germ - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Meatless Monday Supports Goya’s “Can Do” Campaign to Fight Hunger

Nutro – A Healthy Plant-Based Diet Made Simple

Roasted Eggplant Wedges with Herbed Pistachio Millet

Masala Paratha (Besan Ka Masala Paratha)










germ vegetarian recipes

PRE-ORDER Bonus Bundle is Here!

September 9 2017 Vegan Richa 

PRE-ORDER Bonus Bundle is Here! OMG!! THE Book is here!! See me flip through it on my Instagram Stories! First, Thank you to everyone who Pre-ordered! Now, let’s get the ball rolling in terms of marketing and buzz to spread the love to more people, and even more people cooking amazing and flavorful food! I’ve been working on the book for a while now(1.5 years) and I cannot wait for you to get it!   If you already pre-ordered your copy (find the order number in your order email or on amazon.com or other retailer), you can pick up this bundle today by filling up this form. Or Pre Order Now to snag it before it expires.  The Book page has links for all retailers in various countries(UK, Canada, Germany, Spain, India, Africa, Asia, Europe etc).  Why Pre-order? - Get a discount. Pre-order prices are often lower than the price of the book post release, and you can lock in that low price.  - As with my first book, we are donating 40% of the book sales from this year to amazing rescues and charities around the world. If you’d like to support my work, you can buy my books or directly donate to these charities.  >>>> Get your Bonus Bundle here 

AtayaCaffe in Berlin, Germany

September 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Tucked away in a quiet side street off Prenzlauer Allee, AtayaCaffe is bringing a combination of Sardinian sunshine and Senegalese flair to this corner of Prenzlauer Berg. Berlin HappyCow ambassadors J-Veg and Kyttiara went to check it out and enjoy a slow breakfast. Stepping into this cosy cafe decorated with Senegalese wall hangings, we immediately felt at home as we were welcomed with warm smiles. Our taste buds already began tingling as we saw food being brought out from the kitchen for other guests, and we decided to sit outside in the sunshine next to the mini garden on the pavement, where we were joined by owners Elisabetta and Bachir. Elisabetta told us how she had achieved success working under the guidance of a renowned Sardinian chef in Italy for 8 years, but had a dreamt of opening her own place where she could really give a free rein to her culinary creativity. Bachir is a musician and composer with a passion for great food, and together they decided to open their own cafe. Unfortunately the bureaucracy in Italy didnt allow them the freedom they wanted, and so they took the brave decision to make Berlin not only the home […] The post AtayaCaffe in Berlin, Germany appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1

July 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 A few months ago, we asked if you would be interested in seeing semi-regular, seasonal meal plans here and heard a resounding yes. We love coming up with whimsical and creative, plant-based recipes to share here, but we also want this site to be a friendly space for busy people looking to eat more plants. You know, for those of you who might not have the time or brain space for making, say, an experimental aquafaba meringue, like we do. Meal planning is a great practice for saving money on groceries (and impulse takeout orders!), eating homemade meals (which inevitably equal healthier meals), and minimizing those situations of staring blankly into your refrigerator, wondering what to eat for dinner. Do I plan my meals? Sometimes. Ironically, I think that if cooking wasn’t my job, I would plan our family meals much more. But because I’m in the business of dreaming up recipes for this blog and for other publications, I often end up with random, non-coordinated dishes in my fridge, which then become our breakfast, lunch and dinner. For now, we are thinking of publishing one meal plan a season, while maintaining regular, single-recipe post programming the rest of the time. Not changing anything about the blog! Just adding to what’s already here. This is our meal plan for the Summer of 2017. I tried hard to make it comprehensive, practical, and budget-friendly, but also not boring and really delicious. It all starts out with cooking a big pot of chickpeas and making a batch of almond milk, and most of the recipes stem from there. We are splitting this plan into two parts. This first part will focus on the shopping list, prep, breakfast and lunch recipes. The second part is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert. Here we go! Menu (for dinner and dessert recipes, see Part 2) Breakfast Almond Pulp Lime Ginger Granola Overnight Berry Chia Oats Lunch Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad Basil Zucchini Chowder Dinner Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas Zucchini Kimchi Tacos Dessert Peach and Blackberry Crisp *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, it’s got all the ingredients you’ll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 cauliflower head - 1 small broccoli head - 5-7 small to medium zucchini - 3 corn ears or 1 corn ear and 2 1/­­2 cups frozen corn - 1 of each green and red (or yellow, or orange) bell peppers - 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - 2 portobello mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 1 large and 1 small red onion - 2 yellow onions - 1-2 garlic heads (6-7 cloves) - 1-inch piece ginger - 2 avocados - 3-4 radishes (optional) Fruits - 3-4 limes - 3-4 lemons - berries: 1 pint fresh blueberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint fresh raspberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint strawberries – fresh (optional) - 1 cup blackberries – fresh or frozen - 3 ripe peaches or nectarines Herbs - 1 bunch (about 2 cups) basil - 1 bunch dill - 1 bunch cilantro - parsley (optional) Bulk - 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas - 2 1/­­2 cups raw almonds or 2 cups almonds and 1/­­2 cup walnuts/­­other nuts of choice - 3/­­4 cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds - 3/­­4 cup chia seeds - 3 cups gluten-free old fashioned rolled oats - 1/­­4 – 1/­­2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut Other - 1 13.5 oz can light unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 can green or black olives - about 1 cup kimchi - tortillas of choice (corn for gf) - sun-dried tomatoes packed in olive oil (optional) - vanilla ice cream to serve with the fruit crisp (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - white miso paste - sunflower butter /­­ tahini /­­ almond butter - Dijon mustard - Sriracha or chili sauce of choice - neutral coconut oil - maple syrup - coconut sugar - arrowroot powder (optional) - vanilla extract (optional) - kombu (optional) - capers (optional) Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - red pepper flakes - smoked paprika - chili powder - garlic powder - cayenne pepper - black peppercorns - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking nuts and beans helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the nuts and beans more nutritious. - Soak 1 cup of almonds overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. You may need to repeat it later in a week to make more almond milk if needed more for granola. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners during the week. - Make almond milk for the overnight oats and granola, reserve the leftover almond pulp for the granola and fruit crumble. - Make the Almond Pulp Ginger Lime Granola - Cook the chickpeas to be used in the soup, fajitas, tacos and salad, reserve the cooking liquid for the soup. - Make the Overnight Berry Chia Oats - Make the Creamy Salad Dressing and the Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad - Make the Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder - Mix the Fajita Spice - Prep the veggies for the Fajitas Monday Night: Make the fajitas to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you already prepped the vegetables and spice blend during prep day. Bake the crumble for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the fajitas and the crumble are in Part 2. - Make the Fajitas - Bake the Crumble (+ second batch of almond milk if you didn’t make it on prep day) Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the fajitas, prepare the Kimchi Zucchini Tacos for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. They are a very quick, weeknight friendly dish. These tacos would also work well as a lunch, if you need a break from the soup and salad. The recipe for the tacos is in Part 2. - Make the Tacos Recipes 1. Once you try making almond milk at home, it will be hard to go back to the store-bought kind, since it’s infinitely more delicious and affordable. In this meal plan, we also show you how to utilize the almond pulp that is left over from making almond milk in an addictive granola recipe. You will likely need to make two batches of almond milk throughout the week. You can make the first batch (to use for the granola and overnight oats) during the prep day, and the second batch on the day that you make the crisp, which will give you more milk to serve with the granola. You can also make both batches during the prep day. Almond Milk   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 cup almond - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 4 cups purified water Instructions Combine the almonds with the water in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Strain the milk through a nut milk bag into a jar or bottle. Squeeze the pulp dry as much as possible and reserve the almond pulp to use for the granola and crumble. Store the milk in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226 2. This Ginger-Lime Granola is made with the pulp, leftover from making almond milk. Besides being zero waste, this recipe is also incredibly delicious, with bright flavors from ginger and lime, rich notes from shredded coconut, and crunch from pumpkin and chia seeds. It tastes great served with almond milk and fresh berries. Almond Pulp Ginger-Lime Granola   Print Ingredients reserved almond pulp from making almond milk ¼ - ½ cup unsweetened shredded coconut ½ cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds ¼ cup chia seeds 2 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ¼ cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon grated ginger zest of 1 lime juice ½ lime pinch of sea salt Instructions Preheat oven to 325° F (160° C). Combine the almond pulp, shredded coconut, pumpkin/­­sunflower seeds, chia seeds, coconut oil, maple syrup, ginger, lime zest and juice, and a pinch of sea salt in a large bowl. Mix thoroughly. Spread the granola mixture on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet in a somewhat even layer and toast for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir, breaking apart any large clumps. Place the sheet back in the oven and turn off the heat. Leave to dry in the oven for 1 hour. If granola is not completely dry by that time, turn the oven back on the lowest temperature and let dry for another 30 minutes or until completely dry and crispy. If you have convection oven, that setting is really useful here. Keep the granola in an airtight glass container at room temperature. Serve with almond milk and berries. 3.5.3226 3. Cooking a big pot of beans on a Sunday is always a good idea, since you will then have a solid base for all kinds of meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, the chickpeas are utilized in every savory recipe, making the dishes more nourishing and satisfying. Pot of Chickpeas   Print Ingredients 1½ cups dried chickpeas - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 3-4 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife half a yellow onion 1-2 bay leaves (optional) 2-inch piece kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions While the granola is baking, combine the chickpeas with plenty of purified water in a soup pot. Add the garlic, onion, bay leaves and kombu, if using. The water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Bring the chickpeas to a boil over high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Check for doneness. If the chickpeas are soft, salt the water generously and cook for another 10 minutes, until the chickpeas are tender but still intact. Simmer longer, before adding salt, if chickpeas are not yet soft. Drain the chickpeas, reserving the cooking liquid. Youll need 1 cup of it for this meal plan, for the chowder. Optionally, freeze the rest of the liquid for future use in place of vegetable broth in any dish. 3.5.3226 4. These overnight oats are a breeze to put together and make for a satisfying, summery breakfast. We like our overnight oats to be chia-heavy, so this is something between a chia pudding and overnight oats, layered with juicy summer berries. Overnight Berry Chia Oats   Print Ingredients 2 cups rolled oats ½ cup chia seeds 2¾ cups homemade almond milk - from above ⅓ cup maple syrup splash of vanilla extract (optional) about 2 cups mix of fresh or frozen blueberries and raspberries, or any other berries of choice Instructions While the granola is baking and the chickpeas are simmering, combine the rolled oats and chia seeds in a large bowl. Add the almond milk, maple syrup and vanilla extract, if using, and stir to combine thoroughly. Spoon the oats between 2-3 clean jars in layers, alternating them with fresh or frozen blueberries, raspberries or any other berries of choice. Cover the jars with their lids and place in the refrigerator overnight. Enjoy for breakfast. 3.5.3226 5. I make this simple, creamy dressing all the time. It’s perfect in salads, as well as a sauce or dip for so many veggie dishes. Universal Creamy Salad Dressing   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons sunflower butter, tahini or almond butter 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon sriracha or other chili sauce of choice juice of 2 large lemons, plus more if needed Instructions Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of the lemon juice, in a glass jar or a bowl. Mix until smooth. Add the lemon juice and stir until well combined. Store refrigerated in an airtight glass container. 3.5.3226 6. This rainbow salad is loaded with nourishing summer vegetables, chickpeas, olives, herbs and seeds. At the base of the salad is garlicky, sautéed broccoli, which keeps much better than greens and makes for a really sturdy bed for the veggies. When slathered in the creamy dressing (above), this salad is completely irresistible. Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower head - chopped 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above ¼ cup toasted sunflower or pumpkin seeds 1 small to medium carrot - shaved into ribbons with a vegetable peeler kernels from 1 corn ear ½ cup olives - halved or quartered ⅛ red onion - chopped ¼ cup chopped dill ¼ cup chopped parsley (optional) handful basil leaves - torn (optional) 3-4 radishes - sliced (optional) about 2 tablespoons chopped sun dried tomatoes (optional) 1 tablespoon capers (optional) 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 head broccoli - cut into florets sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced freshly ground black pepper about 6 tablespoons Universal Creamy Salad Dressing, plus more for serving - from above Instructions Place the cauliflower into a food processor and pulse a few times into rice-sized pieces. Combine the cauliflower rice, chickpeas, sunflower or pumpkin seeds, carrots, corn, olives, onion, dill, parsley and basil, as well as the radishes, sun-dried tomatoes and capers, if using, in a large bowl. Warm the coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the broccoli and salt and sauté until bright green, for about 5-7 minutes. Add the garlic and stir it around for 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the garlicky broccoli to the bowl with the salad. Season the salad with freshly ground black pepper and add about 6 tablespoons of the Creamy Salad Dressing. Toss to combine well. Store the salad refrigerated in an airtight container. Serve with more dressing. 3.5.3226 7. One of our favorite, easy summer soups, with delicate flavors of zucchini and basil, sweetness from corn, and creaminess from coconut milk. It makes for the perfect, light warm weather lunch. Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon ground coriander (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 yellow onion - chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2½ cups fresh or frozen corn kernels 3-4 small zucchini - cubed 3 garlic cloves - sliced juice of ½ lemon 1 can unsweetened light Thai coconut milk 1 cup reserved chickpea broth - from above 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above 1 packed cup basil leaves, plus more for serving Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the spices, onion, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and sauté for 5 minutes, until onion is translucent. Add the corn and another pinch of salt and sauté for another 5 minutes. Add the zucchini and garlic, and stir around for 1-2 minutes, until the garlic is fragrant. Add the lemon juice and let it absorb for about 1 minute. Add the coconut milk, chickpea broth and chickpeas and bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Measure 1½ cups of the soup into an upright blender, add the basil, and blend into a chunky puree. Return the pureed soup back to the pot and mix it in. Serve the soup garnished with more basil. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. 3.5.3226 8. Use this spice mix for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas, as well as in any other dishes, where a piquant savoriness would be welcome. Fajita Spice   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons chili powder ½ tablespoon sea salt ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ tablespoon ground cumin, preferably freshly ground ½ tablespoon coconut sugar ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon garlic powder (optional) a few grinds of black pepper Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a small jar with a tight fitting lid. Close the jar and shake until well-combined. 3.5.3226 9. Prep the vegetables for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas ahead of time, in order to simplify your weeknight dinner. Fajita Vegetable Prep   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower - cut into florets 2 portobello mushrooms - sliced 1 large red onion - chopped 1 red, yellow or orange bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 green bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - seeded and sliced Instructions Prep all the vegetables as specified in the ingredients list. Store the chopped cauliflower and mushrooms in separate containers. Store the chopped onion and all sliced peppers in one container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding Summer Greek Salad Pink Soup with Roasted Onions and Broccoli Lemongrass Mango Curry with Toasted Pumpkin Seeds .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Green Potato Salad

July 4 2017 Veganpassion 

Green Potato Salad The last weeks I've been traveling for the PLANT BASED INSTITUTE between Munich and Berlin. I don't get to enjoy my balcony that often. On my first free evening I took the chance to have a wonderful BBQ with my friends enjoying the weather. Everyone cooks the dish they want and we really don't want to miss a traditional german potato salad. I like it most with some greens in it. The recipe is from my new book VEGIONAL What do you like most for a BBQ evening? If you like, comment below and maybe the next recipe will be your wish! Makes 4-6 portions. Preparation time: 40 minutes For the remoulade: 100 ml soy milk (you will need soy milk because of it's lecithin) 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. mustard salt, black pepper 1 onion 2 small pickles 1 bunch of fresh herbs of your choice (chives, parsley, tarragon, chervil) For the salad: 4,4 lbs waxy potatoes  10 oz frozen green peas 1 small zucchini 5,2 oz smoked tofu 3 spring onions 2 pickles homemade remoulade 3 tbsp. white wine sugar smoked salt, black pepper Mix soy drink and vinegar in a blender until the soy drink builds flakes. Blend at medium speed and add oil until you reached favoured consistency. Flavor with mustard, salt and pepper. While blending the mixture is a little warm and it will get thicker when it cools off. Cut onion and pickles into small cubes, chop the herbs and stir all in.  Cook potatoes in salted water for about 20 minutes. Then drain potatoes and let them cool off. Cut beans into pieces and leave to cook with the peas in some salted water. Darin afterwards. Peel the potatoes (or not) and cut them in slices. Put them in a salad bowl. Cut small cubes of zucchini and smoked tofu, slice spring onions and add to the potatoes. Also add beans and peas. Chop pickles and stir with remoulade and vinegar. Add the dressing to the salad and mix everything. If you like add smoked salt and pepper. 

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated Beans

April 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated BeansFagor recently sent me their 6 quart pressure cooker, and I was very excited since I’ve never had one before and knew that it would be a very practical addition to my kitchen. Aside from stews, soups, and rich veggie broth, I was especially thrilled about the prospect of perfect home-cooked beans. I’d heard that cooking beans in a pressure cooker makes them amazingly creamy, yet firm and intact, on top of significantly speeding up the cooking process. As an example, soaked kidney beans only take 5 minutes of active cooking time in the pressure cooker. Crazy stuff! All the rumors turned out to be true – my pressure cooker beans have been coming out amazingly buttery. The reason I’m so excited about a more efficient way to cook beans is that I really dislike buying canned ones. I’ll do it in case of an emergency, but it’s really not my favorite way to go. Firstly, canned beans never taste as good as my homemade ones, since I usually include some aromatics like peppercorns, garlic and bay leaf in the cooking water. Canned beans also seem to be harder on my digestion, since I take time to soak and rinse my beans, as well as cook them with kombu (more on that below), while most companies don’t. Maybe I’m just sensitive, but that’s a big factor as well. Plus, dried beans are more affordable than canned ones, and that’s always a great bonus. Today I’m sharing a few useful things I’ve learned about cooking my own beans after years of practice, as well as my favorite recipe for simple marinated beans. I like to make those on a Sunday and spoon them into meals throughout the week. Even if you don’t have a pressure cooker, there are still plenty of great tips and tricks that you might find helpful below. Have a great Sunday :) Soak I always soak dried beans before cooking them. I know, it seems like an annoying practice that doesn’t allow for any spontaneity in the kitchen, but it’s also really easy to make a habit out of it. Soaking reduces the cooking time, as well as helps eliminate the phytic acid (antinutrient) in beans and activates the germination process, making the beans easier to digest/­­more nutritious. To help break down phytic acid, especially during shorter soaking times, add a splash of acidic liquid, such as lemon juice, vinegar or even a few pinches of salt to your soaking water. Cover your beans with plenty of water and leave room in the bowl, since the beans will grow quite a bit as they take on the water. Once done soaking, rinse and drain the beans really well to wash off all of that unwanted stuff. I like to soak my beans overnight. I’ve gotten into the habit of asking myself if there’s anything that needs to be soaked before I go to bed, and sometimes I’ll just soak a cup of some bean/­­lentil/­­grain without even knowing what I’ll do with it the next day. If you happen to soak some beans and don’t have the time to cook them the next day, just change the water, cover, and put them in the fridge until ready to cook. Batch Cook & Freeze The trick that does allow for spontaneity when using home-cooked beans is batch cooking and freezing them for future use. Cook a whole pound of beans at a time and freeze them in 1 1/­­2 cup batches (equal to around a 16 oz can), and you’ve got a foundation for so many meals right in your freezer. It feels really good! You can freeze the beans in glass containers or zip lock bags for anywhere from 6 months to a whole year (labeling with a date is a good idea in these cases). A good tip I learned for preventing freezer burn is to cover the beans with their cooking liquid, then freeze. Add Aromatics & Kombu Another great thing about cooking beans at home is that you can flavor the cooking water any way you want. That will make the beans taste better, as well as provide you with a whole batch of broth, which you can use in place vegetable broth in any recipe. I pretty much never throw away the cooking water, and usually end up freezing it for future use. That way, I almost never have to buy boxed broth. The aromatics I personally like to add to the cooking water are bay leaf, black peppercorns and garlic. Some people add onions, carrots and herbs – the possibilities are endless. Another important addition to bean cooking liquid is kombu, which is a mineral-rich seaweed. Kombu yields all of its beneficial minerals to the beans and the water, as well as helps tenderize the beans and make them easier to digest – a life-changing tip I learned from Amy Chaplin. Pressure Cooking One quirk of pressure cooking is not being able to check the food for doneness while it’s cooking, since the pot cannot be opened while there’s pressure built up inside. It’s helpful to know how long your ingredient will take to cook ahead of time, and time the cooking process accordingly. Thankfully, there is this very helpful chart that tells you suggested cooking times for most common types of beans. I love that it has cook times for both soaked and unsoaked beans, since those vary pretty significantly, and I’ve found them to be very accurate. Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans   Print Serves: around 3 cups Ingredients 1 cup dried beans of your choice - soaked overnight in purified water w/­­ a splash of vinegar, lemon juice or salt 2 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 2 bay leaves 1 piece kombu 1 teaspoon black peppercorns sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the beans very well. In a pressure cooker, combine the beans, garlic, bay leaves, kombu, peppercorns and plenty of salt. Cover the beans with plenty of water, water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Remember that when cooking beans, you cannot fill up the pressure cooker any more than half way, since the foam from the beans might clog up the pressure release valve if there is too much water. Close the pressure cooker lid, set the pressure to high (15PSI) and turn up the heat to high. Wait until the pressure indicator shows that the pressure has been built up and turn the heat down to low. This is when your cooking time starts. Refer to this chart to determine the cook time for your beans and cook accordingly. Once the time is up, turn off the heat and let the pressure release naturally, which will take around 10 minutes. Open the pressure cooker, drain the beans, preserving the cooking liquid to use as broth or as freezing liquid. Discard the bay leaf, peppercorns and kombu. Enjoy the beans :) 3.5.3226   Quick Marinated Beans   Print Serves: 3 cups Ingredients 3 cups mixed cooked beans (I used baby Lima and kidney) handful of parsley - chopped handful of chives - sliced 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar juice of 1 lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions In a bowl, combine the beans with parsley and chives and give everything a stir. Add the olive oil, vinegar, lemon juice, salt and pepper, and mix thoroughly. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Store the beans in the refrigerator, in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. The flavors will develop further as the beans marinate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Garden Juice Fruit and Root Salad Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl Avocado Truffles .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated Beans appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus

April 7 2017 My New Roots 

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus The first job I landed after moving to Copenhagen, was working as a chef in a little cafe. After a few weeks of consistently not burning lasagna and under seasoning everything, I was asked if I was interested in cooking on a few episodes on a local, public TV station. The producers suggested I choose a few dishes that I love, and filmed me in a friends kitchen, since mine was too small. My husband gently warned me beforehand that Danes dont respond well to overly-enthusiastic, hyperbolic Americans, so I faked it and was awkwardly not myself as I spoke lukewarmly about whole grains and beans, fermented things and dark leafy greens. The first recipe I made on the show was sprouted hummus, and although the recipe turned out well, I felt like a fraud. Because above all things, sprouts were, and still are, my true love. The show was on at 2 or 3 in the morning, and because I didnt have a television, I never actually saw it on air. Instead, I watched it on my computer on a borrowed CD, long after it had been on TV. Much to my dismay, the producers titled the show Cooking with Sareh, which still baffles me considering the fact that my name is spelled the exact same way in Danish. The program was poorly edited, badly lit, awkward in every sense, and in my attempts to come off as cool and nonchalant, I seemed utterly bored as I fondled chickpea sprouts - something that otherwise would get me pretty riled up. On the whole, this experience was totally mortifying, except for one small, redeeming factor. I was suddenly being recognized at work in the café, and on the bike paths of Christiania: hey sprout girl! theyd call at me. Its you! I didnt make your hummus, but your show is great, sprout girl, theyd say. If there was any consolation, this was it. I was Sprout Girl. So in case you missed my break out performance on Cooking with Sareh, and my reined-in, lackluster pitch about sprouts, here it is again. Because I am Sprout Girl forever and always. Sprouting is like any other kitchen endeavour: it seems pretty daunting until you actually do it, then youre left wondering what took you so long to try – a real facepalm moment. With simple equipment that you most likely have in your cupboard, and seeds that you already have in your pantry, its a fun and empowering practice that brings you one step closer to your food. Sprouts are so nutritious because they are life potential, ignited. When we soak a seed, we end its dormancy, and awaken the nutrition inside it needed to grow a plant which will in turn make more seeds and more plants. When we eat a sprout, we eat this potential! Pound for pound, sprouts have the largest amount of nutrients of any food. Did you get that? This is a big deal! And its all because sprouting increases vitamin content significantly, especially vitamin A, Bs, C and E, along with boosting calcium, iron, selenium, and zinc. The quality of protein and carbohydrates improves, as the sprouting process begins to break down the complex proteins and starches into amino acids, peptides, and simple carbohydrates needed by the seed to grow. At the same time, anti-nutrients such as phytic acid, protease and amylase inhibitors are neutralized. This makes a sprout very easy to digest with highly absorbable nutrients. Who is responsible for this influx of awesomeness? Its enzymes! Enzymes are compounds found in raw plants that are needed for nearly every biochemical process that takes place in our body, and something many of our modern diets are lacking. Sprouts are virtually loaded with them. There are up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts than uncooked fruits and veggies! Enzymes are also what sets living food apart from raw food. Yes, raw foods still offer us enzymes, but eating a food that is alive guantees more enzymes, and in fact more nutrients altogether. As soon as a food is picked, it begins losing its nutrients. Imagine how much vitamin C is left in that orange, which has traveled hundreds, if not thousands of kilometers to get to your plate, and spent weeks, if not months in a storage facility before being dropped off at your local grocer. Sprouts are the remedy to this, pulsating with life and life-giving nutrients, and pretty much the freshest food you can eat outside of a garden. Sprouts are also incredibly low in calories, yet deliciously filling due to their high fiber and water content. A fantastic food to binge on, especially if youre trying to elbow out some of the other stuff from your diet. I love the versatility of sprouts, not only are there so many varieties, but they can be used in so many ways. Like this hummus for example! You can also go classic and top your sandwiches with sprouts, or fold them into grain salads, puree them into soups and even smoothies. I also love freshening up cooked dishes, like stir-fries, curries and pizzas with sprouts. Their crunch and earthy brightness are a welcoming balance to heavier, richer meals. If youre on a budget, sprouts are a sweet deal. Because the amount of food you sprout triples or quadruples in size, youll end up with way more to eat than you started with for the same price. Its kind of magical. Whats more, is that properly stored sprouts can last over a month, and some varieties up to 70 days. If youre prone to tossing away spoiled produce, sprouts will save you money, big time. Sprouting can take place anywhere you have access to fresh, clean water twice a day. Ive sprouted on road trips, beach holidays, visiting the in-laws...all over the place! And the groovy thing about taking your show on the road is that you can convince other people to get sprouting too. And sprouts are not just great for our health, but also the planet. Consider the fact that youre growing a garden right in your kitchen, using your own energy to make the magic happen. Its hyper-local food at its best! No chemicals or pesticides during the growing process, or fossil fuels for transportation. Could sprouts be the perfect food?! The answer is yes. But I may be a little biased. I am the Sprout Girl, after all. If you are concerned about mold or bacteria contamination, please understand that commercially-grown sprouts are propagated in an ideal environment for pathogens to proliferate. Just one more reason to grow your own sprouts at home where you can be sure of proper hygiene and care. Make sure that your jar or sprouting container is thoroughly clean, that youre rinsing your sprouts with cool water twice daily, and that your sprouts have plenty of airflow. After I drain my sprouts, I make sure that the seeds /­­ sprouts arent blocking the entire opening of the jar (see photo). If you follow these tips, you shouldnt have any problems. Scoring Seeds You can sprout just about anything, but the cheapest and easiest things are found in the bulk bin of your health food store! Lentils, beans, chickpeas, rice, buckwheat, wheat are all widely available and inexpensive. Its imperative that you choose organically-grown ingredients, as conventionally grown seeds are often irradiated, making them difficult, or even impossible to germinate. You can also purchase seeds online, especially the more specialty ones, like alfalfa, radish, onion, broccoli etc. Finding Equipment There are plenty of sprouting apparatuses that you can buy, but if youre just starting out, use a jar! I bet you already have one. – 1 sterilized, large-mouth, quart-sized glass jar with an airtight lid – small piece of cheesecloth – rubber band – a bowl or dish rack How to Sprout There are countless resources on this topic online, and even whole books written about sprouting, so I am presenting you with a very simple, yet rather foolproof technique. If you want to learn more (which I encourage you to do!) here’s a great place to learn about different methods, applications, as well as help and advice: Sprout People     Print recipe     Simple Sprouting Day 1 1. Prep (night) Take a quick glance at the seeds as you put them into the sterilized soaking container. Remove any stones, cracked /­­ damaged seeds, and rinse well. 2. Soak (night) A general rule is covering the seeds with 2-3 times the amount of water (e.g. 1 cup seeds : 2-3 cups water). Use pure, filtered, unchlorinated water. Skim off any seeds that are floating. Let sit for 8-12 hours. Day 2 1. Drain (morning) Put a piece of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and secure it with a rubber band. Drain the seeds letting all the water run out. 2. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 3. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 3 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 4 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) 3. Enjoy (night) Your sprouts are ready! The tail should be at least the length of the seed itself (if it is not quite there yet, continue with the rinsing and draining process until it is. Some seeds take a couple more days). If youre not going to eat all the sprouts right away, make sure you let the sprouts drain for at least 8 hours after their last rinse before you put them in the fridge. Never store wet sprouts, as they will spoil quickly. Store sprouts in the sprouting jar with an airtight lid for one month, or more.     Print recipe     Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus Makes 4 cups Ingredients: 2 cloves garlic 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml tahini 1/­­2 tsp. fine salt, to taste 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (optional) zest of 1 lemon 4 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 cups /­­ 500g sprouted chickpeas (start with 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 300g dried chickpeas) Directions: 1. Pulse the garlic in the food processor until minced. Add all other ingredients, except for the sprouted chickpea and blend until you have a paste. Add the chickpeas and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Season to taste and adjust more salt /­­ spice if desired. To achieve an even smoother consistency, scoop hummus into a high-speed blender and blend on high for an additional 10-15 seconds. Serve immediately and store leftovers in an airtight container for up to five days. I hope that this process seems simple enough for you to try. I promise that once you start sprouting, you won’t be able to stop! It’s so easy, fun, and connecting – not to mention delicious. Good luck and happy sprouting, dear friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! I am thrilled to announce my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Can’t wait to see you there.    The post It’s Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Black Forest Cake

March 21 2017 Veganpassion 

Black Forest Cake It's my boyfriends birthday so I made him his all-time favorite cake. The traditional German Black Forest cake. If you want to bake this cake in a 10 inch form you have to double the ingredients and increase the baking time. Nut flan case: 1/­­3 cup + 1 tbsp. almonds, grounded 1/­­2 cup whole spelt flour 2 tbsp. sugar 1 pack vanilla pudding powder 2 tbsp. butter Mix ingredients with a fork until the dough is formable. Press dough into a greased and floured springform and prick it with a fork. Put form into oven at 320°F air circualtion for 15 minutes. Biscuit: 1 2/­­3 cup +  1 tbsp. flour 1/­­2 cup sugar 2 tbsp. oil 1 pack baking powder 1 cup water with gas 1 pinch salt 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla 1 tbsp. cocoa Bake at 320°F for 30 Minutes. Let the biscuit cool off and cut trough afterwards. Cherry filling: 1/­­2 cup cherries 1/­­2 cup cherry brandy 1 tbsp. sugar 1/­­2 pack red glaze Cook juice with red glaze. Stir in cherries and let it cool off. Cream: 1 3/­­4 cup + 2 tbsp. soy cream 3-4 tbsp. cherry brandy 2 pack vanilla sugar 3-4 tbsp. sugar 3 tbsp. stabilizer for whipping cream 1 pinch salt Whip cream with the other ingredients. Put it in the refrigerator. Besides: 1 cup chocolate shred 5 tbsp. cherry brandy Take the nut flan case first. Take a cake ring as a help. Put the cherry filling on the case and then put half of the biscuit on it. Sprinkle biscuit with a little cherry brandy. Spread whip cream on it and then put the other half of whip cream on it. Take the rest of the cream an spread it all over the cake. If you want you can garnish the cake. Enjoy!

Nasi Lemak

March 15 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Nasi Lemak In the five weeks that I spent exploring Malaysia, Singapore, and Borneo there were a few dishes that I just had to try whenever I had the chance. Nasi Lemak is a national favorite - and one of my favorites, too! The name technically means “fatty rice” but “creamy rice” sounds a least a little bit better. Traditionally, as with this recipe, Nasi Lemak is rice cooked in creamy, coconut milk - often along with fresh herbs and spices such as pandan (which you can replace with bay leaves if that’s what you’ve got.) The bright yellow hue comes from turmeric. Though it’s a breakfast dish, it can be eaten at any time of the day, and many variations cross firmly into Savory Culinary Territory. I eat this all times of the day: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snack, whatever! I tried Nasi Lemak in lots of places: Kuala Lampur, Penang, Malacca, and Singapore. Inspired by those dishes and their accompaniments - and my own imagination, I’ve created a complete meal set: Coconut Pandan Rice served with stir-fried Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, crunchy, charred Spicy Nuts, and a delicious sweet-chili sauce known as Sambal Belacan. These are actually four different recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA which I’ve put together in this one post. You can of course substitute or simplify the dishes for a less involved meal set designed how you like it. Nasi Lemak is equally awesome even when it’s just served with the fresh cucumber, lime slices, and nuts. I love going all out and doing the Lemongrass Tofu cubes, too. Also, I find the hot, spicy Samabal Belecan completes the dish fantastically. How to eat it? Mix it up and eat it with your hands! Serve this meal set up on a banana leaf, wash your hands, mix everything together, and dive in… wild and forkless. (By the way, frozen banana leaves are often available at your local Asian import grocery shop. Just thaw them, rinse them, and eat off of them.) If you prefer a more modern approach: Make it all, arrange it perfectly on plates, eat it with a fork and spoon. It’s up to you! Nasi Lemak Malaysian Coconut Pandan Rice with Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, Spicy Nuts & Sambal Belacan recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 3 to 4 /­­ time 60 min Coconut Pandan Rice: - 2 cups (375 g) broken jasmine rice or basmati rice - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) water - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) coconut milk - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric ground - 2 pandan leaves or bay leaves - fried onions for garnish - 1/­­2 small cucumber sliced - lime slices for garnish - Rinse and drain rice thoroughly. - Bring water and coconut milk to low boil in a medium pot with good lid. Stir in rice, salt, turmeric, and pandan (or bay leaves). Return to simmer. Cover and steam until most liquid is absorbed, 12-15 min. Remove from heat. Stir a few times. Cover and let sit 10 min. Remove and discard leaves before serving. - Garnish with fried onions, cucumber, and lime slices. Lemongrass Ginger Tofu: - 14 oz (400 g) firm tofu cut in cubes or strips - 1 1/­­2 cups (200 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs oil - 2 shallots finely chopped - 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 2 stalks lemongrass finely chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice - 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - fresh coriander or parsley leaves chopped, for garnish - Cut tofu in slabs and wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with a heavy cutting board and press out extra moisture, 15-20 min. Unwrap and cut in cubes or strips. - Heat oil in a large frying pan or wok on medium high heat. Add chopped shallots, garlic, lemongrass, ginger, and ground coriander. Fry, stirring constantly, until shallots being to soften and brown, 2-3 min. - Add tofu cubes. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu cubes are golden brown and crispy on the edges, 5-8 min. - Add chopped pineapple, lime (or lemon) juice, soy sauce, and salt. Fry, stirring regularly, another 5-10 min. Remove from heat. Spicy Nuts: - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) peanuts - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) cashews - 1/­­2 tsp chili powder or paprika ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - Heat a medium frying pan on medium heat. Dry roast peanuts and cashews, stirring regularly, until light golden brown and dark spots begin to appear, 4-7 min. Do not burn. - Add chili powder (or paprika), sugar and salt. Mix well. Continue to cook another 2-3 min, stirring constantly, until sugar has melted and nuts are well coated. Remove from heat. Allow to cool. Sambal Belacan: - 2-3 Tbs vegetable oil - 5 large (90 g) red chilies chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1 Tbs rice vinegar - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice - 1 Tbs coconut sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - Blend all ingredients in a small food processor or blender until smooth, adding more oil (or some water) as needed. - Heat a small frying pan on medium heat. Add blended spice paste to pan and fry, stirring regularly, until sauce darkens, thickens, and oil separates, 8-12 min. vegan recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook in English & German) The post Nasi Lemak appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Sweet Lupines Bolognese with Vegan Parmesan

March 7 2017 Veganpassion 

Sweet Lupines Bolognese with Vegan Parmesan Spring seems a long time coming and I thought to get it a little cozy inside we're going to make a whole week full of comfort foods ? ? ?. Pasta, risotto, waffles and pancakes make an appearance. Make sure to check Instagram and Facebook for more inspiration. Let's begin with a well known classic: spaghetti bolognese. Always a good idea. With sweet lupines from Germany or Austria it's going to be regional. Have a wonderful week and enjoy the nasty weather with some good food ?. Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 1 cup sweet lupine shred 3/­­4 cup + 1 tbsp. vegetable broth 1 onion 1/­­2 can (340 g) sieved tomatoes 1 carrot 1 tsp. Italian herbs salt, pepper olive oil 1/­­2 tbsp. almond butter 1 tbsp. yeast flakes 14 oz spaghetti Cook the pasta as the package says and drop them off. Cook sweet lupines in vegetable broth with closed lid for 5 minutes. Put it aside and allow it to infuse another 10 minutes. Cut carrot and onion into cubes and roast them with olive oil. Add sweet lupines and roast until golden. Mix with sieved tomatoes and Italian herbs, salt and pepper. Stir in almond butter and yeast flakes. For the vegan parmesan: 1/­­4 cup cashews 1/­­4 cup almonds, blanched 2 tbsp. yeast flakes 1/­­4 tsp. ground garlic salt, pepper Mix all ingredients in a mixer. Serve with the Bolognese. Enjoy

Chestnut Cookies

December 1 2016 Veganpassion 

Chestnut Cookies Good morning! Last week I was on german TV again with my vegan baking. Of course I dedicated the show to the christmas bakery. If you couldn't tune in, don't worry, here's the recipe. Have a lot of fun with the christmas bakery! Makes 60 cookies. Ingredients: 150g spelt flour 150g chestnut flour 80g starch 100g powdered sugar 1/­­2tsp. galangal, grounded 1 vanilla bean 1/­­2tsp. cinnamon 1 dash of salt dust from an orange 2tbsp. almond milk 200g vegan butter 40g almonds, blanched and grounded For filling and decoration: 200g berry marmelade or 200g nougat creme 100g couverture chocolate 50g powdered sugar spice flowers In a mixing bowl mix spelt flour, chestnut flour and starch. Add powdered sugar then galangal, vanilla, cinnamon, salt and orange dust and mix together. Add almond milk and vegan butter and mix with a dough hook until you have a soft dough. Put the dough into clear film and put it in the fridge for at least 2 hours. Preheat oven 180°C (356°F) upper-/­­lower heat. Draw 16 circles on 3 baking papers, so the cookies have the same size. Take 1/­­3 of the dough and use a baking grinder and form 60 circles. Roll the dough on a countertop with flour about 3mm thick and cut out 6cm circles. Bake the cookies with enough space on the sheet at 180°C (356°F) upper-/­­lower heat for about 10 minutes. Let the cookies cool off before you fill them. Give each jelly and nougat creme on a teaspoon and put it on a cookie. Put a cookie circle on top and decorate with couvert chocolate, powdered sugar or spice flowers. Have lots of fun with baking and enjoy your first week of december!

Hot Blender Chocolate + Vitamix Competition

November 13 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Hot Blender Chocolate + Vitamix Competition We’ve had intense snow falls and cold days here in Stockholm for the past week. A weather that calls for furry sweaters, warm soups, spicy stews and large cups of hot chocolate. Our favourite chocolate recipe is thick, rich, creamy, vegan and insanely delicious. And we are sharing it here today, along with a competition to win a Vitamix blender (further down in this post). We actually make our chocolate directly in the blender, which not only saves dishes but also makes it perfectly frothy. This recipe is based on one of the recipes from our smoothie book, but we have adapted it slightly for our current mood. We have also added a few mashed blackberries to each glass/­­cup before serving, for a bit of complexity and a hint of berry flavour (which work really well with chocolate). This is of course entirely optional in case you are a hot chocolate traditionalist. We use soaked cashews, soft dates and salt for a plant based creamy sweet milk. Cacao powder, cinnamon, ginger add chocolate flavour and tahini or coconut oil makes it richer. If you can only find dried dates, you can pre-soak them along with the cashew nuts to make them easier to blend. Our chocolate isn’t super dark, as our kids prefer it like this. But you can easily add some extra cacao to make it more intense. http:/­­/­­www.greenkitchenstories.com/­­wp-content/­­uploads/­­2016/­­11/­­Blender-Hot-Chocolate-Vid.mp4 Win a Vitamix! As a belated celebration of our Green Kitchen Smoothies book (which now is out in UK, US, Australia, German, Swedish, Danish and Polish), Vitamix has kindly agreed to give away one of their new Vitamix S30 blenders (the one we have used in this post) to one of our readers. It’s a smaller but strong model that we have been trying at home for the past month. To win it, you simply have to share a smoothie related photo on instagram (it can be either a smoothie you have made from our book, the cover of the book or one of our smoothie photos that you can find online) using the two hashtags #GKSVitamix and #GreenKitchenSmoothies (you need to have a public instagram account - not private - for us to see your hashtags). We will randomly draw a winner on 7 December so it will hopefully arrive before Christmas. The competition is open for everyone in the US and UK. Good luck! Hot Cashew Chocolate Serves 2-4 Important: Before you start, make sure your blender is approved for hot liquids. Otherwise, add cold water to the blender instead of hot and heat the chocolate on the stove after it has been blended. Hot chocolate ingredients 1/­­2 cup /­­ 65 g cashew nuts 2-3 cups /­­ 500-750 ml filtered water 4 fresh dates, pitted 3 tbsp cacao powder 2 tsp tahini (preferably unhulled) or coconut oil 1/­­2 tsp ginger 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon 1/­­2 tsp salt  To serve Blackberries, fresh or thawed frozen  Soak the cashew nuts in water for 3-6 hours. If you are in a hurry and have a strong blender, soaking them in hot water for 30 minutes is also possible. Drain and rinse the nuts and add them to the blender. Boil the water in a kettle. Meanwhile, add the rest of the ingredients to the blender. Add 2 cups of the hot water to the blender. Close the lid carefully. Start blending on low speed and then increase to max speed. It should be ready and smooth after about 30 seconds. Taste it and add more water if it’s too thick or more cacao, dates or salt to taste. Serve immediately. If you like, try mashing a few blackberries in the bottom of the glass before serving. It creates beautiful streaks of colour and adds a delicious berry tone to the the drink. We have received no compensation for this post. We simply asked Vitamix if they’d be willing to give away a blender to a reader because we think Vitamix is awesome and we think you readers are awesome!

MALAYSIA cookbook released

November 1 2016 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

MALAYSIA cookbook released Last week the printer delivered my new MALAYSIA cookbook! I’ll be busy packing Kickstarter orders and other pre-orders of the German and English books and going to the post office for the next few weeks. All the pre-orders and reward packages should arrive in time for the holidays. If you missed the Kickstarter, you can still get my new book: ORDER: The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA vegan cookbook: - direct from publisher Ventil Verlag: DEUTSCHE Ausgabe /­­ ENGLISH edition - from amazon.de: DEUTSCHE Ausgabe /­­ ENGLISH edition - from Book Depository - worldwide (coming soon) - OR order a *signed* copy (eng/­­deutch) directly from me includes e-book, stickers & bookmarks! p.s. The Lotus and the Artichoke MALAYSIA e-book will be officially released in mid-November. On Wednesday, Nov 2, 2016 at 11 am NYC (EST) /­­ 4 pm BERLIN (CET/­­GMT+1) I’ll be on KICKSTARTER LIVE again. Join me and the Kickstarter crew and listen to me tell all about how I turned my kitchen into a cooking show studio with their new live video stream feature. During my successful 30 day crowdfunding campaign I did two live cooking demos with recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke MALAYSIA: Mee Goreng (fried noodles) & Penang Laksa (noodle soup). Click here to watch the Nov 2 show (FREE) & submit your questions for me to answer! The post MALAYSIA cookbook released appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

World Health Summit Sits Down to Table for Meatless Monday

October 10 2016 Meatless Monday 

World Health Summit Sits Down to Table for Meatless Monday The positive impact of Meatless Monday is high on the menu at the eighth annual World Health Summit in Berlin, Germany. From October 9th - 11th, more than 250 international leaders from over 80 countries will gather to discuss the latest strategic developments in healthcare. To demonstrate their support of Meatless Monday, the summit participants will be served a meat-free lunch. This meal pairs perfectly with the summits session on Planetary Health, which explores the long-term health implications of environmental changes on food and agriculture. Were heartened to see our efforts recognized on a global stage and were delighted to share this news with you. Meatless Monday was started in 2003. Today, were active in 44 countries and in over 20 languages. Eating meat-free meals just one day a week not only benefits the environment, but also helps reduce the risk of chronic preventable disease. Thank you for your help. Together, well do a world of good. The post World Health Summit Sits Down to Table for Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms

September 7 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms I’ve found a new favorite weeknight meal that allows me to pack in as many different vegetables as I want, and, after the initial chopping, pretty much cooks itself. I’ve been needing for something like this to come along, since we’ve been having some very busy times around here. Going through house renovations, book edits and a third grader’s school homework all at the same time is no piece if cake, while food easily becomes that much needed escape from daily stress. There have been too many no-food-all-day-then-pizza-at-night days for me, and I knew it had to stop. It goes without saying, I’m very excited to share this lifesaver of a recipe with you today! I’ve been making lots of sweet skillet crumbles this summer, with any and all fruit I’d come across, from cherries and strawberries, to peaches and plums. It’s kind of the perfect lazy man’s dessert – so easy to prepare (chop, mix, bake) and very delicious. It’s really no wonder I’ve gotten hooked on whipping one up almost every week. This is where I got the curiosity to try out a savory crumble – what if the same breezy and flavorful preparation could be applied to vegetables? Well, turns out that it can, and it’s really good. For this particular savory crumble, I used the vegetables that are most abundant right now – zucchini, eggplant and tomatoes, with an addition of mushrooms for their meatiness and substance, and complete with warming curry spice. That being said, this recipe is highly customizable – use any vegetable in season (squash soon!), and any spice mix you prefer, keeping the crumble topping the same. After about an hour of slow-baking in the oven, you will have an amazingly comforting and nourishing meal. The leftovers are really tasty, too. Now you might be wondering what that beautiful wooden appliance gracing some of the photos is. Pleasant Hill Grain, a supplier of high-quality kitchen equipment, sent me one of their grain mills made by KoMo for grinding dry grains and beans, and I am in love! I wrote a lot about the advantages of freshly grinding your own flour in my book – it’s more affordable (whole grains are generally cheaper than flour), more nutritious, and so much more flavorful. It’s an especially great strategy for gluten-free baking, where a mix of various flours is often required. Before this mill, I did all my grinding in my high-speed Belndtec, but the way the KoMo mill is different and better for grinding flours is through its use of stones. Stone grinding is the most ancient form of pulverizing grain, and creates the most nutritious flour, simply because the flour never gets heated up too much while milling, allowing it to retain all the nutrition of the grains. KoMo also uses state of the art stones, made of a combination of corundum and ceramic, which basically never get worn down, and can produce very fine to coarse flour, based on your setting. I can genuinely say that fresh, stone-ground flour is absolutely the best, most flavorful flour you’ll ever cook with. Lastly, can we talk about the minimal design of this mill – is it not the most beautiful appliance you’ve ever seen? It’s designed in Germany and made in the Austrian Alps, and there’s not a single detail that doesn’t have function. The housing is made of Beechwood, and those meticulously crafted finger joints at the corners make me swoon. Once my kitchen is renovated, this guy will be on display, front and center. The most exciting news, though, is that we will be giving away one KoMo mill next week, so a hot tip – stick around for that :) Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the vegetables 1-2 eggplants - cubed 2 zucchini - diced into thick half-rounds ½ lb crimini or baby bella mushrooms 3-5 tomatoes - roughly chopped 1 yellow onion - chopped 3-5 garlic cloves - sliced 1-2 tablespoons curry powder, preferably homemade (I use recipe from this book) sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste 2 tablespoons vegetable oil (I used untoasted, unrefined pure sesame oil, a new discovery, excellent for cooking and oil pulling) or ghee for the crumble topping 1 cup old fashioned rolled oats ½ cup freshly ground barley, or cornmeal/­­polenta ½ cup ground almonds sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste 1 teaspoon baking powder ¼ cup ghee or neutral coconut oil - cold and solid (I prefer using ghee for this recipe as it goes really well with the curry spice) ¼ cup unsweetened, cold almond milk or other plant milk Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Combine all the vegetables and mushrooms in a large bowl. Add curry powder, salt, pepper and oil and toss to coat. Transfer the mixture into a 10-inch cast iron pan and set aside. Combine oats, barley flour/­­cornmeal, almonds, salt, pepper and baking powder in the same bowl. Cut the cold ghee or coconut oil into pieces and add to the bowl. Use your hands to mix the ghee/­­oil into the dry ingredients thoroughly. Add milk and mix to incorporate. Scatter the topping over the vegetables in the skillet and place into the oven. Bake for 1 hour. Serve garnished with fresh herbs, if desired. Reheat leftovers in a pan over low medium heat. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Temaki-zushi Broccoli Stem Riceless Risotto Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Savory Vegetable Crumble with Eggplant, Zucchini, Tomatoes and Mushrooms appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday

May 15 2017 Meatless Monday 

Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday   The global travels of Master Chef Jean-Christian Jury inspired him to write the ultimate kitchen companion on vegan cooking, Vegan: The Cookbook. It features 450 delicious recipes from more than 150 countries. But before Jean-Christian delved into the world of vegan cuisine, he received a startling wakeup call - a heart failure, twice. Years of running several restaurants at the same time, 16-hour work days and a poor diet had finally caught up with the French-born chef. After a few months of recovery, he visited a detox center that specialized in healthy food, fresh smoothies and juices. This enlightening experience transformed his diet and lifestyle. Interestingly, this is the same idea behind Meatless Monday - eating plant-based foods to improve your health. By choosing not to eat meat just one day a week, you reduce your risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity and cancer.   Vegan: The Cookbook - for vegans, non-vegans and omnivores Jean-Christian promotes vegan foods, cooked with fresh ingredients, as a way to keep healthy, age gracefully and prevent many common diseases. His new cookbook offers recipes to satisfy all tastes, representing the cuisines of France, Greece, Italy, Vietnam, China and India. In addition, he explores less familiar fare, such as flavorful dishes from Timor and Papua New Guinea. There is no reason why vegan food cant be as delicious as non-plant-based cuisine. International Master Chef Jean-Christian Jury In 2007, Jean-Christian Jury opened his first vegan restaurant, La Mano Verde, in Berlin, Germany. He received an award for Best Vegan Restaurant on the Planet and was listed as one of Germanys 500 Best Restaurants (Der Feinschmecker 2015-2016).   Expert Guidance, Step by Step For his new cookbook, Jean-Christian specifically crafted his recipes for accuracy and ease of use. He intentionally selected ingredients that are readily available and provides simple step-by-step instructions as well as prep time and cooking time. To help you plan your meal, his book is neatly organized into chapters that cover Starters, Salads, Soups, Main Courses, Grains and Beans, Pasta and Noodles, and Desserts.   Get a Taste of Jean-Christian Jurys New Recipes To whet your appetite, heres a delectable sampler of five recipes found in the Vegan: The Cookbook. Go on and pick your favorite. At Meatless Monday, heres the one we cant wait to try.   Five-Spice Stir-Fried Soba Noodles The post Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Strawberry Almond Galette

April 29 2017 Veganpassion 

Strawberry Almond Galette I always love to be part of the german television show "Kaffee oder Tee". Showing my vegan creations just makes me happy. The crew is fantastic and I had lots of fun with the anchorman. If you're surrounded by such amazing people the baking becomes accessory. Makes one galette (9,8 inch diameter/­­25cm diameter) for 8 pieces Preparation time: 30 minutes Baking time: 30 minutes Ingredients: 1 2/­­3 cup whole spelt flour 1 tbsp. almonds, grounded 1 tbsp. sugar 1/­­4 tsp. baking powder 1/­­4 cup oil 1/­­4 cup + 2 tsp. dairy free drink 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar For the filling: 1 tbsp. almond butter 1 tsp. lemon juice 1 tbsp. sugar 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla 3 tbsp. dairy free milk 2 stalks of rhubarb 10 oz strawberries 1 tbsp. almond slices In a mixing bowl mix whole spelt flour, almonds, sugar and baking powder. Add oil and vinegar and mix with a spoon. Spread flour on the worktop and knead dough with your hands until it's smooth. Roll out the dough until it reaches a diameter of 11,8 inches. Put the dough on a baking paper. In a small mixing bowl mix almond butter with lemon juice, sugar, vanilla and 3 tbsp. dairy free milk until it's creamy. Spread the cream on the dough and keep a distance of 1,9 inches to the edge. Peel the rhubarb in slices and cut the strawberries in slices.  Arrange the strawberries in a circle and keep a distance of 1,1 inches to the edge. Fold up the edges of the dough over the fruits. Spread some dairy free milk on top of the cake edge and sprinkle almond slices on it. Put the galette with the baking paper on a baking sheet and bake at 356°F (180°C) two sided heat. Bake for 30 minutes and put a wooden spoon between the oven and the door for 10 minutes. This way the excessing water of the fruits can escape. Enjoy warm or cold with some ice cream!

Nasi Goreng

March 23 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Nasi Goreng I couldn’t even tell you how many times I had Nasi Goreng while I was in Malaysia. It was definitely often. Like, really often. Not only is this traditional vegetable fried rice dish usually totally delicious, it’s also usually easy to find and (with little to no effort) a great vegan option. Pretty much everywhere I went in the five weeks in Malaysia, this dish was on the menu or easy to order at almost any restaurant. Especially out of the big cities and in the countryside - and particularly on the islands and beaches - this is a vegan/­­vegetarian stand-by that is never hard to find. (By the way, based on my travels, this is true for most of Southeast Asia, including Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar… but the dish is found under other names and with local flavors.) This becomes an almost daily meal, if vegan options are limited. On Pulau Pangkor, there were two food places (more shacks than restaurants) that served fantastic Nasi Goreng and vegetable fried rice. And in Borneo, staying in the Permai rainforest, the local restaurant and the nearby food court had vegetable fried rice, or Nasi Goreng. There were also many breakfast or lunch buffets at hotels and restaurants that had rice dishes like this. Contrarily, when in Penang and Kuala Lumpur I was usually so blown away by other vegan choices that I didn’t eat Nasi Goreng as often. Nasi Goreng’s flavors and textures forge powerful memories for anyone who’s been to Malaysia or Indonesia - or even just a Malaysian or Indonesian restaurant - whether vegan, vegetarian, or neither. Just as with so many classic recipes - from region to region and family to family this dish is made a million different ways. This is mine… inspired by so many excellent meals on my adventures. When I created this recipe for the Malaysia cookbook, I made sure to hit all the best, unique flavors in a good Nasi Goreng: Fresh galangal root (or ginger), lime juice, spicy chili, and a thin, tangy sauce provided by the mix of Shoyu soy sauce, vinegar, and citrus zest. I also round out the savory flavors with some sweetness. Traditionally in Malaysia, this dish would be served with just a bit of chopped vegetables (and way more rice). For my recipe, I’ve got a lot of the good stuff, included the crumbled tofu - which, by the way, replaces scrambled egg - sometimes found in traditional Nasi Goreng. By the way, I have many similar recipes inspired by other travels and other countries and cuisines - including: Cambodian Fried Rice, Mexican Magic Rice, and Vegetable Fried Rice from my World, Mexico, and Sri Lanka vegan cookbooks. After you’ve tried my Nasi Goreng, check out the other recipes and decide which country’s classic fried rice is your favorite. Nasi Goreng traditional vegetable fried rice recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA available in English & German serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 40 min + - 3.5 oz (100 g) firm tofu - 1 cup (190 g) broken jasmine rice or short grain brown rice - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) water - 1 cup (100 g) chinese cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli or bok choy finely chopped - 1 medium (90 g) carrot finely chopped or sliced - 2-3 Tbs oil - 1 tsp sesame oil optional - 3 (50 g) spring onions chopped, separated into white ends and greens - 1 or 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 1 large red chili finely chopped optional - 1/­­2 in. (1 cm) fresh galangal or ginger finely chopped - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1/­­2 tsp black pepper ground - 2 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice or 2 tsp rice vinegar - 1 tsp lime zest or lemon zest optional - 1 tsp sugar or agave syrup - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - lime slices for garnish - Cut tofu in slabs, wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with heavy cutting boards to press out excess moisture. Let sit 20 min. Unwrap tofu and crumble into a bowl. - Wash and drain rice thoroughly. - Bring water to boil in a small pot. Add rice and salt. Stir. Return to boil. Reduce heat to low and cover. Simmer 12 to 20 min as needed. After water is absorbed, remove from heat. Fluff rice with a fork. Cover and let sit and cool, ideally an hour or more. - Heat oil in a large wok or frying pan on medium high. Add chopped spring onion ends, garlic, chili (if using), galangal (or ginger), ground coriander, and black pepper. Fry, stirring constantly, until lightly browned, 2-3 min. - Add chopped carrots. Fry, stirring constantly, 2-3 min. Add crumbled tofu. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu begins to turn golden brown, 3-5 min. Add chopped cabbage (or other vegetables). Fry, stirring constantly, until vegetables start to soften, 4-5 min. - Whisk soy sauce, lime (or lemon) juice, zest, sugar (or agave syrup), and sea salt in a small bowl. - Add cooked rice to frying vegetables. Mix well. Add soy sauce mix and spring onions greens. Combine well. Fry, stirring constantly until liquid has been absorbed and rice and vegetables are moderately browned, 5-7 min. Remove from heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Serve with lime slices. vegan recipe for Nasi Goreng from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA The post Nasi Goreng appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Apam Balik

March 18 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Apam Balik It was my first day in Kuala Lumpur… I’d just arrived and was at the start of a 5 week culinary adventure to get a taste of Malaysia, Singapore, and Borneo. The sun shone bright and the sky was that deep, satisfying shade of blue. I was on a short morning walk from the Winsin Hotel on the edge of downtown Chinatown, heading towards the Indian neighborhood. Just outside the subway station on a particularly more urban street corner was a line of shiny, silver food trucks. My eye was caught immediately by one in particular: A woman was spilling roasted, candied peanuts and then corn kernels from a can onto a golden, round, thin pancake. She folded it over - making sort of a sweet taco - and placed it on a rack on the chrome counter of her street food cart. She caught me watching and smiled. “Hey Mister! You try Apam Balik!” Well, what could I say? I got closer and watched her make another two crepes. First, she stirred a simple batter of mostly rice flour and coconut milk and poured and spread the crepe on the sizzling griddle. Moments later, she pried up an edge, slid her spatula tracing under the circle, and flipped it over. I watched her again top the thin, crunchy crepes with peanuts and corn before folding them in half and setting them on the rack just in front of me. Just then, a colorfully dressed Indian woman parted from a few family members and approached the cart from my side. She reached out an anxious hand in a dance-like gesture, rattling rows of wrist bangles, and scooped two of the Apim Balik pancakes from the rack. She rattled off a few sentences in Malay to the seller, they exchanged some money, and both giggled briefly. The Indian woman turned to me and extended one of the crepes until it was right in my face. She said to me in melodic Indian English: “This one for you. Apam Balik. Peanut Pancake!” It was in my grasp and between my teeth before I knew it. The crepe was crunchy on the outside but then soft and chewy, quickly giving way to the delightful combination of sweet and salty flavors from the roasted peanuts, punctuated by bursts of fresh corn juiciness. It was perfect. I devoured the rest of it. Weeks later, back in Berlin, I set about to re-create the deliciousness. For the vegan recipe in my MALAYSIA cookbook, I made a simple, sure-fire formula for making Apim Balik at home in the kitchen. I didn’t have to veganize anything. It’s a pretty much straight-up thin pancake batter based on rice flour, coconut milk and sugar, lending a crunchy thin crepe. For the filling, I simplified it going with just candied peanuts. My variations (below) include optionally topping it with a sweet syrup and going authentic street food style with sweet corn kernels. Apam Balik crispy, crunchy peanut-filled pancakes recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA makes 4 to 6 /­­ time 30 min + - 3/­­4 cup (100 g) peanuts crumbled or very coarsely ground - 2 Tbs sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - 1/­­2 cup (60 g) flour (all purpose /­­ type 550) - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) rice flour - 1/­­4 cup (45 g) sugar - 1 Tbs corn starch - 1 tsp baking powder - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1 cup (240 ml) coconut milk - 2 Tbs water - agave syrup or coconut (palm) syrup optional - vegetable oil for frying pan - Crumble or coarsely grind peanuts and dry roast in a pan on medium heat until golden brown and dark spots appear, 4-5 min. Add sugar and salt. Mix well. Stirring constantly, roast until sugar melts and mix starts to stick together, 1-2 min. Remove from heat. - Combine flour, rice flour, sugar, corn starch, baking powder, and salt in a large mixing bowl. Whisk in coconut milk and water gradually. Mix until mostly smooth, but do not over mix. Cover and let batter sit 20-30 min. - Heat frying pan on medium high heat. Put a few drops of oil on pan and rub it around with a paper towel. Do this before each pancake. When a drop of water sizzles and dances on surface, pan is ready. - Pour about 1/­­4 to 1/­­3 cup (60-80 ml) batter in the center of the hot pan. Tilt and turn the pan to form a large, thin, circular pancake. - After bubbles appear on surface and underside is golden brown (about 2-3 min), use a spatula to carefully peel up the edges around the pancake and then flip it over. Cook the other side for 1-2 min, then flip it back over. Put 2-3 Tbs of the sugary peanuts on the pancake and roll up or fold over. Transfer to a plate. Repeat with other pancakes. - Serve plain, or drizzle pancakes with agave syrup or coconut syrup. Variations: Creamy: Use peanut butter instead of roasted, crumbled peanuts. Bananas: Add sliced banana to filling. Traditional: Add 1-2 Tbs sweet corn kernels to each pancake filling. vegan recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA available in English & German   The post Apam Balik appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Penang Laksa

March 13 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Penang Laksa Incredibly, I’d been in Malaysia for almost two weeks before I got to try Laksa, the legendary noodle soup. Even before the trip, I’d read about the intensely loved, powerful and fiery, somewhat-sour soup in food blogs and food guides to Malaysia. I’d checked out plenty of recipes and seen lots of super tasty photos. Once I got to Malaysia, whenever I asked locals what dishes I had to try, I heard again and again: Laksa! Okay, great, but where? And the answer was: Penang! Penang was hands-down my favorite place to eat on the Malaysia trip. (Singapore was a fairly close second. Penang was just more artsy, soulful, and real). I collected maps with locations of the best street food in Georgetown (Penang) and scoured the web and my travel guides for addresses of must-try vegetarian restaurants. On my second day in town, I had lunch at the vegan restaurant Sushi Kitchen, and met the chef/­­owner, who made a list for me of Must-See places and dishes. That night I went to Luk Yea Yan, a vegetarian Chinese restaurant known for fantastic flavors and inexpensive eats. I ordered up the Laksa soup. Three minutes later my oversized bowl of hot, steaming, bright red soup arrived - with countless ingredients and toppings piled up to the rim. There were at least three kinds of noodles, tofu cubes, soya and seitan chunks, numerous vegetables, about four kinds of fresh herbs - and balanced on top: a soup spoon with a thick, red curry paste on it. I’d read about this… Traditionally Laksa is usually served with a generous spoonful of rempeh - spicy red curry paste for you to stir in to the hot red broth yourself. I knew what to do. I did it. A half dozen flavors immediately exploded in my mouth: tamarind, chili, lime, pineapple, cilantro, mint. This was followed by a second wave of flavors: an army of vegetables, tofu, and seitan slices. I slurped down the noodles and paddled pieces of everything with my chopsticks into my hungry jaws. I had to take a break a few times to catch my breath and cool the spice alarm with generous draws on my lemon iced tea. When I was done, my forehead was light with perspiration and my lips and tongue were tingling and alive. There was never a doubt whatsoever that I would include a vegan recipe for Penang Laksa in my new Malaysia cookbook. Several weeks later (after having tried vegan Laksa soup at least three other times in Malaysia) I was back in my kitchen in Germany and set to work. It took a few attempts to master the recipe, each try better than the last. And then I had it: my own epic Laksa recipe! Since then, I’ve made it probably ten more times, including for several dinner parties large and small, and plenty of times for lunch. It’s best on cold, cloudy days to fire up your mood and open you up! But I’ve also made it lots of other times, even in the summer, well… just because it’s so awesome and is always a dish guests talk about long after the meal. Penang Laksa classic Malaysian noodle soup recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 45 min - 5 oz (150 g) seitan sliced - 3.5 oz (100 g) smoked tofu sliced - 1/­­3 cup (45 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs vegetable oil  - 1 Tbs soy sauce or Vegan Fish Sauce - 7 oz (200 g) udon noodles (cooked) - 2 1/­­2 cups (600 ml) water  - 2/­­3 cup (150 ml) coconut milk  - 1 kefir lime leaf or 1 tsp lime zest  - fresh mint leaves chopped - fresh coriander leaves chopped - fresh thai basil leaves chopped - bean sprouts for garnish laksa spice paste: - 4 candlenuts or 2 Tbs cashews soaked 20 min in hot water, drained - 1 stalk lemongrass chopped - 1/­­2-1 large red chili chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 shallot chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh galangal or ginger chopped - 1/­­2 tsp paprika ground (more as desired, for red color) - 1/­­2 tsp fennel seed ground - 1/­­2 tsp coriander ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar or agave syrup  - 3/­­4 tsp sea salt  - 1 tsp tamarind paste (seedless) - 2 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice  - 2 Tbs vegetable oil  - If using dried Udon: Cook, rinse, and drain 3.5 oz (100 g) noodles according to package instructions. - Blend spice paste ingredients in a small food processor until smooth. - Heat 1 Tbs oil a large pot or wok on medium high heat. Add sliced seitan and smoked tofu. Fry, turning regularly until edges are browned and crispy, 3-5 min. - Stir in chopped pineapple. Continue to stir-fry, 2-3 min. Add soy sauce (or Vegan Fish Sauce). Fry 2-3 min. Transfer to a plate or bowl. - Return pot or wok to medium high heat. Fry blended spice paste until it darkens and oil starts to separate, stirring constantly, 3-5 min. - Gradually stir in water, coconut milk and kefir lime leaf (or lime zest). Bring to simmer. Add cooked udon noodles. Return to simmer. Cook until noodles have slightly softened, 3-5 min. - Stir in fried seitan, tofu, and pineapple. Turn off heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Portion soup and noodles into bowls. Garnish with chopped herbs and bean sprouts. Serve. Panang Laksa vegan recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook - in English & German) The post Penang Laksa appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Lemon Meringue Tarte

January 30 2017 Veganpassion 

Lemon Meringue Tarte Good morning lovelies! We had a wonderful meringue tarte at german television. I'm so happy to be part of the show "Kaffe oder Tee" ("coffee or tea") and to create vegan dishes regulary. The feedback was overwhelming. Allegedly the second best recipe so far. I'd like to take the opportunity to thank you all so much! For the great support on my blog, the lovely feedback for my books and for the many friendly faces I get to meet at events and fairs. Without all of you the vegan movement today wouldn't have come so far. At "Kaffee oder Tee" I'm reaching so many people who never heard of the word "vegan" before. I'm awed by all of the nice letters you sent to me!!! I'm smiling head over ears right now and that's why I want to share the german video with you. Have lot's of fun with with baking this tarte. Have a wonderful week! You can watch all of the german shows here: www.veganpassion.de/­­TV.html. Makes one tarte  9,45 inch (24cm diameter) For the dough: 1 1/­­3 (180g) cup spelt flour 1/­­3 cup (60g) raw cane sugar 1 pinch of salt 1/­­2 cup (100g) vegan butter 2 tbsp. dairy-free milk (oat milk) flour for the worktop In a mixing bowl mix together flour, sugar and salt. Add butter flakes, then add dairy-free milk. First mix it with a fork, then use ur hands to knead the dough. Roll out on a flour powdered worktop. Roll until the dough has the size of your tarte baking pan. Gease the pan and carefully put in the dough. Prick the dough with a fork to avoid air bubbles. Use dried chickpeas or other legumes for blind-baking. Cut off the remaining dough. Bake at 374°F (190°C) upper-/­­lower heat for 18-20 minutes until its golden. Let it cool off. For the lemon filling: 1 1/­­4 (250ml) cup plantbased cream (oat cream) 2 tbsp. custard powder 1/­­2 tsp. agar-agar 1/­­3 cup (60g) raw cane sugar juice and abraision of two organic lemons Mix 1/­­2 cup (100ml) plantbased cream with custard powder, agar-agar and sugar. Use rest of the cream and cook it. Stir in the custard mixture and carefully cook it for 2 minutes. Add lemon juice and abraision and cook until it thickens. For the meringue: 1 small can of chickpeas (aquafaba) 1 pinch of salt 1 1/­­4 cup (150g) powdered sugar lemon zests as decoration Put the chickpeas into the fridge over night. Pour off the day after and keep the water (aquafaba). You can use the chickpeas different recipe. For the meringue we will only need the water! Whip up the aquafaba with a pinch of salt for about 10 minutes. Sift in powdered sugar and whip up again until it's stable. Put the meringue on the tarte. Use a flamble burner to flabmé the meringue. Decorate with lemon zests. 

Lebkuchen Chocolate Granola

November 20 2016 seitan is my motor 

If you are thinking about giving your friends edible gifts for the holidays this year, you should include this granola. It is inspired by a lebkuchen chocolate that I tried recently. I had no idea that lebkuchen (the German version of gingerbread) and chocolate go together so well, especially if the chocolate is a rich,Read more The post Lebkuchen Chocolate Granola appeared first on seitan is my motor.

Ritter Sport’s New Vegan Chocolate {Review}

November 5 2016 seitan is my motor 

Those who have been following this blog for a while know how much I love everything sweet. Especially chocolate. When I went vegan (almost 10 years ago!) Ritter Sport had a couple of vegan options in Germany. Their semisweet chocolate (50% was vegan) and so were their marzipan and peppermint bars. When they changed theRead more The post Ritter Sport’s New Vegan Chocolate {Review} appeared first on seitan is my motor.

Reformationsbrötchen (Reformation Rolls)

October 29 2016 seitan is my motor 

I have to admit that I don’t know much about Halloween. It has become very popular in Germany lately, mostly because companies and shops have been pushing it. When I grew up I only knew Halloween from US-American pop culture and I don’t think it would ever have occurred to us to celebrate it inRead more The post Reformationsbrötchen (Reformation Rolls) appeared first on seitan is my motor.

Flammkuchen with Squash and Chanterelles

September 12 2016 seitan is my motor 

Although we are still enjoying some unusually hot days, autumn produce has been entering the stores, especially pumpkins and squashes. (Which we also call pumpkins in German. I neer know what’s what in English.) Every year I discover a new variety. And even though there is no need for hot soup yet, I bought aRead more The post Flammkuchen with Squash and Chanterelles appeared first on seitan is my motor.

MALAYSIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 19 2016 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

MALAYSIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter On August 16th, 2016 I launched the Kickstarter Crowdfunding project for The Lotus and the Artichoke MALAYSIA vegan cookbook! This is my 4th Kickstarter project, and like the first three, it’s off to a terrific start. Cruise on over and check out the campaign. It’s a great way to support my creative endeavors and culinary adventures, and it’s a great way to pre-order the new cookbook which will be coming out in October. The Kickstarter will end on Sept 15th... make sure to get in before the fun is over. For the next few weeks, I’ll be posting cool updates and Behind the Scenes stories and photos of the design and production of the new cookbook. The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA After 3 successful Kickstarter projects and 3 internationally celebrated cookbooks, The Lotus and the Artichoke is back with a new cookbook... and back on Kickstarter! Earlier this year, I returned home to Berlin, Germany after 5 intense weeks exploring Malaysia, Singapore & Borneo: checking out the cities, cruising the coasts and countryside, island life during the wild Chinese New Year celebrations, staying in a rainforest treehouse, eating and cooking with the locals everywhere, and riding buses, trains, taxis, and boats all over the place. Since then, I’ve been recreating the insanely delicious eats, writing up new recipes inspired from the trip, spending hours at my art desk and computer with the illustrations and design, and photographing all the dishes for my next cookbook: The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA: A Culinary Adventure with over 70 Vegan Recipes. My 4th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide: - 160 pages - with over 60 full page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 5 weeks of travel in Malaysia, Singapore & Borneo - Explore amazing Malay, Chinese, and Indian cuisine from the fantastic foodie metropolises Kuala Lumpur & Singapore, culinary heritage highlights of Penang, rising star Ipoh, Sarawak’s quaint Kuching, the tribal highlands of Borneo and beyond - Everyday classics, mind-blowing mains, fabulous feasts, street food superstars, awesome salads & fresh treats, great snacks, and crazy delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and easy, awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Pre-Order my MALAYSIA cookbook on Kickstarter Some of the recipes: - Kelabit Mango Salad - Shredded Beet & Coconut Salad - Cucumber Zucchini Salad - Acar - pickled vegetables - Urap - traditional veg side - Penang Laksa Soup - Curry Mee - Nonya Noodle Soup - Spicy Mushroom Noodle Soup - Wonton Soup - Popiah Rolls - Otak-Otak - steamed quiche pockets - Satay Skewers w/­­ peanut sauce - Serunding Kelapa - roasted coconut & spices - Sauce Kachang - satay sauce - Sambal Belachan - red chili sauce - Pineapple Pepper Chutney - homemade red curry rempah paste - vegan faux-fish sauce - super 5-spice powder - Nasi Lemak - coconut creamy rice & ginger lemongrass tofu - Nasi Kandar - Malay street food feast - Nasi Kerabu - herbs, spices & olive mushroom rice - Nasi Goreng - fried rice classic - Mee Goreng - fried noodles with vegetables & crumbled tofu - KLFC - Kuala Lumpur Fried “Chicken” - Mushroom Murtabak - stuffed, grilled Indian flatbread - Sayur Campur - mixed vegetables w/­­ dark soy sauce - Sayur Lodeh - mixed vegetables w/­­ coconut gravy - Kang-Kong Goreng - stir-fried spinach - Bao - steamed buns w/­­ spicy seitan - Assam Tofu Faux-Fish - Asian casserole - Crispy Curry Tempeh Cubes - Soya Rendang - Black Pepper Seitan - Eggplant & Okra Tomato Curry - Szechuan (Kung Pow) Seitan - Char Kuey Teow - stir-fried rice noodles - Hong Shao Rou - roasted jackfruit - Mushroom Manchurian - Roti Canai - red curry & flatbread w/­­ chutney - Banana Leaf - Indian curry meal - Gobi 65 - Indochinese batter-fried cauliflower - Punjabi Sizzler - Apam Balik - crunchy peanut pancakes - Cendol - shaved ice, green noodles & syrup - Kueh Dadar - green pandan crepes - Kueh Lapis - multi-color cake - Ondeh-Ondeh - sweet, chewy dumplings - Kuih Kodok - fried banana fritters - Chocolate Mint Cake - Lychee Banana Sorbet - Coconut Ice Cream - Iced Ginger Lime Soda - Purple Dream - ... and more! Pre-Order my MALAYSIA cookbook on Kickstarter The post MALAYSIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.


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