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Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins










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Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins

before yesterday Meatless Monday 

Top 20 Plant-Based ProteinsWill I get enough protein? is one of the most common questions asked by people looking to add more plant-based foods to their diet. The short (and long) answer is -- YES. Check out our Plant Protein Power Kit for downloadable social media graphics, plant-protein GIFs and printable posters. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the recommended dietary allowance for individual daily protein intake is 0.8 grams per of protein per every 2 pounds of body weight. Although this is an approximate calculation -- other factors such as age, sex, body type, and lifestyle must be considered for a precise nutrient recommendation -- it provides a reliable benchmark to measure your daily protein requirements.  This amounts to around 56 grams of protein per day for the average sedentary man and 46 grams per day for the average sedentary woman. So, how do you reach that daily number eating only plant-based foods? Easy, check out our guide below and discover which seeds, nuts, legumes, vegetables, and plant-based products pack the biggest protein punch. Still have questions? Learn more about plant-based protein from the nutritional experts at Johns Hopkins University. Broccoli One of the most popular vegetables is also one of the most protein dense, with one cup of cooked broccoli containing 6 grams of protein. Roast it, sauté it, or steam it for a quick and nutritious side dish. Chia Seeds Small but mighty, 1 ounce of chia seeds packs nearly 5 grams protein. Drop a spoonful into a smoothie or combine with a liquid like juice or nut milk to make a fun-textured chia pudding. Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food: One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar. A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Frozen Veggie Burgers There are tons of different types of pre-made frozen veggie burgers varying in ingredients, texture, and flavorful, and although their nutritional profiles differ, you can generally expect between 10 - 15 grams of protein per patty. Try a range of brands and see which one(s) fit your palate. Hemp Seed Heralded as a superfood, hemp seeds have a subtle, nutty flavor similar to pine nuts. In baking, hemp seeds can be used as a nut replacement, but it can also be added to smoothies, with 2 tablespoons containing over 6 grams of protein. Jackfruit Jackfruit is often marketed as a plant-based alternative to pulled pork, with a meaty, stringy texture fit for faux barbecue platters and sandwiches. Jackfruit is rarely sold whole, but there are a handful of brands selling products made with jackfruit in the refrigerated section of supermarkets. Jack fruit is not the most protein-dense item on this list, but it still contains 3 grams per cup. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Mung Beans Mainly cultivated in East and Southeast Asia, the mung bean is often used as the foundation of stews, vegetable patties, or dal. One cup of cooked mung beans contains 14 grams of protein. Note: mung beans are easier to find dry rather than cooked and canned. Nut Butters Although not all nut butters are considered equal when it comes to protein content (or flavor), they generally contain around 4 grams of protein per tablespoon. Oatmeal A cup of cooked oatmeal contains 6 grams of protein; pair it with a scoop of peanut butter and a sprinkling of hemp or chia seeds for a protein-packed breakfast. Plant-Based Meat Thanks to plant-based meat, sources of vegan protein are all the rage. A typical plant-based burger patty contains 20 grams of protein. Many quick-service restaurant chains now offer versions of their classic menu items featuring some variety of plant-based meat. Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal. A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Seitan The original plant-based meat replacement, seitan -- which is made from wheat gluten -- is packed with protein and can be quite tasty when properly prepared. A 3-ounce serving of seitan includes between 15 - 20 grams of protein, a number that is comparable to most animal proteins. Soy Milk The market for non-dairy nut milks has exploded in recent years, but soy milk remains the most nutritious option. One cup of soy milk has 8 grams of protein, which makes it a nice base for smoothies and shakes. Sprouted Bread Sprouted bread is a certain category of bread made from grains that have been allowed to germinate (aka sprout) before being milled into flour. Ezekiel Bread -- a common brand of sprouted bread -- contains 4 grams of protein and only 80 calories per slice. Sunflower Seeds Who wouldve thought that the innocent little sunflower seed could pack such a protein punch? A half-cup of sunflower seeds has 15 grams of proteins. Bring some in a little baggy and keep with you for a quick and nutritious snack. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Below, weve curated a sample a menu to demonstrate how easy it is to hit your daily protein target eating only plant-based foods. Breakfast: Overnight Pumpkin Pie Oats (17 grams of protein) Lunch: Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast (13 grams of protein) Dinner: Veggie Meatballs (27 grams of protein) No time to cook? No problem. Meatless Monday On-the-Go is easier than ever. Creating a plant-based Meatless Monday masterpiece? Let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post Top 20 Plant-Based Proteins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Roasted Cauliflower Hummus

January 20 2020 Oh My Veggies 

You know what I hate? Suggested serving sizes. I love hummus. I don’t make usually make hummus myself (unless it’s Edamame Hummus) because it ends up being a disaster, so I buy the little tubs of hummus at the grocery store. And I totally want to eat half the tub in one sitting. But a serving size is almost always two tablespoons. Two tablespoons. Which is nothing! Who eats two tablespoons of hummus?! I am totally a volume eater. Hummus is a healthy food, but the calories really add up when you want to eat more than two tablespoons. So I thought I’d try replacing the chickpeas with roasted cauliflower. Oh sure, my hummus wouldn’t have as much protein, but I’d be able to eat a lot more of it, which is nice too, right? As usual, I thought I was being super innovative, but then I Googled it and about a gajillion recipes for paleo hummus made with cauliflower came up. Oh snap. Anyway, if you divide this Roasted Cauliflower Hummus into four HUGE SERVINGS (see, all caps means the servings are big), you end up saving about 90 calories per serving. I kind of wanted to have a […]

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?

January 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry?A properly-stocked pantry is essential for creating delicious plant-based dishes on the fly. But what does properly-stocked really mean? Sure, you need the basics -- olive oil, white flour, rice, pasta, etc., but there are some additional ingredients that you should consider adding to your collection. Alternative flours, exotic spices, seeds, nut butters, beans (butter beans will change your life), broths, and grains can all add extra levels of depth, dimension, and texture to any variety of plant-based dishes.   Youll likely be familiar with many of the items on this list, but there are also a few lesser known ingredients -- agar-agar, tahini, nutritional yeast, etc. -- which can be used to replace many traditional animal-based ingredients. So, grab a paper and pen, and make sure these items are on next weeks shopping list. Agar-Agar The perfect vegan gelatin replacement for your puddings, jellies, or gelées, agar-agar flakes are derived from seaweed and function similarly to animal-based gelatins. Alternative Flours Were not talking your run of the mill (went there) all-purpose, bleached white flour. Play around with some alternative flours like almond, chickpea, rice, or buckwheat. Many alternative flours are also gluten-free. Beans (canned) Explore the world of beans, and reap the benefits of a healthy, satisfying plant-based protein. Lentils, black beans, butter beans, kidney beans, chickpeas -- doesnt matter; theyre all easy to use, shelf-stable, healthy, and inexpensive. Broth A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Coconut Oil A shelf-stable saturated fat, coconut oil is a healthy alternative to other vegetable oils. In most cases it can be substituted 1:1 for other oils and butters. Its got a laundry list of benefits that range from weight loss to improved cognitive functioning. Chocolate All vegetables and no sweets make everyone hangry. A little bit of chocolate can go a long way in baking as well as a post-dinner night cap. If youre feeling adventurous try some exotic bars that contain a higher percentage of cacao. Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. Theyre every home cooks secret weapon. Tip: fire-roasted tomatoes add even more flavor to your meals. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some inexpensive nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. Grains Theres an endless variety of grains available for your experimenting pleasure. Whole grains are best (think brown rice), but theres also a number of lesser-known grains that have their own unique texture and flavor profile. Try getting a bag of quinoa, amaranth, or farro and simply follow the cooking instructions on the back. Granola You can make your own or buy it for cheap at the store, but theres truly an endless combination of potential granola mixes. Bring it in a baggy as a post-lunch snack or use it to top your morning yogurt. Nut Butter High in protein and healthy fats, nut butters can add complexity to savory dishes and a nutty richness to sweets. Keep a range on hand -- almond, cashew, pistachio -- to add variety to baked goods, sandwiches, and sauces. Nutritional Yeast Just trust us with this one; we swear it tastes almost exactly like Parmesan cheese. Sprinkle on pasta, popcorn or use in macaroni and cheese if youre looking to cut out the dairy or need a boost of umami flavor. Olives Olives, especially the sliced green ones in a jar, add the perfect pop of brininess to pastas, rice bowls, and stews. Theyre a great value and can seriously elevate the flavor of ordinary dishes.  Pasta Thankfully, pasta has evolved to incorporate more alternative flours into its base. Now, you can get high-fiber, high-protein pasta made of anything from lentils to chickpeas to black beans. Pesto It is one of the most versatile condiments/­­sauces out there. A jar of pesto can last unopened in your pantry for months, and it can be your saving grace if you need to whip something up in a hurry. Add some to roasted vegetables or use it to top a tomato soup. Seaweed Snacks Low in calories and nutritionally-dense, seaweed is the ultimate snack food. Oh, and cats love it too. Spices Well, this one goes without saying, but having a pantry (or cupboard) thats properly stocked with all your necessary spices will make cooking (and eating) a whole lot more enjoyable. Some lesser known spices to add are aamchur (unripe mango), star anise, zaatar, or Aleppo pepper. Seeds Seeds are powerhouses of nutrition, texture, and flavor, and there are so many different varieties to choose from -- chia, flax, hemp, sesame, sunflower. Make chia pudding, a flax egg, or toss some hemp or sunflower seeds into your next salad or smoothie. Soy Sauce Umami in a bottle, soy sauce adds an earthy meatiness to dressings, sauces, and stir-fries. Some chefs even recommend adding a dash to tomato sauce for a boost of richness. Tahini You know it from every hummus youve ever eaten, but what might surprise you is that tahini paste is made entirely from pulverized sesame seeds. Combine a tablespoon of tahini with a dash of water, a sprinkle of cumin, and some salt for a quick and creamy dressing for salad or roasted vegetables.   If you decide to make one of these delicious recipes, let us know by tagging @MeatlessMonday and #MeatlessMonday on your social media posts for a chance to be featured on our channels.   The post How Many of These 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients Are in Your Pantry? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cauliflower Mash

January 6 2020 Meatless Monday 

Cauliflower is roasted until brown, then blended with Greek yogurt and vegetable broth for a flavorful, creamy cauliflower puree. This cauliflower mash can be served on the side in place of mashed potatoes and offers a healthy dose of the vitamin K! This recipe is from Ashley of Sprout. Serves 4 - 1 head cauliflower, cut into 1 inch florets - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon black pepper - 1/­­4 cup plain Greek yogurt - 1 cup low sodium vegetable broth, divided - whole wheat breadcrumbs, for garnish - fresh parsley, for garnish Preheat an oven to 450 degrees. Toss the cauliflower with the olive oil. Season with the salt and pepper. Spread the florets onto a baking sheet in 1 layer. Roast for 30-35 minutes, or until the edges of the cauliflower are deep brown. Transfer the roasted cauliflower florets to a blender. Add the yogurt and 1/­­2 cup of the vegetable broth to the blender. Blend until smooth. If cauliflower mash seems too thick, add a little more vegetable broth, 1 tablespoon at a time until the mash has reached desired consistency. Taste for seasoning and adjust if desired. Divide into 4 portions, sprinkle each with breadcrumbs and parsley. Enjoy! The post Cauliflower Mash appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Tofu and Cauliflower in Kolhapuri Sauce

December 26 2019 Vegan Richa 

Tofu and Cauliflower in Kolhapuri SauceTofu and Cauliflower in Indian Kolhapuri Sauce. Creamy Spicy Pepper Coconut Sesame Sauce with baked veggies and Tofu. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Recipe.  Soy-free option. Jump to Recipe Kolhapuri cuisine is a regional cuisine from a town in the state of Maharashtra in India. The region has its own cuisine, various chilies and is know for hot, deep colored, spicy dishes and sauces. The cuisine has its own spice blend called kolhapuri masala which uses spices, coconut, fenugreek and chilies. I make a simplified version of the masala blend and the sauce and use it with Baked Tofu and Cauliflower here. I’ve made a version of this cooked with various veggies here (instant pot recipe). The sauce use whole spices and ingredients such as sesame and coconut that add a unique flavor. Try this sauce with baked veggies, chickpeas or chickpea tofu for variation.Continue reading: Tofu and Cauliflower in Kolhapuri SauceThe post Tofu and Cauliflower in Kolhapuri Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Anja Schwartz Rothe

December 15 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Anja Schwartz Rothe Anja Schwartz Rothe is an herbalist, gardener, medicine maker, and writer, based in New Yorks Hudson Valley. Anja is the alchemist behind Fat of the Land, a small batch herbal apothecary with a focus on cultivating connection to self, environment, and the cycles by which we live. We interviewed Anja about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, her work and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? A nice balance of both! I need to exist inside a structured, but flexible container. A little bit of routine allows me to make the most of my time, while feeling free and inspired. -- Do your routines change with the seasons? Definitely, it is one of the biggest factors that informs the way I live – acknowledging the seasonal shifts within and without and using that information to alter how I show up to take care of myself. -- What do your mornings look like? I dont like alarms, so I usually wake up naturally, somewhere between 6:30 and 8, depending on the time of year. Then I drink a bunch of water, sometimes with lemon and sometimes not. I try to get out in nature almost immediately. I live right next to a bird sanctuary on the Hudson River, so I bring a hot bevvie and do a long walk there. I always leave my phone at the house so I have a chance to really check in with myself, do some breathing, and connect before the day starts. After that, its breakfast and usually emails. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I usually wash my face and do some facial gua sha. Its so relaxing and helps me unwind. Then, I have little ritual of turning down the house, where I close the curtains, turn off the lights, and say goodnight to everything. It sounds like a small detail, but its a gesture I really like, acknowledging the animacy of the home energies, thanking them, and setting it all to rest for the day. In my bedroom, I try to keep good sleep hygiene, which for me means low technology and minimal artificial lighting. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice? Honestly, I think my whole life is a mindfulness practice. Isnt that what mindfulness is all about, practicing showing up in the mundane of the day-to-day in the fullest capacity? Sustenance -- Describe your typical or favorite meal for each of these: Breakfast – Usually some combination of eggs and ferments. In the summer, hard-boiled with smoked salmon and sauerkraut. Right now, Im on a scallion and ginger congee kick – a simple Chinese rice porridge served with a soft boiled egg and miso. Its so good. Lunch – Sometimes an open-face sandwich or leftovers from the night before. Lately, Ive been working through lunch and having an early dinner. Snack – Fruit and chocolate. Its apples, pears, and citrus right now. Dinner – Currently: soup and sourdough bread with lots of ghee. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I make myself a matcha latte with oat milk and a couple droppers of our brain tincture almost every day. On weekends, I might have a cup of coffee and I sometimes do a mushroom tea/­­dandy blend/­­cacao mixture as an afternoon pick me up. I really try not to have too much caffeine though, it makes me a bit of a mess and dehydrates me way too much, always trying to find that balance. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your basket? Its pretty broken up between farmers markets, the local food shop, and the co-op in the next city over. In the summer, primarily farmers markets for that good good fruit and veg. Right now, my staples are eggs, potatoes, citrus, oatly, broccoli, and cauliflower. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? Definitely. I like to keep my kitchen stocked with what I call hippie treats and lots of fruit. I dont buy a lot of packaged food, which means if I want to have sweets in the house I have to prepare them myself. I love baking, and will usually make a treat at least once a week – recently, its been sticky apple ginger date cake and berry crisps from a stocked freezer of gleaned summer berries. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do, but with much variability. In the past, I’ve been really into running, yoga, and rock climbing — and these things come back in waves. In the summer, I’m cycling a lot, and right now I’m getting back into my ephemeral winter gym flow. Sometimes, my exercise is just doing squats in the kitchen while waiting for the kettle to boil. Thats actually my favorite kind. Beauty -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I definitely subscribe to the less is more skincare model. I wash with just warm water, am very liberal with hydrosols, and then use a serum and/­­or balm. I make all my own hydrosols in my garden during the summer and offer some of them in the apothecary. Im currently really loving Dragon Balm by Apis Apotheca, a farm and skincare line run by my friend Aviva, who really knows her shit. Most days I also do a quick little gua sha facial massage afterwards – I always see instant results and it feels too good. -- Do you have any beauty tricks that you’ve found to be especially useful? Drinking lots of water and herbal infusions. My present go-to is nettle, raspberry leaf, goji berry, and fresh ginger root. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress? Big Calm tincture in every pocket, purse, and drawer. I lean heavily on nervines and deep breathing. Getting outside is also really important — and socializing! -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? To be honest, I havent gotten so much as a cold in more than ten years! I owe this mostly to a naturally strong constitution, but also a pretty large emphasis on tonic, preventative medicine and lifestyle. Cooking with medicines, like infused vinegars, dank broths, and elderberry syrup, are big, but getting enough rest is the biggest. Im constantly doing micro check-ins throughout the day to see how I can best give myself what I need to prevent burnout, fatigue, and illness. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Theyre so fluid in my life. I enjoy the hell out of the work I do, and I’d probably be doing most of it even if it wasnt my job, but Im also pretty good at allowing myself to turn off when I’m tired and not place undue expectations on myself all the time. I find allowing myself to take frequent mini vacations is the most helpful — getting out of my environment is the only thing that really turns off my work brain, plus it brings in a fresh influx of new inspiration and perspective. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist? My first job in high school was at the local health food store. There were a couple older women who worked there and would walk me through the vitamin and bulk aisles, teaching me all about the different herbs and supplements. This was a sort of epiphany for me, viewing plants in this way. I then studied anthropology in university, focusing mostly on traditional sustenance and healing practices. After finishing school, I knew I needed to immerse myself in plant medicine, so I enrolled in an herbal medicine program in Appalachia. -- How do you approach foraging the ingredients for your apothecary and seasonal wellness boxes? Do you have a plan in mind for each season or is it more about going with the flow? I definitely have a plan in mind, but I usually have to surrender it while remaining open to new inspiration. It can be a challenge to have expectations for a season, nature doesnt really work that way, and thats been both a constant source of inspiration for me, as well as a lesson in boundaries and respect. I could be inspired to make one thing, but if its not a particularly fecund year for a certain plant, I have to cede to that. Making things from intuition and by listening to the seasons and cycles is probably not the best business model, but its the only way I want to work with plant medicine. -- What are some offerings youre working on currently? Im getting ready to re-release a little book I wrote last year, Always Coming Home: a guide to seasonal wellness, with some edits and new content. Im also refining the 2020 Seasonal Wellness Box subscription that will soon be available. -- How were you able to grow a business with your interests and loves in mind? Its been a very slow chipping away for me to remain really clear on the things that matter and the things that dont in growing my business. It turns out, remaining true to creating medicine that is intimate, small batch, and well cared for is much more important than being able to mass produce things or being on every shelf in the country. I want my values to be foremost and my business to be second. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Going full hibernation this January. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Put my legs up the wall, get a massage, go hiking with a friend, sweat, travel, in the summer I go swimming multiple times of day in various bodies of running water, thats my favorite. -- We love the Catskills so much. What are some of your favorite places to visit in the area? Montgomery Place farm stand for all your fruit and veg needs, there are so many great trails in the mountains, Colgate Lake for a swim, Talbott and Arding picnic at the Saugerties lighthouse for lunch and Lil Debs Oasis for dinner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Im reading The Overstory by Richard Powers right now, and it is SO GOOD. A vignette of short stories written about trees and so much more. Song/­­Album – Hildegard von Bingen forever. Movie – Fantastic Fungi! Just saw and highly recommend, mushrooms will save the world. Piece of Art – All things Andrew Wyeth. Photos by Jenn Morse, Gabrielle Greenberg and Anja herself. The post Anja Schwartz Rothe appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More Vegetables

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More VegetablesEvery parents predicament: How do I get my children to eat more vegetables? Although theres no secret sauce (sorry ketchup), there are tried and true methods to get your kids to eat more adventurously. But what are they? The team at Meatless Monday spoke with Joy Bauer, bestselling author and health and nutrition expert on The Today Show, about her new book, Yummy Yoga: Playful Poses and Tasty Treats , and her creative ways to encourage kids to eat healthier. Yummy Yoga pairs healthy, kid-friendly recipes with fun yoga positions, giving the whole family the opportunity to get in the kitchen and on the yoga mat. But what sets this book apart is the collection of adorable yoga sculptures made out of fruits and vegetables that accompany each recipe (warning: they definitely encourage playing with your food). To celebrate the launch of her book, Joy shared with us some easy-to-apply tips and tricks that will spark a passion for veggies in even the pickiest of eaters. This Monday, follow Joys words of wisdom and help your kids establish a loving relationship with plant-based foods. Tip # 1: Make Healthy Food Fun The key to encouraging kids to eat healthfully is to make food fun and exciting. Thats the whole point of Yummy Yoga. The pages are filled with tasty, kid-friendly recipes -- smoothies, fruit skewers, veggie pizzas, super food ice pops, etc. -- and playful yoga poses to entertain and excite little ones as they discover healthy, new habits.   Tip #2: Eat More Produce Yourself Kiddie see, kiddie do. If your little ones (and big ones) see you eating a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, theyre more likely to do it, too. A study from the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, found that preschool age kids were more likely to eat bell peppers (and prefer them in the future) after being shown a video of people eating the veggie compared to kids who didnt see the veggie video. Encourage your children to eat more fruit and vegetables by enjoying them yourself, and by pointing out other people (grandparents, siblings, cousins, friends, babysitters, and so on) who enjoy them, too!   Tip #3: Think Out of the Box If a picky spouse or child doesnt like steamed broccoli, dont give up. Instead, try another spin. Whip up a batch of Broccomole Dip (I mash steamed broccoli florets into guacamole), Roasted Broccoli , Creamy Broccoli Soup , Broccoli Tots , or top it with cheese sauce or marinara...you get the idea. Be creative and experiment until you find a recipe that your picky eater does like.   Tip #4: Give Them the Power of Choice Give picky eaters the power to choose--a fun recipe, a new fruit or a veggie to prepare as a side dish, or even the theme of the meal. Its a simple equation that will make mealtimes less fraught: more freedom = less fussing. When you involve picky eaters with planning and prep a few nights each week, youll find theyre less likely to argue about finishing their veggies. Good food, good mood...sounds appetizing, right?   Tip #5: When in Doubt, Hide it Sometimes, its easier to just slip veggies into their favorite foods. You can add a handful of kale or spinach into smoothies; add chopped broccoli, diced carrots or yellow bell peppers into mac and cheese (no brainer!); swap out standard noodles for veggie noodles, like spaghetti squash or zucchini linguini (aka zoodles); mix cauliflower rice with traditional rice; blend canned pumpkin puree into marinara sauce and taco meat -- the options are limitless!   Tip #6: Try it on a Monday Monday follows the weekend, which is when most people do their shopping and prep work-the veggies have been purchased, cleaned, peeled and chopped. Plus, its the perfect way to reset and reboot for a healthy and energizing new week ahead. Try Joy’s recipe for Heart-y Artichokes, Green Beans, and Leeks from the book and check out Yummy Yoga for more delicious recipes!   Want some more plant-based cooking tips for you and your picky eaters? Check out The Kids Cook Monday for more recipe inspiration and fun kitchen activities for you and your children to do together. The post Joy Bauer’s Tips for Getting Kids to Eat More Vegetables appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Mushroom Sauce – No Oil Option

December 7 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Mushroom Sauce – No Oil OptionCreamy Vegan Mushroom Sauce. This Mushroom wine sauce is flexible and versatile and great to serve as side with pasta, roasted veggies, mashed veggies and more. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Nut-free option.  Jump to Recipe A flavorful sauce as a side elevates comfort dishes to a new level. This Creamy Mushroom sauce with caramelized mushrooms, herbs, wine, and creamy base is versatile and delicious! Serve the sauce over cauliflower steaks, with pasta, roasted veggies, over mashed veggies, veggie meatloafs or burgers, grilled portobello mushroom, bowls and more. Change up the herbs, add more wine and less non dairy cream, adjust away to your preference!Continue reading: Vegan Mushroom Sauce – No Oil OptionThe post Vegan Mushroom Sauce – No Oil Option appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast

November 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving FeastThanksgiving is a time for family, giving, and gratitude. But its also the time for stuffing...and starches, and birds, briskets, casseroles, cranberry sauce, gravy, dressings, and desserts! But as we know from Thanksgivings past, the entire family doesnt always agree, especially when it comes to the food on the dining room table.  So, whether your guests prefer dark meat, white meat, or no meat, its important that your Thanksgiving spread accommodates everyone. Fortunately, the classic Thanksgiving fixings can be made completely plant-based without compromising tradition or taste. Weve compiled a collection of simple plant-based Thanksgiving swaps that allow everyone -- from the newly vegan to the traditional omnivore -- to enjoy the holiday feast, together. Mushroom Gravy from Trader Joes Sometimes your secret recipe is store bought. We wont tell. Trader Joes has an impressive Organic Savory Vegan Gravy made with onion, garlic, coconut milk, tamari, mushrooms, and a whole bunch of seasonings and zero work for you. Oh, its also gluten free. Roasted-Garlic Smashed Potatoes from Minimalist Baker The secret to incredibly light and fluffy dairy-free mashed potatoes isnt much of a secret. After boiling and mashing your potatoes (you can use a potato masher or hand mixer; if you use the latter, be careful not to overmix), fold in non-dairy butter and a whole head of roasted garlic to pump up the decadence.  Super Savory Vegan Stuffing from The Cheeky Chickpea A Thanksgiving spread is judged not on its turkey, but rather the quality of its stuffing. We scoured the internet to find the most satisfying stuffing recipe available. Chopped mushrooms, wild rice, bell peppers, vegetable bouillon, plant-based sausage, cubed up bread, and Thanksgiving seasonings -- fennel, garlic, parsley, fresh rosemary -- make this stuffing simply irresistible. Cinnamon Sugar Sweet Potato Casserole from Eat With Clarity Oh, sweet potato casserole; you sit innocently on the Thanksgiving table masquerading as a member of the main meal, but we all know youre our pre-dessert dessert...with your delightful topping of crushed pecans, coconut sugar, oats, and marshmallows. But the sweet and creamy nature of this indulgent side dish is a necessary counterbalance to all the punchy herbs and spices. This recipe adds another dimension to the traditional sweet potato casserole by using non-dairy milk, ground flax seeds, and melted coconut oil. Roasted Root Vegetables with a White Balsamic Glaze from Healthy World Cuisine No bacon necessary for these magical root vegetables. The recipe suggests fennel, carrots, and Cipollini onions, but you can add any of your favorite seasonal vegetables. Curried Green Bean Casserole from Omnivore’s Cookbook A spin on the classic, this curried green bean casserole adds a new dimension to the Thanksgiving table. Traditional green bean casseroles typically rely on a can of condensed cream of mushroom soup and a topping of bread crumbs and fried onion straws. This recipe is just as easy to make, but offers your taste buds so much more! No-Meat Loaf from Nora Cooks Turkey doesnt always have to be the star of the Thanksgiving spread. Meatloaf traditionally plays a supporting role, but this holiday season let it take center stage with this smoky, savory plant-based chickpea loaf. After its covered with a tangy ketchup glaze and baked in the oven, its look and texture become indistinguishable from its meaty counterpart. Cranberry Jam from Delish Theres something extraterrestrial-looking about the maroon cylinder of congealed cranberry sauce that you always find sitting menacingly next to the gravy boat. Its Thanksgiving, you deserve better. Treat your family (and yourself) with this simple-to-make four-ingredient cranberry jam. All you need is fresh cranberries, sugar, water, orange zest, and about twenty minutes. Your dinner rolls, stuffing, and other Thanksgiving starches will thank you. Chipotle Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Caper Vinaigrette from Goya Need an alternative centerpiece for your Thanksgiving meal? Look no further than this elegant whole roasted cauliflower with a smoky chipotle finish. Top your cauliflower steaks with a tart and briny caper vinaigrette for a perfect alternative to the big bird. Chocolate Fudge Brownie Pie from Sweet Vegan Sara Some people eat to live, others eat to get to dessert. Your patience has paid off. This plant-based chocolate fudge brownie pie looks sinful, but it really isnt. The crust uses a combination of almond flour, rolled oats, date sugar, and flax eggs (coagulated flax seeds), while the filling is as healthy as hummus, using chickpeas, nondairy milk, date paste, cocoa powder, rolled oats, and vegan chocolate chips. Creamy Coconut Pumpkin Pie from Loving It Vegan What makes this pumpkin pie filling so much more luxurious than the rest? A rhinestone-studded crust? Nope, this pie gets its extra decadent flare from a can of full-fat coconut milk. Fold in some brown sugar, maple syrup, pumpkin pie spice, and a little bit of cornstarch, and youve got yourself the ultimate Thanksgiving dessert.   Invite your friends and family to try (and share) these plant-based Thanksgiving swaps. If youre looking for more meatless recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery. The post Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Scalloped Potatoes

November 9 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Scalloped PotatoesYou have to try My Creamy Vegan Scalloped Potatoes Recipe! No Dairy, No Nuts, No nutritional Yeast! in this Potato Gratin. Can be gluten-free and Soy-free. Oil-free option Jump to Recipe Lets make these Classic Scalloped Potatoes to add to the Thanksgiving menu! These Scalloped potatoes are Easy, use just a few ingredients, don’t need nutritional yeast for the cheesyness, have no nuts and are creamy, cheesy and all things delicious. Use herbs of choice for variation. Use a combination of veggies such as cauliflower with the potato. Top with a breadcrumb topping. Many options!Continue reading: Vegan Scalloped PotatoesThe post Vegan Scalloped Potatoes appeared first on Vegan Richa.

The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based Recipes

November 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based RecipesWere all familiar with the four basic tastes -- sweet, salty, sour, and bitter -- but umami, the mysterious fifth taste, remains an enigma. Umami is responsible for giving foods their deep, savory flavor. When used properly, umami adds a pleasant richness to plant-based meals, balances the natural bitterness of nutrient-dense vegetables, and simplifies cooking by reducing the need for salt and other flavor-enhancing ingredients. Umami can be found in everything from corn, tomatoes, and mushrooms to aged cheeses, nori and soy sauce. While its easy to find foods that contain umami, its not always as simple to coax that savory flavor out of them, which is why umami remains an underutilized culinary tool in many home kitchens across America. Thats why the team at Meatless Monday was so thrilled to work with Yondu Vegetable Umami to develop a free, downloadable e-cookbook complete with umami-rich plant-based recipes. When scrolling through the recipes, youll see the breadth and versatility of this one simple ingredient. But tasting is believing. For starters, try this super simple 3-Minute Veggie Soup , which includes aromatic leeks, sugary snap peas, cool slices of fennel, and a couple of tablespoons of vegetable umami. At only 54 calories per serving, its a nice, light way to open a meal. Catering to a crowd? Pulse together a creamy Minted Pea and Walnut Dip in a matter of minutes. Have some leftover cauliflower? A spattering of chili flakes and lemons zest, along with a drizzle of olive oil and umami will transform this simple vegetable into a Quick Roasted Cauliflower worthy of any restaurant menu. To celebrate the cookbook release, Yondu is giving away 50 free bottles of their vegetable umami. All you have to do is click the link HERE and sign up, but move quick -- its first come first serve. And if you missed the giveaway, Yondu is also offering a coupon code for 50% off your order! Use code: 50umamimeals.   Download your free copy of the e-cookbook HERE and click over to Amazon to purchase a bottle of Yondu, $8.99 (lasts quite a while). Thanks to Yondus vegetable umami, you can effortlessly add a richness to any of your Monday meals. Need more inspiration? Check out Yondu.Us for more recipes. Tag @MeatlessMonday and @Yondu.USA in your umami food posts and share the e-cookbook link with friends and family to inspire easy Meatless Monday meal ideas. The post The One Ingredient You Should Be Adding to All Your Plant-Based Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola Recipe (No Oil)

November 1 2019 Vegan Richa 

Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola Recipe (No Oil)Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola Recipe with Pumpkin Seeds. Use other spices of choice in this delicious granola with pumpkin or sunflower seeds. It makes a great gift. No Refined Sugar or oil. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Jump to Recipe Snacking can sometimes be the harder to figure out, compared to meals. Its the in between meal time when you dont want something heavy but still satisfying enough. Granola and granola bars made from scratch work out really well for those times. Homemade granola has sugar you can control and oil you can omit. Granola over vegan yogurt, porridge, chia pudding or as is from the jar, is amazing to have around. Whether you like a sweet Date Caramel Granola  , or a granola bar (Sunbutter Granola Bars), or want spicy savory snack with this Sriracha Orange Quinoa Peanut Granola or get adventurous with this Lentil cranberry Granola! There are plenty of options and variations! This easy granola has oats, pumpkin or sunflower seeds and pecans. The maple and pecans add a buttery caramel like flavor, the pecans get candied when covered with maple and cardamom complements the flavor profile amazingly. Change it up with seeds or nuts of choice. Lets make some granola.Continue reading: Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola Recipe (No Oil)The post Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola Recipe (No Oil) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets — Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween Treats

October 28 2019 Meatless Monday 

Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets  —  Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween TreatsHalloween season is here, so its time to bust out the bloody bandages, clean out the old cast-iron cauldron, and study up on your seances. And theres no better way to honor the scariest holiday of the year than with a proper Halloween bash (or monster mash, or graveyard smash)? Whether its a spooky soirée for you and your friends or a party for some little monsters , the focal point of the celebration (as with all parties) is the finger food -- minus the fingers, of course. You can always go with the traditional frightening fare -- candy apples, ants-on-a-log, popcorn balls, devils food cake -- but we wanted to offer some more imaginative options that are not only tasty, easy to make, and freaking cute, but theyre also better-for-you! Check out the list below for some hauntingly yummy Halloween treats. Peanut Butter Apple Monsters With sunflower-seed teeth and a strawberry tongue, these gremlin-looking green apples are the perfect snack for guests who are scared of eating too much sugar. Photo courtesy of @nutriacure . Fiendishly Frightening Fruit Platter Ghostly red peppers, Frankenstein kiwis, and cantaloupe tombstones make for a very frightening fruit platter. Photo courtesy of @foodbites . Ghostly Chocolate Cupcakes These are not your ordinary cupcakes. Tucked away within each fluffy chocolate cake is a hint of tangy guava and sweet beet puree. Topping each cupcake is a crown of coconut-milk frosting. Drizzle some thinned out guava juice over the top for an even more ghastly effect. Photo courtesy of Goya . Mummys Favorite Jalape?o Poppers These jalape?o poppers are almost too cute to eat... almost. Photo courtesy of @thepurplepumpkinblog . Ghastly Gluten-Free Zombie Fingers These are almost as scary as someone with a gluten intolerance eating a piece of bread. Made primarily from dates, peanut butter, and oats, these zombie fingers are easy to assemble, and they most definitely look the part. Photo courtesy of Recipes from a Pantry . Boo-nana Popsicles The ideal non-dairy frozen treat for your guests. Not too messy, these popsicles will be gone so fast youll begin to wonder if they ever existed at all... Photo courtesy of Well Plated . Candy Corn Parfait These have the candy-corn look, but with added tropical flavor. Just layer some pineapple, tangerine, and a shot of whipped cream to capture the aesthetic of classic candy corn.  Photo courtesy of Family Fresh Meals . Bat Energy Bites All you need is 20 minutes, a microwave, and a mixing bowl to put these scary snacks together. These ones are just as fun to make as they are to eat. Photo courtesy of Chelsea’s Messy Apron . Tangerine Pumpkins Rushing to complete the Halloween party preparations? These tangerine pumpkins dont require much assembly: Just peel and pop a little wedge of celery on top to give them that pumpkin look. Photo courtesy of Bren Did . Ahhhhh Vegetables! For some, nothing is scarier than a platter of roasted vegetables, but we think these spooky shaped beets, carrots, and squash are just devilishly delightful. Photo courtesy of Live Eat Learn .   Making one of these creepy creations? Tag @meatlessmonday and well repost the scariest photos (and maybe the cutest). The post Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets — Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween Treats appeared first on Meatless Monday.

20 Vegan Curry Recipes to Make Now!

October 11 2019 Vegan Richa 

20 Vegan Curry Recipes to Make Now!20 Vegan Curry Recipes to Make Now! Indian, Japanese, Jamaican, Sri Lankan Curries with lentils, chickpeas, beans, veggies, tofu and more. Gluten-free, Nut-free options, Soy-free options Its Curry week! Try some of these fabulous curries from all around the world! With various beans, tofu, protein, with and without tomato, gluten-free, nut-free options, soy-free options.

Best Vegan Recipes 2019 from Vegan Richa

December 30 2019 Vegan Richa 

Best Vegan Recipes 2019 from Vegan RichaTop Vegan Recipes of 2019 from VeganRicha.com, Sticky sesame cauliflower, Tofu Amritsari Masala, Chickpea brownies and more… This year has been a year of ups and downs. I made a ton of videos, learnt so much, hired people to help with the editing. wrote a book proposal for an Instant Pot cookbook, streamlined some of the blog process, but there’s still lot there to be done. Back to the good stuff. There were many new recipes that resonated a lot with you all, and many that I really loved. And amazingly, there were many recipes that I loved, that ended up in the top recipes! I usually like the more complex flavor or more creative recipes, which don’t always get the interest as much as the popular and easy recipes. So here are top 19 posts from 2019!Continue reading: Best Vegan Recipes 2019 from Vegan RichaThe post Best Vegan Recipes 2019 from Vegan Richa appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?

December 23 2019 Meatless Monday 

Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly?Despite the frigid temperatures and seemingly barren landscapes all around, the winter months can be surprisingly abundant. In fact, much of our most popular produce is actually in-season during this chilly time of year. Thats right, apples, beets, broccoli, cabbage, broccoli rabe, Brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, celery, citrus fruits, fennel, garlic, leeks, mushrooms, onions, parsnips, pears, pomegranates, sweet potatoes, turnips, rutabagas, and radishes all fair pretty well in colder temperatures. But we dont. Thats why weve compiled a list of our warmest, most comforting meatless recipes -- all of which use seasonal winter produce -- to help you and your family stay toasty through the frosty months. Make them this Monday for a cozy start to the week. Carrot Soup with Parsnip Chips   Cauliflower and Chickpea Curry   Cranberry Balsamic Brussels Sprouts   Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes Red Onion Soup with Shiitake Broth Roasted Fennel with Tofu and Oranges Roasted Garlic Parsnip Spinach Shepherds Pie Vegetable Fritters with Green-Chile Coconut Chutney   Interested in adding more Meatless Monday recipes to your cooking repertoire? Click here to access our recipe archives full of easy-to-make meatless and plant-based dishes.   The post Is Your Winter Meal-Plan Menu Seasonal Produce Friendly? appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetable Curry

December 12 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegetable Curry If this cold weather makes you want to cozy up to a curry, but you dont have a lot of time to spend in the kitchen, this curry is for you. This fabulous looking curry is from a new book called Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook by Dianne Wenz. As a vegan lifestyle coach, Dianne is adept at showing how to prepare well-balanced meals that taste great. The opening chapter of the book is loaded with great tools and tips for eating a healthy vegan diet.  Enticing recipes such as Carrot Cake Oatmeal, Cauliflower Banh Mi, Chickpea Pot Pie, and Key Lime Bars, insure that your menus will be as flavorful and fun to eat as they are good for you. Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook is ideal for the new vegan trying to navigate their way through unfamiliar territory.  Its also great for anyone looking to fine-tune their eating habits by eliminating processed ingredients and getting back to basics - including eating more vegetables. This cookbook features easy to find ingredients that are used to make simple and delicious recipes such as this Vegetable Curry. About this recipe, Dianne says, Vegetable curries are a favorite warming meal on cold days. I tend to make them with whatever stray bits of vegetables I have on hand to clean out the produce drawer of the fridge, but this combination of cauliflower, green beans, and carrots is my personal favorite. This is a Thai-style curry that uses red curry paste, but it can also be made with the green variety. Vegetable Curry Serves 6 /­­ Prep time: 10 minutes /­­ Cook time: 20 minutes 1 teaspoon neutral-flavored oil (such as grapeseed or avocado), vegetable stock, or water 1 medium-sized yellow onion, diced 3 garlic cloves, minced 1 tablespoon grated or minced fresh ginger 1 (14-ounce) can light coconut milk 1 cup vegetable stock 3 tablespoons red curry paste 4 cups chopped cauliflower florets 1/­­2 pound green beans, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces 2 carrots, chopped 1 (15-ounce) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed 2 cups spinach Sea salt Black pepper Heat the oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onion, garlic, and ginger and cook until they begin to brown, about 5 minutes. Add the light coconut milk, vegetable stock, and red curry paste to the pot and stir to combine. Add the cauliflower, green beans, carrots, and chickpeas. Bring the mixture to a boil, and then reduce the heat to medium-low. Cover the pot and simmer for 15 minutes, or until the vegetables have softened. Uncover the pot and stir in the spinach, continuing to simmer, while stirring frequently until the spinach wilts. Season with sea salt and black pepper to taste. From Truly Healthy Vegan Cookbook, by Dianne Wenz, published by Rockridge Press. Copyright (C) 2019 by Callisto Media. All rights reserved. The post Vegetable Curry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

14 Recipes that Will Wow Your Family and Friends this Holiday Season

December 9 2019 Meatless Monday 

14 Recipes that Will Wow Your Family and Friends this Holiday SeasonTis the season to incorporate more meatless dishes into your recipe collection. Weve made a list -- and weve checked it twice -- of some of our favorite holiday appetizers, mains, side, and desserts, almost all of which are plant-based! Craving chestnuts roasting on an open fire? Try our roasted chestnut soup. Jack Frost nipping at your nose? Nothing will keep you more snug than our warming carrot cauliflower stew. Grandma got ran over by a reindeer? Well, um, weve got a great recipe for honey-vanilla poached pears. Check out our Meatless Monday holiday menu below and see how you can wow your guests with some festive and flavorful meatless meals. Appetizers Set the proper tone for the meal with these seasonal holiday appetizers: Roasted Chestnut Soup Warming Carrot Cauliflower Stew Spicy Jalape?o Cashew Cheese Dip Sides On this holiday dinner table, let the side dishes take center stage: Maple Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts Rosemarys Beets with Hazelnuts and Basil Roasted Potatoes with Orange Couscous Baked Polenta Basil Fries Mains Plant-based mains can be just as hardy and comforting as their animal-based counterparts: Meaty Mushroom Stew with Garlic Mashed Potatoes Italian White Beans with Kale Winter Harvest Citrus Pasta Chickpea Burgers with Spicy Harissa  Desserts End with something sweet (but not too sweet): Honey Vanilla Poached Pears Apple Cranberry Oatmeal Bread Baked Apple Donuts   Interested in adding some more plant-based recipes to your repertoire? Click here for more Meatless Monday inspiration. The post 14 Recipes that Will Wow Your Family and Friends this Holiday Season appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sesame Tofu

December 7 2019 VegKitchen 

Sesame Tofu Quick, easy, and tasty--this is the perfect recipe for when you are in a hurry, but still want to eat something healthy.   Save Print Sesame Tofu Serves: 4   Ingredients 250 g firm tofu 1 clove garlic, finely chopped 2 tbsp soy sauce 1 tsp sesame oil 2 pinches cayenne pepper 1 tbsp sunflower oil 2 tbsp sesame seeds Instructions Drain the firm tofu and sponge it with a paper towel. The post Sesame Tofu appeared first on VegKitchen.

Holiday Veggie Roast with Oven Cranberry Sauce

November 17 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Holiday Veggie Roast with Oven Cranberry Sauce This post was created in partnership with OXO. Today weve got a festive veggie roast recipe thats made in one oven with a lush cranberry sauce. The savoriness of the caramelized, mustard-miso roasted vegetables pairs so well with the tart, sweet, and juicy character of the cranberry sauce. Plus, the whole thing comes together in a pretty hands-off manner, with the oven doing the bulk of the work. Although Im generally excited and appreciative of any veggie side at the holiday table, I think that roasted vegetables (or any veg-centric sides in general) are often treated as an afterthought, not something that can be just as special as the main event. We are of course here to gently propose that vegetables can themselves be the main event – but even if thats not your thing, this veggie roast will be an exciting addition to your holiday table. Im particular about one thing when it comes to roasted vegetables and thats that they should be nicely cooked through, to the point of beautiful caramelization and crispy edges. Ive had so many instances of ordering roasted vegetables in restaurants, where they arrive looking beautiful, but turn out to be tough and raw on the inside upon the first bite. This is especially true for root veg of all kinds. A half-raw sweet potato or carrot is never a good thing. So its my strong belief that vegetables should be allowed plenty of time to get really, really happy in the oven. Just this little trick alone makes them taste so much better. For special occasions, I also like to roast vegetables in a mustardy sauce of some kind. Its an extra step, but it helps take the flavor to the next level and achieve that A+ caramelization. Thats what we do in this recipe. And since weve already got the oven heated up for the vegetables, we are making the cranberry sauce in the oven all at the same time. Turns out, it works just as well as the stovetop method, so why not go for the simplicity! The sauce features a luxurious mix of cranberries, green apple, and raisins, with orange juice and a kiss of cinnamon, for a beautiful balance of sweet and tart. Were very excited to partner with OXO on this holiday roasting recipe, since they make every kitchen tool youll ever need to prepare the celebratory meal of your dreams (plus much much more for your kitchen). I was so excited to upgrade to their non-stick half sheet baking pans – they are so roomy and sturdy, and perfect for roasting up big batches of vegetables without crowding them. We roast and bake a lot, so we used to go through tons of parchment paper. OXOs Silicone Baking Mat quickly took care of that problem. Its reusable, so easy to clean, and can be stored neatly rolled up in the drawer. Im so happy to replace a single use item like parchment paper with something that will last me years. They also make plenty of quality glass baking dishes, like the one that we used for the cranberry sauce, which comes with a lid so the leftovers are easy to store. OXOs pepper mill is a true dream, it grinds so smoothly and has adjustable settings for the size of your grind (we like it somewhere in the middle). I used to whisk all my sauces and dressings with a fork back in the day, but a whisk really does make the process so much quicker and more pro, and OXOs balloon whisk is a beauty. Holiday Veggie Roast with Oven Cranberry Sauce   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the mustard roasting sauce 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons white miso 2 tablespoons maple syrup 1/­­4 cup plus 2 tablespoons avocado oil or olive oil 1 teaspoon chili powder sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste for the vegetables 1 small kabocha squash - seeded and sliced into wedges 1 small delicata squash - halved, seeded, and sliced into half-moons 1 lb Brussels sprouts - tough ends removed, halved 1 medium cauliflower - sliced into bite-sized florets 7-8 medium carrots or the equivalent of sweet potato (or both) - sliced into bite-sized pieces handful toasted pecans - for garnishing for the cranberry sauce 2 10 oz bags frozen or fresh cranberries - thawed if frozen 1 Granny Smith apple - peeled, cored, and finely diced 1 shallot - finely chopped 1 cup raisins (preferably golden) 1 1/­­2 cups coconut sugar 1 tablespoon fresh grated ginger 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/­­4 cup orange juice (from about 1 medium orange) zest from 1 orange pinch of sea salt Instructions to make the mustard roasting sauce and roast the vegetables Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). In a medium bowl, combine the mustard, miso, maple syrup, oil, chili powder, salt, and pepper, and whisk until smooth. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Distribute all the vegetables among two large, lined baking sheets. Pour half of the mustard sauce over one sheet of the vegetables and the rest - over the other sheet. Mix to coat well. Place the baking sheets in the oven, and roast, mixing periodically for 45-50 minutes, or until all the vegetables are tender when pierced with a knife, with caramelized edges. Serve the vegetables right away or reheat later, topped with the cranberry sauce and sprinkled with toasted pecans. to make the cranberry sauce In a 2 quart glass baking dish or a dish if a similar size, combine the cranberries, apple, shallot, raisins, coconut sugar, ginger, cinnamon, orange juice and zest, and salt. Mix well to combine. Place the baking dish in a 400° F (200° C) oven at the same time that you are roasting the vegetables (recipe above). Cook the sauce for about 45 minutes, mixing periodically. The sauce should be simmering while cooking in the oven. Let cool a bit before serving. The sauce will set up more once it cools. Store any leftover sauce in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a week. Notes - You can easily make this recipe ahead of time. Just reheat the vegetables in the oven at 350° F (175° C) and serve the cranberry sauce right out of the fridge. - The recipe is very versatile, so you can include any of your favorite roasting vegetables in the mix. You can also include any of your favorite spices in the roasting sauce. The possibilities here are endless. 3.5.3226 The post Holiday Veggie Roast with Oven Cranberry Sauce appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Eggplant Parmesan Recipe

November 5 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Eggplant Parmesan RecipeVegan Eggplant Parmesan Recipe. Breaded Eggplant baked and served over spaghetti and chunky marinara, then topped with cashew mozzarella cream. Fancy and so Delicious! Vegan Soy-free Recipe. Nut-free option. Jump to Recipe Comfort food almost spells a loaded Eggplant Parmesan. Yes?! And it is easy enough to make home! Make the easy Chunky pasta sauce or use premade, Make the vegan mozzarella or my nut-free vegan alfredo for topping or use vegan parmesan instead for a quicker option, get the breading station ready, Bread the eggplant slices and bake or pan fry. Assemble everything and swoon. The recipe looks long as it has recipes for sauce, vegan mozz and the breaded eggplant. You can use premade portions for a much quicker meal. The pasta sauce can be made ahead and refrigerated for upto 4 days, same with the vegan mozzarella. Just make the eggplant parmesan fresh for a nice crispy result! lets make this.Continue reading: Vegan Eggplant Parmesan RecipeThe post Vegan Eggplant Parmesan Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust

November 3 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust Way back in the day when I was first getting interested in vegetarian cooking, I came across Mollie Katzen’s recipe for a Cauliflower Cheese Pie, which completely blew my mind. Maybe you know the one I’m talking about? It’s such a classic. I even developed a little tribute recipe to that pie for our first cookbook. This vegan cauliflower and leek version is not as directly inspired by Katzen’s pie, but I still fondly kept it in mind while working on this recipe. Cooked cauliflower itself already tastes kind of cheesy to me, and when baked in a ‘cheesy’ but also totally plant-based sauce like in this recipe, it’s complete heaven. This pie also features caramelized leeks and an addictive, gluten-free onion-pecan crust that’s packed with flavor. It’s definitely a special enough savory pie for a holiday table, and we can’t wait to make it again for ours. Hope you’ll consider it as well! If you’ve been cooking plant-based for a while, you’ve probably heard that boiled potatoes and carrots make for a surprisingly cheesy sauce, when blended smooth with a bunch of aromatic pantry staples like nutritional yeast, garlic powder, and miso. In this recipe, we also add sun-dried tomatoes and smoked paprika to that kind of sauce, for an extra hint of umami and smokiness. We cut a whole head of cauliflower into florets and brown it, then cook it until soft on the stovetop, where we also caramelize some leeks. The cauliflower, leeks and the sauce then get cozied up into the quickly pre-baked onion pie crust and baked all together. The crust is just 5 ingredients, which is a true achievement for gluten-free baking :) This pie is delicious the day of baking, but the leftovers are also amazing (if not better), so you could definitely make it a day ahead and reheat. We will be making the whole thing on our instagram stories this afternoon, if you’d like to see the whole step-by-step process. Happy November! Wishing you all the warmth and coziness. Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust   Print Serves: one 9-10 pie Ingredients for the crust neutral oil for oiling the pie dish 1¼ cup ground pecans (grinding directions in the recipe) ½ cup tapioca starch pinch sea salt 1 medium onion - roughly chopped 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds for the cheese sauce 1 large or 2 small white potatoes 1 medium carrot 2-3 sun dried tomato halves (soaked in hot water if not oil-packed/­­if very dry) or 1 tablespoon tomato paste ¼ cup non-dairy milk 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon miso 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika pinch of sea salt for the cauliflower and leeks avocado oil or olive oil 2 large leeks, white and light green parts only - thinly sliced sea salt red pepper flakes - to taste 1 large head of cauliflower - cut into florets Instructions to make the crust Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a 9-10 pie dish by oiling it well. Place a generous 1 cup of pecans in a food processor and grind into a flour, taking care not to over-grind. Measure out 1¼ cups of the ground pecans and transfer that amount to a large mixing bowl. Save the rest of the ground pecans for a future recipe, or see note. Add the tapioca starch and salt to the bowl, mix to combine. Add the onion to the food processor and puree it. Its okay to have some small onion chunks, but the puree should be pretty uniform. Transfer the onions to a medium bowl, add the ground flax and mix to combine. Let the mixture sit for 10 minutes, letting the flax bloom. Add the mixture to the bowl with the pecan flour and mix well to combine. Transfer the crust dough into the prepared pie dish and form an even pie crust, using a spoon and your hands. Place the crust in a freezer for 15 minutes to set. Cover the crust with parchment paper and baking beans, and blind bake for 15 minutes. Remove the cover and bake for an additional 5 minutes, until the base of the crust is dry to the touch. to make the cheese sauce Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Take care not to over-blend, so that the starch in the potatoes doesnt give the sauce a gluey texture. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. to prepare the vegetables and bake the pie Preheat the oven to 350° F (175° C). Heat about 1 tablespoon of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the leeks, a pinch of salt and red pepper flakes and cook the leeks for 8-10 minutes, until they begin to soften. Turn the heat down to low, cover the pan and cook the leeks for another 10 minutes. Remove the lid, turn the heat back up to medium and cook for another 5 minutes, until the leeks are very soft and somewhat caramelized. Transfer the leeks to a bowl and set aside. Wipe the pan clean and heat another tablespoon of oil over medium heat. Add the cauliflower florets along with a pinch of salt and mix to coat. Distribute the cauliflower in a single layer and let sear, undisturbed, for about 3 minutes, or until the undersides are nicely browned. Mix and keep cooking the cauliflower until soft throughout, for about 15 minutes. If your cauliflower is not softening, cover the pan with a lid and turn the heat down to medium-low, letting it steam until soft. Add the caramelized leeks and half of the cheese sauce to the pan and mix to combine. Transfer the cauliflower mixture to the pre-baked crust, carefully evening it out with a spoon. Add the rest of the sauce on top, evening it out. Cover the pie with parchment paper, foil, or a lid and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover and bake for another 5-10 minutes, until slightly browned on top. Let cool well before slicing. Notes If you have any leftover ground pecans, you can make a quick cheesy sprinkle by mixing them with nutritional yeast, sea salt, and black pepper to taste. Sprinkle over this pie, pasta dishes, avocado toast, etc. 3.5.3226 The post Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola

November 1 2019 Vegan Richa 

Cardamom Maple Pecan GranolaCardamom Maple Pecan Granola. Use other spices of choice in this delicious granola. It makes a great gift. No Refined Sugar or oil. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe. Jump to Recipe Snacking can sometimes be the harder to figure out, compared to meals. Its the in between meal time when you dont want something heavy but still satisfying enough. Granola and granola bars made from scratch work out really well for those times. Homemade granola has sugar you can control and oil you can omit. Granola over vegan yogurt, porridge, chia pudding or as is from the jar, is amazing to have around. Whether you like a sweet Date Caramel Granola  , or a granola bar (Sunbutter Granola Bars), or want spicy savory snack with this Sriracha Orange Quinoa Peanut Granola or get adventurous with this Lentil cranberry Granola! There are plenty of options and variations! This easy granola has oats, pumpkin or sunflower seeds and pecans. The maple and pecans add a buttery caramel like flavor, the pecans get candied when covered with maple and cardamom complements the flavor profile amazingly. Change it up with seeds or nuts of choice. Lets make some granola.Continue reading: Cardamom Maple Pecan GranolaThe post Cardamom Maple Pecan Granola appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Humane Society of the United States holds plant-based culinary training for MBJ Cafeteria Corp at John Jay College

October 21 2019 Meatless Monday 

Humane Society of the United States holds plant-based culinary training for MBJ Cafeteria Corp at John Jay CollegeMBJ staff with HSUS Forward Food chefs With the growing popularity of plant-based foods, colleges and universities are adding more vegan and vegetarian dishes to their culinary repertoire. Plant-based menus are especially popular with younger Americans. Its estimated that 63% of millennials and 65% of Gen Z Americans are trying to incorporate more plant-forward foods into their diets. Concerns for their personal health and the health of planet Earth are key drivers. To meet this demand, foodservice companies are adding a tempting variety of vegetarian and vegan dishes to their menus, and chefs and staff are learning about new ingredients and techniques to create palate-pleasing, plant-based dishes. HSUS Forward Food Jenn with MBJ kitchen staff member This is where the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) plant-based training initiative comes in. Since 2015, the HSUS has provided plant-based training to more than 10,000 dining directors and chefs at major food service institutions across the country. The HSUSs team of professional chefs and registered dietitians design menus, train chefs, lead plant-based leadership summits and partner with hundreds of individual institutions on creating plant-based food initiatives. In turn, those trained provide more plant-based menu items to millions of patrons. The team at MBJ Cafeteria Corp in New York City is ramping up its plant-based menu. The MBJ staff participated in a free plant-based culinary training event at John Jay College to become educated on plant-based techniques and meals in order to increase their offerings at John Jay College and their other City University of New York (CUNY) contracts. Some of the delicious dishes they learned how to prepare for students included buffalo cauliflower wings, fire roasted corn chowder, chickpea and walnut pesto with penne pasta, and garbanzo bean sliders. MBJ kitchen staff consult HSUS Forward Food Chef Amy (second from right) MBJ is taking a deep dive into plant-based fare and HSUS is excited to help train their staff on plant-based meals and techniques, says Stefanie Heath, manager of food and nutrition for the HSUS. After the two-day HSUS training, Aldana Vasques Williams, Vice President, MBJ Cafeteria Corp, said, The hands-on training event motivated our team to imagine new ways to create delicious plant-based meals that are cost-effective and sustainable. Were excited to apply our learnings in developing a plant-based menu that well launch in January in conjunction with Meatless Monday. Display of plant-based dishes MBJ staff created with HSUS Forward Food chefs The post Humane Society of the United States holds plant-based culinary training for MBJ Cafeteria Corp at John Jay College appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Creamy Cajun Pasta with Breaded Tofu

October 5 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Creamy Cajun Pasta with Breaded TofuVegan Creamy Cajun Pasta with Crisp Breaded tofu. Nut-free Creamy Cajun Spice Sauce with Farfalle and Breaded Tofu. 23 Gm of Protein.Vegan Nut-free Recipe. Soy-free option. Easily oil-free Jump to Recipe My Cajun blend gets used up quickly right after my garam masala and berbere blends. Its a versatile blend that works in many types of meals. This Creamy Pasta Sauce has the cajun blend for a smoky delicious flavor profile. The sauce is creamy, fluffy and is made with tofu. I have started to make more Tofu sauces(Lemon Asparagus Pasta) as they are so much quicker than cashew sauces. They also amp up the protein in the meal! The peppers and onions add flavor. I top the pasta with a smoky breaded tofu. You can use other toppings such as roasted cauliflower or veggies, or chickpeas or vegan meat subs. Or just serve as is! See Recipe notes for tofu-free option.Continue reading: Vegan Creamy Cajun Pasta with Breaded TofuThe post Vegan Creamy Cajun Pasta with Breaded Tofu appeared first on Vegan Richa.


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