffee? Are there certain growing practices, flavor profiles, or geographical locations that are important to you? The universal practice of tasting different beans is called cupping. It involves preparing small roasted samples of different beans exactly the same way and trying them at the same time. For Canyon, our parameters narrow down our options. We usually decide on a country first, and then see what organic, seasonal beans grown at high altitudes are available through the network of importers near us in California. Then we order samples, cup, and choose the bean that smells and tastes best to us. High altitude is important because the elevation makes the coffee plant grow slower and put more energy into producing cherries. The slow growth results in cherries (and coffee beans) that are much more flavorful and vibrant. To start Canyon, we focused on Latin American coffees and wanted to find amazing-tasting beans in the chocolatey /­­ caramel flavor profile. We went with beans from Guatemala and Colombia first, because theyre known for these flavor profiles and they have great infrastructure for small coffee producers to process and export their beans. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love going to the movies :) And a nice dinner out before or after. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit .. anything from Krishnamurti & Ram Dass Song/­­Album – Paul Simon – Graceland, Feist – Let it Die, Lord Huron – Lonesome Dreams Movie – Beginners Piece of Art – Robert Lango Men In the Cities, Alfred Stieglitz’ Portraits of Georgia OKeeffe -- What are your favorite places to eat in LA? Gjusta/­­ Gjelina, Honey Hi, Amara Kitchen, Pace, Botanica, Necco, Destroyer, Erewhon -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Im actually in the process of moving out of my house right now! Were taking advantage of the end of our lease to do some traveling and try out living in some new neighborhoods. As a result, Im having to put a lot of my stuff in storage. Its been really nice to get rid of a lot of things and simplify to the essentials. But as far as traveling goes, I always have with me.. – new book and magazines – headphones – Jesse Kamm pants – Nikes – journal – Bodha rose water spray – probiotics – magnesium and ashwaganda  – sparkling water – ursa major rings – eye mask – almond butter packets -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily LAmi of Bodha, and Lacy Phillips at Free & Native! Both these women are a constant inspiration! You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Soft Pumpkin Ginger Snaps

October 25 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Soft Pumpkin Ginger SnapsPumpkin Ginger Snaps. Vegan Pumpkin Ginger Cookies with gingerbread spices and pumpkin. Soft Fudgy Cookies. Vegan Recipe. Gluten-free option These Ginger Cookies are soft, fudgy, blondie like with flavors from the Pumpkin, Ginger bread spices and molasses. They come together very quickly, are almost one bowl if you use a sifter. Even with 2 bowls used, you need to wash only 1. Pumpkin adds a softness to the cookies which bakes up to a fudgy cookie texture compared to the snappy crisp molasses cookies. Bake them longer for a more cookie like crumb and less for fudgier. Use spices of choice like ginger bread, pumpkin pie spice or chai spice. Add some candied ginger or orange, or chocolate chips or nuts for variation. I was hoping to edit an amazing roasted squash post for today, but the easier post won. We’ve all be sleep deprived because of Chewie’s cough. It seems to be letting up a little, so keeping our fingers crossed for our resident adopted fluffster.  Dang these are so good. Make a double batch! Crackly cookies also perfect for halloween!Continue reading: Vegan Soft Pumpkin Ginger SnapsThe post Vegan Soft Pumpkin Ginger Snaps appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake

October 21 2017 My New Roots 

Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake Boil the kettle and make a cup of tea folks, this is going to be a big one! First of all, I have to begin this post by saying THANK YOU. My New Roots is officially 10 years old and I couldnt have done it without your support, enthusiasm, and full-on LOVE for this little blog. And especially after the last couple of posts when I really opened up about my recent struggles, I felt so supported, and saw that so many of you did as well. It reminded me of the strong community that this has become, and the power of people when they come together with a common goal of true wellness. If you had told me an entire decade ago that my deeply passionate, unabashedly nerdy, and nearly ignored internet musings would end up turning into a full-on career, brand, cookbooks, online classes, app, poster shop and retreat company I never, ever would have believed you. But reading my first post again, it’s just as relevant today as ever, eerily almost as if I had written it last week. I guess I had a strong vision in mind and just kept trucking, kept trusting, that it would resonate with someone. But here we are, a third of my life later, and it’s not just someone, but so many of you. And all of my dreams continue to be born and manifest because of you. That offhanded suggestion from an old boyfriend who thought I could use an outlet for all that health talk I kept spewing, was really onto something. Thanks, dude. Secondly...and this is really big news...I am moving back to Canada! Yes, after nine years of delicious life in Copenhagen, my old roots are pulling me home and I am so very ready. This whole thing has been in the works for a few months now, but I didnt really feel like putting it out there until it was real. Well lemme tell ya, when putting my familys life in 50 boxes and shoving them into a shipping container, shiz got real, real fast. What a crazy feeling it is, and totally overwhelming with all the emotions that relocating your entire life is. So, if things have been (and continue to be) quiet around here, its because Ive been sorting through all the details that an international move entails. I send my gratitude for your patience. The next chapter of my life will be completely different from the last, that is for sure. To change things up dramatically, my family and I will be living out of the city in fact, near-ish to Toronto, where I am originally from. I knew that I would end up living in the country at some point, but not so soon! It was more a when I retire kind of thing. But funny what happens when you have kids and they need s-p-a-c-e, your priorities seem to shift to accommodate the little ones. Plus, I feel the need to be on the ground again (Ive been living in a fourth-floor apartment for nine years now!), so we bought a house to get closer to earth in every sense, plant a garden, lay in the grass - our own grass - and enjoy the quiet and safety of a little community. Im really excited for everything that is to come, and feeling so grateful for the divine unfolding. But will I miss Copenhagen? Obvi. This city, and my home here, is where I have spent my entire adult life. The walls of my beloved kitchen that my husband and I built ourselves, have held space for two cookbooks, online classes, countless dinner parties, bleary-eyed breakfasts, and even the birth of our son for crying out loud! And although My New Roots began in Toronto, it flourished here and truly became something on Danish ground. The Scandinavian culture has had a profound influence on me, my aesthetic, and how I see the world now. Having Europe at my doorstep with all its history, architecture, fine arts, culture, and attitude has been an enormous privilege and deeply inspiring. And can we talk about the light? Oh the light! How my camera and I will miss the very special way the sun slants here. Its unlike anything Ive seen before. Anyway, I promise to keep you all posted as we leave one fabulous country for the next. I wont have a working kitchen for some months, but Ill stay as active as I can on Instagram so you can keep up with my kitchen renovations...I know youll want to see all that house porn. Tee hee. Okay, now for the main event. I MADE A CARROT CAKE. Successfully. It is delicious. I feel like I have finally achieved one of my biggest culinary goals ever, and its so appropriate that we celebrate ten years of this blog with a recipe that has challenged me for nearly as long. If you remember back to when I used to post giant layer cakes for my birthday, I ran into trouble in 2013, when I attempted three different versions, which all failed, and ended up making nut butter sandwiches instead. Since then, the headcount has continued to rise, yet some ridiculously stubborn part of me wont give up. In the past Ive almost always used spelt flour for baking, and if any of you have tried one of my famous layer cakes, youll know this has worked well. I was after the same crumb that you can achieve with wholegrain spelt, but wanted the cake to be gluten-free, so I started by using an all-purpose gluten-free flour. It was a total disaster. The cake turned out gummy and inedible, and the frosting, which I tried to make with cooked quinoa (dont ask) was just weird. The next route I tried was with almond flour, since Ive been eating a more low-grain diet for the past few months and I wanted the cake to reflect that. Before testing it out, I assumed that almond flour would make things really dense and heavy, but lo and behold it creates a crumb that is so fluffy, and really gives this feeling of deep satisfaction. Im obsessed. The only thing that I dont like about almond flour is the high price, and the fact that almonds are a very water-intensive crop to grow. But, this is a cake after all, therefore a special treat, therefore not something you have all the time. The initial carrot cake experiments with almond flour were good, but borderline too rich. Plus, since Id ditched the quinoa frosting idea and knew Id be taking the cashew road, I felt like a nut frosting on top of a nut cake was just, well, too nutty. To reconcile my relationship with coconut flour, I cut the dry ingredients with a tad to see what would happen. Not only was the cake just as good, but the texture was better and I liked the flavor the coconut flour provided. We are friends again. The Cashew Coconut frosting for this cake is what Canadians would affectionately call a twofer. Bahahaha! (I really do amuse myself). For everyone else out there, in long form, this refers to a two-for-one deal. You can make this recipe once, but have the frosting come out two ways depending on its temperature. Pretty groovy, eh? If you use the frosting right after making it, it will be loose and glossy, almost glaze-like. If you prefer a traditional-style frosting that is thicker and stiffer, all you need to do is put the mixture in the fridge overnight to achieve this consistency. I chose to go with the room temperature version since I hadnt really worked with it like that before. It provided a more even layer, but its also a little harder to control. Either way its delicious, so dont worry about making the wrong choice...there isnt one! The flavour is major: Im talking soooo cream cheese-like that even I was confused. If youre not feeling the chunky carrot cake vibes, please look away now, because the cake of my dreams is loaded with pineapple, walnuts, and bursting with warm spice and citrus zest. I went to town! Instead of using questionably-edible canned pineapple, I used the dried, unsweetened version from the health food store. This stuff ain’t cheap, but again, cake splurge. If you cant find pineapple like this, dates, raisins, dried figs or apricots would also be good, but Id skip the soaking step. Instead of walnuts you could use pecans, macadamias, or even pumpkin seeds. Altogether this carrot cake is moist, decadent, and satisfying with so many layers of flavour and texture that just wont quit. Ive learned a lot in the past decade, and this cake is an expression of that. Its something to be proud of, and something to share. Thanks for sticking by me while I worked out the kinks…now its time to celebrate all the things!     Print recipe     Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake Serves 10-12 Ingredients: 2/­­3 cup /­­ 60g dried, unsweetened pineapple, plus more for garnish if desired 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 200g lightly packed grated carrots (about 3 medium) 1 cup /­­ 100g walnuts, plus more for garnish if desired 3 cups /­­ 300g almond flour (not almond meal) 2/­­3 cup /­­ 100g coconut flour 1 1/­­2 tsp. baking soda 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 Tbsp. ground cinnamon 2 tsp. ground ginger 1 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp. ground nutmeg 1 cup /­­ 250ml eggs, at room temperature (about 4-5 large eggs) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml odourless coconut oil, melted 1 cup /­­ 250ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract zest of 1 orange and 1 lemon (try to find organic, if possible) Cashew Coconut Frosting: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 200g raw cashews, soaked for 4 hours 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml coconut cream from the top of a can of coconut milk 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Pour just-boiled water over the dried pineapple (do not soak the pineapple youre using for garnish). Preheat the oven to 325°F/­­160°C. Lightly grease two 7 /­­ 18cm spring form cake pans with coconut oil. 2. Wash carrots well and grate them on a box grater. Set aside. Roughly chop the walnuts. 3. In a large mixing bowl, combine the almond flour, coconut flour, baking soda, salt cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and nutmeg. 4. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, coconut oil, maple syrup, and vanilla extract. 5. Drain the soaked pineapple and squeeze with your hands to remove excess liquid. Roughly chop. 6. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry ingredients and stir to combine. Zest the orange and lemon into the bowl. Add the carrots, soaked pineapple, and chopped walnuts and fold to incorporate. 7. Spoon roughly half of the batter into one of the prepared cake pans, then add the remaining batter to the second one. Place in the oven in the middle rack and set the timer for 40 minutes. Cakes are ready when they are golden brown and pass the toothpick test (bake for longer if necessary, up to one hour - cover cake with aluminum foil if you need to bake for longer so that the top doesnt burn). Remove cakes from the oven and let cool completely. 8. While the cakes are baking, make the frosting. Drain and rinse the cashews. Add them to a high-speed blender along with the other ingredients (you can use a normal blender or food processor, but the frosting wont be as smooth). If the frosting is too thick, add more coconut cream or a teeny bit of water and blend again. Chill in the fridge (frosting can be made one day ahead if you want it to be thicker). 9. To frost and decorate, spread a generous amount of frosting over one half of the cake. Carefully lay the second half on top, and spread remaining frosting over the top and on the sides. Decorate with remaining dried pineapple and walnuts, if desired. Serve and enjoy! Cake will keep for 5 days, covered in the fridge. Who knows what the future holds - the world seems so crazy these days - but I do know that I still have steam in me to keep going with this heart project, if youre all still up for reading and cooking from it. Words cannot describe my gratitude for you, allowing me to pursue my biggest dreams and expose my shadowy bits as well. I hope you know how much I love you. I truly do. Here’s to another ten years… xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Okay friends, there are still a couple spaces left for the next Wild Heart High Spirit retreat in Portugal! Its this November 5-11, hosted at the ridiculously beautiful Sublime Comporta hotel (guys, Ive been there and this place is NEXT LEVEL). I will be teaching cooking classes outside in the organic garden (pictured above!) and giving nutrition seminars daily, with yoga and movement classes twice a day with my dear friend and deeply talented friend, Mikkala Marilyn Kissi of Living Yolates. The kitchen is exclusively making My New Roots recipes for the week, so we can all enjoy these meals without having to lift a finger. Enjoy your private pool, open spa, horseback riding on the beach, bonfire nights and dancing under the stars. Come and get inspired to live your best life! Well show you how. Click here for more info, and see you in magical Portugal! The post Farewell to Copenhagen Carrot Cake appeared first on My New Roots.


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