garlic - vegetarian recipes

garlic vegetarian recipes

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu

February 24 2020 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday MenuThis week, in honor of Mardi Gras, were celebrating Healthy-Fat Tuesday with a list of foods and ingredients rich in healthy fats. Fats are complex and often misunderstood nutrients. Despite their often-misleading name, fats play an important role in healthy balanced diets and their consumption doesnt necessarily lead to weight gain. Saturated and unsaturated are the two major categories of dietary fats. Saturated fats are typically solid at room temperature and are predominately found in red and processed meats, whole milk and whole-milk dairy products, cheese, and baked goods. Although fine in moderation, the USDA Dietary Guidelines recommend limiting saturated fat to under 10 percent of your daily caloric intake. Unsaturated fats come from vegetables, nuts, seeds, and fish, and are labeled as good fats because their consumption is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Try incorporating these foods and ingredients into your weekly Meatless Monday menu. Avocado With 77 percent of calories from fat, this pretty green fruit is actually one of the fattiest plant foods on Earth. Avocado is rich in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid associated with reduced inflammation. Easily add some to your diet with this recipe for Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast. Canola Oil Derived from the rapeseed, canola oil has a similar nutritional profile to olive oil but contains a slightly lower percentage of saturated fat. Its one of the most versatile cooking oils, which makes it excellent for frying and medium-heat cooking. It can also be used as the base for salad dressings, sauces, and marinades. Flaxseeds Flaxseeds are high in fiber and protein, but theyre also one of the richest sources of plant-based omega-3 fatty acids -- polyunsaturated fats that are associated with benefits for heart health. Hemp Seeds While technically categorized as a nut, the hemp seed is nutrient-dense and a terrific source of both omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids. Try adding a scoop to smoothies, muffins, or chia pudding. Olive Oil Although it contains small levels of saturated fat, olive oil is predominately composed of a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid. Studies link oleic acid to lower levels of inflammation, but the health benefits of olive oil range from a reduced risk of stroke and heart disease to weight loss. Peanuts An easy and accessible snack, a little pouch of peanuts can instantly cure your hunger pangs. Peanuts are so satiating because of their high-fat content. Classified as an oilseed rather than a nut, the peanut is nearly 50 percent fat, most of which is mono- and polyunsaturated. Try adding some to this hot and spicy Peanut Noodle. Tahini Made from pulverized sesame seeds, tahini -- along with chickpeas -- is one of the main ingredients in hummus. Sesame seeds are made up of 80 percent mono- and polyunsaturated fats, which research shows can help lower cholesterol levels. Tahini makes the perfect dressing for roasted vegetables or this Curry Carrot Salad. Walnuts Like most nuts, walnuts contain good fats, but they are also an important vegetarian source of omega-3 fatty acids. Research shows that omega-3 plays a critical role in reducing oxidative stress in the brain and can even help with the development and function of the central nervous system. Eat them roasted or blend them up with lentils to make the perfect plant-based meatball.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Celebrate Healthy-Fat Tuesday by Adding These 8 Plant-Based Ingredients to Your Meatless Monday Menu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste BudsUnder-seasoned food tastes of...disappointment, but you can effortlessly breathe new life into your meals with the addition of a few key seasonings and spice blends. Spices instantly elevate the subtle flavors of vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and plant-based proteins without piling on extra calories (or dirty dishes in the sink). From sea salt to shichimi togarashi, weve got the 10 spices that you need to add to your spice rack. Adobo (all-purpose seasoning) Adobo is the ultimate all-purpose seasoning, and, although its traditionally used with animal proteins, its salty-garlicy flavor can give that same savoriness to any number of plant-based dishes -- from crispy tofu to vegetarian stews. Adobo seasonings vary in their composition, but they generally include a blend of granulated garlic, salt, oregano, black pepper, and turmeric. Ancho Chile Ancho chile, known as a poblano when fresh, has a deep, smoky, slightly sweet flavor comparable to a spicy chocolate-covered raisin. Its mild-to-medium heat makes it an appropriate addition to moles, enchilada sauce, soup, traditional chili, or even pasta. Black Peppercorns (in pepper mill) Pre-ground black pepper tastes vapid and boring compared to the fresh stuff; thankfully, many spice brands offer miniature grinders complete with whole peppercorns ready to be crushed. A couple rotations of the pepper mill adds a sharp, citrusy flavor, floral-like aroma, and crunchy texture to the tops of salads, soups, pastas, and these delicious tempeh fajitas.  Cumin The fragrant seed is a member of the parsley family, but its often sold as a powder rather than in its whole form. Cumin is aromatic and complex and can add a powerful smoky flavor to black bean burgers, curried potatoes, vegetarian chili, and lentil soups. Just remember to use this strong spice sparingly. Curry Powder Curry Powder is a mixture of different seasonings that differs slightly based on what brand you buy. That being said, many contain some combination of coriander, mustard, cumin, fenugreek, cayenne, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, and turmeric, which gives curry powder its iconic yellow-orange color. Add some to roasted vegetables, blend into hummus, sprinkle on popcorn, or use as the base of this Thai tofu pumpkin curry. Everything Bagel Available at Trader Joes and a spattering of other retailers, the Everything Bagel spice blend is the ultimate compliment to any roasted potato or sautéed vegetable. Add some to a tahini dressing or sprinkle some on an avocado half with a squeeze of lemon and a squirt of sriracha. The spice mixture is a combination of all the wonderful bits youd find on the outside of an everything bagel: sesame seeds, sea salt, dried minced garlic, onion, and poppy seeds.  Red Pepper Flake Although it probably already exists somewhere on your spice rack, the raw, uncalibrated heat of red pepper flake brings a brutish pop to roasted cruciferous vegetables and elegant pastas. Sea Salt Dont roll your eyes just yet. In terms of utility in a dish, sea salt offers the same taste-enhancing qualities as traditional table salt, but when it comes to look, flavor, and texture, sea salt is in an ocean of its own. Its slightly richer flavor and crunch make it a natural fit for both savory entrees and desserts. Shichimi Togarashi Adorning the table of many ramen soup shops, shichimi togarashi is a complex spice blend that includes a combination of red chile pepper, orange peel, sesame seeds, Japanese pepper, ginger, and seaweed. Sprinkle this on literally anything -- noodles, fried rice, stir-fried tofu, soups, marinades, rubs, dressings, tempuras, roasted vegetables, etc. -- to instantly add a flurry diverse flavors and tastes. Star Anise Star anise is often sold in its ornamental whole form, but its much easier to incorporate into dishes as a powder. Its flavor is somewhere between licorice, cinnamon, and clove. Try adding it to broths, chutneys, mulled wine, or desserts, like this warm cranberry poached pear.  Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Not Having these 10 Spices in Your Cupboard is a Disservice to Your Taste Buds appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup

February 17 2020 Meatless Monday 

This warming soup features a host of veggies, a touch of flavorful white wine and Parmesan cheese, and millet, a whole grain that cooks up quickly and gives the soup a hearty consistency. This recipe comes to us from Maria Tadic, RD, who blogs at Bean A Foodie. Serves 4-6 - 2 tbsp olive oil - 2 carrots, diced - 1 medium onion, diced - 2 ribs celery, diced - 1 head roasted garlic, minced - 28 oz can crushed tomatoes - 1/­­3 cup dry white wine - 1 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp pepper - 15.5 oz can white beans, rinsed and drained - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 bag baby spinach, roughly chopped - 6-7 cups vegetable broth (add more or less depending on your desired consistency) - 2 bay leaves - 1/­­2 cup grated Parmesan cheese (or vegan parmesan cheese) - 1/­­4 cup parsley, chopped Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium high heat.  Add in the carrots, onion and celery and sauté for about 5-7 minutes or until the vegetables start to soften and brown slightly. Add in the roasted garlic and sauté for another 2-3 minutes.  Add white wine and scrape the bottom of the pot with a wooden spoon removing any browned bits.  Cook for 3-5 minutes or until wine has reduced by half. Add in the all the ingredients from crushed tomatoes to Parmesan cheese.  Bring soup to a boil.  Cover and reduce heat to low.  Simmer soup on low for 30-45 minutes. Before youre ready to serve, stir in the chopped parsley.  Serve hot soup with extra Parmesan cheese and parsley if desired. The post Hearty White Bean & Millet Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sweet and Sour Guava Curry

February 13 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Sweet and Sour Guava Curry (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Amrood Ki khati Methi Sabji (Sweet and Sour Guava Curry) Guavas, or "amrood" in Hindi, are simply delicious and probably one of my favorite fruits! This year I have an abundance of guavas growing in my backyard. I like to sprinkle chaat masala on guavas. The spiciness really brings out its flavor. Since I have so many delicious guavas, I decided it was time for me to make Guava Sweet and Sour Curry (Amrood Ki khati Methi Sabji). In case you are not familiar, this is a popular North Indian dish which I believe tastes best with fresh hot puris or parathas. This was a staple sabji when I was a child growing up in India, provided guavas were in season. My brother especially enjoyed this dish. He simply relished this sabji and could enjoy eating it every day. However, there was catch – he would only eat this dish with puris! Rotis or parathas simply did not do this dish justice! My brother would pretend to read a book while eating so no one would disturb him so he could truly enjoy eating in peace! Whenever I make this recipe, I remember our sweet, innocent childhood memories. Guava Sweet and Sour Curry has the best flavors – spicy, sweet and sour – all in one dish! This recipe will serve 2. Course Main Course Cuisine Indian Keyword Amrood, cooking shows, Gourmet food, Guava Fruit, Home Cooking, Home Made, Indian food, Jain Food, Kadoo Ki Subji, Khatta Meetha, Main Dish, Mandir Food, No Garlic, No lahsun, No Onion, No Pyaj, North Indian Recipes, Recipe videos, Satvik Food, Spicy, Swaminarayan, Tropical Fruit, Vegetarian, Veshno Cooking Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 15 minutes Total Time 20 minutes Servings 2 people Ingredients2 cups guavas amrood, cut into bite size pieces 2 Tbsp oil 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­4 tsp fenugreek seeds mathi dana 1/­­8 tsp asafetida hing 2 tsp coriander powder dhania 1 tsp fennel seed powder saunf 1/­­4 tsp turmeric haldi 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder 1/­­2 tsp salt 1 Tbsp ginger adrak, thinly sliced 1/­­2 tsp mango powder amchor 1 tsp lemon juice 2 Tbsp sugar adjust to the taste 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro hara dhania InstructionsHeat the oil in a saucepan. Oil should be moderately hot. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil. If the cumin seed cracks right away, the oil is ready. Add the cumin seeds, asafetida, fenugreek seeds, fennel seeds powder, coriander powder, turmeric, and red chili powder stir for few seconds. Add ginger and guava mix it well add 1 cup of water and cover the pan. Lower the heat and cover the pan cook for about 5-8 minutes until guavas are tender. Add mango powder, lemon juice and sugar stir and add cilantro. Turn off the heat and cover the pan for few minutes. Amrood Ki khati Methi Sabji is ready to serve. NotesIf Guava seeds are hard then remove them, adjust the sugar to taste depends how sweet are guava. The post Sweet and Sour Guava Curry appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Mushroom Bourguignon

February 6 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Bourguignon This Mushroom Bourguignon is one of my favorite things to cook on a winter weekend. It’s so fun to put together (makes you feel a little bit like Julia Child), it fills the house with the most incredible, cozy smells, and the result is a savory, earthy dream. My husband and I cooked this for Valentine’s Day last year, and I shared the whole process on our Instagram stories. The amount of recipe requests I got afterwards had me thinking that I should write it up for the blog. Finally sharing it a whole year later! Make this with your love or friend, or just for yourself on Valentine’s day or any other day when you’ve got some time to cozy up in the kitchen. I think you will really love it. I find that this recipe does well with some time and care – it’s not really a weeknight type of deal, and that’s truly the fun of it. For one, I highly suggest making your own mushroom, veggie and miso broth for this stew. You can use store-bought broth and your Bourguignon will still be really delicious, but the homemade broth will take it to that next, next level. This dish is all about layers of deep flavors, and the broth is a true backbone of that. Making your own broth is also not hard at all – it’s just a matter of throwing things in the pot and letting them do their own thing. When I made the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here, I made the broth in the morning, and it was there waiting for me when I started cooking the stew later in the day. No big deal. I love that this dish is made mostly with very straightforward, common, pantry and crisper-friendly ingredients, but the flavor is so special and so much greater than the sum of its parts. These kinds of recipes are always my favorites. You can see how this Bourguignon comes together step-by-step on our Instagram stories later today. Enjoy! Mushroom Bourguignon   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the mushroom bourguignon olive oil or avocado oil 1 lb crimini or other mushrooms of choice - stemmed if necessary, sliced sea salt 20 Cipollini or pearl onions 1 yellow onion - diced 2 medium carrots - sliced 2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves - chopped ½ teaspoon smoked paprika freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 cup red wine 3½ cups mushroom veggie broth (recipe below) or store-bought broth, plus more if needed 2 bay leaves 1½ tablespoon all-purpose flour mashed or smashed potatoes - for serving parsley - for garnish for the mushroom veggie broth 1 oz dried porcini 1 large carrot 2-3 celery ribs 1 yellow onion - skin on 1 leek - white and green parts 5 cloves of garlic - smashed handful fresh thyme 1-2 pitted dates - for deeper flavor (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon white miso Instructions to make the mushroom bourguignon Heat a soup pot over medium heat. Add enough oil to coat the bottom of the pot, letting it heat up. Add the mushrooms and begin browning. Stir once to coat the mushrooms in the oil, then let sit completely undisturbed. Depending on the variety of mushrooms youre using, they will likely release lots of water. Wait for the water to cook off almost completely before stirring, about 10 minutes, that way the mushrooms will brown properly. Stir, add a generous pinch of salt, and let the mushrooms cook for a few more minutes. Transfer the mushrooms to a bowl and set aside until later. Wipe the bottom of the pan if necessary and add another generous pour of oil. Add the Cipollini/­­pearl onions, stir to coat in the oil and let shimmer for the undersides to brown, about 2-3 minutes. Stir to flip and let brown for another 2-3 minutes. Add the yellow onion, carrots, thyme, smoked paprika, a generous pinch of salt, and lots of of black pepper. Sauté until the vegetables are soft, about 10 minutes. Add the garlic and tomato paste, and sauté for 1 more minute. Add the cooked mushrooms back to the pot and stir to incorporate with the other ingredients. Add the wine to the pot, bring it up to a simmer and let simmer and reduce for 3-5 minutes. Add the broth, bay leaves, and another pinch of salt, making sure to add enough broth to achieve a chunky stew consistency. Bring the stew up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 1 hour, adding more broth if necessary. Discard the bay leaves at the end. Put the flour in a small bowl. Take a small ladle-full of the broth from the stew and pour over the flour. Whisk together until smooth. Pour the slurry back into the stew, mix, and let simmer for another 5 minutes for the stew to thicken. Serve the Mushroom Bourguignon over mashed or smashed potatoes, garnished with parsley. to make the mushroom veggie broth Combine all the ingredients in a large pot with at least 10 cups of purified water. Salt well. Its not necessary to include all the vegetables listed, but the more you include, the more flavorful the broth. You can also include any other ingredients that you like in your veggie broth like peppercorns, bay leaf, etc. Bring up to a boil, reduce to a simmer and simmer, covered, for about 1 hour. Put the miso in a small bowl and pour a little bit of the broth over it. Whisk together until you have a smooth paste. Pour it back into the pot with the broth and mix well. You will have leftover broth after making the bourguignon. Its delicious to sip on its own or in any other stew or soup, and it freezes very well. Notes We used crimini and white beech mushrooms for the Mushroom Bourguignon pictured here. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Bourguignon appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

How To Make Your Own Balsamic Ketchup

February 3 2020 Oh My Veggies 

I have a deep love and appreciation for ketchup. (You’ve seen my Cranberry Chipotle Ketchup recipe, right?) So naturally, when I saw that Heinz was introducing a ketchup made with balsamic vinegar, I decided that I needed to try it immediately. And then I found out it wasn’t available everywhere; it seemed the stores I frequent are not stores that carry it. Obviously, I had to try to make it myself. Obviously! I adapted this balsamic ketchup recipe from Serious Eats’ Homemade Ketchup. Are you ready to make ketchup? Let’s get started! You will need these things: 2 tbsp olive oil 1 medium onion, chopped 1 garlic clove, minced 1 (28 oz) can tomato puree 1/­­2 cup packed brown sugar 1/­­4 cup balsamic vinegar 1 tbsp tomato paste 1/­­2 tsp kosher salt 1/­­2 tsp ground mustard 1/­­8 tsp ground cloves, for that certain je ne sais quoi (yes, the “quoi” in ketchup is cloves--of this, I am certain) 1/­­8 tsp allspice 1/­­8 tsp cayenne pepper Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté until just beginning to brown, about 8 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add minced garlic and cook an additional 30 seconds. Add the tomato […]

Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Plant-Based ProteinsWill I get enough protein? is one of the most common questions asked by people looking to add more plant-based foods to their diet. The short (and long) answer is -- YES. Check out our Plant Protein Power Kit for downloadable social media graphics, plant-protein GIFs and printable posters. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the recommended dietary allowance for individual daily protein intake is 0.8 grams per of protein per every 2 pounds of body weight. Although this is an approximate calculation -- other factors such as age, sex, body type, and lifestyle must be considered for a precise nutrient recommendation -- it provides a reliable benchmark to measure your daily protein requirements.  This amounts to around 56 grams of protein per day for the average sedentary man and 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman. So, how do you reach that daily number eating only plant-based foods? Easy, check out our guide below and discover which seeds, nuts, legumes, vegetables, and plant-based products pack the biggest protein punch. Still have questions? Learn more about plant-based protein from the nutritional experts at Johns Hopkins University. Broccoli One of the most popular vegetables is also one of the most protein dense, with one cup of cooked broccoli containing 6 grams of protein. Roast it, sauté it, or steam it for a quick and nutritious side dish. Chia Seeds Small but mighty, 1 ounce of chia seeds packs nearly 5 grams protein. Drop a spoonful into a smoothie or combine with a liquid like juice or nut milk to make a fun-textured chia pudding. Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food: One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar. A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Frozen Veggie Burgers There are tons of different types of pre-made frozen veggie burgers varying in ingredients, texture, and flavorful, and although their nutritional profiles differ, you can generally expect between 10 - 15 grams of protein per patty. Try a range of brands and see which one(s) fit your palate. Hemp Seed Heralded as a superfood, hemp seeds have a subtle, nutty flavor similar to pine nuts. In baking, hemp seeds can be used as a nut replacement, but it can also be added to smoothies, with 2 tablespoons containing over 6 grams of protein. Jackfruit Jackfruit is often marketed as a plant-based alternative to pulled pork, with a meaty, stringy texture fit for faux barbecue platters and sandwiches. Jackfruit is rarely sold whole, but there are a handful of brands selling products made with jackfruit in the refrigerated section of supermarkets. Jack fruit is not the most protein-dense item on this list, but it still contains 3 grams per cup. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Mung Beans Mainly cultivated in East and Southeast Asia, the mung bean is often used as the foundation of stews, vegetable patties, or dal. One cup of cooked mung beans contains 14 grams of protein. Note: mung beans are easier to find dry rather than cooked and canned. Nut Butters Although not all nut butters are considered equal when it comes to protein content (or flavor), they generally contain around 4 grams of protein per tablespoon. Oatmeal A cup of cooked oatmeal contains 6 grams of protein; pair it with a scoop of peanut butter and a sprinkling of hemp or chia seeds for a protein-packed breakfast. Plant-Based Meat Thanks to plant-based meat, sources of vegan protein are all the rage. A typical plant-based burger patty contains 20 grams of protein. Many quick-service restaurant chains now offer versions of their classic menu items featuring some variety of plant-based meat. Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal. A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Seitan The original plant-based meat replacement, seitan -- which is made from wheat gluten -- is packed with protein and can be quite tasty when properly prepared. A 3-ounce serving of seitan includes between 15 - 20 grams of protein, a number that is comparable to most animal proteins. Soy Milk The market for non-dairy nut milks has exploded in recent years, but soy milk remains the most nutritious option. One cup of soy milk has 8 grams of protein, which makes it a nice base for smoothies and shakes. Sprouted Bread Sprouted bread is a certain category of bread made from grains that have been allowed to germinate (aka sprout) before being milled into flour. Ezekiel Bread -- a common brand of sprouted bread -- contains 4 grams of protein and only 80 calories per slice. Sunflower Seeds Who wouldve thought that the innocent little sunflower seed could pack such a protein punch? A half-cup of sunflower seeds has 15 grams of proteins. Bring some in a little baggy and keep with you for a quick and nutritious snack. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Below, weve curated a sample a menu to demonstrate how easy it is to hit your daily protein target eating only plant-based foods. Breakfast: Overnight Pumpkin Pie Oats (17 grams of protein) Lunch: Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast (13 grams of protein) Dinner: Veggie Meatballs (27 grams of protein) No time to cook? No problem. Meatless Monday On-the-Go is easier than ever. Creating a plant-based Meatless Monday masterpiece? Let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways

January 26 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways Here’s something fun that you can make to set yourself up for endless future wins in the kitchen. This freezer bouillon is a great thing to have on hand for those times when you don’t have veggie stock or just don’t want to buy any. Add a few teaspoons to your soup or sauce, and you’ll end up with a rich flavor base with very minimal effort. Inspired by both curry paste and a brilliant ‘Souper Mix’ recipe from The River Cottage Preserves Handbook, this freezer bouillon is essentially just a combination of different, whole food aromatics that you’d typically find at the base of any soup or broth, plus salt. The beautiful thing about this recipe is that there are no strange preservatives or weird ingredients that you might find in store-bought bouillon – just good old veggies and a few other, non-sketchy flavor enhancers. Today we’ve got two variations on the theme: a ‘classic’ freezer bouillon, based on the mirepoix trio of onion, celery, and carrot, and a ‘fiery’ variation, kind of like curry paste but without all the spices, starring, ginger, shallots, garlic and more. To make both of the bouillon variations, you just pulse up veggies and salt into a fine, pesto-like paste in the food processor. Distribute the bouillon among containers, label, and keep in the freezer. Because of the fair amount of salt in the recipe, the paste doesn’t completely freeze in the freezer and is easily scoopable. The salt also helps it keep for a really long time – pretty much indefinitely in my experience. This is a concentrated product and a little is meant to go a long way, so if you taste it as is, it will taste very salty and strong. I like to use the ‘classic’ bouillon variation in all kinds of legume-based soups like lentil soup and minestrone, and in rich sauces like mushroom bolognese. The ‘fiery’ version is really lovely in all kinds of curries and healing soups, meant to help clear the sinuses. But really, there are no rules for how and where you can use this bouillon, it’s really fun to experiment with. Just the other day, I cooked up a pot of plain chickpeas (just chickpeas and salt) and wanted to make a quick, single serving of chickpea soup for lunch. I heated up some olive oil in a small pot, added about a teaspoon of the classic bouillon, and let it get fragrant for about a minute. I then added the chickpeas to the pot with about 2 cups of their cooking water, brought everything up to a simmer for a few minutes, and wilted in some spinach at the end. I ended up with the coziest bowl of soup and a very flavorful, warming broth in just a few minutes. Hope you’ll give this a try this year! Classic Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 yellow onion - peeled, roughly chopped 1 leek - white and light green part only, roughly chopped 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 3 celery ribs - roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 1 bunch parsley - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste (optional) 1 tablespoon olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the tomato paste, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 Fiery Freezer Bouillon   Print Serves: about 3 cups Ingredients 2 shallots - peeled, roughly chopped 6-8 total of ginger pieces - peeled if not organic, roughly chopped 1 head garlic - cloves peeled 2 medium carrots - roughly chopped 1 jalape?o or serrano pepper - seeded, roughly chopped (optional, include for more heat) 1 bunch cilantro - stems included, roughly chopped 1 tablespoon white miso (optional) 1 teaspoon turmeric powder (optional) 1 tablespoon avocado oil or olive oil ¼ cup sea salt Instructions Combine all the vegetables in a food processor in batches, roughly pulsing them and adding more as you go. Periodically scrape down the sides of the food processor to get everything nicely incorporated. Add the miso and turmeric, if using, oil, and salt, and finish processing into a pesto-like paste. Add another tablespoon of oil if your food processor is having a hard time getting going. Let the paste cool down to room temperature if it got warm while processing. Distribute the bouillon paste among sealable containers, leaving about 1 of space at the top (the paste will expand when frozen). Close and label the containers, and place in the freezer. The bouillon should keep frozen indefinitely - it will not freeze solid because of the salt in the recipe. To use: use about 1 teaspoon of the bouillon per 1½ - 2 cups of water. Either add the paste directly to boiling water or sauté it up in oil for a few minutes before adding water. 3.5.3226 The post Homemade Freezer Bouillon, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Crispy Vegetable Pakoras

January 19 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Crispy Vegetable Pakoras (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Crispy Vegetable Pakoras Crispy Vegetable Pakoras are probably my all-time favorite and satisfying appetizer. They are perfect for any occasion, not to mention they are a favorite with all -young or old! These bite-sized snacks are fried to crispy golden-brown perfection. I serve pakoras with tamarind or cilantro chutney. When cooked right they are crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. These pakoras also have the added benefits of being vegan and gluten-free. I have many fond memories of my mother cooking pakoras when I was a child. There was no special occasion that warranted her whipping up a batch of pakoras. Sometimes she would just come up with an excuse - be it the weather (especially if it was cold & rainy!) or if she simply wanted something savory and spicy. Pakoras were also a staple in our household when guests would unexpectedly show up at our house. Vegetable Pakoras are easy and quick to make, not to mention you can use a variety of vegetables to make them. I can tell you from personal experience that these pakoras are extremely addicting! Try pairing these pakoras with your afternoon tea or as a spicy delicious snack! This recipe will serve 4. Course Appetizer, Snack Cuisine Indian Keyword Appetizer, Balushahi, Bhartia Khana, Burfi, Cooking Video, Crispy, Crusty, Delightful, Homemade, Indian Vegetarian, Jain Food, Mandir Food, North Indian Recipes, Onion Garlic Free Cooking, Punjabi Recipes, Snack, Street Food, Veshno Cooking Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 15 minutes Total Time 25 minutes Servings 4 people Ingredients4 okras cut vertically into 4 slices 12 green beans cut into half then cut them vertically 1/­­2 red bell pepper sliced into about quarter inch thick 1/­­3 cup besan Bengal gram flour 2 Tbsp corn starch arrow root 2 Tbsp rice flour 2 tsp coriander powder dhania 1/­­4 tsp mango powder amchoor 1/­­4 tsp red chili powder 1/­­8 tsp baking soda 1/­­2 tsp salt InstructionsFirst prepare the vegetables: okras, wash and pat dry, cut off the tops and bottom. Then cut the okras vertically into four slices. Bell pepper slice into about quarter inch thick, making julienne, and cut the green beans into half then cut them vertically. Next! Prepare pakora mix, mix all the dry ingredients together, besan, corn starch rice flour, and baking soda, mix them well. Rice flour, corn starch and baking soda will add the extra crispness to pakoras. Now add the other spices, coriander powder, mango powder, red chili powder and salt. Mix all the ingredients well. Sprinkle the dry mix over vegetables mix them well add water little at a time as needed to coat the vegetables nicely with besan spice mix, vegetables should be coated well. I added about 1/­­4th cup of water. Heat at least one inch of oil in a frying pan over medium high heat. To test, put one drop of batter in the oil. The batter should come up slowly. Drop the pakoas slowly one at a time. Put few pakoras at a time dont overlap the pakoras. Fry the pakoras until they turn golden brown, turning them occasionally. This should take about 6 minutes. Take them out over paper towel to absorb the extra oil. Fry all the pakoras same way. NotesAlso check out the recipe for Chai Masala Tea. Gulab Jamun, Vegetable Kathi Roll The post Crispy Vegetable Pakoras appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Portobello Pizza with Roasted Garlic Sauce and Kale

January 17 2020 Oh My Veggies 

Do I post too many pizza recipes? I hope the answer to this question is no, because I’m about to post another. A portobello pizza with garlic sauce and kale, to be exact. I just couldn’t help myself! I’m feeling pretty jazzed about pizza lately since I made two discoveries: 1) The best whole wheat pizza crust recipe in existence. 2) The magic of pizza stones. So let’s talk about the crust. In all of my previous pizza recipes, I’ve called for pre-made crust. When I’ve tried making my own pizza crust in the past, it never turned out well and it always took so much time to do--I mean, isn’t the point of pizza that it’s supposed to be a quick meal? And you expect me to make my own crust? Psshh. But after overcoming my fear of baking with yeast, I started experimenting with pizza crust. And then I found this recipe: Bookmark it, print it, pin it, whatever you need to do. Because this recipe is awesome. It tastes good, it’s easy (even with the yeast!), and the best part is, Martha Stewart includes instructions for making these crusts ahead and freezing them. So then when you […]

Garlic Potato Spinach Stir fry – Lasooni Aloo Palak

January 12 2020 Vegan Richa 

Garlic Potato Spinach Stir fry – Lasooni Aloo PalakGarlic Potato Spinach Stir fry – Lasooni Aloo Palak. Potato Spinach curry with garlic and Indian spices. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Soy-free Recipe. Jump to Recipe Some days you just want a good potato side. This easy garlic potato spinach stir fry is like my Aloo Palak with cumin. This one has whole spices, well cooked golden garlic slices and more potatoes to spinach. Lasooni means Garlicky, Aloo means potato, palak means spinach. Its a great side with dals and curries and flatbread or Naan. Adjust the flavors to preference. Add in some cooked chickpeas to make it into a meal!Continue reading: Garlic Potato Spinach Stir fry – Lasooni Aloo PalakThe post Garlic Potato Spinach Stir fry – Lasooni Aloo Palak appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Tofu Almond Stir-Fry

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Hoisin is a Cantonese dipping sauce made from sweet potatoes, vinegar, garlic and chili peppers; you can find it in the Asian ingredients section of most supermarkets. Here, it adds immense flavor to tofu, which gets a pre-soak in vegetable broth for even more flavor. This recipe was created by Trudy Slabosz, who writes the blog veggie.num.num. Serves 4 For the tofu: - 1 package (10.5 ounces) firm tofu, cubed - 1 1/­­2 cups vegetable broth - 1 egg white - 1 tablespoon cornstarch - 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce - 1 teaspoon salt For the sauce: - 1 tablespoon cornstarch - 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon hoisin sauce To complete the Tofu Almond Stir-Fry: - 2 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 5 shallots, sliced - 5 ounces button mushrooms, sliced - 1 can (15 ounces) baby corn, drained - 1 red bell pepper, sliced - 1 green bell pepper, sliced - 1 garlic clove, minced - 2 1/­­2 ounces blanched almonds, toasted To prepare the tofu: In a medium bowl, soak the tofu cubes in vegetable broth for 30 minutes. Strain the tofu and reserve the broth. Drain tofu on a bed of paper towels. In a medium bowl, whisk together the egg white, corn starch, hoisin sauce and salt. Add the drained tofu and gently toss to coat well. To prepare the sauce: In a medium saucepot over high heat, bring the reserved broth, cornstarch, hoisin and soy sauce to a boil. Cook, stirring, 4 minutes, or until the sauce darkens and thickens slightly. To complete the Stir-Fry: Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the tofu ; cook 10, turning occasionally, until crisp and golden on all sides. Transfer to a fresh bed of paper towels to drain. Add the remaining tablespoon oil to the same skillet. Add the shallots, mushrooms, baby corn, bell peppers and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, 4 minutes, or until the mushrooms are tender, but the bell peppers are still crisp. Add the tofu; cook 1 minute more, tossing gently, until the tofu is heated through. Pour the sauce over the stir-fry and toss to combine. Sprinkle with the almonds The post Tofu Almond Stir-Fry appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Happy New Year Hoppin John

January 1 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Happy New Year Hoppin John If it’s January 1st, it must be time for Hoppin’ John.  I love the tradition of making black-eyed peas with rice and collards so much!  I first discovered it when we moved to Charleston SC from Pennsylvania in 1983.  It’s been a New Year’s Day tradition ever since.  Most people serve the collards on the side, but I love to combine them. I sometimes add diced tomatoes just because. My favorite way to serve them is topped with vegan sour cream, Tabasco, sliced jalapenos, with cornbread on the side. I like to cook the collards and black-eyed peas a day in advance and then add them to the rice on New Year’s Day. Here is my basic recipe (and more photos of Hoppin’ John variations from previous years).  Happy New Year to all my friends. I wish you all the best in 2020! Hoppin John with Collards 1 tablespoon olive oil or 3 tablespoons water 1 sweet yellow onion, chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 cup long-grain brown rice 2 cups  vegetable broth or water Salt 3 cups cooked or 2 (16-ounce) cans black-eyed peas, drained and rinsed 3 cups chopped cooked fresh or frozen collard greens, well drained 1 (14-ounce) can fire-roasted diced tomatoes, drained (optional) 1 teaspoon Liquid Smoke 1 teaspoon Tabasco sauce, plus more to serve 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Vegan sour cream, to serve Sliced pickled jalapenos (optional)   Heat the oil or water in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the rice and broth or water and bring to a boil. Add salt to taste (the amount of salt needed depends on the saltiness of your broth or if you use water). Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, covered, until the rice is tender, about 30 minutes.  About 10 minutes before the rice is tender, stir in the cooked black-eyed peas, the cooked chopped collards, tomatoes (if using), Liquid Smoke, Tabasco, and black pepper. Add more salt, if needed. To serve, spoon into bowls and accompany with vegan sour cream, jalapenos (if using) and Tabasco at the table. Here are pics of two other favorites from my Hoppin’ John gallery: Made in a slow cooker with a cornbread topping…. and Hoppin’ John Collard Rolls…. (serve with Tabasco-Sour Cream)… The post Happy New Year Hoppin’ John appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?

December 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?Despite the frigid temperatures and seemingly barren landscapes all around, the winter months can be surprisingly abundant. In fact, much of our most popular produce is actually in-season during this chilly time of year. Thats right, apples, beets, broccoli, cabbage, broccoli rabe, Brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, celery, citrus fruits, fennel, garlic, leeks, mushrooms, onions, parsnips, pears, pomegranates, sweet potatoes, turnips, rutabagas, and radishes all fair pretty well in colder temperatures. But we dont. Thats why weve compiled a list of our warmest, most comforting meatless recipes -- all of which use seasonal winter produce -- to help you and your family stay toasty through the frosty months. Make them this Monday for a cozy start to the week. Carrot Soup with Parsnip Chips   Cauliflower and Chickpea Curry   Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts   Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth Roasted Fennel with Tofu and Oranges Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherds Pie Vegetable Fritters with Green-Chile Coconut Chutney   Interested in adding more Meatless Monday recipes to your cooking repertoire? Click here to access our recipe archives full of easy-to-make meatless and plant-based dishes.   The post Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pithla (Besan Curry)

February 9 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Pithla (Besan Curry) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Pithla (Besan Curry) Pithla is a variation of Kadhi. Kadhi is made in many ways. In North India, Kadhi is made like a thick soup with pakoras dumplings. Another popular variation is Gujarati Kadhi, which is sweet and sour and made watery with a soup-like consistency. When first time I had gujrati Kadhi, I thought it was yogurt hot and spicy drink, and enjoyed very much, still my perception has not changed. Pithla, however, is thick in consistency. Sometimes I call this is Besan Ki Sabji. This is a quick and easy recipe to make. Pithla is made with few ingredients. It's also gluten-free and vegan. Traditionally Pithla is served garnished with hot ghee (clarified butter). Pithla is a complete and satisfying meal. I always thought that Pithla was a dish from the state of Bihar. Whenever we visited our grandparents in Bihar, we would make sure to enjoy this dish. However, I've heard from friends that Pithla is also a popular dish from the state of Maharashtra. Regardless of where this dish originates from, it is one of my favorites! My mom was from Bihar and my dad was from North India. We always lived in North India. My mom's cooking was a mix of traditional Bihari and North Indian food. For me, North Indian cooking tends to be more spicy while Bihari dishes are more simple. My mom tried to adopt elements from both Bihar and North India in her dishes. Her unique blending of the foods from these very different parts of India kept her and my dad both happy. I have fond memories of enjoying Pithla. Even today, when I visit my sisters in India, they will make sure they make the dishes we used to enjoy with our mom. Of course, Pithla was one of many dishes we enjoyed! We would gather around for lunch and reminisce about our old memories while enjoying delicious Pithla served with rice. It truly is comfort food at its best! This recipe will serve 2. Course Main Course Cuisine Indian Keyword Besan Kadhi, Bihari Kadhi, Cooking Video, Curry Recipe, Gatte Ke Kadhi, Gluten Free, Gujrati Kadhi, Homemade, Jain Food, Maharashtrian Dish, Main Dish, Mandir Food, No Garlic, No Onion, Panjabi Kadhi, Quick And Easy, Satvik Food, Swaminarayan, vegan, Veshno Cooking Prep Time 5 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Total Time 15 minutes Servings 2 people Ingredients1 cup besan Bengal gram flour 2 Tbsp oil 1 tsp cumin jeera 1/­­2 tsp mustard seeds rai 1/­­8 tsp asafetida hing 1/­­2 tsp turmeric haldi 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder 1 tsp salt 1 1/­­2 tsp mango powder aam choor 2 Tbsp cilantro finely chopped, hara dhania 4 cup water For Garnishing2 Tbsp ghee clarified butter, this is optional 1/­­4 tap red chili powder InstructionsIn a bowl add the 1-1/­­2 cups of water slowly to besan to make a smooth batter (batter should be consistency of pancake batter or dosa batter). Open the heat on medium high, oil should be moderately hot, when you add the cumin seeds to oil seeds should crack right of way. Add cumin seeds, mustard seeds, asafetida, turmeric, and chili powder to oil, stir and turn off the heat. Add the besan batter and open the heat to medium heat. Keep whipping the batter and batter will start thickening. Add salt and keep adding the water slowly and keep mixing about 2-1/­­2 cups of water. After Pithla comes to boil besan will start splattering. Reduce the heat to low, cover the pan and let it simmer for about 5 to 8 minutes. Pithla will become thick, add chopped cilantro and mango powder mix and let it cook for 2 more minutes. Pithla should be quite thick in consistency thats why sometimes I will call Pithla Besa ki Sabji. Pithla is served hot before serving, traditionally Pithla is served garnished with hot ghee (clarified butter). And sprinkle of red chili powder. If you are vegan skip ghee, clarified butter. NotesServing suggestions: Serve Pithla with Rice, Roti, Kurkuri Bhindi. The post Pithla (Besan Curry) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls Recipe

February 6 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls RecipeThis Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls recipe is perfect for entertaining. Homemade pizza dough topped with dairy-free pesto and herbed mushrooms, all rolled up, sliced and baked. Add vegan cheese if needed. Serve with marinara or creamy dips of choice. Vegan & Soy-free with a Nut-free option. Jump to Recipe Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls – the perfect recipe for entertaining! These Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls are a great appetizer or fun alternative to regular pizza if you want to change things up and surprise your guests with something special yet familiar. You can eat them as-is or dip them into some homemade marinara or pizza sauce. Either way, theyre like a mini-trip to Italy! Super flavorful, packed with Mediterranean flavor and soft and pillowy on the inside. INGREDIENTS USED IN THESE VEGAN PIZZA ROLLS RECIPE AND SUBSTITUTIONS - The dough for the pizza rolls uses active dry yeast, water, flour and semolina as the main ingredients. - As a short-cut, you can use any plain pre-made pizza dough here too. - The filling is a flavorful combination of homemade vegan pesto and sauteed mushrooms, flavored with onion, garlic, and oregano.  I like to add some crushed red pepper,  for a bit of heat. The thick mixture tastes amazing and is not very chunky, making it easy to roll the dough up and slice it like cinnamon rolls. You can also some vegan cheese for that pizza feel. Optional but 100 % recommended. - As a recipe variation, you could add some cooked lentils, coarsely chopped walnuts, or any chopped vegan meats or sausages. Amp up the umami by adding some chopped olives to the filling along with the mushrooms. - Oil-free version: Saute the mushrooms in some vegetable broth when making the filling. Use warmed creamy nondairy milk instead of oil in the dough. - Gluten-free version: Use a gluten-free pie crust and make pizza pockets instead. Or use my gluten-free naan bread batter, fill it in a lined muffin pan (about half the liner). Swirl the filling lightly into the batter to create rolls like swirls. Top generously with shredded vegan cheese and bake for 15 to 18 mins. How to make this Vegan Pizza Rolls Recipe – Step by Step: Start with the pizza dough: 1. Warm the water until warm to touch. Add yeast and 1 tbsp flour and mix and let the yeast activate for 5 mins. 2. Stir the salt into the semolina flour. Add the semolina flour and 1.5 cups flour to the yeast mixture. Add 2 tsp olive oil. and mix to just bring together the dough. Add flour 1 tbsp at a time as required. 3. Cover the bowl and let it sit to rise for 30 mins. Make the fillings while the dough is resting: 4. Meanwhile, heat a skillet over medium heat. Add oil, onion, and mushrooms and mix. Cover and cook for 5 mins. Add salt, oregano, garlic, and water and mix well. Cover and continue to cook for 5 to 8 mins or until dry and tender. 5. Make the vegan pesto if you haven’t made it already using this recipe.  6. Uncover the dough. Add oil and a tbsp of flour and punch the dough down and make a flat disc. Use flour to roll it out to 15 by 10 inches. 7. Spread the pesto all over the rolled out dough. 8. Sprinkle the dough with the mushroom mixture. Top with some red pepper flakes for a bit of heat and sprinkle with vegan shredded mozzarella, if you like your rolls cheesy. 9. Roll the dough up into a roll, like when making cinnamon rolls, and seal the ends. Slice the dough roll into pizza rolls using a sharp kitchen knife and place them in a greased baking dish. 10. Sprinkle with some more cheese if needed. Bake the rolls at 400 F for 22 to 24 mins.  Tip: Check the center of one of the middle rolls, and if the middle does not still feel soft and doughy, then remove the pan from the oven. 11. Cool the rolls for 5 mins, then sprinkle with some red pepper flakes and fresh basil if needed. Serve warm with olive oil or pizza sauce What goes well with Pesto Pizza Rolls? But what can you serve alongside that delicious pizza that plays the perfect supporting role? What about some roasted greens – like green beans, caramelized brussels sprouts, asparagus or a light and a bright side salad? Can I make these Vegan Pizza Rolls ahead of time? Yes, these vegan pesto pizza rolls can be made ahead. Once sliced and placed in a baking dish, you can keep the rolls refrigerated overnight. Cover tightly and store. Remove from the fridge and let sit on the counter for an hour to warm and rise. Then bake and serve. To store them, place in the fridge for up to 5 days or freeze them in the back of your freezer for up to a month.   More vegan bread and rolls recipe from the blog: - Vegan Pizza Rolls - Sweet Potato dinner rolls - Pumpkin Cornbread - Pull-Apart Pizza Bread - Pumpkin Sage Biscuits - 100% Whole Grain Dinner Rolls - Gluten-free Jalapeno Pepperjack Biscuits GF - Gluten-free Garlic Dinner Rolls GF Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls This Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls recipe is perfect for entertaining. Homemade pizza dough topped with dairy-free pesto and herbed mushrooms, all rolled up, sliced and baked. Add vegan cheese if needed. Serve with marinara or creamy dips of choice. Vegan & Soy-free with a Nut-free option. - 3/­­4 cup warm water - 2 tsp active dry or instant yeast - 1 tbsp flour - 2 tbsp semolina flour - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 2 cups flour - 1 Tbsp olive oil (divided) Mushroom Mixture: - 1 tsp oil - 1/­­2 cup sliced onion - 7 oz sliced mushroom - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp dried oregano - 1/­­2 tsp garlic powder Other Toppings - 4 tbsps vegan pesto (see notes ) Optional - fresh basil - vegan mozzarella (shredded) - red pepper flakes -  For the rolls: -  Warm the water until warm to touch. Add yeast and 1 tbsp flour and mix and let the yeast activate for 5 mins. -  Stir the salt into the semolina flour. Add the semolina flour and 1.5 cups flour to the yeast mixture. Add 2 tsp olive oil. and mix to just bring together the dough. Add flour 1 tbsp at a time as required. -  Cover and let the dough sit to rise for 30 mins. Make the fillings: - Meanwhile, heat a skillet over medium heat. Add oil, onion and mushrooms and mix. Cover and cook for 5 mins. Add salt, oregano, garlic and water and mix well. Cover and continue to cook for 5 to 8 mins or until dry and tender. -  Make the pesto using this recipe if you haven't prepared it already. Assemble: -  Uncover the risen dough. Add oil and a tbsp of flour and punch the dough down and shape it into a flat disc. Use flour to roll it out to 15 by 10 inches thick. -   Spread the vegan pesto all over the rolled out dough. -  Sprinkle the dough with the sauteed mushroom mixture. Add some red pepper flakes and vegan shredded mozzarella, if you want. -  Roll it all up and seal the ends. Slice the dough roll into pizza rolls and place them in a greased baking dish. Sprinkle with some more cheese if needed. Bake the rolls at 400 F for 22 to 24 mins. Check the center of one of the middle rolls, and if its not doughy, then remove the pan from the oven. -  Cool the rolls for 5 mins, then sprinkle with some red pepper flakes and some fresh basil if you like. Serve warm with olive oil or pizza sauce - As a short-cut, you can use any plain pre-made pizza dough here too. - For a recipe variation, you could add some cooked lentils, coarsely chopped walnuts, or any chopped vegan meats or sausages. Amp up the umami by adding some chopped olives to the filling along with the mushrooms. - Oil-free version: Saute the mushrooms in some vegetable broth when making the filling. Use warmed creamy nondairy milk instead of oil in the dough. - Gluten-free version: Use a gluten-free pie crust and make pizza pockets instead. Or use my gluten-free naan bread batter, fill it in a lined muffin pan (about half the liner). Swirl the filling lightly into the batter to create rolls like swirls. Top generously with shredded vegan cheese and bake for 15 to 18 mins.     The post Vegan Pesto Pizza Rolls Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Top 10 Best Vegan Pizza Places in the World

February 2 2020 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Pizza is one of the most popular foods on Earth… who doesn’t love it?! And in recent years, with the rise of veganism, plant-based pizzas have become even more delicious and creative than ever. From nut-based mozzarella to vegan meat toppings, we’re excited by what the vegan scene has to offer. Here is our 2020 list of the Top 10 Best Vegan Pizza Places in the World.  10. Hank Vegan Pizza – Paris This pizzeria was established 4 years ago by Hank Vegan Burger. They’re a funky establishment offering pizza by the slice, in notable square-shaped slices. You’ll find vegan cheese, Beyond Meat, and a daily special on the menu. Choose from several salad-drink sets, and round it off with dessert if you like.  Visitors on HappyCow consistently note it as the “Best Pizza in Paris.” Bon appétit! 9. Screamers Pizzeria – Brooklyn Screamer’s is a popular, casual-style pizzeria in Brooklyn. Reviewers state that it’s “OMG” and “Simply The Best Vegan Pizza Ever.” There are 19 different pizzas to choose from, plus calzone and garlic knots. You can also build your own from a variety of veggie and vegan meat toppings. I scream, you scream, we all scream for…. PIZZA! […] The post Top 10 Best Vegan Pizza Places in the World appeared first on HappyCow.

Tofu au Vin

January 27 2020 Meatless Monday 

This meatless take of the French classic Coq au Vin slowly simmers tofu with pearl onions, mushroom, red wine and vegetable broth. The veggie version cuts hours off the cooking time so you’ll be sitting down to dinner just a half hour after you’ve started cooking. This recipe comes to us from Donna of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 3 tablespoons canola oil, divided - 2 cups frozen pearl onions, thawed - 3 medium carrots, peeled and diced - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 bay leaves - 3 cups red wine* - 3 cups low-sodium vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar - 1 14 ounce package extra firm tofu, cut into 1/­­2 inch cubes - 4 tablespoons corn starch, divided - 12 ounces mushrooms, chopped - salt and pepper, to taste - 1/­­2 cup Italian parsley, diced as a garnish *3 cups vegetable broth mixed with 3 tablespoons red wine vinegar can be substituted for the red wine. Heat 1 tablespoon of the canola oil in a large pan over medium high heat. Add the onions, carrots and garlic. Saute for 3-5 minutes, or until lightly browned. Add in bay leaves, wine, broth and soy sauce to the pan. Reduce heat so that liquid is slowly simmering. Simmer for about 20 minutes, stirring frequently, until carrots and onions are soft and liquid has reduced by half. Once sauce is reduced season with salt and pepper to taste. Add 2 tablespoons of the cornstarch into 1/­­2 cup of water and mix until combined. Stir in the cornstarch mixture to the pan to thicken the sauce. Toss tofu cubes in the remaining 2 tablespoons cornstarch and a little salt and pepper until they are all evenly coated. Heat the 2 remaining tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high heat. Sauté coated tofu cubes, turning them occasionally with a spatula, for about 3 to 5 minutes, or until they are crispy browned on all the sides. Remove and set aside in a serving bowl. Add mushrooms to pan and sauté them 5-7 minutes, or until mushrooms are browned and softened. Add red wine sauce and mushrooms to tofu in the serving bowl. Sprinkle with parsley and enjoy!     The post Tofu au Vin appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Moroccan Split Pea Soup

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

This Moroccan versions of split pea soup, called Bissara, is hearty, filling delicious, and a breeze to make. The steaming split pea puree, earthy garlic and spices, and rich olive oil are the perfect combination for an enriching and warming winter meal. This recipe comes to us from Safa of Moroccan Zest . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1.5 cups dried split peas soaked for 2 hours (or more) and drained - 4 cups water - 2 medium-sized garlic cloves, peeled -  1/­­2 tsp salt adjust according to your taste -  1/­­2 tsp pepper powder - 2 tsp cumin powder - 2 tsp paprika powder - 1 pinch hot pepper powder optional - 3 tbsp olive oil extra virgin   Cook the split peas and garlic in water until tender (it should take approximately 8 minutes in a pressure cooker, 45 minutes in a saucepan and 8 hours in a slow cooker) Let the mixture (the split peas, garlic, and water) cool down, then pour in a blender. Add the spices. Blend until smooth. If the mixture is too thick, add more water and blend again. Pour the mixture back in the pan. Add the olive oil and heat for a few minutes. If the mixture is too liquid, cook until water evaporates and the soup has the right consistency for you. Serve hot with fresh bread and olives. Decorate with cumin and olive oil. The post Moroccan Split Pea Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff

January 18 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff I really love January. To me, this month has a bright and sparkling clean feel to it. And even though the start of a new year is purely symbolic, it can be such great time to set some concrete intentions and start making lasting changes or small steps in a new direction. This year, much like the past few years, I’m inspired to simplify, minimize, and really think about the things that I bring into my life, and my impact as a consumer. In the past few years, we’ve tackled food waste and figured out a way to compost food scraps that’s sustainable for us. We’ve also done away with a lot of store-bought household products like paper towels and most single-purpose cleaning products, but there is still a lot of work to do in that area. Of course I find that cooking at home is always a top priority when it comes to simplifying in a sane way. Being prepared, having tried and true recipes and techniques under my sleeve, and having some trusted meal components stocked in the fridge or pantry always leads to less stress, less waste, and more enjoyment throughout the week. This Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff doesn’t have any particular ties to these January musings, beside the fact that it’s a cozy, wintery recipe that I’ll gladly plan to cook on any given week this winter. It’s a nostalgic flavor for us, since our family in Russia cooked it quite a bit, but we think that this plant-based version is even better than the original :) Below I’m sharing some of my plans, projects I’d like to tackle, and resources that I’ve found to be super inspiring when it comes to simplifying, minimizing my impact and beyond. Would love to hear yours! Goals: projects I’d like to tackle and a few (small but impactful) new habits I’d like to form this year – Stop buying single-purpose household cleaning products and make my own, super simple ones (key words: super simple). I already do this by making a 1 part vinegar, 1 part water all-purpose cleaner that I use on pretty much all surfaces. I sometimes infuse the vinegar with citrus peels for a week or add a few drops of essential oils for a more refreshing scent. That cleaner works really well for most things. But I’d like to make a few more site-specific mixes as well, since I sometimes panic and end up buying some shower cleaner I don’t actually need. Simply Living Well is an amazing resource for easy, home-care recipes. I’m going to make this shower spray, this floor cleaner, and this glass/­­window cleaner. All those recipes have really basic, interchangeable ingredients, which keeps them from being overwhelming. Please let me know if you have a favorite homemade laundry detergent recipe – still trying to figure that one out. – Repair things I have before buying new. I’ve always liked doing stuff with my hands, so for me this is an inherently relaxing activity that I’d like to make more time for. Right now, our linen duvet cover has decided to rip in many places at once, and instead of buying a new one, the plan is to mend it properly with tonal patches, which can look really cool. Julie O’Rourke has a super comprehensive darning and mending tutorial here in her IG stories (just flip through the doll-making part). Her whole account is super dreamy as well. – Make a pot of beans every single week. I’ve noticed that every time I make a big batch of beans, I end up thanking myself over and over again for all the easy meals I’ve made possible with that one step. I like to cook the beans with aromatics so that I also end up with a delicious broth that I can either eat with the beans or use later for soups, etc. Different kinds of beans yield such different flavor/­­cooking potential, so it’s easy to switch them up every week without getting bored. For example, I cook chickpeas with aromatics, then have them for dinner in their broth with greens and maybe other veggies wilted in. I freeze some of the broth to use later as veggie stock. I then eat the chickpeas as is in veggie bowls/­­salads, make hummus with them, marinate them, make crispy chickpeas, or make falafel/­­veggie burgers. You can of course do all of this with canned beans, but home-cooked ones are much tastier, more cost effective, less wasteful if you buy them in bulk, and the broth that you get from cooking them is super valuable! If I find that I can’t use up all of the beans, I just freeze them in their broth and again set my future self up for success. We have a lot of meal plans centered around whole pots of beans here. Inspiring Resources: – 75 Ways to Create a Low-Waste Home from Simply Living Well and Zero Waste, Plastic Free Alternatives Master List from Paris to Go are chock-full of ideas to slowly chip away at. – Jessie’s Produce Prep Ebook is such a wonderful guide to reducing food waste and enjoying the abundance of the plant food world. – Mama Eats Plants is the queen of low-waste living, vegan cooking, and a generally mindful lifestyle. – Live Planted is a great, short-format podcast about a practical approach to a low-waste lifestyle and much more. – This One Part Podcast interview with Kathryn Kellogg of Going Zero Waste is so full of positivity and details some actionable steps most of us can implement to decrease waste. Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 8 oz package tempeh - crumbled 2 teaspoons tamari 1 teaspoon maple syrup ½ cup cashews - soaked to soften if no high-speed blender 1 tablespoon white or chickpea miso 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 cup purified water sea salt black pepper avocado oil or other cooking oil of choice 1 yellow onion - diced 4 garlic cloves - minced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary 1 tablespoon tomato paste pinch of red pepper flakes (optional) 6 oz portobello mushroom caps (about 3 medium) - sliced into long strips ½ cup red wine 10-12 oz any pasta of choice fresh parsley - for serving (optional) Instructions Put the crumbled tempeh in a bowl. Pour the tamari and maple syrup over it, mix and let sit while making the cashew sauce. In an upright blender, combine the cashews, miso, mustard, apple cider vinegar, water, and salt and pepper to taste. Blend until very smooth. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Set aside. Heat some oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the tempeh and stir once to coat with the oil, then let sit uninterrupted for 2-3 minutes, until the undersides are browned. Mix and let sit again for another 3-5 minutes, until browned. Push the tempeh to one side of the pan, if your pan is large enough, or transfer back to a bowl and set aside until later. Add more oil to the pan. Add the onions and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7-8 minutes, until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic, rosemary, tomato paste, and red pepper flakes, if using. Stir until the garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the mushrooms, along with another pinch of salt. Sauté until the mushrooms are browned and all the liquid that they release has evaporated, about 8-10 min. Mix the tempeh back in. Add the wine, bring it up to a simmer, and let reduce for about 3 minutes. Add the cashew sauce, stirring it and letting it warm through for a few minutes. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Meanwhile, cook the pasta al dente in well-salted water, according to the directions on the package. Reserve about 1 cup of starchy pasta water for thinning out the sauce. Drain the cooked pasta and add it to the pan with the stroganoff. Start mixing the pasta with the sauce, adding splashes of the starchy pasta water to thin out the sauce and to get it to stick to the pasta, as needed. Enjoy right away, garnished with parsley, if using. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom Tempeh Stroganoff appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Jamaican Jerk Tofu

January 13 2020 Meatless Monday 

Makes 6 servings This is the kind of miracle dish that can convert anyone to tofu. The Jamaican “jerk” seasoning is sure-to-please. It’s sort of like barbeque and sort of like curry, savory and sweet at the same time. Just make sure you allow plenty of time for the pressing and marinating. The drier the tofu gets before you put it in the marinade, the better. It will soak up more flavor and be nicely chewy. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! - 1 pound extra firm tofu, drained, sliced and pressed (see directions) - 1/­­2 large sweet onion, roughly chopped - 4 cloves garlic - 2 tablespoons fresh ginger, grated - Juice of 2 limes - Zest of 1 lime - 2 tablespoons soy sauce - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup - 1 tablespoon dried thyme - 2 teaspoons allspice - 1/­­2 teaspoon cayenne - 1 teaspoon nutmeg - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 2 jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped (you can cut back to one or omit entirely if you don’t like it spicy) Directions Slice the tofu into thick slabs then lay the slices on several layers of paper towels or on a clean dish towel and place a heavy plate or skillet on top. Let it sit for an hour or two. Pressing the tofu is a way to get the extra moisture out – and the drier you can get the tofu, the more of the flavorful marinade it can absorb. Puree all the rest of the ingredients in a blender or food processor to create the marinade. Place the tofu slices in a bowl, pour in the marinade, making sure to coat all the slices, and cover. Let it sit for an hour or two, flipping the slices about halfway through Heat a skillet with a small amount of olive oil over medium high heat. When the pan is hot, lay the tofu slices in a single layer and saute until crispy and browned. That will take 8-10 minutes on each side. (Photo credit: Vegan Style) The post Jamaican Jerk Tofu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

south indian rasam recipe | no dal rasam | no lentil rasam

January 6 2020 hebbar's kitchen 

south indian rasam recipe | no dal rasam | no lentil rasamsouth indian rasam recipe | no dal rasam | no lentil rasam with step by step photo and video recipe. south indian meals are incomplete without higlighting rasam and rice combination to begin with. each state has its variation which differ with the spice mix added to it or with the consistency of the liquid. yet there are some generic rasam recipes popular across the south indian states and no dal rasam with pepper and garlic is one such variation. The post south indian rasam recipe | no dal rasam | no lentil rasam appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Coconut Noodle Soup

January 2 2020 Golubka Kitchen 

Coconut Noodle Soup Oh man is this the perfect recipe for getting back into the swing of things after the holidays! I think that we’re all ready for some deeply nourishing, veggie-heavy meals right about now. I recently made something similar to this noodle soup for dinner and shared it on IG Stories, and got so many inquiries about the recipe. So here it is but a little more intentional and less off the cuff (directly inspired by the Thai soup Tom Kha Gai). It’s seriously my favorite thing to eat right now – the balance of coziness from the noodles and coconut milk and the healthfulness from all the ginger, garlic, mushrooms, and veggies gets me every time. Don’t let the list of ingredients deter you, this soup is very easy to make. It’s all about building flavor in the broth, which starts with the power combo of onion, chili, garlic, and ginger. The broth gets finished off with a touch of coconut milk, which really rounds out its gingery and garlicky intensity and makes it perfectly creamy. It is SO GOOD – I could seriously drink it for every meal this January. We then cook some veggies and mushrooms directly in the broth and serve everything over noodles, garnished with tons of cilantro, scallions, squeezes of lime juice, and crushed nuts. We hope that you’ll give this a try, it’s a real winner! Coconut Noodle Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil or avocado oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 small chili pepper - sliced and seeded if preferred sea salt 2 piece of ginger - minced or grated 6 garlic cloves - minced 4-5 kaffir lime leaves (optional but highly recommended) zest from 2 limes 4 cups (1 quart) low-sodium vegetable broth + 1 cup purified water (or 5 cups broth) 1 medium sweet potato or winter squash, or 2 medium carrots - cut in medium chunks 3.5 oz shiitake mushrooms - stemmed and sliced 1 teaspoon coconut sugar 1 13.5 oz can full-fat coconut milk juice from 1 lime, plus more lime slices for garnishing 8 oz vermicelli rice noodles or other noodles of choice green onion - sliced, for serving cilantro - for serving crushed cashews or peanuts - for serving (optional) chili flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Heat the oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, chili, and a pinch of salt, sauté for 8-10 minutes, until soft. Add the ginger and garlic and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the kaffir lime leaves, if using, lemon zest, vegetable broth, and water. Cover and bring to a boil. Add the sweet potato/­­squash/­­carrots and shiitake mushrooms, bring back up to a simmer and simmer, covered, for 10-15 minutes, until the sweet potato/­­squash/­­carrots are cooked through. Add the sugar and coconut milk. Bring back up to a boil and turn off the heat. Stir in the lime juice. Discard the kaffir lime leaves, if using. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Cook the noodles according to the instructions on the package. Distribute the noodles among bowls. Ladle the broth over the noodles, making sure to catch some vegetables and mushrooms when ladling. Garnish generously with green onion, cilantro, lime slices, crushed nuts and chili flakes, if using. Enjoy! Notes - If you are sensitive to spice, omit the chili pepper and flakes. - Kaffir lime leaves are a life-changingly delicious ingredient, and we really recommend seeking them out. Look for them at Asian/­­Indian markets - they are often sold frozen. You can also find them dried. - This recipe is highly customizable! You can add all kinds of veggies. Here are some ideas: -baby bok choy or spinach -zucchini -spiralized daikon radish -bell pepper -basil -other mushrooms like maitake or crimini, etc. 3.5.3226 Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Coconut Noodle Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Bell Pepper Tempeh Fajitas

December 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Tempeh is marinated in lime juice, soy sauce, cumin, oregano and cayenne pepper. The tempeh is grilled and accompanied by bell peppers and red onions in this Tex-Mex treat, perfect for a quick weeknight meal. This recipe comes to us from Allison of Nourish Network. Serves 5 - 1/­­3 cup and 1 tablespoon olive oil, divided - 3 tablespoons fresh squeezed lime juice - 2 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon dried oregano - 1/­­8 teaspoon cayenne - 2 garlic cloves, grated - 2 8-ounce packages soy tempeh - 1 medium red onion, cut into 1/­­4-inch slices - 1 large red bell pepper, cut into 1/­­4-inch slices - salt and black pepper, to taste - 8 6-inch corn tortillas   Cut the tempeh into 1/­­4 inch by 2 inch strips. Place 1/­­3 cup of the olive oil with the lime juice and soy sauce in an 8 inch dish. Season with the cumin, oregno, cayenne pepper and garlic. Combine 1/­­3 cup oil, juice, soy sauce, cumin, oregano, cayenne and garlic in an 8-inch dish. Add tempeh, tossing to coat thoroughly. Cover and refrigerate for 2-12 hours, stirring occasionally. Heat a large cast-iron grill pan over medium-high heat. Brush pan with oil. Add half of tempeh to pan. Cook for 5 minutes, flip and cook 5 minutes more. Place in a warm bowl and repeat with the remaining tempeh. Place the onion and bell pepper with remaining 1 tablespoon oil. Season with salt and black pepper to taste. Add the bell pepper and onion to pan used to cook the tempeh. Cook for 3-5 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until the bell pepper and onion is tender and fragrant. Heat the tortillas directly over the flame of a gas stove or in a dry nonstick pan. Place 2 tortillas on each plate. Top evenly with tempeh and bell pepper mixture and enjoy. The post Bell Pepper Tempeh Fajitas appeared first on Meatless Monday.

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil

December 18 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil Every day, around 4pm, my husband and I start texting about dinner. If there aren’t any leftovers or a previously thought-through dinner plan, my most common proposition is ‘greens and beans?’ Those two are such staples and always leave us feeling really nourished. I have a million variations on the subject that I can throw together super quickly. Sometimes, for a quick and lazy lunch, I’ll just crisp up cooked chickpeas and kale in a pan with lots of salt and pepper and be totally satisfied. I always push off from there for our dinners, then add more vegetables, a sauce, a grain, crunchy toppings, etc. etc. I vary the kinds of greens and beans I use depending on season and mood, and what’s on hand. These one pot creamed beans and greens are my cozy, wintery version of our staple meal, and they definitely hit the spot every single time. The beans of choice here are white beans, since they are extra creamy in texture and go so well with lemon and pepper – both key ingredients. The green of choice is chard. I kind of think chard doesn’t get enough love? I love it because it wilts quickly, usually costs less than kale, and the stems are totally edible. The secret with the stems is cooking them first until they soften. Usually they’ll end up melting into a dish and become almost indistinguishable, but will still contribute some substance and extra plant power. If you use rainbow chard, the stems will give some of their color to whatever you’re cooking, so that’s fun as well. Chili oil is the component that takes this meal to that extra special place. I don’t recommend skipping it. We just quickly crisp up some red pepper flakes in olive oil and let it infuse while making the meal. A generous drizzle of that will really make everything sing. Hope you’re enjoying this sometimes crazy pre-holiday time! Let’s all remember to be nice to ourselves and stay warm and nourished. Sending you lots of love. One Pot Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the chili oil ¼ cup olive oil 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes pinch of sea salt for the creamed beans and greens avocado oil or olive oil 1 yellow onion - diced 1 medium-large bunch of chard - stems thinly sliced, leaves chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 5 cloves of garlic - minced a few 1 strips of lemon zest (from 1 lemon) 2 15 oz cans or 3½ cups cooked white beans 2 cups vegetable broth 2 bay leaves (optional) 1¼ cup oat milk or cashew milk juice from 1 lemon Instructions to make the chili oil Combine the oil and red pepper flakes in a saucepan over medium heat, cook, swirling, for 3-4 minutes until the pepper flakes are crispy. Add a pinch of salt. Set aside to infuse while making the beans and greens. to make the creamed beans and greens Heat oil over medium heat in a soup pot. Add the onion and chard stems, along with a pinch of salt and plenty of black pepper, and sauté for 10 minutes, or until the chard stems are very soft. Add the garlic and lemon zest, and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the beans, vegetable broth, bay leaves, if using, and another pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, establish a simmer and let simmer and reduce, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and lemon zest strips (this should be easy, since they should float up to the top). Add the chard leaves and cover the pot for a few minutes for the leaves to wilt. Remove the lid and stir in the wilted leaves. Add the milk and bring everything back up to a boil, then turn off the heat. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve warm, drizzled with the chili oil (recipe above). Notes We prefer to use original Oatly oat milk or homemade cashew milk (1 cup cashews, 3 cups water) in this recipe, it does best with something really creamy and rich. 3.5.3226   Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post One Pot Vegan Creamed Beans and Greens with Chili Oil appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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