french - vegetarian recipes

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Baked Potato & Greens Soup With Potato-Wedge Croutons










french vegetarian recipes

Baked Potato & Greens Soup With Potato-Wedge Croutons

September 11 2017 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Baked Potato & Greens Soup With Potato-Wedge Croutons OMG. It’s been TEN years. Well, we do enough OMG-ing in the new intro, so I’ll leave it at that for now. But the Veganomicon 10th Anniversary Edition is out this month, and it’s made me excited enough to update my blog! The book has been tidied up, made a little easier, and most importantly, a lot of photos have been added, all by Kate Lewis. There are also 25 new recipes! I’ll be posting some classics over the next few weeks to get you excited. Order the book on Amazon or where ever you like to support, thank you thank you thank you. Let’s start with this favorite: a potato soup with giant french fry in it! That is, a potato wedge thats been dredged in cornmeal and lightly fried. As for the healthy part, we use kale here, but escarole or spinach would be good, too. Make the baked potatoes the night before so that you can have this soup ready in thirty minutes.

Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans

August 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I have a major weakness for anything marinated, especially vegetables and beans or lentils, probably because of where I grew up. Though Russian cuisine is known for straightforward foods like meat, potatoes, and mayonnaise-heavy salads, I come from a special pocket in the southwest of Russia, where the foods of many cultures intersect. We have culinary influence from Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Karachay-Cherkessia – all Southern nations that are known for their use of spices and herbs that make their food much brighter than traditional Russian fare. The region is also known for delicious, marinated foods, which I grew up eating lots of – marinated eggplant, peppers, mushrooms, green beans and so on. You name it, and chances are that they marinate it. That might be why I’m so excited to share this light, summery, fennel-marinated zucchini and mung bean dish. It’s comfort food to me, and I think you’ll really like it as well :) What brings this whole dish together is the lemony fennel marinade. I usually reach for cumin when putting together marinades for vegetables, but I had the epiphany to use fennel here, and I’m so happy I did. It has the perfect, bright and summery anise flavor, which is also quite unique. Another amazing thing about fennel is that it’s a digestion aid. In parts of India, fennel seeds are chewed after a meal precisely for that purpose, and also as a breath freshener. So cool! The preparation here is quite low maintenance, and we’ve got a video up top to show the whole process. The zucchini is not cooked, just ribboned and marinated, which makes it softer, but with a pleasant, crisp bite. It’s served over marinated mung beans (I mixed in some lentils as well), with lots of herbs, microgreens and avocado. This dish can serve as an excellent, summery side or an addition to salads, but honestly, I’ve been eating it as a light meal most of the time. It’s nourishing and filling enough because of the inclusion of fiber and protein-rich mung beans and lentils. Both mung beans and lentils fall under the nutritious category of pulses, together with all other beans, chickpeas and dried peas, which might just be the most affordable superfoods out there. This year, we are working with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada on creating some simple, weekday-friendly pulse recipes, as part of their Half-Cup Habit program. Making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week always leads to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes, check out our Red Lentil Gazpacho, White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, or any recipes on the Pulses website. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup mung beans or French lentils, or a combination of both - soaked in purified water overnight sea salt 4 small zucchini - sliced into thin ribbons lengthwise, preferably on a mandolin ⅓ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice ⅓ cup olive oil ½ tablespoon fennel seeds - toasted and freshly ground 1 garlic clove - minced pinch of red pepper flakes about 1 cup minced fresh herbs, such as dill, mint, parsley, basil, cilantro freshly ground black pepper avocado - for serving (optional) microgreens - for garnish (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the mung beans/­­lentils and place them in a medium soup pot. Cover with plenty of water, bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 7 minutes. Taste for doneness and cook longer if needed, until fully cooked, but not mushy. Add salt at the end. Drain, transfer to a medium bowl or shallow dish and set aside. If cooking both mung beans and lentils, cook them separately, as they have different cooking times. Place the ribboned zucchini in a colander and generously sprinkle with salt. Let soften and release excess liquid for up to 30 minutes. In a small bowl, combine the lemon juice, olive oil, fennel seeds, garlic and red pepper flakes, mix until well combined. Add half of the marinade, half of the herbs, salt and pepper to the dish with the cooked mung beans/­­lentils and stir to coat. Rinse the zucchini, pat it dry with paper towels, and transfer to a medium shallow dish. Add the remaining marinade, herbs, salt and pepper to the zucchini, and toss to coat. Roll the zucchini slices and put them into the dish with the mung beans/­­lentils. Drizzle any remaining marinade over top. Alternatively, you can simply combine the beans, zucchini, all of the marinade, herbs, salt and pepper in a dish or bowl, and toss to coat thoroughly, skipping the rolling of the slices (that step is just for looks). Cover the dish and let marinate in the refrigerator for a few hours or days - the longer, the better. Serve garnished with avocado and microgreens, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Barley Tomato Salad Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza Creamy, Garlicky Fettuccine with Roasted Green Vegetables Lime and Dill Rice with Pistachios from Vibrant India + Giveaway .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Poutine (Gravy-Covered Cheese Fries)

August 3 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Poutine (Gravy-Covered Cheese Fries) Poutine is a Canadian fast-food specialty with roots in Quebec. Basically its French fries smothered in gravy and covered with cheese, or rather, cheese curds -- whatever those are. This vegan poutine recipe swaps out a beefy gravy for a veg version, and nondairy cheddar shreds for the curds. Admittedly, poutine (vegan or not) is […] The post Vegan Poutine (Gravy-Covered Cheese Fries) appeared first on VegKitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cheesy Potato Wedges from The Vegan Air Fryer

June 27 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Cheesy Potato Wedges from The Vegan Air Fryer If you love your air fryer as much as I do, you’re going to be thrilled to own The Vegan Air Fryer, a new cookbook by JL Fields.  And if you don’t yet own an air fryer, I encourage you to page through this book to see what you’re missing. Like many people, the main thing I cook in my air fryer is potatoes — how great it is to have crispy French fries without oil!  But air-fried French fries are only the beginning.  In The Vegan Air Fryer you’ll find everything from appetizers to main dishes and even desserts. And for all you potato lovers out there, there are also loads of other recipes for air-fried spuds, including these Cheesy Potato Wedges. Cheesy Potato Wedges Try these potato wedges if you love potato skins but want that potato, too. This is a great side dish and also a fun recipe to make for game day noshing. (From The Vegan Air Fryer, copyright (C) 2017 by JL Fields. Used by permission. Photo by Michelle Donner.) Serves 4 Potatoes - 1 pound fingerling potatoes - 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil - 1 teaspoon kosher salt - 1 teaspoon ground black pepper - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder  Cheese Sauce - 1/­­2 cup raw cashews - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika - 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast - 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice - 2 tablespoons to 1/­­4 cup water Potatoes: Preheat the air fryer to 400°F for 3 minutes. Wash the potatoes. Cut the potatoes in half lengthwise and transfer them to a large bowl. Add the oil, salt, pepper, and garlic powder to the potatoes. Toss to coat. Transfer the potatoes to the air fryer. Cook for 16 minutes, shaking halfway through the cooking time. Cheese Sauce: Combine the cashews, turmeric, paprika, nutritional yeast, and lemon juice in a high-speed blender. Blend on low, slowly increasing the speed and adding water as needed. Be careful to avoid using too much water, as you want a thick, cheesy consistency. Transfer the cooked potatoes to an air fryer-safe pan or a piece of parchment paper. Drizzle the cheese sauce over the potato wedges. Place the pan in the air fryer and cook for 2 more minutes at 400°F. No-Oil Option: Omit the olive oil.   The post Cheesy Potato Wedges from The Vegan Air Fryer appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate

May 31 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate I’m so excited to talk bit about Heather Crosby’s new cookbook Pantry to Plate today. When I received my copy and took a scan from cover to cover, I was immediately blown away by the way this book kindly invites the reader to be both spontaneous and practical in the kitchen by working with the ingredients that are already on hand. With thirty clever recipe templates, Heather demonstrates how to improvise your way to delicious, plant-based meals. For example, Dense Veggies + Protein + Herbs + Binder + Spices = Vegan Meatballs (or Veggie Burgers)! The templates specify the required amount for each component, as well as which components are a must and which ones can be skipped altogether. In addition to the templates, the book is full of other useful tools that help make intuitive cooking a breeze: besides a regular recipe index, there is a cook by ingredient index, as well as mini-templates for creating flavor with aromatics, a whole bit on pairing spices, and a dressing and sauce section that has pretty much every staple sauce recipe you’ll ever need. If you don’t have a particular ingredient for a recipe, chances are you have something on hand that could act as a substitute, and there is a whole chart of interchangeable mix-and-match ingredients in the book to help you work through that. I’m quite terrible at sticking to recipes myself, since I always want to play, add, subtract and find alternative ingredients, so it’s as if this book was made for me. How Heather managed to define freestyle cooking in such clear, comprehensive terms, will remain a mystery to me :) Some more sections/­­recipes I’m most excited about: Coconut Yogurt, Dairy-Free Milks, Probiotic Cream Cheese, Veggie Fries, Cheesy Comfort Food, Hand Pies, Sneaky Brownies, Nice Cream. YUM! Onto the (not) meatballs. These Italian-style veggie meatballs come from the Veggie Burger section of the book and can be easily shaped into burgers or sliders, as Heather points out. They get their substance and ‘meatiness’ from lentils and portobello mushrooms, and a bit of sweetness from carrots and onions, while herbs like oregano, parsley and thyme, and spices like fennel and pepper give them that characteristic Italian flare. We enjoyed them two ways, the first day with zucchini noodles and pesto (pictured here), and the second day, a bit more traditionally, with real pasta and tomato sauce. Both were equally delicious. Heather also suggests to serve the meatballs in a sub roll, or even as an appetizer, along with some tasty sauce. Whether you live and breathe freestyle cooking, or you want to learn a bit more about being intuitive in the kitchen, check out Pantry to Plate, I have a feeling it will earn an important place on your bookshelf :) Italian Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate   Print Serves: 20 to 24 Meatballs or 5 to 6 Full-Sized Burgers Ingredients 2 tablespoons unrefined coconut oil, grapeseed oil, or avocado oil 2 cups (260 g) diced carrots 1 cup (70 g) chopped portobello mushrooms 1 cup (160 g) diced yellow onion 2 cups (400 g) cooked green, brown, or French green lentils (roughly 3/­­4 cup/­­140 g dry) 2 tablespoons water 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme 3 garlic cloves, minced 2 teaspoons ground psyllium husk 2 teaspoons rough-chopped fennel seed 1 teaspoon fresh-cracked black pepper 1 teaspoon sea salt, plus more to taste 1/­­2 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika Instructions In a skillet heated to medium, add 1 tablespoon of the oil and sauté the carrots for 20 minutes, until easily pierced with a fork but firm, not mushy. Add the mushrooms and onion and sauté over medium heat for 5 to 10 minutes, until softened and browning a bit. Transfer to a food processor with the remaining ingredients. Pulse together 30 to 35 times, until just broken up and sticky with texture and bits of color intact. Taste--if needed, season with more salt or seasonings. Pulse or stir to incorporate. Form 1 1/­­2 -inch (4 cm) meatballs with your hands. Heat a skillet to medium and add the remaining oil. Slow-cook the meatballs, rotating often, for 10 to 15 minutes, until browned on all sides. Serve warm. Notes Recipe from YumUniverse Pantry to Plate (C) Heather Crosby, 2017. Photographs copyright (C) Heather Crosby, 2017. Reprinted by permission of the publisher, The Experiment. Available wherever books are sold. theexperimentpublishing.com 3.5.3226 You might also like... A Salad for the Weekdays Roasted Pepper Lasagna Melon Basil Summer Rolls Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Italian-Style Lentil and Mushroom (Not)Meatballs from Pantry to Plate appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday

May 15 2017 Meatless Monday 

Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday   The global travels of Master Chef Jean-Christian Jury inspired him to write the ultimate kitchen companion on vegan cooking, Vegan: The Cookbook. It features 450 delicious recipes from more than 150 countries. But before Jean-Christian delved into the world of vegan cuisine, he received a startling wakeup call - a heart failure, twice. Years of running several restaurants at the same time, 16-hour work days and a poor diet had finally caught up with the French-born chef. After a few months of recovery, he visited a detox center that specialized in healthy food, fresh smoothies and juices. This enlightening experience transformed his diet and lifestyle. Interestingly, this is the same idea behind Meatless Monday - eating plant-based foods to improve your health. By choosing not to eat meat just one day a week, you reduce your risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity and cancer.   Vegan: The Cookbook - for vegans, non-vegans and omnivores Jean-Christian promotes vegan foods, cooked with fresh ingredients, as a way to keep healthy, age gracefully and prevent many common diseases. His new cookbook offers recipes to satisfy all tastes, representing the cuisines of France, Greece, Italy, Vietnam, China and India. In addition, he explores less familiar fare, such as flavorful dishes from Timor and Papua New Guinea. There is no reason why vegan food cant be as delicious as non-plant-based cuisine. International Master Chef Jean-Christian Jury In 2007, Jean-Christian Jury opened his first vegan restaurant, La Mano Verde, in Berlin, Germany. He received an award for Best Vegan Restaurant on the Planet and was listed as one of Germanys 500 Best Restaurants (Der Feinschmecker 2015-2016).   Expert Guidance, Step by Step For his new cookbook, Jean-Christian specifically crafted his recipes for accuracy and ease of use. He intentionally selected ingredients that are readily available and provides simple step-by-step instructions as well as prep time and cooking time. To help you plan your meal, his book is neatly organized into chapters that cover Starters, Salads, Soups, Main Courses, Grains and Beans, Pasta and Noodles, and Desserts.   Get a Taste of Jean-Christian Jurys New Recipes To whet your appetite, heres a delectable sampler of five recipes found in the Vegan: The Cookbook. Go on and pick your favorite. At Meatless Monday, heres the one we cant wait to try.   Five-Spice Stir-Fried Soba Noodles The post Vegan: The Cookbook — 450 Recipes to Savor on Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

35 Vegan Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes

May 5 2017 Vegan Richa 

35 Vegan Mother’s Day Brunch RecipesVegan Mother’s Day Recipes. 35 Vegan Mother’s Day Brunch Ideas.  Cinnamon Rolls, Pancakes, Frittata, Scrambles, Stuffed French Toasts, Muffins and more vegan breakfast brunch recipes for Mother’s Day. Gluten-free Options. My Mom will be visiting a few days after Mother’s Day. She has been a pillar of strength for the family since I remember. She always has boundless love to give. My nieces are visiting as well and they will be keeping the grandma (my mom) busy, entertained and very happy. Breakfast has been a favorite meal for mum. At my parents’ home in India, it is an elaborate affair starting with warm lemon water or juice (carrot + opo squash or bitter gourd), followed by seasonal fruits. Followed by some news (reading or tv), then some hot fresh savory breakfast with masala chai, followed by a few assorted raw nuts.  In my home here. things are governed by the varying schedules, but we almost always make time for a sit down breakfast served with hot masala chai with almond milk. I am looking forward to even more elaborate breakfasts, and lunches and dinners during mom’s visit week.  Here are a few options from the blog to cook up for Mother’s Day. Sweet or Savory or both. Happy Mothers Day to all Mums!Continue reading: 35 Vegan Mother’s Day Brunch RecipesThe post 35 Vegan Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan in Asheville

April 13 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan in AshevilleWe just returned from our annual visit to Asheville, the unofficial vegan food capital of the South. Every spring we drive down for a few days to enjoy fabulous vegan food and all the other wonders that Asheville has to offer.  Here are some highlights with photos by Elissa Free. For the second year in a row, we stayed at The Chestnut Street Inn, a gorgeous house with a perfect location, made even better by the terrific innkeepers, Emilie and Arturo, who make us feel like family.  Emilie goes out of her way to make special vegan breakfasts for us each morning.  This visit we enjoyed Churro Waffles with Strawberries, Stuffed French Toast with Orange Syrup, Savory Breakfast Enchiladas, and an astonishing Banana Crepe Cake with Caramel Sauce.   For a snack, Emilie even makes us a batch of vegan cookies each day…. Of course, one of the main reasons for our trek to Asheville, is the oppotunity to have dinner at Plant, our favorite restaurant.  As usual, we went there on our first night in town as well as our last night.  Among the highlights were an ethereal maitake mushroom appetizer, the always-a-favorite seitan entree, and a sublime lemon cheesecake with a side of apple-bourbon sorbet that tasted just like apple pie. Other food favorites included an amazing lunch at Chai Pani: And also at Bean Vegan Cuisine: We also had a great meal with friends at Doc Chey’s where I’m obsessed with the spicy green bean appetizer: Believe it or not, we also made time to do a few things other than eat great vegan food!  We visited the North Carolina Arboretum, took part in an “escape room,” went to the local farmers’ market, visited the Woolworth Walk, Lexington GLass Works, and lots of other fun stuff, including listening to loads of great street musicians. Until next year, Asheville!!! The post Vegan in Asheville appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways

March 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Quick Blender Pancakes, Three WaysThis post was created in partnership with Revol. So excited to share this recent discovery with you today. If you follow us on instagram, you may have seen me posting an abnormal number of pancake photos recently. That would be because Ive been cooking some variation of blender pancakes almost every morning for the past couple of weeks. Seriously obsessed. Blender pancakes start out with whole grains instead of flour, which get soaked overnight in purified water. Soaking not only softens the grains and makes them more blend-able, but also awakens the life within each individual grain and rids them of phytic acid, making them more bioavailable and easier to digest. You could use a number of grains here, but I find raw buckwheat to be the perfect neutral base. Buckwheat is also incredibly nutritious, and is actually not a grain at all, but a fruit/­­berry of the buckwheat plant (related to rhubarb!). In the morning, simply combine your soaked grains with a liquid and other add-ins in a blender, whirl everything into a smooth batter and you are ready to fry up your pancakes. Its all super quick, easy and so tasty, and there is a lot of room to get creative, too. The whole process kind of reminds me of making a smoothie because the flavor combo possibilities are endless, and because you can just throw a bunch of ingredients into the blender and expect totally delicious results (almost) every time. I offer three of my favorite flavor combinations here, two sweet and one savory. The orange, sweet potato pancakes are subtly sweetened with maple syrup and jazzed up with spices. They are hearty, warming, and very kid-friendly. The green ones are flavored with matcha and studded with sesame seeds that add tiny pops of crunch throughout. Matcha is the star in this variation, youll be able to taste its lovely, grassy and sweet notes very well. The pink, savory pancakes, combine beet with spices, ginger and greens, making them a great option for those who favor a non-sugary breakfast. I love them with our avocado mayo, but you can employ pretty much any one of your favorite, creamy sauces as an accompaniment. Whichever variation you try, you will love how easily they come together and how forgiving the recipes are in terms of add-ins. I know by now youve noticed the beautiful plates/­­cups /­­enamel board in the photos. They are from Revol, a French cookware and bakeware brand with a newly launched website. They sent me a few items of my choice from their Color Lab and Crumple collections, and I was blown away by the quality of their wares. The half-glazed dinner plates are handmade in France and feel incredibly sturdy. They stack up perfectly when you store them in the cupboard and are just a true pleasure to eat off of. I couldnt resist the pink crumple cups because they are adorable, and because I was missing vessels of that size in my kitchen. They are the ideal size for espresso or cappuccino, if thats your thing, but I will be using them for my occasional morning ginger-turmeric shots. The little cheese plate/­­presentation board is hand-dipped in enamel, and will make for a perfect snack board at any get-together. All the pieces are refined and minimal, yet they still feel warm and welcoming, and you can definitely sense the hand in all of them. Everything is oven and dishwasher safe, too, so there’s a perfect balance of beauty and utility. Spiced Sweet Potato Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 12 pancakes Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato coconut oil for roasting sweet potato and frying ¾ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight 1 tablespoon sesame tahini or other nut/­­seed butter 1 cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar ½ teaspoon baking powder pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 4 cardamom pods - green shells removed (optional) ½ teaspoon ground ginger (optional) 1 tablespoon maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon ground flax or chia seeds (optional) 2 tablespoons hemp seeds (optional) Instructions Preheat oven to 400°F (200° C). Prick the sweet potato with a fork several times and place it on a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Roast for 40-50 minutes or until tender throughout. Let cool, then peel. Alternatively, peel the sweet potato and roughly chop it into cubes. Place onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray and roast for 30-40 minutes, until tender. Mash the sweet potato pieces a bit with a fork when you are measuring out 1 cup of the flesh in the next step. Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with 1 cup sweet potato flesh, sesame tahini, almond milk/­­water, apple cider vinegar, baking powder, salt, spices and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add flax/­­chia and hemp seeds, if using, pulse to combine. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt and/­­or cacao nibs. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Matcha Sesame Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 8 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup almond milk or water 1 teaspoon matcha powder 1-2 tablespoons maple syrup, plus more for serving 1 tablespoon sesame seeds (I used black) Instructions Drain the buckwheat over a colander and rinse very well. Combine it with almond milk/­­water, matcha, and maple syrup in an upright blender, and blend until smooth. Add sesame seeds and pulse on low to mix the seeds into the batter. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 more minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with more sesame seeds, coconut flakes, fresh fruit, maple syrup/­­honey, yogurt, etc. These pancakes are best eaten fresh, but you can also reheat them on low temperature in the oven or toaster, in case you have leftovers. 3.5.3226 Savory Beet Blender Pancakes   Print Serves: about 9 pancakes Ingredients ½ cup raw buckwheat groats - soaked in purified water overnight ½ cup whole sorghum groats or more buckwheat/­­barley/­­quinoa etc. - soaked in purified water overnight ½ small cooked beet 1 tablespoon sesame tahini ½ cup water 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon tamari or more to taste ½-inch piece ginger ¼ teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika ½ teaspoon cumin ⅛ teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 tablespoon chia or flax seeds (optional) 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast (optional) 1 tablespoon dulse (optional) large handful chopped spinach/­­kale leaves or small handful sliced scallions avocado mayo - for serving (optional) Instructions Drain and rinse the buckwheat and sorghum very well. Combine the grains with the beet, sesame tahini, water, apple cider vinegar, tamari, ginger, baking powder, smoked paprika, cumin, red pepper flakes, and chia/­­flax, nutritional yeast, dulse, if using, in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Add chopped spinach/­­kale/­­scallions and pulse to mix in. Warm ½ tablespoon of coconut oil in a medium non-stick frying pan over medium heat. The pan should be very hot, but not smoking. Pour ¼ cup of the batter per pancake into the pan and spread each one out slightly with the back of a spoon, into roughly a 4-inch pancake. Fry as many pancakes as the pan can hold, I did 3 at a time. Fry until the edges turn dry and bubbly, for at least 2 minutes, flip and cook for 1-2 minutes, until the underside is golden brown. Continue with the rest of the batter, keeping the cooked pancakes covered and warm. You should not need to add any more oil, and you may need to lower the heat a bit once youve fried up your first batch to keep the pan from smoking. Enjoy right away with avocado mayo/­­plain yogurt/­­any sauce of choice and more sliced scallions. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Raw Greenylicious Herb Soup and BBQ Grissini by Earthsprout Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Baked Polenta Basil Fries

March 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

Who says fries are always full of fat? Polenta is cut into strips and baked before being served alongside marinara sauce. Sea salt and fresh basil ground together make an ideal sophisticated seasoning as this finger food gets a health makeover. This recipe comes to us from Sherry of Exploits of a Vegan Wannabe. Serves 8 - 1 teaspoon sea salt - 2 tablespoons fresh basil, chopped - 1 18 ounce package prepared polenta*1 teaspoon olive oil - black pepper, to taste - a little marinara sauce**, for dipping *Found in a roll shape in the Italian section of most grocery stores. **Optional. Preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Grind the salt and basil together in a mortar and pestle or with the back side of a large knife. Unwrap the polenta. Cut in half, then cut the halves in half. Cut the quarters into slices the shape of French fries. Place the chopped polenta in a large bowl. Drizzle with the olive oil and toss with the basil sea salt and pepper to taste. Place the seasoned fries in a single layer on a baking sheet. Season with a little more salt and pepper if desired. Bake for 20 minutes and flip for maximum browning and beauty. Cook 6-8 minutes more on their other side, or until the fries reach a desired level of doneness. Take the polenta fries out of the oven and place onto a paper towel or brown paper bag to absorb the remaining oil. Serve alongside marinara sauce for dipping, if desired, and enjoy! The post Baked Polenta Basil Fries appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna

February 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean LasagnaThis post was created in partnership with Newman’s Own Organics. I’ve always thought of lasagna as an intimidating dish in terms of its layered preparation, though I love the flavor and find myself craving it often during the cooler months. I set out to change my outlook with this simple and nourishing spaghetti squash version that tastes every bit as comforting as the original. Spaghetti squash performs impressively well as a lighter and more nutritious substitute for lasagna noodles that’s still hearty and substantial here. The uppermost layer of the squash that tops the lasagna becomes slightly crispy and golden in the oven and reminds me of my lacy, oven-baked latkes, for which I have a major weakness. The core of the lasagna is made up of the flavor-building trio of onions, carrots and celery, as well as affordable, protein-rich mung beans (you can also use lentils), kale and mushrooms. For the cheesy element, I went with my go-to almond ricotta that is a breeze to make, as well as fluffy, slightly tangy and cheesy, much like the real thing. I was very excited to partner with Newman’s Own Organics for this recipe for numerous reasons. Pasta sauce is one of the few things that I don’t mind buying pre-made, especially when I know that I can stand behind all the ingredients like I can with Newman’s. Their organic pasta sauce is made with real vegetables and herbs, all of which are organic, and that’s very much reflected in the delicious, classic flavor that works incredibly well in this lasagna. There’s no added sugar, either, the sauce just depends on the natural sweetness of the tomatoes. Another great reason to support the brand is that they donate 100% of their net profits to all kinds of charities around the world, which is an idea that got put into motion by Paul Newman in 1982 and has been carried out gracefully to this very day. This Paul Newman quote is at the core of the company’s mission and basically says it all: I want to acknowledge luck. The benevolence of it in my life and the brutality of it in the lives of others. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna   Print Serves: one 9 x 13 baking dish or two 9 x 9 baking dishes Ingredients for the almond ricotta 2 cups almonds - soaked overnight in purified water 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 garlic clove - chopped generous squeeze of fresh lemon juice pinch sea salt for the lasagna 1 large or 2 small spaghetti squash 3-4 tablespoons neutral coconut oil sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 cup mung beans or French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water 1 large yellow onion - chopped pinch red pepper flakes dried thyme, oregano, marjoram - to taste (optional) 2 medium carrots - sliced 2 celery ribs - thinly sliced 1 lb crimini mushrooms - sliced two 24 oz jars marinara sauce or crushed canned tomatoes Instructions to make the almond ricotta Drain and rinse the almonds. Optionally, squeeze each almond to slip off the skin for a whiter, smoother ricotta, rinse well. Place almonds into the bowl of a food processor along with the rest of the ingredients. Add ¼ cup water and grind to a ricotta consistency. Add another 1-2 tablespoons of water, if needed. Use right away or refrigerate for up to 3 days. to make the lasagna Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Cut the squash in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Generously oil the inside of each half with about 1 tablespoon of the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place the squash cut side down on a parchment paper-covered baking tray and bake for 30-40 minutes or until tender. Remove from the oven and set aside. Reduce the oven temperature to 375° F (190° C). While the squash is roasting, drain and rinse the mung beans/­­lentils, place them in a medium saucepan and cover with purified water. Bring to a boil over high heat, lower the heat to a simmer, add salt and cook, partially covered, for 10 minutes. Taste for doneness, simmer for 2-5 minutes more if the beans are not yet tender. If using lentils, cook them for 20-30 minutes until done. Drain and set aside. Warm 2 tablespoons of coconut oil in a large saute pan over medium heat. Add onion, a pinch of salt, black pepper, red pepper flakes, and thyme/­­oregano/­­marjoram, if using, and saute for 5 minutes, until onion is translucent. Add carrots, celery and another pinch of salt and saute for another 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and saute for about 8 minutes or longer, until the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add mung beans and saute for 2 minutes, until coated and incorporated. Remove pan from the heat and set aside. Grease a 9 x 13 baking dish (or 2 smaller square dishes, about 8 x 8 or 9 x 9, as pictured) with the remaining 1 tablespoon of coconut oil. Spread ⅓ of the marinara sauce/­­crushed canned tomatoes over the bottom of the dish. Using a fork, scoop the spaghetti squash strands out of the skin and spread ⅓ of them over the marinara in an even layer. Reserve about 1 cup of the ricotta for garnish, if desired. Crumble ⅓ of the remaining ricotta over the squash. Top with half of the mung bean and vegetable mixture in an even layer. Repeat with ⅓ of the marinara, squash, ricotta and vegetables. Finish with the last layer of marinara and the squash. Cover and bake for 20 minutes. Increase the oven temperature to 400° F (200° C). Uncover the lasagna and bake for another 10 minutes, until the marinara is bubbling through to the surface. Optionally, turn the broiler on high and broil for a couple minutes, until top layer of the lasagna is golden in places. Remove from the oven, garnish with the reserved ricotta, if using, let cool slightly, slice and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Carne Asada Fries

January 31 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Carne Asada Fries Carne asada fries exemplify how an offbeat local food trend takes off and goes national. An odd combination of french fries, avocado, sour cream, and in its original form, strip steak, this dish originated in San Diego in the 1990s and soon became a standard in casual Mexican restaurants in the American Southwest. Now its on the menu in such eateries nationwide.The post Vegan Carne Asada Fries appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

A French Chef Goes Vegan

December 12 2016 Vegetarian Times 

We talk to Chef Xavier Bonnafous of Southern Pressed Juicery, in Greenville, South Carolina, who is known for his innovative raw and vegan creations.

Vegan Banana French Toast with Caramelized Bananas

June 30 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Banana French Toast with Caramelized BananasVegan Banana French Toast. Vegan French Toast with Caramelized bananas. Banana and non dairy milk make up the french toast batter. Cooked French toast is served with caramelized Bananas, maple and vegan butter. Vegan Nut-free Recipe.  This French toast is easy, amazing and delicious breakfast or snack. Hearty Bread is soaked in a batter of banana and nondairy milk, cooked to golden. Sliced banana is caramelized with coconut sugar and served over the warm french toast with maple and seasonal fruit. You want to use a rustic bread or a stale bread for best results. Regular sandwich bread can get too soggy. Check with a trial slice to see how long to soak the slice for the best results based on your bread and pan. Soak longer if the french toast is overly dry in the middle. Soak for just a second if the bread tends to absorb a lot of the batter and turns out soggy. You can also let the slices air dry for 15 minutes before using.  I like to use my home made wheat or white breads and not overly chewy sourdough from our local bakery to make these vegan french toasts.Continue reading: Vegan Banana French Toast with Caramelized BananasThe post Vegan Banana French Toast with Caramelized Bananas appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade

June 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade Have you ever tried adding fresh aloe vera to your drinks? As soon as the days get unbearably hot around here, I like to keep a few aloe leaves in my fridge for a good number of reasons, especially for healing unexpected sunburns and making the most refreshing post-beach tonics. Aloe is one of those amazing, all-purpose healing plants; it’s anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, helps lower cholesterol, works wonders when applied topically to skin by moisturizing it and helping ease acne and blemishes, and the list goes on and on. If you’ve never taken apart a fresh aloe leaf before, its insides are made up of a clear, jellyfish-like material, which is where most of the healing magic is contained. The problem is that on its own, the flesh is quite bitter and soapy. I’ve noticed that citrus really helps neutralize that unpleasant taste, so I love adding aloe to lemonade. This lemonade recipe is pretty special – it’s just the most refreshing thing you can think of after a hot day outside. It’s minty, with a cooling effect from the cucumber and a nice tartness from freshly squeezed lemon juice. I also think it would make for a great summery cocktail mixer, if you feel so inclined :) One last aloe tip – when I’m cutting apart an aloe leaf in the kitchen and putting most of the flesh into the blender, I rub the green skins with any leftover flesh on my (clean) face, which makes for a refreshing face mask. There are some links below, Sunday hugs to you, friends. The Next Gluten Matthew Kenney on Pardon My French Human Design BodyGraph – sort of like an astrology birth chart, but it combines a bunch of traditional sciences like astrology, the Hindu-Brahmin Chakra system, the Zohar or Kabbalah, and the IChing to map out a ‘body graph.’ We found ours to be pretty accurate and fascinating. Patti Smith on Singing at Bob Dylan’s Nobel Prize Ceremony (make sure to watch the video) Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables – I’ve got my eye on this cookbook Roasted Poblano and Jackfruit Tacos – can’t wait to make these Our Youtube Channel – we are obsessed with making videos! Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade   Print Serves: 5-6 cups Ingredients 1 packed cup mint sprigs, plus more for serving 3 cups purified water half of a large cucumber 1 large aloe leaf 1 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (4-5 lemons) ¼ cup maple syrup Instructions Bruise the mint a bit by rubbing it between your hands. In a small saucepan, combine the mint sprigs and water, bring to a boil and let cool to infuse. Once cool, strain the mixture into an upright blender and discard the mint sprigs. Cut the cucumber half in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds. Optionally, shave off a few cucumber ribbons with a vegetable peeler for serving in the glass. Roughly chop the cucumber and put it into the blender. Cut the white base off the bottom of the aloe leaf, then cut off the spiky sides. Cut off the top layer of the skin lengthwise. Scoop out all the flesh into the blender using a spoon. Add the lemon juice and maple syrup to the blender and blend everything until smooth. Let cool completely in the refrigerator. Serve over ice, with cucumber ribbons and more fresh mint leaves. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Pi?a Colada Milkshake - Ice Cream Sunday Raw Spearmint and Chocolate Cheesecake Superberry Smoothie Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Minty Aloe and Cucumber Lemonade appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Portobello Mushroom Pizzas with Hummus

May 17 2017 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Portobello Mushroom Pizzas with Hummus I’ve been enjoying my (sort of) new air fryer, but I haven’t been getting as creative with it as other people in my Facebook group have. I’ve done potatoes in fancy ways but mostly plain French fries and hash browns, tempeh bacon, asparagus, and, most successfully, tofu. After weeks of just “winging it,” I decided to take a look at the recipe book that came with my AF (as I abbreviate it) and noticed a non-vegetarian recipe for portobello mushroom pizzas that looked easy to veganize. (...) Read the rest of Portobello Mushroom Pizzas with Hummus (1,036 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2017. | Permalink | No comment Post tags: Air Fryer, Chickpea Recipes, Eat-to-Live, Gluten-free, Soy-free, Under 200 The post Portobello Mushroom Pizzas with Hummus appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Chai Coconut Milk Vegan French Toast

May 10 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This vegan French toast is made with crusty bread slices dipped in spiced coconut milk batter and pan-fried to golden perfection.

Spring Ragu

May 1 2017 Meatless Monday 

A ragu is basically a well-seasoned stew. This one takes its flavor from the tarragon, which brings out the best in the array of seasonal vegetables. This recipe was created by Stephanie Alexander and can be found in The Meat Free Monday Cookbook. Serves 3-4 - 8 garlic cloves, whole and unpeeled - 2 pounds fresh fava beans in pods, shelled - ice cubes - 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, chopped - 4 trimmed and cooked artichoke hearts, - halved or quartered, depending on size - 12 baby turnips, peeled - 1 cup vegetable stock - 1 pound peas in pods, shelled - 2 teaspoons coarsely chopped - French tarragon - 1 tablespoon finely chopped flat-leaf parsley - freshly ground black pepper Put the garlic in a saucepan and cover with water. Bring slowly to a boil over low-medium heat, then drain. Repeat this process and then slip the skins off each clove and set aside in a bowl. Refill the saucepan with water and return to a boil over high heat, and drop the fava beans into the boiling water for 1 minute only. Immediately drain in a colander and tip into a bowl of ice-cold water. Then peel the beans. Reserve until needed. Melt half of the butter in a sauté pan over a medium heat. Once it starts to froth, add the artichoke pieces, turnips, and peeled garlic, and sauté until the artichoke pieces become golden flecked with brown. Add the vegetable stock and peas, then cook, covered, for 5 minutes. Uncover, scatter with the beans and herbs, and shake gently to mix; there should be very little liquid remaining in the pan. If it still looks sloppy, increase the heat to high and continue to shake the pan. Add the remaining butter to form a small amount of sauce. Taste for seasoning; there probably wont be any need to add salt. Grind over some black pepper and serve at once. The post Spring Ragu appeared first on Meatless Monday.

tomato sauce recipe | tomato ketchup recipe | homemade tomato sauce

April 11 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

tomato sauce recipe | tomato ketchup recipe | homemade tomato saucetomato sauce recipe | tomato ketchup recipe | homemade tomato sauce with detailed photo and video recipe. it is also known as table sauce or tangy sauce as it is primarily prepared from ripe and juicy tomatoes with vinegar as a preservative agent. optional seasonings or herbs can be added to achieve a flavourful tomato ketchup recipe. it can be easily served with french fries, potato chips, veg burger, pakora recipes. Continue reading tomato sauce recipe | tomato ketchup recipe | homemade tomato sauce at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways

March 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways I finally got around to trying sweet potato toast this week, a concept that I’ve been seeing circulating around the internet. Our instagram post about it generated a lot of interest, so I thought I would go into more detail here today. Basically, the whole idea is replacing bread with thinly sliced, toasted sweet potato and topping it as you would any toast. I know, why mess with an already perfect concept like toast? For one, it’s great for those trying to take it easy on grains or gluten. It’s also perfect for sweet potato lovers just looking to change things up for breakfast, snack, etc. (me). It’s a fun way to eat a nutritious root vegetable, and I have a feeling that it could easily be made very kid-friendly. It is decidedly its own thing, not toast, but totally stands on its own as tasty and filling fare. As with any toast, there are infinite possibilities when it comes to the toppings, since sweet potato gives a pretty neutral base. I offer my favorite sweet and savory options below. In the sweet one, earthy and creamy tahini is studded with jammy, smashed raspberries (I use frozen and defrosted ones this time of year), drizzled with honey/­­maple syrup and sprinkled with cacao nibs and seeds, and that combination is incredibly lovely. The savory one is (surprise!) avocado toast, but made a bit more substantial with the addition of balsamic lentils, a dusting of nutritional yeast and seeds. On a technical note, the whole reason behind the sweet potato toast craze is that you can cook the sweet potato slices right in the toaster. The catch is that I don’t own a toaster, so what I like to do is cook the slices in the oven the night before and then re-heat them, either in the oven or in a pan on the stovetop whenever I’m ready to eat my ‘toast.’ You could even cook a bigger batch for the week ahead, since the roasted sweet potatoes hold up well in the refrigerator. But if you do have a toaster, by all means cook the potato slices in there. I offer directions for both methods in the recipes. There are some weekend links below, Sunday hugs to you :) What The Health – a new film from the creators of Cowspiracy, this time targeting health organizations. Really excited to watch it, it’s available to stream on their website now. Hugh Forte’s Food Photography – just learned that the photographer behind Sprouted Kitchen has a separate Instagram account for his dreamy food photos, I can stare at them for ages. How Millions of Kids Are Being Shaped by Know-It-All Voice Assistants Sweet Potato Sheet Pan Dinner Salad – looks perfect, and those photos are amazing. The Avocado Show – an Amsterdam cafe centered around everything avocado, look at that. What We Eat When We Eat Alone – recently discovered this gem by Deborah Madison. Raspberry-Tahini Sweet Potato Toast   Print Serves: 4-6 toasts Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato ½ tablespoon coconut oil - soft (if using the oven) 2-4 tablespoons sesame tahini ¼ cup raspberries (fresh or frozen and thawed) honey or maple syrup for drizzling mixed seeds for garnish (I used cacao nibs, hemp, pumpkin seeds) Instructions Peel and slice the sweet potato into even, ¼-thick slices. If you have an organic sweet potato, you can leave the skin on, but I prefer it peeled. If using an oven, preheat it to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet and place the sweet potato slices on the sheet. Add the coconut oil and mix with your hands to coat. Put the baking sheet into the oven and cook for 15 minutes. Flip the slices and cook another 10-15 minutes until cooked through. Add toppings and enjoy right away or refrigerate in an air-tight container until ready to eat. Reheat in a 350° F (175° C) oven for about 5 minutes, then top. If using a toaster, place the sweet potato slices in the toaster and toast on high for about 5 minutes, until cooked through and toasty at the edges. Cooking time will vary slightly for different toasters. Spread tahini on each slice. Add raspberries, mashing them a bit with a fork. Drizzle each slice with the desired amount of honey/­­maple syrup and sprinkle with mixed seeds. Enjoy! 3.5.3226   Avocado-Lentil Sweet Potato Toast   Print Serves: 4-6 toasts Ingredients 1 medium sweet potato ½ tablespoon coconut oil - soft (if using the oven) ⅓ cup cooked black or French lentils 1 teaspoon olive oil ½ teaspoon balsamic vinegar, plus more for drizzling 1 small, ripe avocado juice of ½ small lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste nutritional yeast for garnish mixed seeds for garnish (I used hemp, flax, pumpkin, and sunflower seeds) Instructions Peel and slice the sweet potato into even, ¼-thick slices. If you have an organic sweet potato, you can leave the skin on, but I prefer it peeled. If using an oven, preheat it to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a parchment paper-covered baking sheet and place the sweet potato slices on the sheet. Add the coconut oil and mix with your hands to coat. Put the baking sheet into the oven and cook for 15 minutes. Flip the slices and cook another 10-15 minutes until cooked through. Add toppings and enjoy right away or refrigerate in an air-tight container until ready to eat. Reheat in a 350° F (175° C) oven for about 5 minutes, then top. If using a toaster, place the sweet potato slices in the toaster and toast on high for about 5 minutes, until cooked through and toasty at the edges. Cooking time will vary slightly for different toasters. In a small bowl, combine lentils, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, half of the lemon juice, salt and pepper. In another small bowl, mash the avocado with the remaining lemon juice, salt and pepper. Spread mashed avocado onto each sweet potato slice, followed by the lentils and a sprinkle of nutritional yeast and mixed seeds. Drizzle with more balsamic vinegar and enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... A Salad for the Weekdays Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream -- Ice Cream Sunday Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices Superfood Cherry Garcia Pops with a Chocolate Core - Ice... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway

March 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway When I first heard that Laura Wright was writing a cookbook about two years ago, I began a very impatient wait for a book that I knew would become very important to me, as well as a staple in my kitchen. Now that the wait is finally over, I truly haven’t been able to stop cooking from this masterpiece of a book, and it has exceeded all of my very high expectations. Every time I set out to read Laura’s blog, The First Mess, I know that I will be walking away with a smile, as well as inspired to cook something bright, comforting and nourishing to the core. Laura’s writing style is so uniquely heartwarming and honest, like being in a conversation with a dear old friend, and that tone is very much echoed in the very well-considered, homey recipes and beautiful photography in The First Mess cookbook. All of the recipes in the book are vegan and whole food/­­vegetable/­­fruit-forward, but more importantly, they are delicious, unique yet somehow familiar, considerate of time, and made with accessible ingredients. The book is for absolutely everyone, whether vegan, vegetarian, omnivore, health-conscious or not, and it will get you excited to cook. This all-inclusiveness and approachability is so hard to achieve with a plant-based cookbook, but that is Laura’s genius. Ever since receiving my copy a few weeks ago, I’ve been floating on a cloud of cooking inspiration, and I’ve already made the French Onion Lentil Pots, Roasted Chili Basil Lime Tofu Bowls, Mustard-Roasted Broccoli Paté, Lazy Steel Cut Oatmeal, Fudgy Nut and Seed Butter Brownies (twice), plus the two recipes in this post, all to insanely good results. I chose to feature the Moroccan Stew recipe here, since I think it really captures the essence of Laura’s cooking. The stew comes together quickly, with pantry and grocery store staples, yet it tastes completely new and luxurious. Plus, it’s a great recipe to make during this seasonal produce limbo that we are in right now. Of course, I couldn’t choose just one recipe to post, so I made the Sunshine Everything Crackers to snack on as well. They are so addictive! As well as gluten-free, colored golden with turmeric, and they taste like better, healthier cheez-its/­­goldfish crackers. We plowed through them in a few days, and they made for an excellent lunchbox snack for the kid, too. The First Mess cookbook comes out on March 7th, but you can preorder it now to save a few bucks and to receive the delicious-looking bonus recipe bundle that Laura created for preorder customers. G I V E A W A Y /­­/­­ We are giving away one copy of The First Mess cookbook. To enter, leave a comment here telling us about your go-to recipe for this transitional time of year, or your favorite recipe from The First Mess blog until next Wednesday, March 8th, 2017. Giveaway is for U.S. and Canada only. Reprinted from The  First  Mess  Cookbook  by arrangement with Avery Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company. Copyright (C) 2017, Laura Wright. Sunshine Everything Crackers   Print Serves: about 60 1-inch (2.5 cm) crackers Ingredients 1 cup (250 ml) chickpea flour 1 cup (250 ml) gluten-free oat flour 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon fine sea salt 2 teaspoons garlic powder 1 teaspoon ground turmeric pinch of cayenne pepper (optional) ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons sunflower oil (I used neutral coconut oil) ¼ cup filtered water, plus extra if necessary ¼ cup mixed raw seeds (I used flax, hemp, sesame) Instructions Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). In the bowl of a food processor, combine the chickpea flour, oat flour, nutritional yeast, sea salt, garlic powder, ground turmeric, cayenne pepper, if using, and oil. Pulse the machine to get everything lightly mixed. Mix on high until you have a wet and uniform crumbly mixture. With the food processor on low, slowly pour the filtered water through the feed tube of the food processor. The cracker dough should start to form a large ball. If the ball isnt forming, add more water by the teaspoon through the feed tube. Open the lid of the food processor and add the mixed seeds. Pulse the dough a couple of times to distribute the seeds. Lay a sheet of parchment paper, about the size of a large baking sheet, on the counter. Dump the cracker dough onto the parchment and flatten it a bit with your hands. Lay another sheet of parchment paper on top of the dough. With a rolling pin, evenly roll the cracker dough out to roughly an ⅛ inch (3mm) thickness. Remove the top sheet of parchment paper. Carefully transfer the parchment with the rolled-out cracker dough to a large baking sheet. With a knife, score the cracker dough into a gird, forming 1-inch (2.5 cm) square crackers. Slide the baking sheet into the oven and bake until the edges of the crackers have browned slightly, about 20 minutes. Let the crackers cool completely before storing in a sealed container. The crackers will keep for about 5 days. 3.5.3226   Moroccan Stew   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients 2 teaspoons coconut oil 1 medium yellow onion - small dice 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 2 teaspoons ground cumin 2 teaspoons ground coriander ½ teaspoon dried chili flakes (optional) 2 cloves garlic - minced 3 to 4 Medjool dates - pitted and chopped 2 carrots - chopped into ½-inch (1 cm) pieces 1 large sweet potato - peeled and chopped into ½-inch (1 cm) pieces salt and pepper - to taste 1 can (28 ounces/­­769 ml) crushed tomatoes 3 to 4 cups (750 ml to 1 L) vegetable stock 1 yellow bell pepper - stemmed and chopped into ½-inch (1 cm pieces) 2 cups (500 ml) cooked chickpeas for serving pitted green olives lemon wedges cooked brown rice, millet or couscous Instructions Heat the coconut oil in a large, heavy-bottomed soup pot over medium heat. Add the onions and immediately lower the heat until they are sizzling quietly. When the onions are soft and translucent, add the cinnamon, cumin, coriander, and chili flakes, if using. Slowly sauté and stir the spiced onion mixture until the onions are quite soft, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the chopped dates, carrots, and sweet potatoes. Season the vegetables with salt and pepper. Stir to coat the vegetables in the spices and oil. Add the crushed tomatoes and stir. Add 3 cups (750 ml) of the vegetable stock. Bring to a boil uncovered, and simmer until the sweet potatoes are just tender, about 10 to 12 minutes. Add the yellow bell pepper and chickpeas and stir. Season the whole thing again with salt and pepper. If the stew seems too thick, add the remaining 1 cup (250 ml) of vegetable stock. Simmer until the yellow bell peppers are tender and the sweet potatoes are quite soft, about 5 minutes. Check the soup for seasoning and adjust if necessary. Serve the stew hot with a few green olives per portion, lemon wedges and warm cooked grain. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Caramelized Vegetables in Crispy Coconut Cups Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream - Ice Cream S... Raw Pad Thai with Baby Bok Choy and White Crab Mushrooms Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

The Kitchen Renovation

February 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

The Kitchen Renovation Vintage European bistro chairs found on Craigslist, kitchen table passed down to my husband from his grandmother. We’ve been living in our home for fifteen years now and up until this fall, we had never put a hammer or paintbrush to anything in the house except for Paloma’s baby room, right before she was born. We inherited some classic 90s Florida detailing from the previous owners – dust-attracting, shaggy red and white carpeting, stucco walls, green laminate countertops and a low-hanging ceiling in the kitchen. Just like many other families I know, we are quite food-oriented and tend to crowd in the kitchen, since that’s where most of the action happens. It’s also where I work, where I come up with recipes for this site and for my cookbooks, so it’s fair to say that I spend most of my life in this space. We recently completed a long, laborious kitchen renovation that spilled out into the living room, and I cannot describe how much my heart sings when I come downstairs every morning and see this kitchen that finally feels so entirely mine. It took us a decade and a half to gather up the courage and the funds to do this, and these past few months have brought some of the most trying times for us as a family, but it finally feels like it was worth it and I’m so excited to share some snaps of Golubka Kitchen HQ with you. We took a documentary approach to these photos, and instead of shooting everything in one day, the photos were taken over a week, on cloudy days and on sunny days, in the morning and in the evening. There are different aspects of the kitchen that shine on different days, and we really wanted to capture that. ‘Farmhouse’ kitchen sink from Ikea, faucet from Ebay. Our house has three stories – garage on the first floor, open kitchen and living room on the second, and bedrooms on the third. We renovated the kitchen, the living room floor, ceiling, and fireplace (yes, we have a fireplace in Florida and we use it, too), and both staircases leading up and down to the kitchen and living room. The most expensive part of the whole renovation was the removal of the old hanging ceiling in the kitchen, together with all the electrical work involved. We decided on the cabinets and countertops quickly, but the easy decisions ended there. It took me so incredibly long to settle on a cohesive look for the kitchen. As a notoriously undecisive Libra, I endlessly kept changing my mind about the wall treatment, the tile, the light fixtures, the shelves, the faucet, cabinet pulls, etc. I do love those clean, white kitchens with minimal everything, but in the end I decided that in order to stay true to my heart, I had to go with something a little more feminine and detail-oriented, with a hint of the Downton Abbey kitchen. The old kitchen had endless cabinets on the walls, some of which always ended up a mess, while others weren’t utilized at all, so I knew I wanted exposed shelves. I’m super happy with that decision – I love having my dishes and jars within arm’s reach and at eye level, since it allows me to be more organized and minimal. Many people wonder whether dust is an issue with open shelves, and I’ve found that it’s not any more of an issue than anywhere else in the house. I also use all the objects on the shelves quite frequently, which doesn’t allow too much dust to accumulate. The shelves are made of very beautiful and sturdy wood reclaimed from an old barn in Kentucky, which we found at Barn Works. I finished the wood myself without the use of a wood stain. The floating shelf arrangement was made possible with the heavy duty brackets from Shelfology, which secure the shelves to the wall very safely and seamlessly. Tadelakt Moroccan Plaster with Benjamin Moore ‘White Stone’ color pigment Industrial brass rod with copper hooks from Etsy, vintage Brazilian copper utensils with wooden handles found on Craigslist. During the initial planning stage, I was certain that I wanted a subway tile backsplash, but was simultaneously seeing and liking backsplashes made with Moroccan, Spanish and Mexican patterned tiles. I agonized over my choice between the two until I discovered Tadelakt, the Moroccan plaster, and there was no turning back. I knew I wanted grey shaker kitchen cabinets, but the plaster treatment also presented the possibility of grey walls. I’ve always been attracted to grey rooms, to me they just speak of serenity, so I was pretty happy with this opportunity. Finding someone who would apply the plaster masterfully but for a fair price, and getting the job completed was probably one of the most nerve-racking parts of the renovation. We did find someone brilliant, and it ended up worth the stress, because I am completely in love with my new walls. The material is so warm, textural and interesting, and it totally ties the whole kitchen together. As much as I loved the idea of a patterned tile floor, I was still torn between its beauty/­­practicality and the homey feel of hardwood floors, which I wanted to have in the living room. I finally settled on the idea of combining the two, and as a result, the tile follows the line of the kitchen cabinets in the shape of an inverted ‘Z,’ while we can still enjoy the warmth of the hardwood floors in the sitting area and into the living room. The tile is from the Cement Tile Shop, which offers an overwhelming array of the most beautiful, authentic patterns. Of course I found settling on one to be a near impossible task. I went from multicolored to black and white, to pastel, to monochrome tiles dozens of times before landing on the Fountaine Antique pattern with a custom border. As for the hardwood floor, I’d always dreamt of an old-fashioned herringbone pattern in real wood, which proved to be really difficult to find within the United States. The one company that carried thick oak planks in a herringbone pattern didn’t have enough to cover our floor at first, but they later ended up finding one extra box tucked away in a different warehouse. I’m so glad that they did because I’m completely over the moon about how the floors turned out. It’s worth mentioning that the old kitchen floor was white tile that showed off every spec of dust that landed on it, and the living room floors had white plush carpeting, and I am so happy to finally be rid of both. We found the best contractor, Don, who left us endlessly impressed, together with his talented and considerate team. He truly cared about every step of the process and saved us so many times with his expert advice and creative input. The most standout showcase of the team’s work is the spacious drawer pantry they built out of vintage fruit crates from Schiller’s Salvage. My idea was realized even better than I had envisioned – the crates were originally too long and the crew manually disassembled, shortened and rebuilt them, then positioned them on smoothly sliding tracks. The countertop over the crates is made of old barn oak and finished by me in the same way as the floating shelves. The whole piece, on top of being unique and beautiful, is the most functional and spacious storage space in the whole kitchen. Quartz countertops from the Home Depot in ‘Snowy Ibiza’ Antique Spanish hutch from the 1800s, a lucky Craigslist find, brought to the U.S. from Madrid Vintage ceramic and brass cabinet pulls from Ebay and Etsy Vintage ceramic door knob from eBay, ‘Pink Shadow’ Sherwin Williams paint on the door. Custom built computer shelf made by Algis from old barn wood. My favorite thing about the vintage French chandelier that I found on Etsy are the rainbows it sends onto the walls in the evenings. Fireplace brick wall made with 100 year old sliced brick from Craigslist, arranged beautifully by Algis. Stairs leading up to the third floor with the bedrooms. Since both of the staircases connect to the kitchen and living room, we realized that we had to redo them as well, so that they wouldn’t be an eyesore within the new renovation. My husband and I set out to do the whole thing ourselves to save some cash, but in hindsight, I wouldn’t wish this type of adventure upon my worst enemy. All the stairs were covered with red carpeting, and the railings were painted an ugly orange-ish brown. The original plan was to remove the old carpet and to cover the existing stairs with new wood planks. To our surprise, however, we discovered a beautiful pine under the carpeting and decided to restore the original stairs along with stripping and re-finishing the railing. It took me two and a half months to complete this part of the project alone. Stairs leading up to the kitchen/­­living room from the garage. Ceramic tile from Spain with weathered grey hues, uneven borders, satin finish. This kitchen renovation wouldn’t have been possible without the help and generosity of Cement Tile Shop, Shelfology, Barn Works, Schiller’s Salvage, and Floor and Decor. My eternal gratitude goes out to Don and the team for your incredible care and craftsmanship in everything you do, Algis for the amazing job with the tile, plaster, fireplace and shelf, Vadim for the impeccable hardwood installation, and Dale for the immense help with the tile and stairs. Resources Contractor – Don Violette at V & P Construction and Maintenance Kitchen Tile – Cement Tile Shop Shelves – Shelfology for the floating shelf brackets, Barn Works for the reclaimed lumber Vintage Fruit Crates – Schiller’s Architectural and Design Salvage Hardwood Floors – Floor and Decor Kitchen Cabinets – Floor and Decor Countertops – Home Depot, quartz in ‘Snowy Ibiza’ Accessory Resources – in photo captions If you happen to be looking for some incredibly talented craftsmen for your renovation in the Tampa Bay area, please reach out to me and I will be happy to connect you. The post The Kitchen Renovation appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding

January 2 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding Happy New Year! Checking in with a quick breakfast recipe idea that was born out of my struggle to feed my very picky eight year old a nutritious breakfast. Chia pudding used to be a staple breakfast for her, flavored differently depending on the season or what was on hand, and I felt pretty good about her starting the day with a nice portion of the Omega-3 rich seeds. Then, one day she decided that she doesn’t like the texture of chia in her pudding any longer (too crunchy! too chewy!), and getting breakfast into her before leaving for school became a monumental task. I’m sure many parents out there can sympathize with me when I say I would pay money for this picky eating stage to be over. But for now, I deal with it by identifying a food Paloma loves and then trying to mask other nutritious ingredients with it. For example, she’s crazy about tomatoes, so I make a crushed tomato-based stew with other veggies mixed in, and she tends to be ok with eating that. Recently, Paloma’s been obsessed with our tahini hot chocolate, and I figured that blending chia seeds into a similar mixture and letting it sit to solidify into a pudding could work. The chia is still there, but not as noticeable since it’s whipped up with the rest of the ingredients. And it worked – the child is fed, chia is back in business, and I loved the result so much for its simplicity that I decided to share it here. I like to make this pudding the night before and let it chill in the refrigerator overnight for the chia to become its most springy self. I’m also planning on trying this one out with carob powder instead of cacao, just to ease up our cacao consumption. There are some links after the jump, have a peaceful Monday :) Patti Smith on the Here’s The Thing Podcast The Making of the Sqirl Cookbook Cover – one of our favorite cookbook covers of all time The Art of Forecasting Food Trends – a prediction for what’s hot in 2017: ‘Jackfruit! Sorghum! Harissa! And dont ignore horseradish, spirulina and Asian-inspired breakfasts. Authenticity and its cousin transparency are in. So is food inspired by Africa. Or maybe its the Philippines. Even French food has a constituency.’ Destroyer – an LA restaurant’s beautiful instagram Dreaming in French, The Paris Years of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, Susan Sontag, and Angela Davis – currently reading Things to Come – can’t wait to see this movie Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding   Print Serves: 3-5 Ingredients for the pudding 5-6 prunes 1½ tablespoon raw cacao powder 4 tablespoons chia seeds 2-3 tablespoons honey 1 tablespoon coconut oil ½ tablespoon almond butter ½ tablespoon tahini 2¼ cups water cacao nibs - for garnish hemp hearts - for garnish optional add ins 1 tablespoon hemp (or other) protein ½ tablespoon mesquite powder 1 teaspoon maca powder 1 teaspoon moringa powder Instructions Comine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender until very smooth. Distribute between bowls or pour into a large jar, cover, and let sit in the refrigerator for a minimum of one hour or overnight before eating. Garnish with cacao nibs and hemp hearts. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Berry Tarts with a Peach and Herb Sorbet Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange Miso Glaze & A New Cookbook! Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake Valentines Day Dessert - Rose Ice Cream, Pomegranate Sorb... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Saturday Six | French Toast Casserole, Cocoa Chili & Cauliflower Shawarma

December 10 2016 Oh My Veggies 

Were rounding up some of our favorite recipes from this weeks Potluck submissions, including cranberry and pear studded French toast casserole, rich cocoa infused chili, and tahini drizzled cauliflower shawarma.


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