foam - vegetarian recipes

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foam vegetarian recipes

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan

November 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Chi San Wan is a creative consultant, mama, entrepreneur and author based in London. We love Chi’s beautiful cookbook, her aesthetic, and down-to-earth approach to wellness, and we were very excited to get a peak at her everyday routine. In this interview, Chi tells us about her morning and bedtime routines, her ways of dealing with stress, the simple beauty tricks she’s learned from her mother, making space for the occasional cake and wine, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I enjoy routine, especially in the mornings. Before Marloe came along, routine was the only thing keeping me grounded. I have all sorts floating around in my head, and working for myself means one day can be very different to the next, so I need my mornings to be predictable in order to get me in the right mind-set for the rest of the day. However, now that those routines are governed by Marloe, our one year old, things are somewhat less predictable, and I have learnt to let go of the importance of routine a little. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. They vary slightly from day to day, depending on whats on the agenda, but in an ideal and average world my morning would be waking up around 6am, do some stretching, then 20 mins of meditation. Around 6:30am Marloe wakes up and we like to cuddle in bed together as a family (shes really into giving kisses at the moment). We get out of bed around 7am and take turns to shower whilst the other one plays with Marloe, makes lemon hot water and preps breakfast. We sit down together for breakfast between 7:30am-8am and have our mornings chats – most of the time theres food throwing involved. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I like to stop any computer work by 9pm, make myself a small hot drink and climb into bed to do some reading – usually self-help or study. I try to sleep by 10pm latest, but sometimes me and my boyfriend just end up chatting about the day until 11pm or midnight… Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Typically… Breakfast – multi-grain porridge with almond milk, topped with whatever seasonal fruits are around and some nut butter Lunch – quinoa, roast veg, salad, some kraut, some seaweed – usually leftovers Snack – sourdough and avocado, or an apple with cheese /­­ nut butter, whatever I find on my travels Dinner – salmon and veg, or daal /­­ curry with rice, yoghurt and lots of freshly chopped herbs -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? If I have the time, I will make myself a matcha latte in the mornings or for a snack. If we have eggs, maybe I will have an Earl Grey tea or some fresh juice. I only ever drink coffee when I fancy a croissant! Then it would have to be a flat white with fresh almond milk or oat milk.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I never used to! But somehow, during pregnancy and since Marloe was born, I have developed a sweet tooth! Maybe its to keep energy up? As the weather is colder now in London, I have been obsessed with searching for the best hot chocolate (always disappointing and not chocolatey enough!). When I get the urge for something sweet, its usually something very specific, not any old sweet thing will suffice, and I will have to go on a hunt for it. Though usually after dinner, I am happy with a piece of raw chocolate from the fridge.  -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I try and have a wide and varied diet to keep things in check, and food is the first thing I look to when trying to manage my general wellness. I try and listen to my body, even if sometimes its asking for wine or cake! Usually, it needs just that and feels much better for it. In terms of taking anything else, since pregnancy and the birth of Marloe I have taken a high DHA Omega 3 supplement and probiotics daily (just in case I dont get the chance to eat it in food form). Once a week I will make some water steeped in goji berries, longan (when my mum visits, she will always leave me some) and any dried herbs I have on hand and sip on that. I have some adaptogenics on hand too – chaga, cordyceps, reishi, ashwaghanda, schisandra – but I dont make a habit of taking them everyday, only when I need to. -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Do you try to guard her from all unhealthy/­­processed foods, or are you more relaxed about it all? Do you have any advice for parents who want to raise their kids to be comfortable with real, whole foods? For her first year I was a little precious about what I gave her to eat – everything was made at home and organic produce only. I went with baby led weaning which is so messy, anyone who knows me knows I cannot handle mess so this was, and still is, a learning curve for me. But it gives me great pleasure watching Marloe enjoy her food, and try anything I give her. She has days where she is super picky, but generally she is a happy eater. I am more relaxed and realistic about what she consumes now, because I cant always control where we are – she has predominately home made food, but when we are out she will have bits of whatever we are eating, and its fun to watch her try new things! I really recommend baby led weaning. If you read up on it, it makes a lot of sense to get kids to eat real, whole foods this way – who wants to eat mush? It could be anything! Real food looks and tastes much more exciting and it makes them more adventurous with food, and less fussy. Eating together at the table is important to me as well, and for Marloe to have what we are eating – she knows if we have given her a different meal and will shout until we feed her some of ours.  Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I love to fit yoga in when I can and I walk a lot (at a very fast pace), but other than that, its chasing the baby around. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I dont do any form of exercise that I find torturous, such as spin or anything high adrenaline; it doesnt work for me. I enjoy yoga – dynamic or kundalini, and walking in nature a lot.  Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I think if youre comfortable in your own skin, that is beautiful. But for everyone, that could be down to many different factors and it will chop and change with time. Someone who is confident but grounded with integrity – their beauty will shine through. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Its pretty simple and not that exciting! I try and dry-brush when I can, I use Dr. Bronners Baby soap for the body, and then after a shower, whilst the body is wet, I will rub a concoction of almond oil, sesame oil and essential oils that I fancy, all over. For my face, I take the day off with coconut oil and rose water (I make my own with 3/­­4 organic rose water and 1/­­4 colloidal silver). For my morning shower, I will use a thin flannel to scrub the face and spray with rose water, followed by a tiny bit of Nucifera, The Balm – a recent find in LA. Its been amazing for the change in weather in the UK.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water, water, water. Not eating so much dairy, wheat and sugar, but consuming more good fats like avocado, coconut and ghee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mum looks so good and youthful, but she has never drank much, never smoked, never wore make-up...thats her trick! I have never smoked, I drink less now naturally, as I am breastfeeding and I’m too busy to do any make-up, so usually a go at the eyelash curlers will do for the day! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I think fitting in meditation everyday greatly reduces stress for me and puts things into perspective. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Acupuncture. Talking it out with my boyfriend and friends. Knowing that ‘this too shall pass’. Treating myself to whatever food and drink I desire (within budget of course).  -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I take Wellness tablets. I make sure to be hydrated and wrap up warm at all times, especially the throat and chest. I make congee or daal, something warming and easy to digest so the body can rest.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? At the moment, I am very much governed by my daughters day to day antics, and I try and fit everything else around her. This does stress me out at times, but then I try and remember to enjoy these first years with her. I am lucky to have this time together with her, because I am freelance. I just try and plan my time carefully (shared iCal helps!), but not everything always goes to plan – which I am learning to let go of.  Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Things generally fall better into place when I take time to be kind to myself, so I just keep reminding myself that self-care is important, especially for a working mum. Setting routines like bed times for myself etc helps with this and saying no to some friends, projects, events etc when you just need the time to sort stuff out, so that everything else can run more smoothly. Obviously there is room for spontaneity, thats what keeps me feeling alive!  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Meditation. Making the time for it. It keeps me feeling focused, rested and puts things into perspective. Its a form of self-care and love for myself, and is incredibly nurturing. I dont always do it every day twice a day, but when I do, it helps immensely. I learnt from Jacqui at The Broad Place in the summer and, hands down, they’re the best teachings of meditation I have come across, because its real and it works.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Its easier said than done, but I try not to stress about it, and just trust the process rather than sit and wallow. Ill meet up with friends and my peers and we chat it out – usually its something that is felt by a few people, and I find that it usually reverberates between similar minds, like theres something going on with the energy around us. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I cant pinpoint one thing, its a zeitgeist thing, its in the air...maybe because we are entering a revolution, the age of Aquarius. I am constantly  inspired and influenced by the people I surround myself with, the internet, social media, so books /­­ movies /­­ classes suggested through those mediums are naturally the ones I gravitate to.  Knowledge -- You co-authored A Simple Table, a beautiful cookbook that focuses on fresh and simple meals. What was the key message that you aimed to communicate with the recipes and lifestyle tips in the book? Thank you. The key message was that everyday nourishment neednt be difficult or a chore. It could be simple acts of kindness to yourself, or simple recipes that dont require crazy expensive ingredients. Its to encourage the reader to explore what makes them feel good inside and out, as everyone is different and there is no one formula. Most of all, it was to enjoy the simple pleasures.  -- Tell us a bit about the fresh almond milk company that you co-founded, The Pressery. What inspired you to start it and what did you learn from having that business? I felt a change in me, and the start of a movement back in 2013 when I became a little disillusioned working in fashion, and more excited about food and drink and the effects it has on us. I have always been a food fanatic, so it was natural for me to explore this familiar and yet unknown territory. My business partner had been feeling the same for a while, so it felt like the right time to launch a small business in something we were both passionate about. I was already making almond milk at home, and after some research we settled on focusing on making the one product the best we could. There is a lot to learn through starting a business from nothing (I was a freelance fashion stylist before that), and building a brand from scratch – we started selling at a market and then got into Selfridges, and I grew the social media following from 0 to 22k organically in 2 years. Ive met many people through the business, with whom I am still good friends now and work with today, as a creative consultant. It was a natural progression for me and I wouldnt be where I am now if it wasnt for The Pressery.  Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I like to have a glass of red wine, make dinner with my boyfriend and possibly have a candle lit bath with Epsom salts and essential oils.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – salt. by Nayyirah Waheed, there is always a piece that speaks to me at any point in my life Song/­­Album – I will never tire of Your Hand In Mine by Explosions In The Sky Movie – In The Mood For Love has been a long favourite – the soundtrack, the colours, the feelings… Piece of Art – anything by Agnes Martin really does feed and soothe my soul, when the exhibition was at the Tate Modern, I went about 5 times! -- What are your favorite places to eat in London? Leilas  for breakfast, Esters  for brunch, Towpath  for lunch, Granger & Co Kings Cross  for work meetings, Violet  for cake and tea, P. Franco  for wine and small dishes and for dinner – Primeur , Campania and Jones , Uchi , Westerns Laundry , Legs , Luca ...too many!  -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list . What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – comfy t-shirt and shorts for sleep – current book  – Nucifera The Balm – rose water spray – essential oils to mix – Weleda lip balm – Dr. Bronners Baby soap (which doubles up as shaving foam) – x2 pairs of jeans (one boyfriend, one flares) – x1 sunglasses – x1 rucksack, x1 fancy bag, x1 tote bag – x1 black trousers (usually wide culottes) – x3 different style tees – x1 cashmere sweater – x2 white shirts  – x1 jumpsuit /­­ playsuit  – x1 dress for day or evening – x2 sandals (one Birkenstocks, one Isabel Marant) – x1 trainers – x1 smart shoes (for me, its Doc Martens) – x1 jacket or coat (depending on the destinations temperature) – x1 light cashmere scarf -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Id love to hear from Julie from Rudy Jude, Rosa from Cereal Magazine, Serena Mitnik-Miller from General Store and Holly from The Acey. Photos taken by Jessica MacCormick, Emma Lee and Chi San Wan. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

(Jalapeno) Sauerkraut

November 4 2017 Vegan Dad 

(Jalapeno) Sauerkraut I feared fermenting veggies for a long time. What if I give my family food poisoning? How will I know if something is fermented properly? Isnt it all too complicated? But now that I took the plunge, I wish I had done so earlier. This recipe, even though it has 8 steps, is utterly simplicity and produces a tender, tangy, and flavourful kraut. A chopped jalape?o only deepens the flavour without adding too much heat. Add two if you want more zip. Im not a big fan of veggie dogs, but with a homemade bun and this kraut, I would eat them any day. INGREDIENTS - 1 head of cabbage - 2-3 tbsp coarse salt (like pickling or kosher salt)--more as needed - 1 chopped jalapeno pepper (including seeds)--optional METHOD 1. Remove 2-3 outer leaves from the cabbage. 2. Core cabbage, and slice very thinly (a food processor works wonders here). 3. Woking in batches if necessary, place cabbage (and jalape?o, if using) in a large non-reactive bowl and sprinkle with salt. Start mashing/­­squeezing the cabbage with your hands, or use a wooden sauerkraut pounder. This will force liquid from the cabbage. The cabbage will start to go translucent, and you should get a good amount of liquid from it. If not, use a little more salt. 4. Transfer the cabbage to a large glass jar. I use a big 56 oz jar. Tamp down the cabbage (here is where the sauerkraut pounder really comes in handy) so that the liquid covers the cabbage. 5. Cover the cabbage with the leaves your removed in step 1. Rip the leaves into small pieces if necessary. Fully cover the cabbage right to the edges of the jar. Use a knife to tuck the edges down a bit so that pieces of cabbage dont float tup during the ferment (see pic above). 6. Tamp the cabbage leaves down so that they are submerged. 7. Place a smaller jar (or something non-reactive) on top of the leaves. It needs to reach the top of the bigger jar. Place the canning lid on upside down (i.e. rubber seal up), and then tighten on the metal ring. The idea here is to keep the kraut and leaves compressed and submerged throughout the ferment. The upside down lid will allow gas to escape during the ferment. 8. Place somewhere away from sunlight and direct heat (coolish room temp is great). Ferment away! I think 1.5 weeks makes for the perfect kraut. It will bubble and foam--this is what you want to see. Check every few days: remove the lid and take a sniff. It should not smell rotten or unpleasant. To my nose, kraut that has not fermented long enough has a slightly metallic air to it which mellows out after about 10 or 11 days. Remove the cabbage leaves from the top and enjoy! Refrigerate until used up.

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. Lunch – Beans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

FOAM Catering – The Hague

August 21 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

FOAM started as a, surprise surprise...catering company (FOAM stands for “Fresh, Organic, and Meat-Free”). But in 2016, FOAM opened the doors of its brand new ‘Health Food Hotspot’ in one of the hottest neighborhoods in The Hague. The Frederikstraat is a very lively street with all kinds of restaurant and cute little shops. FOAM is a hip white vegan hotspot with a lovely garden where you can enjoy a great organic coffee, fresh juices and a delicious lunch or good breakfast. There is also a terrace in front of the restaurant, if you prefer to enjoy the hustle and bustle from the street. I really liked the way the restaurant is decorated, with crisp white walls and furniture and fresh flowers, vegetables and fruit on display. They also have a wide range of vegan cakes, pies and brownies. During our visit, my sister enjoyed a salad and I had a portobello burger with fresh mint-tea. Portions are not that big but that just left some room for dessert! I had a lovely apricot and orange cake. The whole menu is 100% plant-based and they say on their website that “all their food is prepared with a lot of love.” All […] The post FOAM Catering – The Hague appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Hibiscus Ginger Latte

January 29 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Hibiscus Ginger Latte Hibiscus is a powerful tropical flower with a long list of health benefits (anti-inflammatory, digestive aid, metabolism-boosting, helps with cholesterol level and blood pressure maintenance). It also happens to produce the most brilliant, ruby red-colored tea with a prominent tart flavor. I’ve always found pure hibiscus tea to be a little too sour for my taste, but came up with this latte in a recent attempt to get more of its stunning color into my morning routine, and now I’m completely hooked. The creaminess of the almond milk helps offset the harshness of the hibiscus, and the ginger adds a nice note of warmth and complexity, making this latte a great winter drink. The green tea is optional here, but a great addition when you need a little help waking up in the morning or as a mid-afternoon boost. And I swear I feel like I’m getting color therapy when drinking this latte – the fluffy, pink foam is so soothing to look at, I’m in a complete state of peace by the time I’ve taken my last sip. We have some weekend links for you after the jump, have a great Sunday :) - The Cookbook Deal – I’ve been so excited for this podcast, in which Jessica Murnane documents a whole year of her life while making her first cookbook. I loved the first two episodes, and although that might have something to do with the fact that I’ve now gone through the book-making process twice, I think anyone can enjoy it because Jessica is such a great and charming storyteller. And if you are thinking of writing a cookbook, you should definitely give this one a listen. - This Hibiscus Mask from S.W. Basics - Andrea Gentl’s Photo Essay From Her Time in the Andes – breathtaking - Feedback, NY, Down the Aisle – interesting people interviewed about their grocery shopping routines. So far I’ve enjoyed interviews with Julia Turshen, Hannah and Landon Metz, Kenny Anderson. - The Matriarch Behind Beyoncé and Solange - On The Rocks – crystals explained on Garance Doré Hibiscus Ginger Latte   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 tablespoon dried hibiscus flowers 1 piece ginger - shredded 1 green tea bag 1½ cups hot water 1½ cup unsweetened almond milk or other milk of choice 1 tablespoon honey/­­any other sweetener of choice, or to taste (optional) Instructions Combine hibiscus, ginger, green tea and water in a teapot or a large mug, keep covered while steeping. Remove the green tea bag after 2-4 minutes of steeping. Let the hibiscus steep for another 15-20 minutes. Warm up the milk if you prefer a hot latte. Pour the tea into a blender through a strainer. Add the milk and honey to the blender and blend until frothy and smooth. This latte also tastes great iced. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Elderflower Lemonade Black Sesame Cappuccino Spiced Hot Chocolate and a Cookbook of Our Own Quick Persimmon Eggnog .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Hibiscus Ginger Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Aquafaba-Gingerbread Mousse with Pomegranate

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

Aquafaba-Gingerbread Mousse with Pomegranate Let's be honest: the dessert is the best thing about christmas dinner. I always don't eat too much of the main dishes so there is still room for the wicked dessert. It's just so divine this heavenly sweet mousse that melts in one's mouth and awakens the sweetest dreams. I'm floating on my christmas cloud out of mousse and pomegranate... Makes 4 portions. For the gingerbread mousse: 1 can chickpea water 1 good pinch of salt 120 g couverture chocolate, bittersweet 2 tbsp. coconut blossom sirup (or any other sweetener) 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla, grounded 1/­­2 tsp. gingerbread spice 200 g vegan whipping cream 1/­­2 pomegranate Let the chickpeas drip off and collect the water. Keep the chickpeas for a curry or any other deliciousness. In this recipe we will only need the chickpea water. Whip chickpea water (aquafaba) with a pinch of salt. This process is going to take about 5-10 minutes until the foam is stiff. Meanwhile chop the chocolate and melt it in a bain-marie (the water may not boil). Put it aside and wait until the chocolate has cooled off and got a little thicker. Fold chocolate, sirup, vanilla and gingerbread spice in the mousse. Put the mousse in glasses and put them in the fridge for at least 30 minutes. Serve mousse with whipped cream and pomegranate.

Pumpkin Tarts

October 19 2016 Vegan Dad 

Pumpkin Tarts This is the last of my pumpkin recipes for this fall. Its too late for Canadian Thanksgiving, but these could be a hit at your very own American Thanksgiving. The filling has lots of pumpkin flavour but has a lighter texture than usual pumpkin pie filling. The filling does not have to be baked so these tarts come together relatively quickly.  INGREDIENTS Makes 24 tarts - 24 frozen tart shells, baked - 1/­­3 cup unsalted chickpea aquafaba - 1/­­8 tsp xanthan gum - 3 tbsp sugar - 1/­­4 cup raw cashews - 1 cup plain soy milk - 1/­­3 cup sugar - 1 cup cooked pumpkin (see note below*) - 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon - 1/­­2 tsp ginger - 1/­­4 tsp nutmeg - large pinch allspice - pinch of salt - 1 tsp vanilla - 2 tbsp corn starch - 1/­­4 tsp agar powder - whipped topping METHOD 1. Bake the tart shells per the instructions on the package. Cool. 2. Soak cashews in boiled water for 15 mins. Drain. 3. While cashews are soaking, add aquafaba and xanthan gum to a mixer bowl. Fix the mixer with a balloon whisk and whisk on med-hi speed until foamy. Add sugar 1 tbsp at a time, and blend until soft peaks form. 4. Put the soaked cashews and the remaining ingredients (but not the aquafaba mixture) in a blender. Blend until very smooth. 5. Pour the blender contents into a saucepan and cook on the stove or medium heat, stirring constantly. When bubbling, cook for two minutes. 6. Let mixture cool for 2 mins, stirring regularly to prevent a scum from forming. Fold in the aquafaba mixture completely. 7. Spoon mixture into the cooled tart shells (save any leftovers in the fridge and call it pumpkin custard). When they reach room temperature, transfer to the fridge to fully cool. I think these taste best the next day. 8. When ready to serve, top with the whipped cream of your choice (I use the recipe from Homemade Vegan Pantry, but you could use a commercial topping as well).

Celery Root and Herb Cream with Goat Cheese Appetizer

September 15 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | To make Celery Root: Cut 4 1/­­8-inch-thick slices from celery root. Using 2-inch round cutter, punch out 8 disks from slices, and set aside. Chop remaining celery root (including leftover bits from slices) into 1/­­4-inch pieces (you should have 2 cups). 2 | Bring large saucepan of salted water to a boil. Blanch celery root disks 10 to 20 seconds, remove with slotted spoon, and pat dry with paper towels. Cover, and chill. 3 | To make Herb Cream: Bring large saucepan of water to a boil. Lower egg into water with slotted spoon, and cook 31/­­2 minutes. Transfer cooked egg to bowl filled with ice water; cool until chilled. Remove egg from water, crack shell, and peel. Transfer cooked egg to blender, and add shallots, dill, parsley, and garlic. Process on high speed 3 minutes, or until smooth. Add oil in slow, steady stream, and process 1 minute more, or until sauce is thick. Fold Herb Cream into chopped celery root, and season with vinegar and salt, if desired. Chill. 4 | To make Goat Cheese Foam: Warm milk and cheese in saucepan over medium heat until cheese melts. Whisk in lemon juice and soy lecithin; season with salt, if desired. Cool. Blend with immersion blender until foamy. 5 | To prepare Garnish: Toss crackers and goat cheese together in bowl. 6 | Place 2-inch round cutter on plate, and place 1 celery root disk inside cutter. Top with 1 inch chopped celery root, then Herb Cream; top with second celery root disk. Carefully lift cutter, and top stack with goat cheese-cracker mixture. Top with watercress, and spoon 1 Tbs. Goat Cheese Foam over top. Repeat with remaining ingredients.

Masala Idli

June 10 2015 Manjula's kitchen 

Masala Idli Masala idli is a simple and easy snack. This is one of my favorite ways to serve masala idli. Adding the stir-fry salad to idli makes a very versatile dish. You can serve this as lunch, snack or salad. To make masala idli I am using the rava idli witch is quick and easy to make. This also makes a great lunch box meal as it is very healthy and satisfying. This recipe will serve 4. Ingredients: For Idli - 1 cup coarse sooji (samolinai) - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­2 cup yogurt (curd, Dahi) - 3/­­4 cup water use as needed - 1 teaspoon ENO (fruit salt) For seasoning the Idli - 1 tablespoon oil - 1/­­4 teaspoon mustard seed (rai) - 1/­­4 teaspoon cumin seeds (jeera) - 1 green chili seeded and cut in length wise in four - 1 teaspoon samber powder optional The seasoning is for half the idlies we are making other use next time Utensils for Making Idlis - Idli stand – I am using the mini idle rack but you can use regular rack and cut the idli in four pieces. - Covered pot, large enough to hold the idli stand. - Alternatively, an egg poacher can work just as well, if you do not have an Idli stand. For Stir- Fry Salad - 3 cups cabbage, cut into thin slices - 1/­­2 cup red bell pepper cut into thin slices (capsicum, Shimla mirch) - 1/­­4 cup green beans cut in half lengthwise and then into pieces 1-1/­­2 long - 2 teaspoons oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon mustard seeds (rai) - Pinch of black pepper - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt (adjust to taste) - 1/­­4 teaspoon sugar - 1 teaspoon lemon juice Method to make Idli - Mix semolina, salt, and yogurt, add water as needed to make a pancake-like batter. Set aside for at least 30 minutes. - The batter thickens as the semolina absorbs the water. At this point, add a little more water as needed. - Add approximately 3/­­4 cup of water to the pot. Check to make sure that the water does not touch the bottom plate of the idli stand. Bring to boil. - Lightly grease idli plates with oil. - Add Eno Fruit Salt to the batter and mix well. The mixture will begin foaming.  Immediately begin pouring into the Idli trays. Place the stand into the steaming pot. - Cover the pot and steam idles for about 6-8 minutes on medium heat. Insert a toothpick in the center of one idli. If the toothpick comes out clean, remove the stand from the pot. Do not overcook idles, as they will lose their softness and dry out as they cool. - Cool for just a few minutes before removing each individual idli. They should come out easily and not stick to the mold. Idles should be spongy and soft. Seasoning for Idlies - For this recipe we need to use about half the idlies, save other for next time. - Heat oil in a saucepan. Add mustard and cumin seeds. When the seeds begin to crack, add the chilies. Stir for a few seconds add the idlies and stir-fry them for 2-3 minutes until idlies are lightly golden brown. - Sprinkle the samber powder and mix it well gently, assuring idlies will not brake. Turn off the heat. Stir- Fry Salad Method - Heat the oil in frying pan over medium high heat. - Add mustard seeds, as the seeds crack, add cabbage, bell pepper, and beans. Stir-fry three to four minutes, vegetables should be crisp, do not overcook. - Turn off the heat. Add salt, sugar, black pepper and lemon juice. Mix well. - Mix the idlies with stir fry and fold gently. Masala idlies are ready. - Serve them warm or at room temperature. Suggestions - This is two part recipe and good thing is you can serve them both as a separate dish and they truly taste delicious and when you combine them both that really bumps up the taste factor. - Idlies can be refrigerated for 4-5 days or freeze them for a month. Check out the recipe for Mysore Bonda The post Masala Idli appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Spring Vegetal Tacos

May 4 2015 Meatless Monday 

These vegetable tacos are so packed with springtime flavors, it’s worth the extra assembly time. This recipe comes to us from Chef Ivy Stark of Dos Caminos and appears on the restaurant’s new SPE Certified menu. Makes 12 tacos For the tacos: - 12 corn tortillas - 12 oz. refried white beans - 12 spears grilled jumbo asparagus - 2 ripe California Hass avocados, sliced and grilled - 12 tsp. cucumber pico de gallo - 12 tsp. queso fresco For the Cucumber Pico de Gallo: - 2 kirby cucumbers, peeled - 1 small red onion, finely diced - 2 roma tomatoes, finely diced - 1 jalapeno pepper, finely chopped - 1 serrano chile, finely chopped - 1/­­4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice - 2 tsp. extra virgin olive oil - 1 tsp. lemon olive oil - salt For the Refried White Beans: - 1 cups dried cannellini beans - 2 serrano chiles, split - 2 pints of water - 1 tbsp. olive oil - 1 medium yellow onion, diced - 1/­­2 tsp. dried oregano - 2 tsp. lemon olive oil - 1 tsp. salt For the Refried White Beans: Wash the beans in a colander. Bring water to a boil in a medium stock pot. Add the beans and the serranos. Reduce to a simmer, cover, and cook, skimming foam from the top occasionally, about 1 hour and 45 minutes. Drain, reserving the liquid. Mash the beans, along with some of the bean cooking liquid, until creamy but not completely mashed. Heat the olive oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Sauté the onion with the oregano and salt until golden brown. Add the mashed beans and cook, stirring occasionally. Cook until the liquid evaporates and the beans form a mass that pulls away from the sides and bottom of the pan, about 10 minutes. Puree in a blender, while adding the lemon olive oil in a steady stream. Season with salt as needed. For the Pico de Gallo: Finely dice the cucumbers, combine with the remaining ingredients and season with salt. Let stand 30 minutes before serving. For the Tacos: Warm the corn tortillas by placing them on a warm griddle for 30 seconds. Place a spoonful of white beans into each of the corn tortillas. Cut asparagus in half and place on top of white beans. Place one slice of grilled avocado and 1 tsp. of cucumber pico in each taco. Sprinkle with queso fresco. The post Spring Vegetal Tacos appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Caramel Corn

April 18 2015 Vegan Dad 

I cant eat this tasty treat because of my Crohns, but I have had rave reviews from friends and family alike. This recipe is pretty much like every other caramel corn recipe out there, except that it uses vegan margarine which is cheap and adds some salt to complement the sweetness. I also like the addition of vanilla extract to round out the flavour a bit more. It does use light corn syrup which some may want to avoid--I am guessing that you can use brown rice syrup instead but I have not tried it. Experiments with adding maple syrup led to a pronounced burnt sugar taste (the kids ate it anyway). This recipe is party sized, so cut it in half if you want to. I like a thin glaze of caramel on the popcorn, so if you like more use only a 3/­­4 cup of popcorn. If you want to add nuts then reduce the popcorn accordingly. All my pictures were blurry (argh!). I will take more when I make this again. INGREDIENTS - 1 cup popcorn kernels - 1/­­2 cup light corn syrup - 1 cup vegan margarine (I use Becel) - 2 cups light brown sugar - 1 tsp vanilla extract - 1 tsp baking soda METHOD Preheat oven to 200 degrees. 1. Pop your popcorn (I do it in two batches in an air popper) and place in a large roasting dish. 2. Mix together corn syrup, margarine and sugar in a medium/­­large saucepan. Place on a burner set between medium and med-hi heat. Keep mixing while everything melts, but stop once the mixture begins to bubble. 3. Let bubble until it reaches hard crack stage (between 300 and 310F). If you dont have a candy thermometer, you can let it bubble for 10 mins and it will be close enough. 4. Remove the mixture from the stove. Add the vanilla and mix well (it will splutter a bit). 5. Add the baking soda (it will foam like mad) and mix well. 6. Pour over the popped corn and mix well. 7. Bake, uncovered, for an hour. Mix well every fifteen minutes. 8. Remove from roasting pan and spread out on a piece of parchment paper to cool. Break up an large clumps. Once cool, store in an airtight container.

Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi

March 31 2015 My New Roots 

Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi My parents made my lunch every day that I was in school from the time I was barely old enough to hold a brown paper bag, right up until my last days of high school. It was always exactly the same format, with slight variations: sandwich, juice box, granola bar, piece of fruit. Pretty standard fare for most of my peer group if I remember correctly, and I never complained about it. That is until the day I peered over my bologna-on-a-bun to see Alexis at the popular kids table in the junior high cafeteria slurping over what looked like a rather foreign and intriguing styrofoam cup of something hot and tasty. Oh, thats Mr. Noodles, my best friend Julie said, and went on to explain that all you had to do was pour boiling water into the cup and wait a few minutes before eating the noodle soup-like meal. I looked down at my cold, relatively flavourless, pedestrian food and felt left out. Not only was I totally un-cool, but suddenly my lunch was too. Could life get any worse?! I ran home and told my mom about the cup noodles and begged her to buy some at the store, promising her that this could not only save her time, but most importantly, my lunchroom reputation. Dont you want me to be popular?!, I wailed. Convinced this was my ticket to the promised land of spin-the-bottle and weekend shopping mall hang-outs, I persuaded her to invest the fifty cents on a couple trials and see what all the fuss was about. When she came home I had the kettle boiled and ready to get down to business. Folding back the paper lid, I spotted a magical little package of flavoured powder inside, which I read was meant to be emptied into the cup before adding the water. A couple shriveled, token peas fell out amongst the dust and my mom looked pleased to see green. The boiling water was added, I closed the lid again and waited - the longest four minutes of my life thus far. But oh, what ceremony! What rapture! The timer on my ironman wristwatch beeped, I stirred the cup, and dug in. It was salty. Very salty. Thats about all I can recall. The noodles, semi-cooked and crispy in parts were underwhelming and bland, while the broth, if I can all it that, was shockingly saline. But none of that mattered. I would have eaten cow dung if it meant sitting next to Alexis. I finally had the answer to the question of cafeteria coolness. Needless to say, eating ramen did not initiate me into the popular crowd, nor did it inspire a great love of this ubiquitous, cheap eat canonized by hung-over college kids everywhere. Until very recently this had been my only experience with ramen. But when yet another ramen recipe request landed in my inbox, I knew it was time to revisit this famous dish. It needs to be said that instant ramen is a far cry from its traditional roots of noodles in broth, which when prepared properly with care and intention, can be utterly delicious. I suppose its like most things that go from revered, regional dish to the freezer section of the gas stations grocery aisle, or worse. Shouldnt these things receive a different name or label in respect to the original recipe? Its somewhat maddening, but I surrender to the fact that there is only so much I can change in this world. The backbone of all ramen is the broth, or dashi. Dashi is a clear stock that is traditionally made using kombu, Japanese sea kelp, and katsoubushi or bonito, dried fish. Other dashi bases can include shiitake mushrooms, and because my recipes are plant based, Ill be showing you how to make this variety and the kombu one today. Once you have this base, you can spike your dashi with shallots, garlic, ginger, miso, etc. but today were keeping things simple and I leave the fun and improvisation to your ramen-hungry minds. Toppings vary widely, but vegetarian ingredients can include noodles (obviously), mushrooms, strips of nori or other tasty sea veggies, greens, spring onions, shredded cabbage, kimchi, garlic, and the ever-so-popular soft-boiled egg. If you are vegan, simply leave this ingredient out – it’s the only animal product in the recipe and still delicious without it. The one thing I love about ramen is its versatility and infinitely customizable combinations to suit every season, taste, and budget. On Salt, Sodium and Finding a Balance The big bad deal with packaged ramen and its accompanying powdered broth or flavour packet is the incredibly high sodium content, some brands containing an entire days worth in just one serving! On the flip side, making your own dashi allows you to control the sodium level and provide you with balanced saltiness for overall wellbeing. Sodium is not only important to us, our survival depends on it. Its role in the human body is to work in conjunction with potassium to maintain cellular fluid levels, acid/­­alkaline balance, and keep the nerves and muscles functioning properly. Sodium plays a role in hydrochloric acid production in the stomach, and is used during the transport of amino acids from the gut to the blood. Because sodium is needed to maintain blood fluid volume, excessive sodium can result in increased blood volume and elevated blood pressure, especially if the kidneys are compromised in any way and unable to clear it efficiently. Hypertension and premenstrual problems are more frequent in people who have a high salt intake, especially when there is a relatively low level of potassium in the diet to counteract it. Virtually all whole unprocessed plant foods contain more potassium than sodium. Grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables, especially leafy greens, offer ten to several hundred times more potassium, and yet the average American is said to be deficient in potassium. Although there is no standard ratio of sodium to potassium to recommend, eating a balanced, whole foods diet (surprise!) is the best way to achieve equilibrium. So how much sodium should be eating in a day? First it needs to be established that sodium and salt are two different things. The salt we consume is in fact a combination of two ions, sodium and chloride, in percentages of roughly 40% and 60%. Most nutrition experts agree that sodium intake on a daily basis should not exceed 2 grams per day. This amount is equal to 5 grams of salt, or 1 teaspoon. Yup. Thats it. Put into those terms, its easy to see how one could overdo it...by lunch hour. To avoid excess sodium intake, limit processed foods. As I mentioned above, a little recon revealed that some instant ramen brands cover the daily sodium base in just one serving. Yikes! Sodium lurks in some very unexpected places, so be savvy and read labels. To be extra cautious avoid high-salt foods such as commercially-prepared pickles, olives, and saurkraut, canned and instant soups, processed cheese, condiments like ketchup, barbeque sauce, gravy, alfredo sauce, salad dressings, mayonnaise, soy sauce, snacks foods like chips, salted peanuts and pretzels, crackers, and boxed breakfast cereal. Remember, cooking for yourself is the only way to know exactly what you are getting in your food. There are a few things that need to be mentioned about this recipe. First, you need to start the process the night before (or the morning of) by simply soaking the dashi ingredients in water and set in the fridge. This is how you make the broth. You can hurry the process by cooking the ingredients in hot water if youre in a rush, but the results are better if you follow this slower method (plus, your fridge does all the work). I will also say that traditional dashi is delicate and mild-flavoured, unlike the instant dashi that is saltier and stronger due to the addition of artificial, chemical flavour enhancers. When you try the dashi for the first time, try not to compare it to the ramen broth youve had in the past - this is the real deal. Appreciate its clean, pure taste and it subtlety, and add tamari or miso only as needed to enhance the natural flavour. Second, you can make and enjoy the dashi bases separately if you like, or combine the two for a more complex flavour. I really like the combination of the kombu and shiitake dashi together. They both contain good amounts of umami, so united they deliver a deep, multifaceted taste experience without the meat. Third, get organic ingredients if you can. Sea vegetables and mushrooms are both like little sponges in their respective environments so finding the cleanest and highest quality you can is a good idea. Finally, purchase the most high-vibe ramen noodles you can find. The other reason I was inspired to write this recipe and post was because of all the incredibly awesome ramen Ive seen at the health food store. Made with whole grains, some of them even gluten-free, I couldnt say no! Now, you could make your own noodles if you like (this is an art I greatly admire) but in the interest of saving a smidgen of time, buy yourself some noodles and get to the ramen even faster.     Print recipe     Ramen Revisited + How to make Dashi Serves 4 (each dashi recipe below serves 2) Dashi 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water : 60g dried shiitake mushrooms (do not use fresh) 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water : 20g kombu Directions: For the kombu dashi, place .7oz /­­ 20g of kombu in 4 cups /­­ 1 liter of water overnight in the fridge. In the morning, discard the kombu, strain the remaining liquid and warm it in a pot on the stove until just barely simmering. Serve. For the shiitake dashi, remove any dirt or debris from the dried mushrooms and place in 4 cups /­­ 1 liter of water. It is important to submerge the mushrooms, so place something on top of them, such as a smaller glass lid, and set them in the fridge overnight. In the morning, remove the mushrooms, squeezing out as much liquid from them as you can. Set the mushrooms aside, strain the remaining liquid and warm it in a pot on the stove until just barely simmering. Serve. Ramen 3-4 bunches baby bok choy, quickly stir-fried in a little shallot and garlic 2 carrots, julienned 2 spring onions, sliced 2 soft-boiled or medium eggs (to suit your taste) (optional) 1 pack whole grain ramen noodles (gluten-free, if desired) To serve dried or fresh chilies tamari or miso, to taste (use discretion!) Directions: 1. Prepare all the ingredients: stir-fry the bok choy or other greens, julienne the carrots, slice the spring onions, slice the rehydrated shiitake mushrooms, soft boil the eggs. 2. Bring a pot of water to the boil. Add the noodles and cook according to the package instructions. 3. While the noodles are cooking, ladle the broth into the bowls. Add the hot noodles and all other ingredients. Take a moment to arrange the food in a pleasing way, sit, and enjoy.   *   *   *   *   *   * Hey everyone! Mybook comes out today!!! I am so ridiculously excited to see this day arrive and the book arrive in your homes and kitchens. The reviews have been so positive so far and for that, I thank you. Please note that although most stores in North America that are carrying the book should have it in stock today, some may take a few days to longer. If you want to purchase the book online, there are many retailers listed here. I would like to take this time to acknowledge the couple of misprints in the book. During the editing process the following mistakes were made: on page 21, the ghee recipe is labeled vegan. On page 241-242 buckwheat and spelt switched places so that buckwheat is in the gluten-containing section of the grains chapter, while spelt is in the gluten-free section. In other news, my Vancouver tour dates and events have been confirmed! Here is where and when you can find me in Van city (this will be my first time there, can you believe it?!). Click the links for more details and ticket information. April 15: Burdock and Co. Collaborative Dinner + Book Signing April 16: Whole Foods Cambie Cooking Demo + Book Signing April 17: Interview + Afternoon Tea with CBCs Sheryl MacKay Barbara Jos Books to Cooks Dinner Event + Book Signing Looking forward to seeing you all there! Also, check out my most recent interview over at the gorgeous site, The Coveteur.

Morel Mushroom Po’ Boys

March 9 2015 Meatless Monday 

Earthy morel mushrooms are coated in Cajun seasoning and panko breadcrumbs for a light crunch before they are cooked in a skillet. Heirloom tomato slices and butter lettuce leaves balance the morels and a tofu based garlic aioli is spread on the hoagie buns will satisfy any mayonnaise craving. This recipe comes to us from Danica of Soundly Vegan. Serves 2 For the mushroom filling: - 1 tablespoon flax seed* - 1 cup water - 1 tablespoon and 1/­­2 teaspoon low sodium Cajun Seasoning** - 10 large morel mushrooms, cut into quarters*** - 1/­­4 cup brown rice flour - 1 cup panko bread crumbs - canola oil, for preparing the skillet - salt, to taste For the garlicky tofu aoili: - 4 ounces extra firm silken tofu - 5 garlic cloves - 1/­­3 cup olive oil - 1.5 teaspoon Dijon mustard - juice of 1/­­2 lemon - non-dairy milk, to taste - salt and pepper, to taste To complete the Morel Mushroom Po’ Boys: - 1 heirloom tomato, sliced - 4 leaves butter lettuce - 2 hoagie buns *Found in health food stores or the health food section of most grocery stores. ** Low sodium Cajun seasoning is sold in most grocery stores, but if time allows try making your own. ***Morels are complexly flavored mushroom  which hit peak season in early Spring. If Morel mushrooms are not available, try substituting another flavorful mushroom like shiitakes or hen of the woods mushrooms. To prepare the morel mushroom filling: Place the flax seeds with the water in a blender and pulse until foamy. Pour into a bowl. Place the brown rice flour in a separate bowl and season with 1/­­2 teaspoon Cajun seasoning. Toss to combine. Place the panko breadcrumbs into another separate bowl and season the breadcrumbs with 1 tablespoon Cajun seasoning. Mix well. Prepare a skillet with a coating of Canola oil. Place the skillet over medium-high heat. Toss the morel mushroom quarters lightly in some brown rice flour. Shake off the excess and dredge them in the flax wash.  Allow the excess flax wash to drip off the morels before coating them with the seasoned panko bread crumbs. Place the coated mushroom quarters in the heated skillet and cook 3-4 minutes, or until browned on the bottom. Flip and cook another 3-4 minutes or until the morel mushrooms are browned on both sides. Season a sprinkling of salt and place on a bed of paper towels. Pat dry with a paper towel on top. To prepare the garlicky tofu aioli:   Add the tofu, olive oil, garlic, mustard and lemon juice to a blender. Pulse until well combined. Add the non-dairy milk until desired consistency is reached. Season with salt and pepper to taste. To complete the Morel Mushroom Po Boys: Coat each side of the hoagie with garlicky tofu aioli to taste. Save the leftover aioli in the refrigerator and use in place of mayonnaise in a future cooking project. Evenly divide the lettuces leaves and tomato slices between the two hoagie buns. Top with equal amounts of the morel mushrooms, close the hoagies and enjoy! The post Morel Mushroom Po’ Boys appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Rabri (Malai - Kerchan)

February 15 2015 Manjula's kitchen 

Rabri (Malai - Kerchan)Rabri or rabadi is a North Indian delicacy. It is served as a dessert. Rabri is a reduced milk, cooked little differently instead of creamy rubri is lumpy.  I like this dish because you can serve alone or over malpua, jalebi, gulab jamun, or waffles. There are countless combinations you can come up with. Preparation time 5 minutes Cooking time 40 minutes Recipe will serve 4. Ingredients: - 4 cups of milk - 2 tablespoons sugar - 1/­­4 teaspoon crushed cardamom - 2 teaspoon sliced almonds - 2 teaspoon sliced pistachios Method - To make rabri use wide heavy frying pan. Boil the milk over medium high heat as milk comes to boil reduce the heat to low medium. - Move the layer of foaming from boiling milk towards the rim, do the same as milk foams again. Keep doing this until milk is about 3/­­4 in volume. This should take about 30 minutes after milk first comes to boil. Note: it is important to keep the heat low otherwise milk on the rim will start burning. - After about 20 minutes of boiling milk add the sugar and cardamom, continue to boil, until it is 3/­­4 in volume. Add almonds and keep pistachios for garnishing. Turn of the heat, remove the cream from the rim and fold it into milk. - Rabri is ready, taste best when it is served chilled. But if you are serving rubric with part of other dessert use warm. Try with jalebi, gulab jamun ....... The post Rabri (Malai – Kerchan) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated Beans

April 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated BeansFagor recently sent me their 6 quart pressure cooker, and I was very excited since I’ve never had one before and knew that it would be a very practical addition to my kitchen. Aside from stews, soups, and rich veggie broth, I was especially thrilled about the prospect of perfect home-cooked beans. I’d heard that cooking beans in a pressure cooker makes them amazingly creamy, yet firm and intact, on top of significantly speeding up the cooking process. As an example, soaked kidney beans only take 5 minutes of active cooking time in the pressure cooker. Crazy stuff! All the rumors turned out to be true – my pressure cooker beans have been coming out amazingly buttery. The reason I’m so excited about a more efficient way to cook beans is that I really dislike buying canned ones. I’ll do it in case of an emergency, but it’s really not my favorite way to go. Firstly, canned beans never taste as good as my homemade ones, since I usually include some aromatics like peppercorns, garlic and bay leaf in the cooking water. Canned beans also seem to be harder on my digestion, since I take time to soak and rinse my beans, as well as cook them with kombu (more on that below), while most companies don’t. Maybe I’m just sensitive, but that’s a big factor as well. Plus, dried beans are more affordable than canned ones, and that’s always a great bonus. Today I’m sharing a few useful things I’ve learned about cooking my own beans after years of practice, as well as my favorite recipe for simple marinated beans. I like to make those on a Sunday and spoon them into meals throughout the week. Even if you don’t have a pressure cooker, there are still plenty of great tips and tricks that you might find helpful below. Have a great Sunday :) Soak I always soak dried beans before cooking them. I know, it seems like an annoying practice that doesn’t allow for any spontaneity in the kitchen, but it’s also really easy to make a habit out of it. Soaking reduces the cooking time, as well as helps eliminate the phytic acid (antinutrient) in beans and activates the germination process, making the beans easier to digest/­­more nutritious. To help break down phytic acid, especially during shorter soaking times, add a splash of acidic liquid, such as lemon juice, vinegar or even a few pinches of salt to your soaking water. Cover your beans with plenty of water and leave room in the bowl, since the beans will grow quite a bit as they take on the water. Once done soaking, rinse and drain the beans really well to wash off all of that unwanted stuff. I like to soak my beans overnight. I’ve gotten into the habit of asking myself if there’s anything that needs to be soaked before I go to bed, and sometimes I’ll just soak a cup of some bean/­­lentil/­­grain without even knowing what I’ll do with it the next day. If you happen to soak some beans and don’t have the time to cook them the next day, just change the water, cover, and put them in the fridge until ready to cook. Batch Cook & Freeze The trick that does allow for spontaneity when using home-cooked beans is batch cooking and freezing them for future use. Cook a whole pound of beans at a time and freeze them in 1 1/­­2 cup batches (equal to around a 16 oz can), and you’ve got a foundation for so many meals right in your freezer. It feels really good! You can freeze the beans in glass containers or zip lock bags for anywhere from 6 months to a whole year (labeling with a date is a good idea in these cases). A good tip I learned for preventing freezer burn is to cover the beans with their cooking liquid, then freeze. Add Aromatics & Kombu Another great thing about cooking beans at home is that you can flavor the cooking water any way you want. That will make the beans taste better, as well as provide you with a whole batch of broth, which you can use in place vegetable broth in any recipe. I pretty much never throw away the cooking water, and usually end up freezing it for future use. That way, I almost never have to buy boxed broth. The aromatics I personally like to add to the cooking water are bay leaf, black peppercorns and garlic. Some people add onions, carrots and herbs – the possibilities are endless. Another important addition to bean cooking liquid is kombu, which is a mineral-rich seaweed. Kombu yields all of its beneficial minerals to the beans and the water, as well as helps tenderize the beans and make them easier to digest – a life-changing tip I learned from Amy Chaplin. Pressure Cooking One quirk of pressure cooking is not being able to check the food for doneness while it’s cooking, since the pot cannot be opened while there’s pressure built up inside. It’s helpful to know how long your ingredient will take to cook ahead of time, and time the cooking process accordingly. Thankfully, there is this very helpful chart that tells you suggested cooking times for most common types of beans. I love that it has cook times for both soaked and unsoaked beans, since those vary pretty significantly, and I’ve found them to be very accurate. Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans   Print Serves: around 3 cups Ingredients 1 cup dried beans of your choice - soaked overnight in purified water w/­­ a splash of vinegar, lemon juice or salt 2 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife 2 bay leaves 1 piece kombu 1 teaspoon black peppercorns sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the beans very well. In a pressure cooker, combine the beans, garlic, bay leaves, kombu, peppercorns and plenty of salt. Cover the beans with plenty of water, water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Remember that when cooking beans, you cannot fill up the pressure cooker any more than half way, since the foam from the beans might clog up the pressure release valve if there is too much water. Close the pressure cooker lid, set the pressure to high (15PSI) and turn up the heat to high. Wait until the pressure indicator shows that the pressure has been built up and turn the heat down to low. This is when your cooking time starts. Refer to this chart to determine the cook time for your beans and cook accordingly. Once the time is up, turn off the heat and let the pressure release naturally, which will take around 10 minutes. Open the pressure cooker, drain the beans, preserving the cooking liquid to use as broth or as freezing liquid. Discard the bay leaf, peppercorns and kombu. Enjoy the beans :) 3.5.3226   Quick Marinated Beans   Print Serves: 3 cups Ingredients 3 cups mixed cooked beans (I used baby Lima and kidney) handful of parsley - chopped handful of chives - sliced 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar juice of 1 lemon sea salt - to taste freshly ground black pepper - to taste Instructions In a bowl, combine the beans with parsley and chives and give everything a stir. Add the olive oil, vinegar, lemon juice, salt and pepper, and mix thoroughly. Taste for salt and pepper, adjust if needed. Store the beans in the refrigerator, in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. The flavors will develop further as the beans marinate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Garden Juice Fruit and Root Salad Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl Avocado Truffles .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans + Quick Marinated Beans appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Easy Vegan Eggnog Recipe

December 23 2016 Vegan Richa 

Easy Vegan Eggnog RecipeEasy Vegan Eggnog Recipe with eggy chickpea flour custard , almond milk, nutmeg, cloves and cinnamon. Homemade Nog. Make Golden Eggnog with Turmeric or add Cardamom for Chai spice. Vegan Holiday Drink Recipe Vegan Nog is easy to find these days with so many brands coming out with vegan options. If you want to make some from scratch, this is an amazing version for you. Add spices to preference, add liquor or not and make this holiday drink. Honestly, I don’t think I ever actually liked eggnog in my pregan days. Those days feel so far away that I cannot remember why I didn’t like eggnog. But this vegan version has me hooked. This Vegan Eggnog is all creamy and foamy with no eggs. Chickpea flour (or use regular flour) is cooked up into a thick custard, that is blended into non dairy milk and spices. I like this chilled when using almond milk since some almond milk brands dont do well with boiling. For a hot version use soy milk or other non dairy milk. Fold in some whipped aquafaba for more foamy texture.  If you make this, do leave me a comment here on the post or tag me on Instagram. Continue reading: Easy Vegan Eggnog RecipeThe post Easy Vegan Eggnog Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts and How to Make Ghee at Home

December 2 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts and How to Make Ghee at Home I’ve recently been putting more emphasis on having plenty of good fats in my diet. Hormonal balance, healthy brain function, energy, and yes, weight regulation are all associated with a regular intake of healthy fats (together with a diet mindful of sugar), and that’s enough reasons to get me to be a bit more attentive to my fat consumption. Virgin coconut oil is on high rotation in my kitchen, so I’m covered there, but I’ve recently been adding more variety to my fats by mindfully incorporating things like avocado, flax/­­other seeds and nuts, and ghee into everyday meals. I just got back into making my own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein) at home. It’s such an easy and gratifying process, and I thought I would share my method here, since I’ve heard some people describe ghee-making as intimidating. It is not! It does take some time, but my double-boiler recipe does not require too much babysitting – the magic mostly happens on its own. Since gift season is fast approaching and I like to cook my gifts, I’ve been brainstorming edible presents I’ll make this year. The idea for compound ghee came up. Chances are, you’ve heard of compound butter, which is butter mixed with other flavorful ingredients like herbs, spices, dried fruit and more, and used as an extra-flavorful agent in cooking. I applied this flavoring idea to ghee and whipped it with miso and dates, to mind-blowingly delicious results. In Ayurvedic tradition, ghee is regarded as a highly medicinal food (anti-inflammatory, immune-boosting and a digestive aid), and what better thing to give your loved ones than a jar of health-promoting ghee that also tastes amazing and can be used to enhance so many foods in their kitchens – anything from toast to veggies. And of course, the flavor possibilities for compound ghee are endless, next on my list is a roasted garlic and herb one. It’s going to get wild. This easy, festive brussels sprout dish is one idea for utilizing the miso-date ghee. To me, well-roasted brussels sprouts often resemble popcorn in flavor, so a slather of buttery, sweet and salty ghee seems like a very logical finishing touch. Serve it as a side dish on your holiday table and don’t forget to offer your guests a dish of extra miso-date ghee for dipping, they will appreciate your generosity very much ;) Miso-Date Ghee   Print Serves: 3¼ cups ghee, 1 cup miso-date ghee Ingredients for the ghee 2 pounds (8 sticks/­­908g) unsalted butter, preferably grass-fed (I use Kerrygold) for the miso-date ghee 1 cup ghee 1 tablespoon sweet white miso 3-4 dates Instructions to make the ghee Cut the butter into large chunks. Place into a medium-sized heatproof pan/­­bowl that is approximately twice as large as the volume of the butter. Prepare a large, heavy-bottomed pot or saucepan that can fit the bowl of butter within to make a double boiler. Half-fill the large pot with water and place the bowl with butter inside. Make sure the bowl is stable and not floating and the water in the pot is somewhat level with the butter. Bring the water to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and simmer for about two hours or longer, until the upper foamy layer of the butter turns golden in color. Keep an eye on the water level in the pot and add more hot water as needed. The butter will melt and separate into three layers - foam on top, clear golden ghee in the middle, and white milk solids on the bottom (some might float atop). Remove bowl with butter from the heat and let cool slightly. Skim the foam off the top with a slotted spoon and discard. Prepare a cheesecloth-lined, fine-mesh strainer and strain the ghee into a clean jar, pouring carefully and trying to keep the milk solids at the bottom from sliding into the strainer. If you see that a lot of the white solids got into the jar through the strainer, strain one more time. The finished product should be clear and golden in color. Ghee does not have to be refrigerated, but you can refrigerate it if you prefer. The ghee will solidify a bit at room temperature and harden in the fridge. It stays fresh for months. to make the miso-date ghee Use soft, room temperature ghee. Combine all ingredients in a blender until smooth. If you prefer to have some larger date chunks in your ghee, reserve one date and add it in once the ghee has been whipped smooth, pulsing once or twice to break the date up into chunks. Distribute the miso-date ghee between small gift jars or place into one jar and keep refrigerated. 3.5.3208 Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts   Print Serves: 4 as a side Ingredients 3-4 cups brussels sprouts - outer damaged leaves removed, halved sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon plain ghee or neutral coconut oil - soft 3-4 teaspoons miso-date ghee at room temperature (from above), plus more for serving ¼ cup pecans - toasted and crushed Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Place brussels sprouts onto a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Add salt, freshly ground black pepper and plain ghee/­­coconut oil, mix thoroughly. Place in the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes, depending on the size of your brussels sprouts, until baked throughout and charred in places. Let cool slightly. Place the still warm brussels sprouts into a bowl and add the miso-date ghee, mixing thoroughly. Taste and add more if needed. Add toasted pecans and mix. Place onto a serving plate and serve with more miso-date ghee for dipping. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Zucchini Blossoms with Roasted Eggplant Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange Miso Glaze & A New Cookbook! Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Vegan Cheese Plate .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts and How to Make Ghee at Home appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Icelandic Coffee Wreath (because it's time for a little less talking and a little more baking)

November 17 2015 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Icelandic Coffee Wreath (because it's time for a little less talking and a little more baking) I have a great need to be in the kitchen. Baking calms me. It makes getting through the news, the oncoming winter and the holidays bearable. I have to keep busy. Following recipes and pinching and folding dough as in this recipe--it's like meditation. Yesterday I baked cookies. Last week, it was this coffee cake. People can be cruel, life can be dreadfully challenging, heartbreaking and sad, but coping by baking--I don't know why, it seems like the right thing to do now. It won't cure the ills of society, but it fills my soul and gives me perspective on life and simply getting through one day at a time, sharing food to show love--this works for me. You can mix the dough for this pastry in about five minutes before you go to bed. The next morning, you'll need about ten minutes to pull the dough from the fridge, combine the filling and roll the wreath. Let it proof for about 45 minutes while the oven preheats and viola: coffee cake. There is literally nothing in the world I love more with my espresso in the morning than this. I have to keep my paws off it all day long while it sits under the cake keeper on the kitchen counter mocking me. This confection always impresses the husband.  (Let's be honest, it'll impress anyone.) The aroma of almond, citrus with cinnamon and nutmeg lingers in the house for about two days after it's been baked.  Our home smells like early winter mornings when we have this on hand, and I love it.   I have a precious baking book I bought several years ago and around this time each year it comes off the shelf and plays a prominent role in all things "baking", it's called: The Great Scandinavian Baking Book by Beatrice Ojakangas. There are no colorful photos in it--only sketches of baked goodies, so be prepared to have to READ. (I know, such a terrible way to have to bake, to actually have to READ.) Please don't get me started.  Dough removed from fridge in the morning, shaped into a rectangle with your hands. Filling in food processor ready to be blitzed, along with some flax/­­water mixture.  I put the dough right in the fridge after it's mixed in the the stand mixer bowl and cover it with plastic wrap.  No one wants to do dishes at ten o'clock at night. Filling with added raisins, orange zest and chopped pecans sprinkled over the dough. Rolling the dough. Wreath proofing. Coffee ring proofed and then sliced around with scissors to create a "wreath". This cake spent five days on the counter under the cake keeper here.  DH and I shared a slice of it every morning.  I heat a small sliver of it in the microwave for about fifteen seconds. Perfect every time. Maybe I've blogged about this before. No matter.  With things in the world being what they are, I find foods like this to be exactly what I need.  Vegan Icelandic Coffee Wreath *adapted from The Great Scandinavian Baking Book 2 cups unbleached all purpose flour 1 cup spelt flour 1/­­3 cup sugar 1/­­3 cup almond milk with 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon ground flax mixed with 2 tablespoons water 4 tablespoons Earth Balance butter, cut into 1/­­4" pieces 1/­­2 cup warm water 3 teaspoons dry active yeast Filling 1 package almond paste (cut into chunks) 1 teaspoon ground flax mixed with 2 tablespoons water 2 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/­­2 cup raisins 1/­­3 cup chopped pecans zest of one orange *powdered sugar for dusting The night before you plan to bake the wreath, prepare the dough. In the bowl of a stand mixer add the water and yeast and allow yeast to dissolve and begin to foam (takes about five minutes). Next, add the sugar, flax mixture, almond milk and butter, then mix in the flour in three separate additions--stopping after each addition to make sure the flour has been incorporated. Then turn the mixer on medium speed and mix the dough for about 3-5 minutes, until it comes together and forms a smooth ball. (If you find the dough either too wet or too dry, add flour or a tablespoon of almond milk to adjust.) Place dough in fridge, covered with plastic wrap overnight. The next morning remove dough from fridge and prepare the filling. Place all filling ingredients in food processor and pulse carefully until the mixture is crumbly. Lightly dust your counter and remove the dough from the bowl and flatten to a rectangle about 16-20 inches across and about 8 inches in width. The dough will be about 1/­­4" thick. Sprinkle filling over dough to within an inch of the borders. Roll up from the bottom (the long way) and pinch the dough closed. Carefully bring the dough ends together to form a ring. Place on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. Sprinkle flour over the ring and place in a warm place and allow dough to proof (or get puffy) for about 45 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400 degrees. After the dough has risen, clip around the wreath every few inches. Bake for 25-30 minutes or until the dough begins to turn golden. Allow to cool for about 15 minutes before slicing. Just before you slice it, sprinkle with powdered sugar. Store in a cake keeper at room temperature for about three days.  

Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte

July 20 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Lavender Milkshake and Chamomile Latte Cooking with edible flowers has been one of my greatest pleasures in the kitchen. Floral infusions provide amazing flavor and can add beneficial, healing properties to any dish or drink. My favorite was the Rose Ice Cream and Rose Petal Mille Feuille I made a few years ago with organic rose petals and the purest essential rose oil from my perfume maker friend. The oil was so concentrated that a tiny drop turned a portion of ice cream into a magical bowl of aromatherapy. Here are two refreshing drinks we’ve been enjoying this summer, featuring some of the most loved, calming culinary flowers – lavender and chamomile. Chamomile is an amazing little flower, and its oils are anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal and antiallergenic. It has long been used as a sleep aid all over the world. Having a cup of chamomile tea before bed has become one of my daily rituals – it really does the job of getting me ready for some wholesome rest. Lately, I’ve been loving this creamy chamomile latte. My favorite way to enjoy it this summer is cold, but it also makes for a comforting warm drink for the cooler parts of the year. Lavender, with its own share of antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties, is king of the aromatherapy world – even the smallest whiff sends a relaxation signal to the mind. This milkshake combines lavender and blueberries, as the two are a match made in heaven. Drink it as a refreshing mid-afternoon snack after some time in the sun or even as dessert after dinner. The most important variable when cooking with dried edible flowers is their freshness. If a flower is freshly dried, a little of it will go a long way, while older dried flowers have likely lost their potency. It’s also important to remember that the best way to extract the beneficial oils from herbs such as chamomile and lavender is gently heating them in a double boiler for longer periods of time. Directly pouring boiling water over the herbs is a harsher method, which kills off many of their benefits. We are off to Sochi for the last stretch of our Russian vacation. Black Sea, here we come. Chamomile Latte serves 2 1 1/­­2 cups water 4 tablespoons dried German chamomile flowers – make sure to get them from a store with a good rotation 1/­­2 cup almond milk (I like homemade unsweetened) honey to taste – optional Combine water with chamomile in a small, heatproof bowl. Place the bowl into a heavy bottomed pot or pan. Add water to the pan, making sure that water level in the pan is lower than the bowl. Bring water in the pan to a simmer and simmer for 15 minutes. Let cool enough for safe handling. Strain chamomile tea, mix with almond milk and honey, if using. For an extra creamy and foamy consistency, blend the tea and almond milk in a blender. Drink warm or chilled in the fridge. I like it best cold and unsweetened. Lavender Milkshake serves 2 1 1/­­2 cups almond milk or other plant milk (I like homemade unsweetened almond milk) 1 tablespoon edible dried lavender flowers (make sure to get them from a store with a good rotation – flowers should be lavender, rather then grey in color, with a fresh, strong aroma) 6-8 scoops of your favorite vanilla, blueberry or lavender ice-cream handful of fresh or frozen blueberries – optional, for color handful of ice cubes – optional, for smoother texture splash of maple syrup – optional, to taste seeds of 1 vanilla bean or splash of vanilla extract – optional Combine almond milk and lavender flowers in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat, cover and let cool. Strain and chill in the refrigerator. Combine lavender milk and the rest of ingredients in a blender and blend to a smooth and thick milkshake consistency. If your lavender flowers are very fresh and aromatic, you can skip the infusion step and simply blend almond milk, 1/­­2 tablespoon (or to taste) lavender and blueberries, in a high speed blender until completely smooth. Then add the rest of ingredients and blend to a smooth and thick milkshake consistency.  

Rhubarb is the New Strawberry {Rhubarb Ice Cream}

June 9 2015 seitan is my motor 

Rhubarb is the New Strawberry {Rhubarb Ice Cream} Last year, when my father visited us in Dresden, he brought a box of strawberries from a grocery store around the corner. “Those aren’t good. You should not buy them,” I said. He tasted a berry and replied that they weren’t too bad. “But they are terrible compared to those we can get at home in our village!” I guess ten kilograms of childhood memories came out with that sentence. When we were children my dad would buy fresh strawberries on Sundays. Sometimes we helped him wash and slice them, sometimes he would even let us whip the cream. Nothing was better than those fresh strawberries. We ate them straight from the plant if we got the chance. For example during our bike rides, when we picked some at the edge of a field. Or when we emptied the patches in our neighbour’s garden. All these memories came back when I told my father that the strawberries here in the city weren’t good. He disagreed. He told me that the fruits back home weren’t that much better anymore. He even thought they were worse. I didn’t believe a word of what he said. That simply couldn’t be true. During this years Pentecost vacation F and I made a trip to my parents’ place. My father picked us up from the main station in Bremen. On our car ride to my parents’ village, we drove by several strawberry fields. I got exited and mentioned something about eating them for breakfast every day. My father said I should probably find something else to eat. They had changed the breed a couple of years ago, he elaborated. Those berries weren’t worth the trouble anymore. Yes, they kept well but most of the flavour was gone. Why would he say that? Some weird berry conspiracy theory? Did he not remember how we all loved to eat strawberries together? That he always would pick them up for us? The next day F and I prepared lunch. Suddenly my father stepped into the kitchen with a box of strawberries in his hand. I smiled. I told F that this would make such a wonderful dessert. Then I looked at the strawberries. They looked vary pale. I  asked my father, “Why did you bring these? Were the good ones sold out?” “No,” he replied. “They do all look like that now. I thought that if you tasted them you would finally believe me.” I was still in denial. I gave one to my daughter. “Taste it! The best strawberries you can get.” She tasted and then looked at me disgusted. I said: “But those are good.” It wasn’t true. I didn’t believe what I just said. I think I just wanted to share an important childhood memory with my daughter. But there was nothing to share. I was disappointed and those strawberries were just pale, sour, and watery. Okay, okay. Maybe this is all in my head. Maybe I am turning into one of these “everything was better in the old days” person now. Or maybe it was just the beginning of the season and I need to give those strawberries some more time to grow. There are other childhood memories to share or to improve. Like my relationship with rhubarb. This vegetable/­­fruit was something I mostly ignored when I was a kid. At least when it came to baked goods.  Our neighbours made tons of rhubarb cakes and many grown ups tried to trick me into liking it. They pretended it was great in desserts. They pretended it was sweet. But it wasn’t. There was never enough sugar in those cakes and a kilogram of whipped cream could not change that. Back then I thought those neighours wanted us to give up our sweet tooth. But that wasn’t true. Nobody tricked us. Rhubarb was something we did not appreciate very much.  We spent our afternoons stuffing our face with strawberries instead. Now that those strawberries are disenchanted I can finally appreciate the tartness of rhubarb. It’s now my daughter who refuses to eat it. But you can make very sugary things from rhubarb, too. Sugar can be used as a preservative, for example in jams. Or syrups.They are very simple to make and they can be kept in the fridge for 1 or 2 weeks. I made a batch for my ice cream recipe, but it’s also a base for refreshing lemonade. (Simply dillute it with (sparkling) water.) If you want something tarter, rhubarb compote is a great choice, depending on how much sugar you add. For my ice cream I didn’t use too much sugar, but if you want to pair the compote with oatmeal or grießpudding, you can double the amount of sugar used. Just adjust it to your taste. There are a couple of wonderful methods to make vegan ice cream, but I like to try something new from time to time. I admit it’s definitely not the easiest and fastest method to make ice cream. But I’ll also talk about a couple of  shortcuts in a minute. This version calls for whipped chickpea brine (called aquafaba), which improves the texture a lot and makes the ice cream light and easy to scoop. In fact, even after over a week in the freezer, this batch still had a consistency similar to soft serve. Since we’re  without an ice cream machine rightn now, I used my blender method for this recipe. That is a bit involved, but it will produce similar results to ice cream from a machine. If you thing this all sounds to complicated, I have a couple of ideas for you: You can leave out the aquafaba and make this into a “regular” coconut based ice cream. You can also use an ice cream machine, if you have one. If you wanto to use a machine and include the whipped aquafaba, churn the coconut milk and syrup mixture  and fold in the whipped chickpea liquid once the machine is done. Then proceed to freeze it, add the compote, and freeze until solid. If you don’t have an ice cream machine or a blender, make a simple semifreddo by combining the coconut milk and syrup mixture and the compote. Pour it into a container and freeze it until solid. Instead of scooping it out, you can slice it for serving. Another tip is to split up the workload and prepare both the syrup and the compote a day in advance. Print Rhubarb Ice Cream Ingredientsrhubarb syrup recipe only very slightly adapted from this recipe - For the syrup 500 g (4 cups) sliced rhubarb 240 ml (2 cups) water 250 g (1 1/­­4 cups) sugar juice from 1/­­2 lemon vanilla seeds scraped from 1 bean For the compote 200 g (1 2/­­3 cups) sliced rhubarb 100 g (1/­­2 cup) sugar For the ice cream 1 400 ml can full-fat coconut milk 2 tablespoons melted coconut oil or canola oil 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar 240 ml (1 cup) rhubarb syrup (see above) 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) brine from a can of chickpeas 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar a splash of lemon juice 1/­­2 a batch of rhubarb compote (see above) InstructionsTo make the syrup, combine sliced rhubarb and water in a small pot. Bring to a boil and cook until the rhubarb falls apart, about 5-10 minutes. Strain the liquid through a fine sieve and pour back into the (cleaned!) pot. (Discard the rhubarb pulp left in the sieve.) Add sugar, lemon juice, and vanilla. Boil for 10 minutes and make sure the mixture doesnt boil over. Let cool and pour into a sterilized jar. (Store leftovers in the fridge for up to two weeks.) To make the compote, combine rhubarb and sugar in a small pot and bring to a boil. Cook until the rhubarb falls apart. Set aside and let cool completely. To make the ice cream, combine coconut milk, oil, and sugar in a bowl and whisk. Add syrup and whisk again. Transfer to a shallow container such as a brownie pan and place in the freezer. Freeze for 2-3 hours, or until mostly solid. Once the coconut milk mixture is frozen, combine the chickpea brine and the remaining sugar. Whip the mixture with a hand held mixer or in a stand mixer until very stiff. This may take up to 10 minutes. You can add a splash of lemon juice to speed up the process. Cut the frozen coconut milk mixture into smaller pieces and transfer to a high speed blender. Blend until it has the consistency of soft serve. Pour into the chickpea fluff and fold the fluff into the coconut mixture until everything is smooth. Make sure to do this slowly and carefully. You dont want the chickpea foam to collapse too much. Pour into a container and freeze for another 2-3 hours. Fold in the rhubarb compote and freeze until solid. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­06/­­vegan-rhubarb-ice-cream/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com Rhubarb is the New Strawberry {Rhubarb Ice Cream} is a post from: seitan is my motor

Good Old-Fashioned French Toast Stuffed with Strawberries and Sweet Soy Cream

April 23 2015 Vegetarian Times 

1 | To make Sweet Soy Cream: Place soymilk in blender or food processor. With machine running, drizzle in oil very slowly until thoroughly blended with soymilk. Blend 1 minute more, or until mixture has consistency of heavy cream. Transfer to bowl, and stir in lemon juice. Flavor with agave nectar and vanilla and cinnamon (if using). Transfer to jar, and refrigerate until ready to use. (Recipe makes 3 cups; extra will keep one week.) 2 | To make Egg Foam: Whisk egg replacer with 1 cup water in metal bowl. Place bowl on burner over medium-high heat, and whisk 1 to 2 minutes, or until foam has fluffed to 11/­­2 times original size and reaches 100°F on instant-read thermometer. 3 | To make French Toast: Whisk together soymilk and vinegar in medium bowl. Whisk in Egg Foam, vanilla, agave nectar, and cinnamon, then whisk in oil. 4 | Coat large skillet with cooking spray, and heat over medium-high heat. Halve bread slices nearly to bottom, leaving attached at crust like spine of open book. Dip each piece of bread in soymilk mixture 30 seconds per side, then place in skillet. Cook 8 to 10 minutes, flipping once, or until French Toast is browned and crisp on both sides. 5 | To serve: Spoon 1/­­4 cup strawberries on bottom half of each French Toast slice. Fold top over, top with 2-Tbs. dollop of Sweet Soy Cream, then drizzle with sorghum syrup.

Black Sesame Cappuccino

April 1 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Black Sesame Cappuccino I don’t mean to offend those who are passionate about their coffee by naming this drink cappuccino, but I can justify. The rich, foamy texture and deep flavor of this black sesame tea reminded me so much of all of cappuccino’s finest qualities, that I couldn’t resist giving it this name. I generally don’t drink coffee, but that changes as soon as I find myself on the other side of the Atlantic, where vacation mode and the magic of the European lifestyle make coffee into a very pleasant necessity for me. Otherwise, it’s always tea. Out of the caffeinated teas, good quality black, loose leaf tea is my drink of choice. In my latest attempt to take a break from caffeine, I came across the possibility of using black sesame seeds and dates in a hot, tea-like drink. Chinese black sesame tea has long been known for its therapeutic properties. It is especially believed to nurture and restore hair strength, and is generally a great, calming whole body tonic, thanks to the overwhelming amount of nutrients in black sesame seeds. When I made my version of black sesame seed tea for the first time, I couldn’t believe its rich taste and velvety texture. It really hit the spot and I’ve been drinking it in the morning for the past couple of weeks, not missing caffeine very much. Sesame seeds contain lots of lecithin, which, aside from helping keep your arteries flexible, accounts for the silky, creamy texture of this tea. In the absence of black sesame seeds, I’ve substituted with unhulled tan sesame seeds, which worked great as well. I’ve included a recipe for another sesame drink I discovered while making my cappuccino. The taste of this milk reminds me of halva, one of my favorite childhood treats. This one is quick to prepare and quite satisfying in its own way. Black Sesame Cappuccino 1 cup black sesame seeds 2 soft dates – pitted 3 cups water 1 cup homemade almond milk or almond-sesame milk (see recipe below) 1. Combine sesame seeds, dates and water in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil, adjust heat to a strong simmer and cook for 30 minutes, partially covered. The water volume should reduce by about 1/­­3. Towards the end, mash dates against the sides of the pan with a spoon, letting them further release their sweetness. Strain the liquid and collect black sesame seeds in a large strainer. 2. Pour the strained liquid back into the saucepan, add one cup of almond or almond-sesame milk and reheat gently. Add sweetener of choice, if needed (I find the subtle sweetness from dates to be enough). Optionally blend at high speed to make it foamy. Enjoy hot. Note: Optionally, you can dry the leftover black sesame seeds for future use. To do that, spread them on a baking sheet and keep them in the oven at the lowest temperature for a couple of hours. When almost completely dried, turn off the oven and leave the seeds in until the oven is cold. Halva Milk 2 cups homemade almond-sesame milk (see recipe below) – warmed if desired 2 tablespoons toasted black sesame seeds – ground in a coffee grinder any preferred sweetener – to taste. Combine all the ingredients in a blender until well combined and frothy. Enjoy hot or cold. Almond Sesame Milk 1 cup almonds 1/­­4 cup unhulled sesame seeds Soak almonds and sesame seeds in purified water overnight. Drain by catching the seeds in a fine-mesh strainer, rinse under cold water. Combine nuts and seeds in a strong blender with 4 cups of purified water. Blend until smooth. Strain through a nut bag or cheese cloth. Keep refrigerated for up to 3 days.

Vegan Marshmallow Fluff from Chickpeas!

March 15 2015 seitan is my motor 

Vegan Marshmallow Fluff from Chickpeas!Vegan cuisine is very innovative. Sure, some people might say that if you try to recreate a vegan version of every animal product based food there is, that is not innovative. But it is, because so many people come up with the most mind blowing techniques or very unexpected ingredients to create these “fake” foods. And we must admit that they are often so much more amazing than the “real” thing. Last year a blogger posted a way to make a vegan version of beaten egg whites that works perfectly for all kinds of meringues. And the most fascinating thing is, they used brine from a can of beans or hearts of palm as a base for their recipe. And if you think about it, it makes sense. During the cooking process beans release starches and proteins. These compounds form a stiff and stable foam that rises to the top of the cooking liquid. The brine has starches and proteins, too. If you combine this liquid with sugar, the two ingredients act exactly like and egg white sugar mixture: The protein is turned into a foam and the sugar traps and stabilises the air bubbles. This is the easiest and most widely available method to make vegan egg white foams and it has been all over the internet for the last couple of weeks. Somebody already came up with a recipe for macarons and meringues have been popping up, too. People are very exited about this invention and trying it out like crazy. It’s amazing how innovative, adventurous and creative people have been over the last few weeks. I hopped on this train quite late, I saw a picture on instagram and then a link here and there. I didn’t do much research exept for reading that French blog post and I have been experimenting for two days now. I came up with my own versions of meringues and macarons and I plan to share them soon. (I posted a preliminary recipe for the macarons on facebook, but it’s not perfect yet.) But since both recipes are a bit tricky, let’s start with something foolproof here, that will totally win you over: marshmallow fluff made from chickpea brine. And no, it doesn’t taste like beans once you have whipped it up with sugar and vanilla. The picture above shows a basic foam, made from chickpea brine drained from a can and and powdered sugar only. I made a first attempt at meringues with this and it didn’t work out because the foam was too runny to pipe. Only later I learned that you just need to whip longer. I whipped for about 2 minutes when 10 would have been more appropriate. But impatience is sometimes a good thing. The blogger behind révolution végétale mentions two ingredients that will help stabilise your foam: guar gum and cream of tartar. Cream of tartar is often used in angel food cake and in meringue preparations. It helps to give more volume to regular egg white foams. Guar gum is a binder. Like xanthan gum it is often used in gluten free baking. You can also add it to ice creams to make them smoother. If you’ve ever worked with guar or xanthan gum you know that if you add too much, it will turn our slimy and gum like. For this recipe, the gum like texture is perfect as the gum will speed up the whipping process and change the texture of your foam greatly once the sugar is added. It changes from soft peaks to stiff peaks in a minute or so. Note that you cannot substitute cornstarch, agar agar, or tapioca starch here. Those have to be heated to swell and bind, while guar gum will swell once it’s combined with a liquid. Cornstarch or agar agar will do nothing to change the texture of your foam at this point. This bean fluff has a very firm but sticky consistency, just like melted marshmallows or marshmallow creme. The only downside:  It will probably creep up your beaters and stick to the mixer. It’s ean with a wet cloth, so I personally didn’t worry about it. Use  for ‘Smore pies, as a cookie filling or try some rice crispy treats. I used it as a base for my meringues, so stay tuned! If you are looking for a more delicate version you can put on top of pies, I suggest to leave out the guar gum and simply whip your foam until you have reached the desired consistency. Print Vegan Marshmallow Fluff Use this marshmallow fluff for Smore pies or as a cookie filling. Its also the base for my upcoming vegan meringue recipe, so stay tuned! Ingredients120 ml (1/­­2 cup) chickpea brine, drained from a can of chickpeas 1/­­2 tsp guar gum 1/­­8 tsp cream of tartar 50 g (1/­­2 cup) powdered sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla InstructionsCombine brine, guar gum, and cream of tartar in a large bowl. Beat with a handheld mixer for two minutes, until the mixture resembles lightly beaten egg whites. (See first picture) Add powdered sugar and vanilla and beat on high for five minutes, until the mixture is stiff and sticky. Transfer to a jar. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­03/­­vegan-marshmallow-fluff-from-chickpeas/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com Vegan Marshmallow Fluff from Chickpeas! is a post from: seitan is my motor

Quick Teff Cr?pes

February 19 2015 VegKitchen 

Although these cr?pes dont have quite the same texture or pronounced sourness typical of teff injera, they make a good stand-in on days when you want Ethiopian food quickly and dont have time for the fermentation process or access to commercial injera. They have a slightly spongy-stretchy texture, with a small bit of tang from the yogurt and vinegar, and work well for scooping up sauces and stews. Recipe and photo from Teff Love: Adventures in Vegan Ethiopian Cooking by Kittee Berns (C) 2015, Book Publishing Company, reprinted by permission. For complete how-to on making authentic Ethiopian injera (the spongy moist flatbread shown in the photo, refer to the aforementioned book! Makes 14 (6-inch) cr?pes - 1 cup teff flour, any variety -  1/­­2 cup chickpea flour -  1/­­2 teaspoon baking soda -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 2 cups carbonated water -  2/­­3 cup unsweetened plain vegan yogurt - 6 tablespoons apple cider vinegar Preheat a nonstick skillet (see cooking tip) over medium heat. Put the teff flour, chickpea flour, baking soda, and salt in a medium bowl and whisk vigorously to combine and to beat out any lumps in the chickpea flour. Add the carbonated water and vegan yogurt and whisk well to combine. When the griddle is hot, whisk in the vinegar to combine. The batter will rise and foam, and the consistency will be thin and reminiscent of chocolate milk. Form each cr?pe by using a 1/­­3 cup measure to scoop the batter from the bottom of the bowl and pour it into a disk on the hot pan. Use a spoon to quickly and lightly smooth the batter into a 6-inch disk, starting in the center and working in concentric circles until you reach the edges (keep the center of the cr?pe the thickest and the edges the thinnest; the cr?pe should be between 1/­­8 and 1/­­4 inch thick). Cover and cook for 1 minute. The cr?pe should be dry on the top with a smattering of little holes over its surface. Uncover and continue to cook the cr?pe without turning it for 1 to 1 1/­­2 minutes. The total cooking time for each cr?pe should be 2 to 2 1/­­2 minutes. When fully cooked, the cr?pe should be dry on top with a few air-bubble holes, and the bottom should be firm, smooth, and lightly browned. Depending on your cookware and stove, youll need to adjust the heat to achieve this result. Use a flat, flexible spatula to loosen and release the cr?pe, and then quickly transfer it to a plate and cover with a clean, dry tea towel. Repeat the cooking process until all the batter has been used. As the cr?pes are made, stack them on top of each other and keep them covered with the towel so they dont dry out. As they cool, the cr?pes will develop a spongy-stretchy texture. Let them rest until theyre room temperature, then wrap the stack loosely in a clean, dry tea towel and seal it in a ziplock bag until serving time. Be sure the cr?pes are completely cool or the bag will collect moisture and theyll spoil. If you notice any condensation, open the bag to air it out. Cooking Tips: For the best success, I recommend cooking these cr?pes on a flat, anodized griddle or pan. If you find the cr?pes are sticking as they cook, mist the pan with a small amount of oil. Keep in mind, just as with traditional teff injera, the first one cooked is usually a throwaway or a treat for the cook. Halve this recipe if youd like a smaller yield, and for the best results, eat these the same day theyre prepared. Nutrition information: Per cr?pe: 45 calories; 2 g protein, 1 g fat; 8 g carbs; 2 g fiber ; 97 mg sodium Visit Kittee Berns at Cake Maker to the Stars. - Here are more Global Flatbreads.

Black Sesame Matcha Rolls with Miso Lemon Glaze

February 10 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Black Sesame Matcha Rolls with Miso Lemon Glaze Call me crazy, but I’ve never been attracted to sticky cinnamon buns. I blame the fact that I didn’t grow up eating them, and that I enjoy cinnamon only in moderation. The dreamy combination of matcha and black sesame has long been haunting me, and I’ve been searching for the right shape in which to marry them. After seeing yet another beautiful photo of glazed cinnamon rolls somewhere in the social media sea, I was inspired to join my two key ingredients in this green and black treat. I went with a spelt dough and a very simple toasted black sesame filling. For the glaze, I utilized miso, following the logic that ingredients from the same part of the world go well together. Turns out that matcha, sesame and miso are the perfect trio from the East. The buns came out to be satisfying on so many levels – soft, moist dough with the subtle notes of matcha, followed by a chewy, fragrant filling, and complete with the sweet and sour, slightly salty glaze – it’s a heavenly combination. And just for fun, I’ve included a timelapse iPhone video of the whole process, I think that somehow these rolls seem less daunting after you see how they are made. P.S. I finally made a Pinterest account (late bloomer, I know) – see it here. Click here to view the embedded video. Black Sesame Matcha Rolls with Miso-Lemon Glaze Note: It’s important to refrigerate full-fat coconut milk the night before for the miso glaze. I found that organic Thai coconut milk is the most reliable type for separating fat from water after overnight refrigeration. for the matcha dough (adapted from Laura and here) 1 1/­­2 teaspoon active dry yeast 3/­­4 cup unsweetened plant based milk – almond, hemp, coconut, etc. 4 tablespoons coconut oil – divided, plus more for oiling the bowl 2 tablespoons cane sugar 2 cups light spelt flour 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt 2-3 tablespoons matcha powder to make the dough 1. Line 8-10 inch baking dish with parchment paper, extending it to the sides (a cast iron pan would work well here). 2. Warm up milk with coconut oil and sugar in a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir until coconut oil is melted and incorporated into the milk and sugar is dissolved. The mixture should be warm to the touch, about 105F. Let it cool if it feels hot. Add yeast and leave it to foam for about 5 minutes. 3. Meanwhile, mix flour, salt and matcha in a medium mixing bowl. Add foamy milk to the flour and stir to incorporate. Knead on a floured surface for about 5 minutes. Leave to rise in warm place in an oiled bowl covered with plastic wrap. The dough should double in size in a about 40 minutes. for the sesame filling (adapted from Cynthia) 1 1/­­2 cup black sesame seeds 1/­­3 cup honey Preheat oven to 350 F. Spread sesame seeds on a baking sheet and toast for 7 minutes. Place them in a food processor and grind into a paste. Add honey and continue to mix until smooth. to assemble and bake the rolls 1. Roll the dough on a floured surface into a rectangle roughly 11 by 14 inches in size. Brush the entire surface with remaining 2 tablespoons melted coconut oil. Evenly spread sesame filling over the dough. 2. Roll up the dough from the longer side of the rectangle. Seal the sides. Cut into 8-10 even pieces. Arrange them in the prepared parchment covered baking dish/­­pan. Cover with plastic wrap, let rise for 1 hour. 3. Preheat oven to 375F. Bake for 20 minutes or until slightly golden. Let cool before glazing. for the miso-lemon glaze 4 tablespoons coconut fat (see below) 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon sweet or light miso paste 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon honey zest of 1 lemon 2 teaspoons lemon juice 2 teaspoons coconut water from the can – plus or minus (see below) 1. Place a can of full fat Thai coconut milk into the refrigerator the night before. The coconut fat should separate from the water and accumulate on top. 2. Make the glaze right before you’re ready to glaze the rolls, which should be at room temperature. Scoop 4 tablespoons of fat into a small mixing bowl, add miso paste and honey and mix until smooth. 3. Add lemon zest and juice, mix and add coconut water from the same can of coconut milk. The amount of coconut water will differ depending on the types of milk, honey and miso paste, so add 1/­­2 to 1 teaspoon at a time and watch for consistency. The glaze should be thick but pourable. 4. Pour the glaze over the rolls and enjoy!


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