garlic - vegetarian recipes

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garlic vegetarian recipes

Smoky Chipotle Black Bean & Roasted Sweet Potato Tacos

January 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

Black beans and sweet potatoes are a perfect pair and this taco recipe amps up their flavor with mushrooms, avocados and high-impact seasonings like chipotle powder and bitter orange marinade (often found in the international aisle). This recipe comes to us from Maribel of Food 4 Thought NYC. Serves 4, 2 tacos each - 1 can of black beans, rinsed - 1 medium sweet potato, peeled and diced - 1 cup of diced bella mushrooms - 1 cup shredded cabbage - 1 avocado, sliced - 1/­­2 red bell pepper, chopped - 1 bunch fresh cilantro, cleaned and trimmed - 8 white corn tortillas - 2 tbsp. of olive oil, separated - 2 large cloves of garlic, minced - 1 tbsp. of tomato paste - 1 tbsp. of naranja agria (bitter orange) marinade (substitute lime juice if unavailable) - 2 tsp. of salt, separated - 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne - 1 tsp ground chipotle powder - 1/­­2 tbsp. dried oregano - 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder - Freshly ground black pepper Preheat oven to 400°F. Line a small rimmed baking sheet with foil, add sweet potatoes, 1 tbsp. of oil, 1 tsp of salt, cayenne, and freshly ground black pepper; mix well. Place sheet in oven and bake for approximately 20 minutes or until potatoes are golden and tender. While potatoes are baking, heat remaining oil in a skillet over medium flame. Cook the minced garlic for 1-2 minutes, but be careful not to burn them otherwise youll end up with a bitter flavor. Add mushrooms and red peppers, stirring occasionally for 3-5 minutes. Once the veggies have softened, throw in the rinsed beans along with the paste, salt, chipotle, oregano, garlic powder, and black pepper. Mix everything together and allow it to cook for 8-10 minutes. About halfway through, add the bitter orange marinade (or lime juice). Remove from heat. Make sure you have all of your taco toppings ready on the side for easy prep. Turn on a burner to low-medium flame. Working with one tortilla at a time, carefully place it over the flame using tongs. Once you see the edges darken and it puffs up in the center, then flip it over. Cook each side for about 1-2 minutes. Place on serving plate. Spoon about 1 tbsp. of black bean and mushrooms, along with 1 tbsp. of sweet potatoes on each tortilla. Top with sliced cabbage, avocado, and a small handful of cilantro. Squeeze a bit of lime juice on top if you have it, or just enjoy it as is. The post Smoky Chipotle Black Bean & Roasted Sweet Potato Tacos appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby

January 7 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby Beth Kirby is a photographer, cookbook writer, entrepreneur, and the creator of Local Milk, her food, travel, and lifestyle blog. We are endlessly amazed by Beth’s ability to present her work with both authenticity and style, and we were completely blown away by each one of her thoughtful and inspiring answers in this interview. It’s a true gem. In this dialogue, Beth tells us about self-care as the foundation for happiness, having a schedule as a way to avoid stress, why she doesn’t believe in the idea of work-life balance, and how her routine has changed since becoming a mother, as well as her newfound love for weight training, the adaptogens and herbs she incorporates into her everyday potions, beauty, motivation, sustenance, and much more. There’s some amazing business advice here, too! Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Routine is so very important to me. Routines ensure that time is carved out for the important things in my days & life. Im super flexible with my routines so theres no such thing as failing, but the closer I adhere to the routine, the more impact I tend to make in my day. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I actually just wrote a little guide to a slow morning routine that details mine! I usually wake up when my baby wakes up, between 6:30-7:30 AM. The first thing I do every morning is make the bed because I feel this sets the tone for the rest of my day. My husband takes the baby to give me 10 minutes to meditate (I love the Headspace app) and do a few sun salutations to wake my body + mind connection up. After that I brew my morning elixir, a simple lemon, ginger, and turmeric tea, and then I do some journaling while I drink it. After that comes breakfast & a matcha potion, a shower & getting dressed for the day, a quick tidy of my space if I need it, and then Im down to work! I dont always do every single thing, but the more of them I hit, the better my morning! -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Im so exhausted at the end of the day, I dont usually need much help sleeping! I love making moon mylks with sleep promoting herbs as a little night time luxury. We keep the bedroom a sleep only zone with no television or computers, so its quite easy to pass out once Im in my own bed (or whatever bed I happen to be in!) -- How has your routine changed since you had your daughter? Its gotten a lot more flexible! If shes having a bad morning, things like preparing breakfast can take a lot longer or maybe I skip the shower (truth time!), but in a lot of ways, its made me more routine because if I dont have a plan and stick to it, the day can slip away a lot more easily when you have kids. I kinda floated through my days doing whatever I wanted whenever I wanted before she was born because I had all the time in the world. Now its make hay while the sun shines or forget having any hay! Haha. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  Miso Soup, 7 minute veggie & egg steam, and rice. After spending a fair amount of time in Japan, this has become my breakfast of choice. I keep dashi in the fridge for a quick miso soup so it takes literally minutes, and I steam a few veggies, whatever is on hand, in my steamer with an egg in its shell for 7 minutes. It all, including the egg, comes out perfectly! We cook rice in a rice cooker or donabe depending on where we are. I usually have a little miso dressing in the fridge to dip my veggies and eggs in and enjoy them alongside the rice & soup. Its so comforting and healthy, but its also really quick and easy as long as you throw the rice in a rice cooker and have dashi on hand. Lunch –  Smoothie! I usually hit my work stride during midday, and I dont like to take a massive amount of time (or make a big mess!) for lunch, so my favorite thing to do is whip up a super food adaptogen rich smoothie. I love pineapple and avocado as a base, and if its after a workout I make sure to throw some hemp & moringa in there for a plant based protein punch. Snack –  Ume plum onigiri. I almost always have leftover rice on hand, so I make rice balls with pickled plums in the center and wrap them with toasted nori for a quick snack. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Coffee makes me crazy, so I only have it on special occasions (like if Im near a really, really amazing café I might have a cappuccino), but when Im at home Ive started making a morning matcha potion.   -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I used to! But its lessened over the past couple of years as I cut back on candy & sweets. I love sugar, but I like to save it for feast days like holidays and celebrations instead of consume it as part of everyday life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I incorporate adaptogens & tonic herbs--particularly rhodiola, ashwaghanda, he shou wu, astragalus, maca, and reishi--into a lot of my food like smoothies, mylks, and matchas. I also love Wooden Spoon Herbs tinctures, especially Anxiety Ally (anxious lady over here!) as well as her Green Protein Powder after workouts. Ive also recently discovered tocos and MCT oil, which I work into either my smoothie or matcha each day. -- Youve spent significant amounts of time in both Japan and France. How have those cultures influenced your cooking? For sundry reasons, Japan has definitely had a bigger impact on my cooking than France even though we live in Paris about half the year. I love to eat French food, but I find a lot of it is richer than I care to eat on a daily basis, and because I cook vegetarian at home 99.9% of the time, Japanese cuisine is, in my experience, much easier to adapt to that. And I just love Japanese flavors. I would say I cook Japanese inspired meals more than anything else (even when in Paris!) -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Weve done baby led weaning which simply means offering solids around 6 months and letting her decide what and how much shed like to eat of what we offer. We try to make sure shes offered a wide variety of whole food options, and dont worry about it after that. She eats what we eat, and at 16 months shes still breastfed, and thats fine by me. We are super, super laid back about it. She eats what and when we eat, and she can still have mom milk whenever she wants. That said, those organic baby food pouches are a lifesaver on the go because she can hold them! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I see a personal trainer for an hour a day, five days a week. On my days off I do one day of cardio and one day of rest. I do mainly resistance training with weights and bodyweight and a little cardio. I think a lot of women do a toooonnn of cardio and are afraid of weights because they think theyll bulk up when in reality getting big is incredibly difficult. Instead weights make you stronger, toned, healthy, and able to eat more…which I love! Before Eula I ate very few calories and did lots of cardio, and while I was thin, I never felt healthy. Now I eat as much healthy food as I want when Im hungry and lift weights. While Im not where I want to be post-baby yet, Im on the road! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I freaking hate cardio. Especially running. I dont run. Unless something is on fire. I actually like weight lifting and resistance training. Its hard, but the time flies, and I can feel my body getting stronger. Having a trainer, while an investment, has been the trick for me. I need that accountability, and I needed to feel like someone who knew my goals for my body was guiding me towards them as opposed to me just randomly doing things. What motivates me is freedom from issues around food, being fit for the first time in my life, being a good example to my daughter, keeping up with my fit husband, and getting a toned butt! Haha! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? This is probably cliché but confidence. When someone is confident in their own skin and in who they are as a person, confident about where they are in the journey whether theyre only beginning or years down the road, that is beautiful. When you love yourself inside and out, you glow. Easier said than done, I know, but when we work towards banishing self loathing we arent only more beautiful to ourselves, we are more beautiful to others as well.   -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? As for my face, I keep it super simple: I wash and exfoliate with Aesop, and then I tone with Thayers Rose Tonic and hydrate with Evan Healy moisturizer. I love her formula because its natural and it isnt greasy like so many. It goes on so light. I also get a HydraFacial every couple of months. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I drink tocos daily in my smoothie or matcha, as its amazing for skin. He Shou Wu is another herb I take for beauty, again usually stirred into tea or a smoothie since I have one of those two things almost every day. I also take an ultra collagen supplement by Reserveage.   -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Dont wash your hair everyday! This strips hair of its oils and can dry it out and make it brittle. I wash mine once every 3-4 days, and I use a dry shampoo by Oribe on the days in between as needed. And if nothing else, if I can throw on a bit of Benefit Porefessional, mascara, and do my brows, I feel done. But the truth is, I hardly ever do my make up unless I have an event or am going to be on camera. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Not taking on more than I can handle, delegating, saying no as often as needed, having a schedule, and planning help me avoid stress. As a very DIY spirited entrepreneur, I constantly have to fight the temptation to just do it myself, and as a person who really likes to do what I feel like doing when I feel like doing it, I have to fight the urge to float through my days working on whatever catches my eye. Instead, batching days and time blocking (i.e. Mondays are for marketing & meetings, Tuesdays are for client work, Wednesdays are for editing & writing, Thursdays for content creation, Fridays are for finance, Saturday is for family, and Sunday is for weekly food prep, etc...) helps keep me on track. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Meditation is my not-so-secret weapon. And exercise. And sleep. If Im meditating, sleeping at least 7 hours a night, and getting my work-outs in, I can field whatever stress comes my way with reasonable grace. And it does come. I also find the simple belief that everything happens for a good reason calms down the stresses of life, big and small. Whether Im stuck at a red light when Im running late, or I didnt get something I thought I wanted, this belief frames it as a blessing. I choose to believe the universe knows better than I do what should happen and when. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic! I immediately start sucking on cloves of garlic. More than 50% of the time this knocks it out. It smells strong, but hey, it works! It has antibiotic properties (they called it Russian Penicillin during the war!), and it can kill bugs. I also start drinking a lot of herbal tea. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? This may sound strange to say, but I dont believe in work life balance. Balance implies everything has equal weight all the time. I believe in boundaries, but not balance. I dont believe anything great was ever created meting out time to it in a stingy way. Passion is going all in. Its long days and late nights. Its a pendulum swing. Whats important to me is not living these perfectly balanced days where everything gets equal weight, but rather in knowing when to swing back. You have to define your non-negotiables, and then the rest of your time is fair game. My non-negotiables are my weekly workouts, morning routine (though I shorten it as needed depending on the day), and an hour or so at the end of the day to cuddle and connect with my family. When Im in a season of intense work, say launching something new or writing a book, people know they will see less of me. I will spend less time on other things. And when I need a break or when its complete, I will just the same pour myself all into to rest and enjoying the people I love. Its about knowing your own limits, setting boundaries so that the priority gets to be the priority, pushing it to the boundary, and then stepping back when its time. Thats my approach. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself. When you truly, fully grasp that if you dont take care of yourself all the other things you want will forever remain out of your grasp, then it becomes really easy to stay motivated and prioritize yourself. We all have different goals and dreams, but what most people have in common is that they quite simply want to be happy. You can make seven figures and be perfectly miserable if you dont take care of yourself. Its the foundation the rest is built on. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Working out, specifically weight training. I have spent my entire life avoiding exercise. I always really hated it, and it felt like a waste of time when I could be working. Which was so silly! It gives me more energy, better focus, elevates my mood, and helps me make better food choices because when you make one good choice it becomes easier to make others. Also, full disclosure, it really helps with libido! As a woman who is crazy about her husband but definitely suffered from sloth like tendencies post baby, this has been awesome! Intimacy is such a priority for me, and working out has totally reenergized our relationship. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Ha! Story of my life. Honestly, I lean into it. What those periods mean, usually, is that Im burnt out or theres some big issue in my life or business that isnt working, and Im not dealing with it. In those periods, I let myself rest. And I take a look at whats not working, and I try to develop a solution. If Im simply burnt out, a good rest will leave me totally inspired. And if theres something that isnt working in my life or business, taking time to figure it out becomes the priority. Once the problem is solved, motivation and inspiration return. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Tools of Titans, The One Thing, and Essentialism are all books that deeply influenced my routines and my general philosophy on life. While largely geared towards entrepreneurs, I think their principles can apply to anyone. Knowledge -- Your home birth story was incredibly inspiring and touching. How did you come to the decision to have a natural home birth? Do you have any resources to recommend to future parents thinking of doing the same? Well, Id actually planned to give birth at the hospital for the majority of my pregnancy. I decided to have a home birth weeks before she was due! It was kind of crazy. In the process of writing my birth plan, I realized how against the grain I was going for a hospital birth by simply wanting no medication or unnecessary medical interventions. I didnt want to be swimming upstream while doing the hardest thing I would ever do. If someone is thinking about doing the same, I would say do a lot of research on the quality of midwifery care in your area. Not every area of the world is created equally when it comes to available care. The Farm Midwifery Center has lots of great resources for people considering the option! -- Do you have any tips for surviving or minimizing jetlag, and for dealing with a jetlagged baby? I actually have a whole blog post on traveling with baby! If you are traveling across many, many time zones and its at all possible, build a few extra days into your schedule to take it easy and recover from jetlag. When she was under one year old, we took turns getting up with her those first few nights, and tried to keep her awake as long as possible near bed time. And while I know a lot of people might not be comfortable with this, once she was over one year old we gave her a small, weight appropriate dose of benadryl the first two to three nights to help reset her clock. It was an amazing life saving discovery that our pediatrician approved, and we felt comfortable with after lots and lots of research. If you dont want to do that, you can try melatonin or herbal remedies like No Jet Lag. In the end whether you use anything or not, the baby adjusts much quicker than the adults in my experience! -- Youve masterfully created your own brand, and your photography style is instantly recognizable, yet weve read that you are completely self-taught. What was your path to building such a successful lifestyle brand? What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out? Oh man! I have WAY too much to say about this. Im writing e-courses for 2018 that deal with this very topic. So! My path was to embrace the public learning curve. I didnt wait until I had it all figured out to start. I just started, and I got better as I went along. The better I got, the more readers and opportunities I had. There was no overnight success. There was passion, hard work, and showing up everyday for years. I have ALWAYS focused on two things above all else: content and relationships. I dont deal in mediocre and always strive to produce the best content I possibly can, and I aim to treat everyone I come in contact with love and respect. Those are the foundations, in my estimation, of any successful enterprise. The advice I would give to someone starting out, the short version, is this: First, you need to figure out what youre passionate about and be super specific, start with one thing. For me, that was cooking. You can branch out into other niches later, but start with one. Then you need to figure out the core values of your brand. For instance beauty, mindfulness, and authenticity are some of the core values of Local Milk. This is going to set the tone for all that you do. The next thing, the most important thing, you need to figure out is who youre talking to. Who is you dream customer, client, audience? What do they love? What are their hopes, dreams, fears, struggles? How can you make their lives better? This is where youll get ideas for content, revenue streams, copywriting, and everything. Its so important. You cant skip it. You cant hit a target you arent aiming for, and you need to know what your target audience looks like (eg: is it magazine editors or stay at home moms? or both? why?) and responds to before you go on to create your brand. I could keep going! But Ill leave the nitty gritty details for the e-course! The biggest advice I can give is: Just start! There is ALWAYS room at the top, and NO ONE starts there. -- You are a true believer in the fact that a dream life and dream job is achievable for anyone, even those at their lowest point. Can you tell us a bit more about how you were able to come to this realization? Well, Im living proof, so its an easy thing for me to believe. I spent the first decade of my adult life in the throes of bipolar and drug addiction. Im a high school AND college drop out. I started this business when I was 29 on VERY little money. The only thing Id ever done before this was wait tables. I had to heal myself before I could start this journey, but once I did that, I didnt quit, and I didnt look down. Every small win felt like a huge win to me. I was grateful for the first $20 I was ever paid for a photo. And to be honest, it was probably only worth $20. I have the unshakeable belief that if you work hard at something youre truly passionate about, you cannot fail. But you have to work hard. And you have to be passionate, you have to love it. Before you can do any of it, however, you must take care of yourself spiritually and physically. That was the key to all of my success. Ten years of failure because I could not and would not take care of myself. Once I started, it all just flowed. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? In no particular order: sailing anywhere with clear blue water, Netflix and chill with my husband, and playing Warcraft. Haha! I try to make it to the sea at least once a year, and I love to hang out with my husband doing anything or nothing. When work is done for the day, I like to relax with a good series. And Warcraft is my secret pleasure. Especially when Im really burnt out, and I just need to get away”. I absolutely love video games, specifically WoW, and while I cant play full time anymore, whenever Im taking one of those breaks from work to rejuvenate, Ill get on there for a few days. Im hoping to find time soon to play! Its great because it has NOTHING to do with work. And when you have a lifestyle brand, EVERYTHING can be turned into work! But I think its safe to say the World of Warcraft remains and always will remain firmly off brand! -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Nabokovs Lolita (topic notwithstanding its some of the best writing in the world) Song/­­Album – Songs of Leonard Cohen Movie – The Empire Strikes Back (its my favorite movie, so you know...it sure feeds my soul!) Piece of Art – anything by Cy Twombly -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are a few essential objects that would be in yours? This is actually labeled my minimalist packing list in my evernotes! camera laptop external hard drive phone earphones passport/­­visas wallet medicine dry shampoo brush Cosmetics aesop face wash + exfoliant thayers rose tonic deodorant toothbrush + paste underwear black boots blockshop scarf sunglasses 1 oversized necklace 1 pair earrings 1 hat 2 trousers 2 elizabeth suzann linen tunics 1 over sized sweater 1 silk shift dress 1 pair black tights lauren manoogian capote coat socks -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Heidi Swanson, Jenna Kutcher, Alison Wu, and Melyssa Griffin are my current woman crushes. Photos by Beth Kirby. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Lacy Phillips .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Beth Kirby appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes

January 4 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes Happy New Year, friends! We wanted to stop by with a round-up of 18 vegan and gluten-free New Year reset-friendly recipes that are vegetable-forward and deeply nourishing, but also satisfying and delicious. We’ve got you covered on healing soups and stews, vibrant mains, energy-boosting breakfasts and snacks, a powerful cold remedy drink, and even a minimally sweetened dessert that still very much tastes like a treat. Wishing you all the health and happiness in 2018 :) No-Recipe Healing Soup (v, gf) One of our most popular recipes of 2017. This is a highly customizable soup, built on a powerful broth made with immunity-friendly ingredients. It’s delicious and warming, but especially helpful to those under the weather or low on energy. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices (v, gf) A deeply nourishing and simple stew recipe, heavily influenced by South Indian cuisine, with a high potential for customization. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew (v, gf) The ultimate, cozy stew from our Fall Meal Plan, loaded with so many star ingredients of fall/­­winter fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. Check out the whole meal plan, too – it has all kinds of other great ideas for a new year reset menu for a whole week. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup (v, gf) A soup that’s both creamy and chunky, full of grounding, winter-appropriate ingredients. Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip (v, gf) Mango season is coming soon, and this curry is the perfect way to celebrate the sunny fruit’s arrival. Besides the mango, it’s loaded with all kinds of other nutritious, health-promoting produce like broccoli and fennel. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Mung Bean Falafel (v, gf) Mung beans make for a great alternative falafel base. They are incredibly nutritious and affordable, and their cooking time is a lot shorter than that of chickpeas. This falafel is very simple to prepare, and it makes for a perfect component to complete a bright and flavorful veggie bowl. Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas (v, gf) An incredibly savory, alternative polenta recipe made with millet instead of corn. Simple in looks, but surprisingly complex in flavor. Taco Collard Green Rolls (v, gf) All the flavors of a great veggie taco, contained in a collard green roll. A crowd-pleaser through and through. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans (v, gf) If you happen to have access to good zucchini this time of year, try out this light, plant-powered dish. One of my favorites to prepare when I’m feeling sluggish and non-vibrant. Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango (v, gf) Another great recipe for ushering in mango season. Cucumber noodles are a life-changing discovery, and the glazed tofu technique is our absolute favorite way to prepare tofu. Quick Marinated Beans (v, gf) A great thing to make on the weekend, to have in the fridge throughout the week. These marinated beans are able to transform any salad or bowl into a complete, satisfying meal. Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut (v, gf) Incorporating more fermented foods into your diet is always a great idea, especially during a new year reset. Gut health is everything! If you are up for a home fermentation project, consider making this colorful sauerkraut. Omit the blueberries if you can’t find any this time of year. Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways (v, gf) Taking a break from grains or bread? Sweet potato toast might be the perfect thing to curb any toast cravings or withdrawals you may be having. It’s also just a really delicious dish in its own right. Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl (v, gf) Raw beet, avocado, cranberries, camu camu: these are just some of the ingredients in this powerful, immunity-boosting bowl. Makes for a perfectly vibrant breakfast. Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways (v, gf) These are truly healthy pancakes, made with nutritious, protein-rich, gluten-free grains, and vibrant veggies. The blender technique makes them very easy to put together, too. Sweet and Savory Energy Bites (What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp) (v, gf) Having healthy snacks on hand is the key to success, in our opinion. These energy bites are one of our favorite things to make with leftover nut milk pulp, and they make healthy snacking easy and delicious. Almost Savory Raw Chocolate (v, gf) We know that a lot of people take a break from sugar after all that holiday indulgence. This chocolate recipe is a life-saver for any true chocoholics having a hard time with that idea (aka us). You can make it with zero sugar, but still feel like you’ve had your chocolate fix after having a square or two of this stuff. It’s gold! Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy (v, gf) If you or anyone around you is thinking of getting sick, MAKE THIS! It’s helped us and countless friends of ours fight off colds in their beginning stages. It’s also an invigorating and firey tonic, perfect for any bitter winter day. You might also like... Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Favorite New Year Reset Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato Bowl

January 3 2018 Vegan Richa 

Spiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato BowlSpiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato Bowl with Veggies, Greens and Tahini Garlic Dressing. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Use cooked lentils, beans or chickpeas for variation. Happy New Year Everyone! Starting up the year with this amazing Sprouted lentil bowl. Lentils are sprouted, then lightly spiced, greens are wilted with garlic, Veggies roasted with Cajun spice and served in a bowl with a dressing of choice.  Use sprouted mung beans or other sprouted chickpeas/­­beans for variation. I also love this with sprouted brown chickpeas. Cook it a bit longer to reduce the raw flavor and serve up in the bowl. Sprouted Lentils and Beans makes the nutrients more bio-available, improves the quality of the protein and also makes them more digestible for some. You can also use cooked lentils or chickpeas instead for a quicker meal. Lets get Sprouting. Continue reading: Spiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato BowlThe post Spiced Sprouted Lentils, Cajun Roasted Sweet Potato Bowl appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Lime Wild Rice Lentils

January 1 2018 Meatless Monday 

Black lentils and wild rice are cooked together, then seasoned with tomato paste, garlic, lime juice, oregano and chili powder. Crushed wakame seaweed adds a unique umami flavor to the dish, which is delicious when finished with hot chili flakes and cool Greek yogurt. This recipe comes to us from Marica of Wasabi Honey Bee. Serves 4 - 2 cups black lentils, rinsed and picked over - 1/­­2 cup wild rice, rinsed - 1 6 ounce can tomato paste - 3 cloves garlic, crushed - 6 sticks wakame seaweed*, crushed into pieces - juice from 1 lime - 1 teaspoon chili powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon oregano - salt and black pepper, to taste - hot chili flakes, to taste - plain lowfat Greek yogurt, to taste *Found in Asian markets or the Asian or dried good section of most grocery stores. Bring the water, lentils and rice to a boil in a large pot over medium high heat. As soon as the water boils, reduce heat to medium low and simmer for about 25 minutes, or until the lentils are cooked through. Drain the lentils and rice and return them to the pot. Return the pot medium low heat. Add the tomato paste, crushed garlic, wakame seaweed pieces and lime juice to the pot. Season with the chili powder, oregano and salt and pepper to taste. Stir, taking care to ensure that all ingredients are evenly distributed. Simmer, stirring occasionally, for 3-5 minutes more, or until the flavors meld together. Divide into 4 servings, finish each with a sprinkle of red pepper flakes and a dollop of Greek yogurt and enjoy! The post Lime Wild Rice Lentils appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spaghetti Squash Pasta with Sun-dried Tomato, Garlic & Basil

December 29 2017 Vegan Richa 

Spaghetti Squash Pasta with Sun-dried Tomato, Garlic & BasilSpaghetti Squash Pasta with Sun-dried Tomato, Garlic & Basil. Light Dinner with no Grains. Add some spiced chickpeas, roasted nuts or baked tofu for variation. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe I had 3 small spaghetti squashes lying around the other day and I decided to jump onto the spaghetti squash pasta wagon to see what this squash is about.  It is an interesting Squash that when roasted and scooped looks like noodles/­­spaghetti and can be use used in place of those.  It is neutral flavored (less sweet) than many of the winter squashes and works well in savory dishes. To this squash, I added a simple saute of garlic, basil, sun dried tomato, olive oil, salt and pepper and crumbles up almond cheese or vegan parm.  Simple, pleasing, light and delicious! Continue reading: Spaghetti Squash Pasta with Sun-dried Tomato, Garlic & BasilThe post Spaghetti Squash Pasta with Sun-dried Tomato, Garlic & Basil appeared first on Vegan Richa.

besan bhindi recipe | besan wali bhindi | rajasthani bhindi recipe

December 25 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

besan bhindi recipe | besan wali bhindi | rajasthani bhindi recipebesan bhindi recipe | besan wali bhindi | rajasthani bhindi recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. unlike any other traditional north indian curry recipe, besan bhindi recipe is a no onion no garlic recipe. this recipe contains only dry coating of besan mixed with spice powders like red chilli, garam masala and amchur. after the coating the okras are pan fried till crisp and served hot. Continue reading besan bhindi recipe | besan wali bhindi | rajasthani bhindi recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Paella from the Pantry

December 19 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Paella from the PantryThis vegan paella is the ultimate in delicious pantry cooking. The quickest way to get it on the table is by having cooked rice on hand. If you have cooked rice in the freezer, it defrosts quickly in the microwave. You can also substitute a quick-cooking grain such as quinoa, if you prefer. Paella from the Pantry This vegan paella is the ultimate in delicious pantry cooking. - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 large yellow onion, chopped - 3 cloves garlic cloves, minced - 1 cup vegetable broth - 1 pinch saffron threads or ground annatto or turmeric, for color - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1 teaspoon dried oregano - 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes - 1 28-ounce can diced fire-roasted tomatoes, undrained - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 cup frozen green peas, thawed - 1 1/­­2 cups cooked chickpeas, or 1 (15.5-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 2 1/­­2 to 3 cups cooked rice - 1 6-ounce jar marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped - 1 6-ounce jar roasted red bell pepper, drained and chopped - 1/­­2 cup sliced pimiento-stuffed green olives - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley - Heat the oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 5 minutes to soften. Add the garlic and cook 1 minute longer. Stir in the broth, saffron, paprika, bay leaf, oregano, red pepper flakes, and tomatoes and their juice. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to medium. Season with salt and pepper to taste, cover, and simmer for 8 minutes. Stir in the peas, chickpeas, cooked rice, artichoke hearts, roasted red bell pepper, olives, and parsley. Cook 3 to 5 minutes longer, stirring gently, to heat through. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. The post Vegan Paella from the Pantry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup

December 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Here’s a simple, nourishing soup that will help ground you through any holiday craziness or, really, any kind of stress you might be experiencing. Pureed soups offer such an easy way to get lots of veggies into your diet, and the possibilities for pureed soup recipes are endless. Think of them as warm, savory smoothies, and you’ll see that almost anything goes. I love a smooth soup, but sometimes I crave a little more texture within that creamy format. Enter this Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale soup, which has it all in terms of texture: a smooth and silky base, with satisfying chunks of chickpeas and kale throughout. Root vegetables are the perfect thing to be eating right now, when our bodies require more high-quality fuel to keep warm. They gather all their energy underground, where they grow to become nutrient and calorie-dense. Roots are grounding in the most literal sense. Parsnips, carrots, sweet potatoes, celeriac, beets, rutabaga, and any other root veggies you can think of, will make for a great addition to your winter meals. This soup highlights parsnips, the roots that look like albino carrots and have the loveliest sweet and earthy flavor. They are pureed together with warming spices like turmeric and coriander, as well as home-cooked chickpeas, which make this soup even more hearty, and satisfying enough to be eaten as a light lunch. Whole chickpeas and ribboned kale are then warmed in the pureed mixture, to make for the perfect balance of creamy and chunky. Have you tried adding half a cup of pulses, like the chickpeas in this soup (along with beans, lentils and dry peas) to your meals throughout the week yet? We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: they are the perfect, nutrient-dense and affordable building blocks for healthy, hearty and sustainable meals. Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a pinch of acv 2 bay leaves (optional) 2-inch piece of kombu seaweed (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 onion - chopped 1 tsp fennel seeds 1 tsp ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground turmeric pinch of red pepper flakes 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 lb parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped black pepper - to taste 5 cups chickpea broth + more if needed (recipe below) 1 bunch kale - finely chopped zaatar, herbs/­­sprouts and nuts/­­seeds - for serving Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Combine them with 8 cups of purified water, bay leaves and kombu, if using, in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook, partially covered for about 30 minutes, or until the chickpeas are completely cooked. Add salt at the end. Discard the bay leaves and kobmu, then strain, reserving the chickpea broth. Warm the coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, fennel, coriander, turmeric, red pepper flakes, and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the parsnips, 1 cup of the cooked chickpeas, more salt and black pepper, and 5 cups of the chickpea broth to the same pot. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook, partially covered, for about 15 minutes, or until the parsnips are completely cooked and soft throughout. Puree all the contents of the pot in batches in an upright blender. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Return the pureed mixture to the same pot. Add the kale to the pot and stir it in. If the soup is too thick at this point, add a little more of the reserved chickpea broth to achieve the desired soup consistency. Bring the soup to a gentle boil once more, and simmer, stirring often, for 10 minutes. Add the remaining cooked chickpeas and stir to warm them through. Serve the soup warm, sprinkled with zaatar and any herbs/­­sprouts or nuts/­­seeds of choice. 3.5.3226 You might also like... No-Recipe Healing Soup Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion Garlic

December 10 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion GarlicVegetable Korma – Veggies in Spiced Ginger Chile Sauce. Creamy Indian Korma Recipe made without Onion and garlic. Vegan Indian Gluten-free Soy-free  Can be made nut-free. No Onion No Garlic Recipe. Instant pot option Weekends always have me craving Indian food, so here is this quick Korma Sauce with vegetables of choice.  There are several different types of kormas. Some are decadent, some light. Some use lots of whole spices, some use just a few and some use coconut. This korma sauce is a simple sauce made with whole spices, ginger and chili and then thickened with cashews. The sauce does not use onion and garlic as is used is many korma sauces. Some regional cuisines in India do not include certain root veggies like onion and garlic, or allium. This delicious and easy sauce has a similar flavor punch of my restaurant style Navratan korma sauce (from my first book), but simpler and without any onion and garlic. Use whichever whole spices you have and Use other nuts or coconut as sub for cashews. Lets get to this delicious Clean up the fridge Veggie Korma. Also in other news, get both my books on Kindle Matchbook DEAL, ebook version 88% off for only 2.99 on amazon US, when you get the print copy. If you already bought the print copy at any time past or present (for yourself or for gifting), you get this deal too! Head to the book page and it will automatically show you the deal if you have a print copy order in your account. Take the ebook with you on kindle, computer or your phone!Continue reading: Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion GarlicThe post Vegetable Korma – Creamy Indian Korma Recipe No Onion Garlic appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Crispy Fried Cauliflower Wingz

December 5 2017 Vegan Dad 

Crispy Fried Cauliflower Wingz This recipe is perfect for your upcoming holiday party! Or tuck it away until the Super Bowl. An indulgence, to be sure, but you deserve it. Ive been meaning to work up a recipe like this since the cauliflower wings craze hit the interwebs a while ago, but I never got around to it. These are crispy and flavourful, and remain so even when they are no longer hot. The boys doused theirs in Buffalo hot sauce, while the rest of us stuck to a sweet BBQ sauce. Delicious!  INGREDIENTS - 1 large head of cauliflower, cut into florets Brine - 2 cups cold water - 1 tsp garlic powder - 2 tsp onion powder - 2 tsp smoked or seasoned salt - 2 tsp paprika - 1 tsp poultry spice Batter - 2 cups all purpose flour - 1 cup panko crumbs - 1/­­2 cup chickpea flour - 1/­­2 cup tapioca flour/­­starch - 1 tbsp each: onion powder, garlic powder, paprika, Italian seasoning - 1 tsp white pepper - 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar - 3 cups plain soy milk (more if needed) METHOD 1. The day before: mix together the brine ingredients (I use a blender). Pour into a large freezer bag, then add the cauliflower florets. If your cauliflower is very large, you can make a 1.5 recipe of the brine.  2. Remove as much air a possible so the brine is making maximum contact with the brine. Refrigerate for at least 12 hours, rotating the bag as needed for even brining.  3. The Day of: drain cauliflower in a colander. Heat oil in a deep fryer to 350 degrees. 4. While cauliflower is draining, whisk together the dry ingredients for the batter (i.e. flour to white pepper).  5. Dredge the cauliflower in the flour mixture in batches until coated. Shake off all excess and place on a baking sheet. 6. In a separate bowl, whisk together vinegar and soy milk. Add enough of the soy mixture to the remaining flour mixture to make a thickish batter. Add more soy milk if needed. 7. Add some pieces of cauliflower to the batter. Turn to coat. Leave the cauliflower in the batter for a few minutes to allow the batter to soak into the dredging flour. 8. Shake off excess batter and transfer to a cooking tray or plate.  9. Fry in oil, 3-4 minutes per side, until deep golden brown. Make sure your oil is not too hot or the outside will burn before the cauliflower is cooked. 10. Drain on paper towels and serve while still hot. NOTE 1: while one batch is frying, add another to the batter so it can soak. Repeat. NOTE 2: add more soy milk to the batter, if needed. The dredging flour will thicken the batter a bit, so just thin it down again. 

Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Wilted bok choy and peanuts fill a flavorful, savory broth alongside chewy noodles for a hearty one-dish meal. Look for fresh rice noodles in the pasta or Asian food section of most grocery stores. This recipe comes to us from Sharon Palmer, The Plant-Powered Dietitian. Serves 4 - 1 teaspoon sesame oil - 1 tablespoon peanut oil - 1 red onion, sliced - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon peanut butter - 3 tablespoons soy ginger dressing - 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce - 2 tablespoons orange juice - red pepper flakes, to taste - 1 (12 ounces) package fresh rice noodles - 6 (6-ounce) heads baby bok choy - 1/­­4 cup peanuts Place the oils in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and sauté for about 5 minutes, or until the vegetables soften and become fragrant. Add the peanut butter, dressing, soy sauce, orange juice, red pepper flakes and 1-1/­­2 cups water to the skillet. Stir until bubbly and smooth. Cover and cook while you prepare the noodles. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil over medium-high heat and cook the rice noodles according to package directions. Drain and rinse with water. Transfer the cooked noodles to the skillet and stir to combine. Add the bok choy and peanuts to the pan and let cook for 1 minute, or until the bok choy is slightly wilted. Enjoy! The post Spicy Bok Choy with Noodles and Peanuts appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vantra Eden – The Healthiest Restaurant In London?

November 29 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Very near the center of the city, 100 yards down the road after taking a left out of Goodge Street Station, lies some of the healthiest food in London. Vantra Edens fare, its sign proclaims, contains No Dairy, No Gluten, No Sugar, No Fried Food, Non GMO, No Peanuts & Cashew, No Garlic, No Vinegar, No Artificial Chemicals, No Unhealthy Cooking Methods - Vegan, Raw & Steamed, Halal & Kosher Friendly, Detoxing, Energising. No garlic? I ask Phun, Vantras owner. Makes people too horny. They cant meditate, he laughs in reply. Of course, there are bowls of garlic and chilis to add at the end of the buffet should you have other appetites planned for the rest of your day. Vantra Eden is first in the community of food tents at 79a Tottenham Court Road, across the street from Habitat. Theyre open Monday-Friday from 12-3 PM, a buffet with lunch boxes, juices, cakes, & more. A medium box is ?6, while a large is only ?7.50. Very reasonably priced. And the food is amazing. With the dishes either raw or steamed, the buffet selection offers the deliciously creamy ‘Vegan Stroganoff’ (Shiitaki Mushrooms, Celery, Mustard, Parsnips, Rosemary and Herbs), incredibly flavorful […] The post Vantra Eden – The Healthiest Restaurant In London? appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables

November 27 2017 Meatless Monday 

Cauliflower is roasted golden in the oven while bell peppers are sautéed sweet and fragrant with zucchini on the stove. Parsley, garlic and red wine vinegar make a vibrant chimichurri sauce to sprinkle over this delectable vegetable medley. Serves 6 For the chimichurri sauce: - 1 bunch parsley, stems removed - 1 clove garlic - 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar - 1/­­2-1 teaspoon red pepper flakes - 1/­­2 teaspoon black pepper - 1/­­3 cup olive oil For the vegetables: - a drizzle olive oil, for preparing the veggies - 1 head cauliflower, broken into small florets - 1 medium zucchini, sliced - 1 cup bell peppers, sliced To make the chimichurri sauce: Place the parsley, garlic, red wine vinegar, red pepper flakes, black pepper and olive oil into a blender or food processor. Blend until thoroughly combined. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. To complete the Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Toss the cauliflower florets with a drizzle of olive oil, until the cauliflower is coated. Place the olive oil coated cauliflower florets onto a baking sheet. Roast the cauliflower in the oven for 1 hour, or until the florets begin to turn golden brown. 15 minutes before the cauliflower florets have completed roasting, prepare a large skillet with a light coating of olive oil. Place the sliced zucchini and bell peppers into the skillet over medium heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes, or until the bell peppers become sweet, soft and fragrant. Divide the cauliflower and sautéed zucchini and peppers into 4 portions. Drizzle with chimichurri sauce to taste, and enjoy! The post Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Kitchen-Sink Capellini

January 2 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen-Sink CapelliniAs the name implies, theres everything but the kitchen sink in this delicious Kitchen-Sink Capellini, including artichoke hearts, Kalamata olives, and two kinds of tomatoes. Made with quick-cooking capellini, this meal is ready in just minutes with a complex flavor that belies its speedy preparation.   Kitchen-Sink Capellini As the name implies, theres everything but the kitchen sink in this delicious pasta dish, including artichoke hearts, Kalamata olives, and two kinds of tomatoes. Made with quick-cooking capellini, this meal is ready in just minutes with a complex flavor that belies its speedy preparation. - 8 ounces capellini or angel hair pasta - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 3 garlic cloves, finely minced - 2 14-ounce cans fire-roasted diced tomatoes, undrained - 1 16-ounce can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed - 1/­­3 cup oil-packed or reconstituted sun-dried tomatoes, cut into thin strips - 1 6-ounce jar marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped - 1/­­2 cup Kalamata olives, pitted and halved - 4 cups baby spinach or 1 cup chopped frozen spinach, thawed and squeezed (optional) - 2 tablespoons fresh chopped basil or 1 teaspoon dried - Salt and ground black pepper - 1/­­4 cup toasted pine nuts or chopped walnuts - Cook the pasta in a pot of boiling salted water until just tender, about 4 minutes. Drain the pasta in a colander. Drizzle with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil, toss to coat, and set aside. - In the same pot in which you cooked the pasta, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 30 seconds. Stir in the diced tomatoes, cannellini beans, artichoke hearts, olives, spinach (if using), basil, and salt and pepper to taste. Cook over medium heat until hot and well combined, about 5 minutes. Add the reserved pasta and toss gentle to combine and heat through. Serve hot sprinkled with the pine nuts. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. Save Save The post Kitchen-Sink Capellini appeared first on Robin Robertson.

17 Best Vegan Recipes 2017

December 31 2017 Vegan Richa 

17 Best Vegan Recipes 2017Best of 2017. Recipes and Posts that were popular this year. 17 Best Vegan Recipes 2017 from the blog. Garlic Sauce with Cajun Cauliflower, Scalloped Potatoes, Butter Tofu, Tiramisu Fudge Bars and more. Gluten-free options Its that time of the year again. The date is changing and I will be writing 2017 for a few weeks before it finally settles. Its been a busy year (The second book work pretty much took up more time than I had), but we did get a break now around the Holidays.  Recharging and chilling (in the cold and snow), and excited about 2018. 135 Posts in 2017! 130 new Recipes. 140 More in a New Book (Everyday Kitchen, Sept 2017). 150 in the first book(Indian Kitchen, May 2015).! 380 posts on Instagram. Cooking on Instagram Stories. Loads of recipe remakes from blog and both the books #veganricha #veganrichasindiankitchen #veganrichaseverydaykitchen ! 81 Videos on Youtube. Longer videos to come in 2018. 2018 will see more of similar flavorful food, some simple everyday recipes, some new cuisines and styles to try out new flavors and textures, some regional Indian fare (Indian sub-cuisines, so much more to learn!) with new ingredients, Instant Pot cooking, and more video types(narration, live etc). Have something you’d like me to try next year, let me know in the comments. What were your favorite posts from the blog? Here are the top 17 posts from 2017 in order of popularity.Continue reading: 17 Best Vegan Recipes 2017The post 17 Best Vegan Recipes 2017 appeared first on Vegan Richa.

One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust

December 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Since this is our last recipe of 2017, we wanted to make sure that it’s a special one. It needed to check all the boxes we usually try to check with our recipes: nourishing, delicious, seasonal, beautiful, convenient, and a little bit unexpected. This veggie and lentil-centered one pan pie is all of those things. It’s very cozy and fun to prepare, too. If I had a choice, most of my savory dishes would be one-pan dishes :) Convenience is hard to beat. That little bit of initial effort you put into assembling all the ingredients for a single-pan dish pays off incredibly well when you end up with a big meal, plus a ton of leftovers for the week, having only used one pan or pot in the process. This one-pan dish is something like a vegetable pot pie, but the crust is made up of thinly mandolined winter roots – potatoes, sweet potatoes, and celery root. The filling is shredded Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and red lentils (you can add barley, too, for a grain component) that cooks in a mixture of healing spices and coconut milk. The whole thing is packed with a great variety of plants. It’s perfect for those looking to up their intake of vegetables after the holidays, but still wanting to keep their cooking hearty and cozy. The ingredient that takes this dish into the complete meal category are the red lentils. Vegetable dishes are great on their own, but adding any kind of pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas, dry peas) to your plant-centric meals will up their nutrition and ability to satisfy quite a bit. Pulses are incredibly nutrient-dense, like superfoods, but they are also very affordable, unlike most other superfoods, so it’s a win-win all around. Try adding about a half a cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – your cooking will greatly benefit from them, and you’ll be on your way to discovering a whole new world of deliciousness (of you haven’t already, of course). Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Happy New Year! Thank you so much for visiting GK, trying out our recipes, and reading up on the self-care series. It all means so much to us .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Eggplant and Shiitake “Meatballs”

December 25 2017 Meatless Monday 

Quinoa is an excellent meatless protein source and this fun preparation mixes the superstar grain with hearty vegetables to create a delectable dish that can either be served as a main with pasta, or as an intriguing meatless party appetizer (make mini balls and don’t forget the little toothpicks!). This recipe comes to us from Stefanie of Sarcastic Cooking. Serves: 3-4 (makes 8 meatballs) - 1 small eggplant - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 4 ounces shiitake mushrooms, cleaned, stems removed, and diced - 3/­­4 cup quinoa - 1 1/­­2 cups water - 1 large egg - 1 egg white - 1/­­4 cup grated Parmesan cheese - 2 cloves garlic, grated - 1 teaspoon salt -  1/­­2 teaspoon black pepper - pinch of crushed red pepper flakes - 1 teaspoon chopped basil - 1 teaspoon chopped parsley - vegetable oil, for frying - marinara sauce, to serve Preheat the oven to 350F. Using a fork, prick holes all over the eggplant. Place the eggplant on a baking sheet and roast it in the oven for an hour, until the eggplant collapses/­­shrivels. While the eggplant roasts, cook the quinoa and mushrooms. In a small saucepan, bring the 1 1/­­2 cups of water and quinoa to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover with lid, and let cook for about 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, uncover and fluff with a fork. In a small skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat for a minute or so. Add mushrooms to pan and sauté for 7-10 minutes until golden. Once the eggplant is cooled, slice it in half length-wise. Use a spoon to scoop out the flesh of the eggplant. Give it a chop and discard the eggplant skin. Add the eggplant, quinoa, and mushrooms to a medium mixing bowl. Mix in the egg, egg white, parmesan, garlic, salt, pepper, crushed red pepper flakes, basil, and parsley. Mix well. Line a baking sheet with parchment/­­wax paper. Form the shiitake/­­eggplant mixture into large balls. Place the balls on the lined baking sheet. Place the sheet with all the meatballs on it in the refrigerator for twenty minutes while you heat the oil. Fill a large, heavy-bottomed skillet about 1/­­4 of the way up with vegetable oil. Heat the oil over medium/­­high heat for about ten minutes. Remove the meatballs from the fridge, add four meatballs to the hot oil at a time. Fry the balls, turning occasionally, for 8-10 minutes until golden on all sides. Remove with a slotted spoon, add to a plate lined with paper towels to drain. Fry the next batch in the same way. Serve the meatballs with marinara sauce and your favorite pasta. The post Eggplant and Shiitake “Meatballs” appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Wellington with Mushrooms, Lentils, Veggies

December 15 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Wellington with Mushrooms, Lentils, VeggiesMushroom lentil Wellington. Easy Vegan Wellington for the Holidays and potlucks. Puff pastry wrapped lentil walnut mushroom loaf.  Vegan Recipe. Make into a loaf to make gluten-free.  Another week done and another 2 to go. Lets make this fabulous puff pastry wrapped lentil mushroom walnut roast to celebrate. The lentil mushroom mixture is fabulous on it its own. You can make it into patties or a loaf and serve with gravy. I made 2 loaves and wrapped them in puff pastry for a wellington style loaf. The buttery crisp pastry makes it festive and decadent.  Onion, garlic, walnuts gets toasted on the skillet, then mushrooms cooked down, then combined with lentils, veggies, herbs and flavoring. The mixture is packed into a puff pastry and baked to golden. Slice and serve with gravy , mashed potatoes, side salad. Sunlight fades too quickly these days so I made a quick wrap with slits. Use lattice or other pastry wrap designs to make it prettier. To make it gluten-free, make the mixture into patties or a glazed loaf.Continue reading: Vegan Wellington with Mushrooms, Lentils, VeggiesThe post Vegan Wellington with Mushrooms, Lentils, Veggies appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Kitchen Creativity

December 12 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen Creativity In a break from my usual recipe posts, I’d like to share an excerpt from Karen Page’s new book entitled Kitchen Creativity. Beyond a cookbook, Kitchen Creativity is a guide to inventive cooking (without recipes!) that will inspire you to think, improvise, and cook like the world’s best chefs. Great cooking is as much about intuition and imagination as it is about flavor and technique. Kitchen Creativity gives insights into these creative processes from more than 100 top restaurant kitchens, including the Bazaar, Blue Hill, Daniel, and Dirt Candy. Based on four years of research and dozens of in-depth interviews, Kitchen Creativity illuminates the methods of culinary invention. Part I reveals how to learn foundational skills, including how to appreciate, taste, and season classic dishes before reinventing the classics from a new perspective. Part II’s A-to-Z entries are an invaluable culinary idea generator, with exercises to prompt new recipe ideas and combinations. While not a cookbook, nor a vegan book, for that matter (although vegan chefs and ingredients are very well represented), Kitchen Creativity has a lot to offer for cooks looking to broaden their creativity in the kitchen.  The following is an excerpt from Kitchen Creativity on one of my favorite topics, umami… “Umami” from Kitchen Creativity by Karen Page The taste of umami is imparted by glutamate, a type of amino acid discovered in 1908 by Dr. Kikunae Ikeda of Tokyo Imperial University. In studying kombu (kelp), Ikeda managed to isolate glutamate as its own compound, giving it the name of umami, which translates as savoriness. Thus, 5,000 years after the discovery of salt, and 4,000 years after the discovery of sugar, and 3,500 years after the discovery of sour (vinegar), umami is a relatively new taste concept. Japanese cooks had been using umami-rich ingredients intuitively for centuries, long before their scientific properties were discovered to enhance flavor. While we first mentioned umami in our 1996 book Culinary Artistry, it did not begin to gain more widespread acceptance until after 2000 when glutamate receptors were discovered on the tongue. The main sources of umami are those deriving from 1) the amino acid glutamate (found in, e.g., kelp); and those deriving from 2) so-called nucleotides--such as a) adenylate (aka AMP, which is found primarily in fish and shellfish), b) guanylate (aka GMP, which is found primarily in plants and fungi, e.g., shiitake mushrooms, esp. dried), and c) inosinate (aka IMP, which is found primarily in meat and fish, e.g., bonito flakes). The big umami magic happens when one or more nucleotides are combined with glutamate, as there is a synergistic affect--resulting in umami with as much as eight times the potency. Umami Dynamics Umami can enhance a bland dishs appeal with mouth-filling savoriness. Umami can also enhance a dishs perceived sweetness, while tempering its perceived bitterness. If you find yourself with too much of a good thing when it comes to umami, try balancing with salty, sweet, bitter, acidic, or piquant ingredients. Umami is a taste that tends to linger on the palate--something referred to as a long finish in the wine world. Because it contributes to the qualities of deliciousness and satiation, umami is especially prized as a taste in dishes and menus. Note: Certain herbs and spices can also emphasize a dishs savory aspects, such as bay leaf, cumin, oregano, paprika, sage, and thyme. Using Umami Chefs praise black garlic (aka fermented garlic) for its ability to add depth and earthiness to dishes ranging from vegetables to meats. If you doubt umamis importance as one of the five primary tastes, consider the fact that leading chefs like Michael Anthony, Eric Ripert, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten believe dashi to be a key component of their cooking. Some chefs use it to replace liquids in countless preparations, from brines to broths to salad dressings. Chefs have rising enthusiasm for all manner of fermented ingredients (e.g., fermented soybeans, kimchi, miso, pickles, sauerkraut), which bring umami to dishes including vegetables. The corn smut known as huitlacoche is prized as a Mexican delicacy, not only by chefs cooking in the vernacular like Rick Bayless, but also mainstream chefs who find themselves using it in quesadillas, soups, and tacos. Sean Brock declares is insanely delicious and luxurious, like black truffles. Kombu (aka kelp, the sea vegetable) is prized for its umami by Yoshihiro Narisawa. Brad Farmerie is fanatical about miso, which allows him to achieve a rich mouthfeel without butter or cream. Miso is an integral part of Farmeries roasted chile caramel Brussels sprouts, which involve caramelizing sugar (sweet) before adding chiles (hot), cilantro stems (bitter), lime juice (sour), fish sauce (salt/­­umami), and miso (richness). He adds miso to sweet potatoes + brown butter + rosemary to create another dish hes not able to take off the menu. Other chefs will add misos (e.g., white) to salad dressings or soups for an umami boost. From his time in Japan, Michael Anthony picked up a love of sea weeds and pickles. Thomas Henkelmann describes rich, flavorful stocks as essential for cooking in every season. Umeboshi paste is prized by chefs, including Isa Chandra Moskowitz of Omahas and Brooklyns Modern Love, for its umami quality. Moskowitz adds it to her Caesar salad dressing for its anchovy flavor. Even native Brits like Mark Levy fall prey to the charms of white truffles, which he prizes for their mysterious aroma and short availability. Excerpted from Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius--with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the Worlds Most Creative Chefs by Karen Page (Little, Brown, October 31, 2017). Save Save Save Save The post Kitchen Creativity appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Lentil Moussaka

December 6 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Lentil Moussaka This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. As our new cookbook release date approaches and we enter a really busy season of our lives (more on that soon!), we count on hearty and sustainable meals like this lentil moussaka to see us through periods of tiredness or stress. If you are feeling any kind of holiday season-related pressure, it might just be the perfect, comforting dish for you, too. I love casserole-style dishes – they take some initial effort to put together, but afterwards they turn into a meal that just keeps on giving. This moussaka is definitely like that – the portion is big enough to have dinner or lunch taken care of for a solid few days, it keeps well and only gets better with age, can be eaten hot or cold, and can even be re-imagined as, say, a toast topping, if its initial layered charm ever wears off.  Moussaka is cooked in numerous countries in the Middle East and the Mediterranean, and the recipe varies from region to region, but it usually involves layers of ground meat, eggplant or potatoes, and a béchamel or egg custard blanket on top. In our vegan version, protein-rich lentils take place of the ground meat. Once they are cooked in a mixture of mushrooms, carrots, onion, herbs, and crushed tomatoes, and layered with silky roasted eggplant, it’s incredible how savory and satisfying they become. We went with mashed potatoes for the top layer, in place of the custard or béchamel, which takes this dish even further into the cozy and wintery meal territory. The mashed potato blanket also gets the most incredible, crispy, golden crust on top after some time in the oven, which makes the whole thing even more irresistible. I suggest roasting the eggplant, making the mashed potatoes, and maybe even cooking the lentils in advance, that way assembling the moussaka will feel like a breeze. All the ingredients in this recipe are very affordable and widely available, and it’s amazing that such a satisfying meal can be made with just lentils and veggies. I generally make sure to keep a big jar of French lentils in my pantry, because they are very versatile and perfect for adding substance to all kinds of plant-based meals. Lentils fall under the category of pulses, together with chickpeas, beans and dry peas, which are all perfect vehicles for sustainable and nourishing meals. We’ve been having a ton of fun working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on creating accessible recipes, centered around pulses, as part of their Half Cup Habit initiative. Try adding a half cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – they will up your whole healthy cooking game, I promise. For more of our pulses recipes, head here, as well as to the Half Cup Habit website. Enjoy :) Vegan Lentil Moussaka   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 3 medium-large eggplants - sliced in ½ inch thick rounds 4 tablespoons neutral coconut or olive oil - divided sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 cup dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of acv 4 medium Yukon gold potatoes - peeled and quartered 2 tablespoons olive oil or ghee, plus more for brushing the mashed potato layer 1 large yellow onion - chopped 2 medium carrots - sliced 1-2 celery ribs - sliced (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon each fresh or dried thyme, oregano and/­­or marjoram (optional) 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 lb baby bella or crimini mushrooms - sliced 1 28 oz can of box of crushed tomatoes 1 tablespoon tomato paste ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cinnamon (optional) ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg (optional) handful of toasted pine nuts (optional) chopped parsley and dill - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking sheets. Arrange the eggplant slices on the baking sheets in a single layer, oil with 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and roast for 20 minutes. Flip the slices and roast for another 15 minutes, until silky. Set aside. Lower the oven temperature to 375° F (190° C). While the eggplant is roasting, drain and rinse the lentils. Cover them with purified water in a medium pot, and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 10-15 minutes or until cooked, but not mushy. Add salt at the end. Drain over a colander and set aside. Place the potatoes in the same pot you used to cook the lentils, cover with purified water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until soft throughout. Add salt at the end, then drain, reserving ¼ cup of the cooking water. Return the potatoes to the same pot. Mash them with 2 tablespoons of olive oil or ghee, black pepper and ¼ cup of the reserved cooking water. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Continue to mash until smooth. Set aside. Warm the remaining 2 tablespoons of coconut oil/­­olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, carrots, celery, if using, salt and pepper, red pepper flakes and oregano/­­thyme/­­marjoram, if using. Sauté for 7 minutes, until the vegetables soften up. Add the mushrooms and sauté for another 8 minutes, until the water released by the mushrooms evaporates and they begin to brown. Add garlic and stir around for another minute. Add the lentils, crushed tomatoes, tomato paste, smoked paprika, cinnamon and nutmeg, if using, to the pot with the mushrooms. Stir to combine, then cover and cook for 5 minutes for the flavors to incorporate. Arrange half of the eggplant slices on the bottom of a 9 x 9 baking dish. Top with half of the lentil mixture, followed by the remaining eggplant slices and lentils. Spoon the mashed potatoes on top, evening them out with a spoon into a smooth layer. Brush more olive oil/­­ghee over the potato layer and place the dish in the oven. Bake for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the pine nuts and herbs, if using, and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans Roasted Pepper Lasagna Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes and Black Rice .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Lentil Moussaka appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Hearty Italian Minestrone

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

The cannellini beans give this traditional Italian soup fiber and protein. An easy weeknight dinner that makes great leftovers, this hearty soup is a great way to eat your vegetables on a cold winter night. This recipe comes to us from Kristie Middleton‘s book, MeatLess: Transform the Way You Eat and Live--One Meal at a Time. Serves 4 to 6 - 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil - 1/­­2 medium yellow onion, diced - 1 clove garlic, minced - 1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes in juice - 2 carrots, chopped - 1 medium zucchini, chopped - 5 cups low sodium vegetable broth - 1 teaspoon salt - 1 teaspoon ground pepper - 1 cup alphabet, macaroni, or other pasta - 1/­­2 bunch kale, torn into bite-size pieces - 1 15-ounce can cannellini beans, rinsed, and drained - 2 tablespoons tomato paste - 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves or 1/­­2 teaspoon dried - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil or 1 teaspoon dried - Chopped fresh basil or a sprig of parsleyfor garnish In a large stockpot, saute onion in olive oil on medium heat until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add garlic and continue to cook for another minute. Add tomatoes, carrots, zucchini, broth, salt, and pepper. Bring to boil. Add pasta and cook for 7 to 9 minutes until al dente. Stir in kale, beans, tomato paste, thyme, and basil. Simmer for 5 minutes more. Garnish with more chopped fresh basil or a sprig of parsley. PRO-TIP: Ladle soup into individual containers, allow to cool, seal containers, and freeze for up to three months for easy work lunches or quick homemade dinners! The post Hearty Italian Minestrone appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford

December 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Trinity Mouzon Wofford is the founder of GOLDE Turmeric, a line of high-quality turmeric blends for golden milk, lattes, and more. We are in love with everything GOLDE, and were so excited to get a peek at its radiant founder’s wellness routine. In this interview, Trinity tells us about her rule-free approach to self-care, her path to self-acceptance, and the importance of giving the body exactly what it’s craving, as well as a Geisha-approved moisturizer that works wonders for her skin, her number one cold remedy that’s likely in your kitchen right now, exercise, beauty, stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think having some form of a routine is crucial to your mental health when you run a business from home. It’s been sort of tricky as of late because we’re in transition from our home in Upstate New York to moving back down to Brooklyn. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. On an ideal day, I’m up around 6:30am and checking my phone for email and GOLDE‘s social media. Following that, I’ll do a bit of stretching to loosen up, and then hop in the shower. After I’ve gotten ready, I’ll sit down to work and make a to-do list for the day -- this is crucial for me. I forget things and get really anxious about what I’m forgetting if I don’t bother to organize my thoughts and tasks in advance. I’ll usually dig into whatever those tasks are for an hour or so before pausing for breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My partner, Issey, and I always make sure to have a cut-off time for work, barring emergencies. Once that point rolls around (it varies day-by-day), I’m usually catching up on the news or my favorite blogs while Issey preps dinner. We’ll eat together and then usually end off binging some TV show. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Issey’s miso soup with tons of mushrooms and seaweed. He makes it completely from scratch using his mom’s recipe. Lunch – Lunch is usually whatever is leftover from dinner that week  -- lately its a lot of hearty stews. Snack – We’ll do a little crudite plate with raw veg from the farmer’s market: carrots, turnips, radishes, persian cucumbers. Always with some cheese and seed crackers. Sometimes also with wine. Dinner – Tibetan food from our favorite spot in Jackson Heights, Queens. It’s a lot of dumplings (momos), noodles, and warming soups. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I can’t, really. I love the taste of coffee, but it turns me into a shaking, anxious mess. I always start the day with a turmeric tonic made with one of our blends -- usually cacao or original because the matcha also makes me a bit hyper. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Yes, yes, yes. I try not to “keep it in check” so much as listen to it with a variety of foods. Sometimes it’s fruit or homemade popcorn with coconut sugar. Sometimes it’s half a box of Dots eaten while laying on the couch. Refined sugar is trash for your system, but so is getting too regimented with your foods. I keep it light (emotionally) and eat what I’m craving. When junk food isn’t off limits, you’re not going to crave it every day. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Well, turmeric, of course. It makes such a difference in my skin and immunity. Issey loves it for instant allergy relief. There are apparently over 10,000 medical studies on its effects on the body --it’s really incredible. We’re also huge proponents of ashwaghanda in our household. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Upstate New York is not exactly the land of boutique fitness, so it can be more challenging to get in a sweat on the regular. I focus mostly on stretching and going on walks/­­hikes on the weekend. I think I’ve probably gained a bit of weight since I’ve been up here because I’m not moving as much as I did in NYC, but I don’t really mind. It’s okay for your body to fluctuate with your circumstances, as long as you’re treating it with respect. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? It varies. I really like working out as a method to clear my head, so often I do look forward to it. But that said, I don’t really try to push myself too much. If you want to be a world-class athlete, then by all means, train 2+ hours a day. I’m just looking to keep my body and psyche in good health, so if I don’t feel like making it to my workout, I don’t feel the need to punish myself later. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I grew up black in a very white town, so I’ve had a lot of really emotional moments coming to terms with what beauty means for me. At the moment, I like to keep things really natural with my curls out and minimal makeup. It took a while to accept my looks for exactly what they are, so now I’m really openly embracing it. I feel more beautiful now than I did 5 years ago, mostly due to opening myself up to the concept that I’m perfectly fine just as I am. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I try to keep my routine relatively simple. I’ll wash my face with raw African black soap or something gentle like Cerave. I love Drunk Elephant products, and I apply their C-Firma and B-Hydra serums every day. They help a lot with keeping my skin clear and getting rid of dark marks. After that I’ll moisturize with raw shea butter, or a cream that has that. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Turmeric, again. Because it’s anti-inflammatory, I’ve found it to be really helpful in clearing up redness or breakouts. Besides that, I try not to get too bogged down with a ton of supplements. I focus mostly on eating a variety of plants every day. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Shea butter is amazing for my skin. My partner’s Japanese mother recently put me on to this cream called Secret de Maiko. It contains shea butter and a few other natural, organic ingredients. Apparently this is what young Geisha girls would use as a moisturizer/­­makeup base. This cream is better than pure shea butter because it won’t leave you greasy at all. I use it twice daily. It’s great for keeping your skin clear and calm. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Well, cannabis helps. I use a vaporizer pen so there’s no smoke-related health detriments/­­lingering smell. I really want to try the Hmbldt pen because I’m a sucker for sharp design. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? There’s going to stress sometimes. I try to deal in healthy ways like going for a walk to clear my head, or talking to a close friend about whatever I’m dealing with. But life isn’t perfect, so sometimes you just end up being a bit tense for a few days. I think that’s normal and natural -- I try not to fight it too much. You have to let yourself feel it so that you can process it and move past it. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic!! At my old job, everyone in the office knew about this because I would practically through bulbs of raw garlic at anyone who complained of illness. Nothing works better for immediately beating a bad cold. If I feel something coming on, I take 2-3 whole cloves (swallowed like horse pills) with a ton of water. That can save you in just a couple hours -- it’s crazy. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I really like to work, so what I consider to be a healthy work/­­life balance might not be the right approach for someone else. I genuinely enjoy spending my free time dreaming up new campaigns, product ideas, or designs for GOLDE. I guess that’s the benefit to doing your own thing -- it doesn’t always feel like work. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I’ve gotten a lot better with this with age. I try not to have any food or exercise rules. Being militant about your body is not self-care, and it can really easily spiral into disordered behavior that veers on the edge of “orthorexia.” I mostly just listen to my body and allow itself what it wants, whether that has to do with food, movement/­­exercise, socializing vs. indulging my natural introvert, etc. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I really think doing away with rules (re: food, etc.) has been the most important change I’ve made. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with avoiding gluten or dairy because it upsets your stomach or causes breakouts, but don’t complicate your life with structure that does not serve you. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Usually moments like these mean I need to re-focus myself. I’ll start by making to-do lists, and go from there. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting GOLDE? I was pre-med at NYU, with plans to practice holistic medicine. By my senior year of college, I wasn’t so sure about spending more time and money on schooling, and sort of fell into a marketing role at a tech startup. I really loved the creative aspects of marketing, and found that GOLDE was a way of combining my interests in sharp branding with making holistic health more accessible. The interest in turmeric actually came from my mom, who has Rheumatoid Arthritis. She noticed a huge difference in her overall levels of inflammation when she started incorporating it into her daily routine -- that’s when I started paying attention. -- How do you approach the sourcing of your ingredients for GOLDE? We actually just started sourcing all of our turmeric with a company called Diaspora Co. They focus 100% on supporting ethical and high-quality spice trade that empowers rather than disenfranchises the people of color who have been growing and ingesting medicinal plants like turmeric for generations. The turmeric that we’re going to be using is an heirloom variety with almost twice the typical amount of curcumin. It’s grown on a fourth-generation, family-owned farm in India, and farmers are paid 6X the standard commodity prices to ensure truly fair wages. We’re really excited to be featuring a product that’s not only incredibly high-quality, but also works to re-build lingering inequality left in the wake of colonialism. -- What’s your favorite way to use your wellness blend? I love to have it just with hot water and raw honey in the morning. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Heading to the Union Square Greenmarket is one of my favorite activities. When I’m in the city, I like to go every Monday morning when it’s not too crowded. It’s mostly just you and the chefs (or their assistants?) shopping for what they’ll be preparing that day. I also love infra red sauna. I go to Higher Dose in the East Village. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie Song/­­Album – Songs in the Key of Life – Stevie Wonder -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I am nowhere near as regimented as our dear Joan. Usually my suitcase is packed haphazardly with whatever clothing is clean and well-suited for the weather. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? More people of color, please! A few of my favorites: Diane Chang Yaminah Mayo Dr. Tiffany Lester Latonya Yvette Nikisha Brunson Alex Elle Lauren Ash Sana Javeri Kadri Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Issey Kobori and Nico Behnzukeh. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce

November 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce I love galette. It really is the lazy wo/­­man’s pie. I love that galette crust requires the least amount of fuss of all the crusts, and that the messier it looks, the better. I love that galette filling can be any good combination of vegetables, fruit and herbs, and that it can be as minimal or grand as one wants. This sweet potato version falls on the minimal side of the galette spectrum, yet it is completely lovely and delicious. There are layers of caramelized onions, thinly sliced sweet potato, and sage, all enveloped by a rustic spelt dough. We love to eat it with our favorite, magic green sauce, which is a savior for any leftover herbs in your refrigerator that are fated to end up in the trash or compost.  The green sauce is something I make every week. It’s sort of a cross between pesto and chimichurri, but made with pumpkin seeds as a more affordable alternative to pine nuts, and umami-fied with a bit of miso. You can make it with pretty much any herbs you have on hand. I usually make mine with parsley, but it also does well with the addition of cilantro, basil, tarragon, sage, and even rosemary. You can add in things like carrot or radish tops, too, which normally get thrown away, but are perfectly good to eat. I don’t discriminate against soft herb stems in this sauce either, and whirl them all in. For instance, if I’m using parsley leaves for a recipe, I’ll save the stems for this sauce instead of throwing them away. I’ll do the same with most other herbs. The sauce is a nice brightener for pretty much any savory dish. It’s great on toast, in pasta, on roasted vegetables, with eggs, and it’s absolutely delicious on this galette. I hope you’ll give it a try :) Sweet Potato Galette   Print Serves: two 7 galettes Ingredients for the filling 1 large yellow onion - halved and sliced lengthwise about 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil - divided 1 medium sweet potato - mandolined or thinly sliced into rounds sea salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves for the dough 1½ cups (150g) sprouted spelt flour or whole spelt flour, plus more for rolling the dough 1 teaspoon coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 3 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons hot purified water 1 tablespoon finely chopped sage Instructions to caramelize the onions Start by caramelizing the onions. Heat 1 tablespoon of coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the onions and sauté until translucent, for 3-5 minutes. Add a pinch of salt, turn down the heat to medium low and cook the onions, stirring periodically, for 30-40 minutes, until caramelized and golden brown. Make the dough while the onions are caramelizing. to make the dough While the onions are caramelizing, place the flour in a medium mixing bowl, add the sugar and salt, and mix with a fork to combine. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture, and pour in the oil. Pour the hot water over the oil, stirring with a fork and slowly incorporating the flour into the liquid. Add the chopped sage and mix it in. When all the flour has been incorporated, turn out the dough onto a floured surface and knead with your hands until smooth. Add more water, 1 teaspoon at a time, if the dough appears too dry. Take care not to add too much water, give the flour a chance to absorb the initial amount of water first. Divide the dough in half. Flatten each piece into a round disc, wrap them in plastic wrap or place into a floured bowl and cover with a damp kitchen towel. Let rest at room temperature for 30 minutes. to assemble and bake Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Line a large baking sheet or two medium baking sheets by covering them with parchment paper. Roll out the dough on a floured surface, one portion at a time, into ⅛-thick circular sheets, about 9 in diameter. Place one sheet of dough on the prepared baking sheet, keeping it to one side to make room for the second galette (if you are using two baking sheets, you dont have to worry about this). Brush the dough with the remaining melted coconut oil and sprinkle it with about ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Arrange half of the caramelized onions in the center of the sheet of dough, followed by half of the sweet potato slices (arrange those in a spiral or any other pattern you prefer), leaving a 1-2 inch border of dough all around. Brush the sweet potato slices with melted coconut oil as you arrange them, in small sections, making sure that they are well oiled. Once arranged, generously sprinkle the sweet potato with sea salt and pepper, and another ½ tablespoon of chopped sage. Fold over the edges of the galette, working circularly, until the galette has a folded border. Brush the edges with melted coconut oil. Repeat this process with the second portion of the dough and remaining sweet potato and sage. Drizzle any leftover melted oil over the filling of both galettes. Trasnfer the baking sheet(s) to the oven and bake for about 45 minutes, until the potatoes are cooked through and golden. Remove the galettes from the oven, let them cool slightly, slice and serve with the magic green sauce (recipe below). 3.5.3226     Magic Green Sauce   Print Serves: about 1½ cups Ingredients 1 large or 2 small bunches of parsley - roughly chopped, including stems 7 or more sprigs of sage - roughly chopped, including stems ½ cup toasted pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons lemon juice (from about half a lemon) ¼ cup olive oil 1 heaping tablespoon white miso generous pinch of red pepper flakes sea salt - to taste splash of red wine vinegar (optional) 1 clove garlic - roughly chopped (optional) Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender or a food processor until smooth. Keep the sauce refrigerated in an air-tight container, it will last for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Colour Wheel Wraps Peach and Raspberry Summer Tart and a Guest Post for Scandi Foodie Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso Caramel and Chocolate - Ice Cream Sund... Welcome Summer Multigrain Salad with Strawberries and Asparagus .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato Galette with Magic Green Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Cheesy Crackers

November 21 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Cheesy CrackersIts easy to find crackers without animal ingredients, unless of course, your favorite crackers happen to be the cheesy ones. Now you can make vegan Cheesy Crackers at home, complete with the delicious crunch and flavor you love but without the animal ingredients and additives.   Cheesy Crackers Now you can make vegan Cheesy Crackers at home, complete with the delicious crunch and flavor you love but without the animal ingredients and additives. - 1 cup all-purpose flour - 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast -  1/­­2 teaspoon baking powder -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt -  1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon smoked paprika - ? teaspoon turmeric - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon vegan butter - 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice - 5 to 6 tablespoons cold water, or more as needed - Preheat the oven to 350°F. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, nutritional yeast, baking powder, salt, garlic powder, smoked paprika, and turmeric. Mix well. Add the olive oil, butter, and lemon juice, mixing with a fork until the dough is fine and crumbly. Add the water a tablespoon at a time until the dough becomes cohesive. - Transfer the dough to a piece of parchment paper large enough to fit a large rimmed baking pan. (You can use a Silpat instead, if you have one.) Top the dough with another sheet of parchment paper and roll out the dough until thin, measuring about 11 x 13 inches. Transfer the parchment paper and rolled-out dough to a large rimmed baking sheet. Remove the top sheet of parchment paper and cut the rolled dough into 2-inch squares. If desired, remove any uneven pieces of dough from around the edges and press together into a small disk and roll it out to get more crackers that are a uniform size. (Otherwise, youll have a few partial crackers from around the end to nibble on!) - Bake for 15 to 17 minutes, or until the crackers are baked but not browned. The color should be golden. Cool completely on the baking sheet. These crackers keep well for a week in a sealed container at room temperature. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson. Save Save The post Vegan Cheesy Crackers appeared first on Robin Robertson.


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