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Green Peanut Butter Sandwich + Smoothie

November 21 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Peanut Butter Sandwich + Smoothie Hey! First of all, thanks for all your cheering words on the news of our marriage. That was fun! Secondly, I promised a lot of persons on instagram that we would share a chocolate recipe which currently goes by the working name Taco Brownies. But all the interest in them made me a little anxious so I’m heading back into the kitchen today to test another round before we’re ready to post them. Here is something to snack on while you wait. A peanut butter sandwich and a green smoothie. Technically, a sandwich hardly qualifies as a recipe. But what we want to say with this point is really just that you should try peanut butter on a savory sandwich. I love all kind of nut butter sandwiches and even if I usually top it with sliced bananas, apples, strawberries or a sweet compote, this savory version is my most recent addiction. Crispy lettuce and cucumber add a nice textural contrast to the sandwich without competing with the peanut butter flavor. The cottage cheese makes it moist and yummy and the chickpeas ... well I don’t know why the chickpeas are there actually. I guess I just like chickpeas inside my sandwiches. This sandwich is yummy, sticky, crunchy, rich and yet fresh somehow. We usually make it with a good quality rye bread but anything goes. I just realized that this is a green sandwich without avocado so we should perhaps call it “the-death-of-avocado-sandwich-sandwich” or something catchy like that. Anyway, it’s good. And it’s not impossible that you already have the ingredients at home. So, try it! For the other recipe, I’ll let Luise do the talking. It was her idea to pair the sandwich with a smoothie and since she is queen Latifah of green smoothies I am sure she has something clever to say. /­­David Here’s something clever for you. Make this smoothie. It’s that good. It has lots of green vegetables and a mild and fresh taste with tones of lemon and ginger. Just the way I like it. Also, using frozen vegetables makes the smoothie creamy and more nutritious and you can skip the ice. It also works really well paired with a sandwich as well because (most of) you have two hands and now you can have a good snack in each hand. We actually wrote a “In The Other Hand” chapter for our smoothie book with lots of great snacks, but we couldn’t fit it in the book. Lots of love! /­­Luise Green Peanut Butter Sandwich Makes 2  Just one note on peanut butter. Read the ingredient list in the supermarket and go for the brands that only list peanuts (and maybe salt). You can of course use other types of nut butters as well, I’d especially recommend cashew butter for this, but it’s usually a lot pricier. 4 slices rye bread 4 tbsp peanut butter a few leaves crispy lettuce 5 cm /­­ 2 inches cucumber 4 tbsp cottage cheese 4 tbsp chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans 2 tsp olive oil  pea shoots thyme Spread peanut butter on each bread slice. Rinse the lettuce and cucumber. Tear the lettuce into smaller pieces, slice the cucumber thinly and place both on top of each peanut butter sandwich. Top with cottage cheese, chickpeas, a drizzle of olive oil, pea shoots and thyme. Put the sandwich together, wrap with sandwich paper and dig in. Broccoli & Ginger Smoothie 2 normal glasses or 1 very large If you don’t have a super powerful blender, start by mixing all ingredients except broccoli and banana (because they are thicker and will slow down the blender blades). When mixed until smooth, add the last ingredients and mix again. If you like it a little sweeter, you can add a fresh date or more banana. 4-5 florets frozen broccoli (or frozen cauliflower) 1 large banana 1 large handful fresh spinach 1 large handful fresh kale 1 large knob fresh ginger 1 slice lemon, peeled 1-2 cups plant milk, (oat milk /­­ rice milk /­­ almond milk) Add all ingredients to a high speed blender and mix until smooth. Taste and adjust the flavor and consistency if needed. Pour into two glasses or bottles.

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes

November 21 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes It’s been eight years since we started collecting recipes on this website, and over those years we’ve accumulated quite a few holiday recipe ideas. We thought it was finally time to do a big, comprehensive round up of our absolute favorites. We’ve got you covered on mains and hearty sides, as well as lighter sides, soups, salads, dessert, and drinks. Wishing you and your family a happy and healthy holiday season :) v = vegan, gf = gluten-free, veg = vegetarian, vo = vegan option Mains and Hearty Sides Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower (v, gf) There’s something so grand and ritualistic about a holiday table centerpiece that took time, care and anticipation. Since most such centerpieces involve meat, one can feel a little left out during the peak of a celebratory meal if meat is not their jam. In this recipe, we applied this grand, ceremonious approach to braising a head of cauliflower. Someone even made a video outlining the entire braising process. Baked Latkes (v, gf) Latkes are my ultimate weakness, but I’ve always dreaded the long and smoky process of frying them. My love for latkes is so strong though, that I had to come up with an easier path to that crispy, golden potato goodness. These baked latkes are SO much easier to make than the traditional fried kind, since the oven does all the main work for you. The flavor and texture are not compromised one bit, I promise. The recipe also includes a beet salad with an avocado mayo, which is to die for. Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna (v, gf) This healthful but hearty lasagna employs spaghetti squash in place lasagna noodles. There’s mushrooms, mung beans, kale, carrots, tomato sauce, and an easy almond ‘cheese’ as well. Braised Leeks with Cauliflower White Bean Mash (v, gf) If you’ve never tried braising leeks, you are in for a serious surprise. They are amazing, especially served over a hearty cauliflower and white bean mash. If leeks are not your thing, consider making the mash alone and serve it as a side, to up your holiday mash game :) Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin (v, gf) I can’t say enough about this gratin comprised of layers of sweet potato, Brussels sprouts, and caramelized onions, showered with spices and coconut milk. It’s easy to make but so beautiful and satisfying at the same time. Warm Salad of Roasted Cauliflower, Grapes, and Black Rice (v, gf) This will forever be my favorite fall/­­winter salad. It’s all about the contrast of flavors: aromatic black rice, nourishing spiced cauliflower, juicy grapes, and a slightly spicy miso dressing full of umami. Sprinkle in some pomegranate seeds for an extra festive look. Sorghum Beet Risotto (v, gf) This vibrant risotto would make for an excellent side dish at a holiday table, especially if you don’t know what to do with that forgotten bag of sorghum in the back of your pantry :) Curried Squash and Kale Riceless Risotto (vo, gf) Another alternative (aka riceless) risotto option. This one uses riced kabocha squash in place of actual rice. It’s luxuriously creamy, warming, and overall impressive. Root Vegetable Chickpea Flour Quiche (v, gf) This vegan quiche comes together quite magically, with no crust, eggs or cream to speak of. Chickpea flour acts similarly to the egg-cream foundation of traditional quiche and solidifies into a sort of custard when baked at a high temperature. Add a studding of silky root vegetables and greens to that, and you’ve got yourself the perfect, healthful and delicious fall/­­winter quiche. Soups and Sides Creamy Butternut Squash, Pear and Cranberry Soup with Crispy Kale (v, gf) This is butternut squash soup elevated. The addition of cranberries and pear is as delicious as it is unexpected. There’s a special ingredient that will help aid digestion during a big meal, too. Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower (v, gf) A soup that’s both grounding and fortifying, and good enough to serve as an unexpected, colorful starter at the holiday table. Pink Soup with Roasted Onion and Broccoli (v, gf) Another stunning, colorful soup option. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage (v, gf) We love mashed potatoes, but we also love pairing a bowl of mashed potatoes with another, more interesting mash made with underutilized root vegetables. Both celeriac and parsnips are so uniquely flavored and healthful, it’s no wonder that they make for some delicious mash. Serve it with the Braised Holiday Cauliflower for the ultimate plant-based holiday meal. Miso-Date Ghee Brussels Sprouts (veg, gf) This recipe teaches you how to make your own ghee (golden, clarified butter that has a higher smoke point than normal butter and is low in lactose and casein /­­ not vegan), as well as how to make miso-date ghee, which is too delicious for words. It’s great on roasted Brussels sprouts, as well as everything else in this world. Sweet Potato Nachos with Cheesy Chipotle Sauce and All the Fixings (v, gf) A healthful take on nachos, with crispy sweet potatoes taking the place of tortilla chips. Great for self-serve style, snack-heavy parties. If you don’t want to go through the intricate process of making sweet potato chips, roasted sweet potatoes will work perfectly in their place. Kale Salad with Marinated Beets, Lentils and Almond Cheese (v, gf) This salad is simple but effective: visually stunning, healthful and delicious. Plus, you’ll want to sprinkle that almond cheese on everything! Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad (v, gf) Earthy, nourishing parsnips go so well with juicy, bittersweet citrus. The combination is especially irresistible when sprinkled with spiced and toasted walnuts and raisins. Use grapefruit if you can’t find pomelo. Desserts Apple Pecan Pie with Salted Pumpkin Caramel (v) This is three favorite Thanksgiving pies in one: apple, pecan and pumpkin. It’s decadent and impressive, and a definite crowd-pleaser. (Also pictured in slice form at the beginning of this post). Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake (v, gf) Slices of this fruit and nut cake make for a great accompaniment to a cheese plate, as well as an awesome gift basket component. Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries (v, gf) The super-festive appearance of this decadent, frozen fudge basically speaks for itself. Rum and Raisin Bundt with Orange and Miso Glaze (v) The universally loved combination of rum and raisins is elevated by a sweet and subtly salty orange and miso glaze in this vegan bundt recipe we developed for Food & Wine. Sweet Potato Caramel Nougat (v, gf) Oh man, this nougat! Not as sticky or sweet as traditional nougat, this one has a caramel-like complexity from our trademark sweet potato caramel. There is a studding of toasted nuts and cookie crumble throughout each slice, too. Great for homemade gifts or party platters. Upside Down Citrus Polenta Cake (v, gf) This cake is a crowd pleaser through and through. It’s got it all in terms of stunning looks and bright, special flavor. Black and White Chocolate Pudding (v, gf) These elegant, black and white chocolate pudding cups are easy to put together, but very impressive and full of whole food ingredients. Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache (v, gf) If you are looking for a grand and fun cake project, but still want something wholesome and not too sugary, look no further than this stunner of a cake. Hibiscus Orange Blossom Turkish Delight In this recipe, we’ve updated the old school treat with the use of healthful ingredients, and the beautiful, floral flavors of hibiscus and orange blossom. Serve these Turkish delights alongside tiny tongs at a holiday party for the ultimate, fancy dessert experience :) Banana Toffee Tart (v) This tart is worth making just for the vegan date toffee alone, but combine that with a (vegan) buttery crust and caramelized bananas, and you’ll forever be everyone’s favorite host. Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats (veg, gf) Another crowd favorite from a few years ago, this cake is like carrot cake, but made with parsnips in place of carrots. The parsnips yield their moisture and delicate flavor to the cake dough, which is then layered with a cream cheese frosting and topped with candied kumquats. This recipe can easily be veganized – just use maple syrup in place of honey to candy the kumquats and make the frosting. Honey-Roasted Pears with Vanilla Cashew Cream (veg, gf) All the components of this dessert can be made ahead of time, and assembled later. The cashew cream is not your average cashew cream, either – it’s extra-fluffy with the help of a special ingredient. White Chocolate Blood Orange Mousse Tart (v, gf) This delicate white chocolate mousse tart is flavored and colored with the juice and zest of blood orange. You also have the option of skipping the crust and making the mousse alone. Just distribute it amongst little ramekins for individual servings. Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies (v, gf) These cookies are crunchy on the outside, chewy on the inside, and incredibly buttery throughout. Their unexpected green coloring looks beautiful, contrasted by the red topping of goji berries. Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Roasted Pecans (veg, gf) Winter squash does beautifully in ice cream, especially the naturally sweet, bright orange kabocha squash. In this recipe, kabocha ice cream is swirled with a simple, tart cranberry sauce and topped with maple pecans. This recipe can easily be vegan – just use maple syrup in place of honey. Miso Caramel Popcorn (v, gf) It’s entirely possible to make really good caramel popcorn at home! This popcorn is sweet, salty, and incredibly addicting – you’ve been warned :) Drinks Rosemary Hot White Chocolate (v, gf) This hot white chocolate is both cozy and decadent, with unexpected, warming notes from rosemary and a perfectly smooth, frothy consistency. Quick Persimmon Eggnog (v, gf) This is eggnog for both the adventurous and the health-conscious. Much lighter than the original, but still perfectly creamy and satisfying. Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules (v, gf) This is the perfect winter cocktail for those of us who don’t drink alcohol, but still want to participate in the celebratory ritual of clinking glasses and toasting with something special and delicious. Pear Cranberry Chai (v, gf) This cozy chai is brewed with the addition of pears and cranberries, which takes the flavor to the next level. Simply put, it’s the best chai we’ve ever had. H A P P Y   H O L I D A Y S  !  !  !   The post Favorite Plant-Based Holiday Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan

November 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Chi San Wan is a creative consultant, mama, entrepreneur and author based in London. We love Chi’s beautiful cookbook, her aesthetic, and down-to-earth approach to wellness, and we were very excited to get a peak at her everyday routine. In this interview, Chi tells us about her morning and bedtime routines, her ways of dealing with stress, the simple beauty tricks she’s learned from her mother, making space for the occasional cake and wine, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I enjoy routine, especially in the mornings. Before Marloe came along, routine was the only thing keeping me grounded. I have all sorts floating around in my head, and working for myself means one day can be very different to the next, so I need my mornings to be predictable in order to get me in the right mind-set for the rest of the day. However, now that those routines are governed by Marloe, our one year old, things are somewhat less predictable, and I have learnt to let go of the importance of routine a little. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. They vary slightly from day to day, depending on whats on the agenda, but in an ideal and average world my morning would be waking up around 6am, do some stretching, then 20 mins of meditation. Around 6:30am Marloe wakes up and we like to cuddle in bed together as a family (shes really into giving kisses at the moment). We get out of bed around 7am and take turns to shower whilst the other one plays with Marloe, makes lemon hot water and preps breakfast. We sit down together for breakfast between 7:30am-8am and have our mornings chats – most of the time theres food throwing involved. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I like to stop any computer work by 9pm, make myself a small hot drink and climb into bed to do some reading – usually self-help or study. I try to sleep by 10pm latest, but sometimes me and my boyfriend just end up chatting about the day until 11pm or midnight… Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Typically… Breakfast – multi-grain porridge with almond milk, topped with whatever seasonal fruits are around and some nut butter Lunch – quinoa, roast veg, salad, some kraut, some seaweed – usually leftovers Snack – sourdough and avocado, or an apple with cheese /­­ nut butter, whatever I find on my travels Dinner – salmon and veg, or daal /­­ curry with rice, yoghurt and lots of freshly chopped herbs -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? If I have the time, I will make myself a matcha latte in the mornings or for a snack. If we have eggs, maybe I will have an Earl Grey tea or some fresh juice. I only ever drink coffee when I fancy a croissant! Then it would have to be a flat white with fresh almond milk or oat milk.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I never used to! But somehow, during pregnancy and since Marloe was born, I have developed a sweet tooth! Maybe its to keep energy up? As the weather is colder now in London, I have been obsessed with searching for the best hot chocolate (always disappointing and not chocolatey enough!). When I get the urge for something sweet, its usually something very specific, not any old sweet thing will suffice, and I will have to go on a hunt for it. Though usually after dinner, I am happy with a piece of raw chocolate from the fridge.  -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I try and have a wide and varied diet to keep things in check, and food is the first thing I look to when trying to manage my general wellness. I try and listen to my body, even if sometimes its asking for wine or cake! Usually, it needs just that and feels much better for it. In terms of taking anything else, since pregnancy and the birth of Marloe I have taken a high DHA Omega 3 supplement and probiotics daily (just in case I dont get the chance to eat it in food form). Once a week I will make some water steeped in goji berries, longan (when my mum visits, she will always leave me some) and any dried herbs I have on hand and sip on that. I have some adaptogenics on hand too – chaga, cordyceps, reishi, ashwaghanda, schisandra – but I dont make a habit of taking them everyday, only when I need to. -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Do you try to guard her from all unhealthy/­­processed foods, or are you more relaxed about it all? Do you have any advice for parents who want to raise their kids to be comfortable with real, whole foods? For her first year I was a little precious about what I gave her to eat – everything was made at home and organic produce only. I went with baby led weaning which is so messy, anyone who knows me knows I cannot handle mess so this was, and still is, a learning curve for me. But it gives me great pleasure watching Marloe enjoy her food, and try anything I give her. She has days where she is super picky, but generally she is a happy eater. I am more relaxed and realistic about what she consumes now, because I cant always control where we are – she has predominately home made food, but when we are out she will have bits of whatever we are eating, and its fun to watch her try new things! I really recommend baby led weaning. If you read up on it, it makes a lot of sense to get kids to eat real, whole foods this way – who wants to eat mush? It could be anything! Real food looks and tastes much more exciting and it makes them more adventurous with food, and less fussy. Eating together at the table is important to me as well, and for Marloe to have what we are eating – she knows if we have given her a different meal and will shout until we feed her some of ours.  Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I love to fit yoga in when I can and I walk a lot (at a very fast pace), but other than that, its chasing the baby around. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I dont do any form of exercise that I find torturous, such as spin or anything high adrenaline; it doesnt work for me. I enjoy yoga – dynamic or kundalini, and walking in nature a lot.  Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I think if youre comfortable in your own skin, that is beautiful. But for everyone, that could be down to many different factors and it will chop and change with time. Someone who is confident but grounded with integrity – their beauty will shine through. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Its pretty simple and not that exciting! I try and dry-brush when I can, I use Dr. Bronners Baby soap for the body, and then after a shower, whilst the body is wet, I will rub a concoction of almond oil, sesame oil and essential oils that I fancy, all over. For my face, I take the day off with coconut oil and rose water (I make my own with 3/­­4 organic rose water and 1/­­4 colloidal silver). For my morning shower, I will use a thin flannel to scrub the face and spray with rose water, followed by a tiny bit of Nucifera, The Balm – a recent find in LA. Its been amazing for the change in weather in the UK.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water, water, water. Not eating so much dairy, wheat and sugar, but consuming more good fats like avocado, coconut and ghee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mum looks so good and youthful, but she has never drank much, never smoked, never wore make-up...thats her trick! I have never smoked, I drink less now naturally, as I am breastfeeding and I’m too busy to do any make-up, so usually a go at the eyelash curlers will do for the day! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I think fitting in meditation everyday greatly reduces stress for me and puts things into perspective. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Acupuncture. Talking it out with my boyfriend and friends. Knowing that ‘this too shall pass’. Treating myself to whatever food and drink I desire (within budget of course).  -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I take Wellness tablets. I make sure to be hydrated and wrap up warm at all times, especially the throat and chest. I make congee or daal, something warming and easy to digest so the body can rest.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? At the moment, I am very much governed by my daughters day to day antics, and I try and fit everything else around her. This does stress me out at times, but then I try and remember to enjoy these first years with her. I am lucky to have this time together with her, because I am freelance. I just try and plan my time carefully (shared iCal helps!), but not everything always goes to plan – which I am learning to let go of.  Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Things generally fall better into place when I take time to be kind to myself, so I just keep reminding myself that self-care is important, especially for a working mum. Setting routines like bed times for myself etc helps with this and saying no to some friends, projects, events etc when you just need the time to sort stuff out, so that everything else can run more smoothly. Obviously there is room for spontaneity, thats what keeps me feeling alive!  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Meditation. Making the time for it. It keeps me feeling focused, rested and puts things into perspective. Its a form of self-care and love for myself, and is incredibly nurturing. I dont always do it every day twice a day, but when I do, it helps immensely. I learnt from Jacqui at The Broad Place in the summer and, hands down, they’re the best teachings of meditation I have come across, because its real and it works.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Its easier said than done, but I try not to stress about it, and just trust the process rather than sit and wallow. Ill meet up with friends and my peers and we chat it out – usually its something that is felt by a few people, and I find that it usually reverberates between similar minds, like theres something going on with the energy around us. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I cant pinpoint one thing, its a zeitgeist thing, its in the air...maybe because we are entering a revolution, the age of Aquarius. I am constantly  inspired and influenced by the people I surround myself with, the internet, social media, so books /­­ movies /­­ classes suggested through those mediums are naturally the ones I gravitate to.  Knowledge -- You co-authored A Simple Table, a beautiful cookbook that focuses on fresh and simple meals. What was the key message that you aimed to communicate with the recipes and lifestyle tips in the book? Thank you. The key message was that everyday nourishment neednt be difficult or a chore. It could be simple acts of kindness to yourself, or simple recipes that dont require crazy expensive ingredients. Its to encourage the reader to explore what makes them feel good inside and out, as everyone is different and there is no one formula. Most of all, it was to enjoy the simple pleasures.  -- Tell us a bit about the fresh almond milk company that you co-founded, The Pressery. What inspired you to start it and what did you learn from having that business? I felt a change in me, and the start of a movement back in 2013 when I became a little disillusioned working in fashion, and more excited about food and drink and the effects it has on us. I have always been a food fanatic, so it was natural for me to explore this familiar and yet unknown territory. My business partner had been feeling the same for a while, so it felt like the right time to launch a small business in something we were both passionate about. I was already making almond milk at home, and after some research we settled on focusing on making the one product the best we could. There is a lot to learn through starting a business from nothing (I was a freelance fashion stylist before that), and building a brand from scratch – we started selling at a market and then got into Selfridges, and I grew the social media following from 0 to 22k organically in 2 years. Ive met many people through the business, with whom I am still good friends now and work with today, as a creative consultant. It was a natural progression for me and I wouldnt be where I am now if it wasnt for The Pressery.  Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I like to have a glass of red wine, make dinner with my boyfriend and possibly have a candle lit bath with Epsom salts and essential oils.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – salt. by Nayyirah Waheed, there is always a piece that speaks to me at any point in my life Song/­­Album – I will never tire of Your Hand In Mine by Explosions In The Sky Movie – In The Mood For Love has been a long favourite – the soundtrack, the colours, the feelings… Piece of Art – anything by Agnes Martin really does feed and soothe my soul, when the exhibition was at the Tate Modern, I went about 5 times! -- What are your favorite places to eat in London? Leilas  for breakfast, Esters  for brunch, Towpath  for lunch, Granger & Co Kings Cross  for work meetings, Violet  for cake and tea, P. Franco  for wine and small dishes and for dinner – Primeur , Campania and Jones , Uchi , Westerns Laundry , Legs , Luca ...too many!  -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list . What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – comfy t-shirt and shorts for sleep – current book  – Nucifera The Balm – rose water spray – essential oils to mix – Weleda lip balm – Dr. Bronners Baby soap (which doubles up as shaving foam) – x2 pairs of jeans (one boyfriend, one flares) – x1 sunglasses – x1 rucksack, x1 fancy bag, x1 tote bag – x1 black trousers (usually wide culottes) – x3 different style tees – x1 cashmere sweater – x2 white shirts  – x1 jumpsuit /­­ playsuit  – x1 dress for day or evening – x2 sandals (one Birkenstocks, one Isabel Marant) – x1 trainers – x1 smart shoes (for me, its Doc Martens) – x1 jacket or coat (depending on the destinations temperature) – x1 light cashmere scarf -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Id love to hear from Julie from Rudy Jude, Rosa from Cereal Magazine, Serena Mitnik-Miller from General Store and Holly from The Acey. Photos taken by Jessica MacCormick, Emma Lee and Chi San Wan. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Easy Vegan Mashed Potatoes – Instant Pot or Saucepan

November 13 2017 Vegan Richa 

Easy Vegan Mashed Potatoes – Instant Pot or SaucepanEasy Vegan Mashed Potatoes. Serve with gravy as a side. Fluffy Instant Pot Mashed Potatoes. Saucepan option Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Recipe. Can be oil-free. Mashed Potatoes don’t need an introduction. They are used is many cuisines in many different ways. These are basic mashed potatoes that you can amp up to preference. Potatoes are cooked in an Instant Pot or Saucepan along with raw garlic, drained and mixed with coconut milk to add the creaminess, some herbs and spices and whipped up.  These Garlic Mashed potatoes are simple, quick and amazing! Serve these as you wish with a simple mushroom free gravy or a mushroom gravy. What are your favorite additions to mashed potatoes! Continue reading: Easy Vegan Mashed Potatoes – Instant Pot or SaucepanThe post Easy Vegan Mashed Potatoes – Instant Pot or Saucepan appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married!

November 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Pumpkin & Kale Salad + Just Married! Hey guess what, we just got married! In a beautiful greenhouse in Rosendal’s Garden in Stockholm, surrounded by our closest family and friends (+ ALL their kids) and accompanied by live jazz music and gorgeous food. Even though I proposed to Luise in the back of a campervan on New Zealand almost three years ago, we pulled this wedding together - from idea to I do - in less than five weeks. With three young kids, constantly overflowing mailboxes and an unhealthy always-need-to-be-in-control tendency, we realized that if we don’t do a quick and spontaneous wedding we probably won’t get hitched until we are retired. So instead of our dream wedding going on for three days and nights in the Italian country side, we aimed for an informal and cosy autumn gathering in one of our favorite Stockholm locations. It turned out so much better than we could ever have hoped for and we are now officially mr and mrs. We let the chefs at Rosendal take care of all the food (which was a huge relief). Our only instructions for the lunch buffet (lunch is much easier if you want friends with kids to attend) was that we wanted hearty salads and food roughly in line with our own philosophy. Typically, we didn’t get any photos of the whole buffet table, but there were roasted vegetables, butter tossed potato and chanterelles, slaw with pickled mustard seeds, hummus, sourdough bread, sauerkraut, a goat’s cheese salad with shredded beets, herb sauces and lots and lots of cake. All seasonal and local, pretty decorated with fruit and flowers. And so good! Another salad that they prepared was made with roasted pumpkin, cavolo nero and buckwheat and we have recreated our own version of it here below. We never got the exact recipe from the chef so this is a pretty loose interpretation of how we remembered it (after a couple of glasses of champagne). We are sharing that today along with a few snaps that David’s sister took at the wedding. Forget everything I’ve previously stated about marriage. This was fun! And I feel damn fortunate to marry the most beautiful woman I know. Lots of love from us! The kids were more interested in the fireplace than the camera ... These two guys were so good! Send me an email if you need Chet Baker-style jazz musicians in Stockholm and I’ll forward their contact info.        This is a gorgeous and rustic recipe perfect for this season. It would also be ideal for Christmas, maybe with some cinnamon added to the dressing. One of the things we really love about this is that you don’t need to peel the pumpkin (which always is a hassle), just cut into wedges and you can even keep the seeds on. Some of the seeds might get a little burnt but the one hanging on to the slices add a nice crunch. We cover the pumpkin wedges in dressing both before and after roasting to give them a delicious coating. Roasted Pumpkin Salad with Cavolo Nero & Buckwheat Serves 4 1 Hokkaido squash, Kent pumpkin or other small winter squash/­­pumpkin variety 200 g /­­ 4 cups dinosaur kale (cavolo nero) or regular kale, thick stems removed  1 cup /­­ 250 ml /­­ 170 g raw buckwheat groats, rinsed Dressing 125 ml /­­ 1/­­2 cup olive oil 3 tbsp maple syrup 1-2 lemons, juice + zest 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch fresh ginger, finely grated Sea salt & pepper To serve Pomegranate seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75 g toasted pumpkin seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 150 g feta cheese Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F fan mode. Divide the pumpkin in half and then cut it into wedges. Leave any seeds that are hanging on to the wedges and discard the rest. Stir together the dressing, taste and adjust the flavors. Pour about half of it in a bowl and toss the pumpkin slices in it (keep the remaining dressing in the bowl). Place on a baking tray and roast for about 25-30 minutes. We like it a little burnt towards the edges. When roasted, carefully loosen the wedges from the tray and brush them with the remaining dressing in the bowl. While the pumpkin is roasting, cook the buckwheat groats in 2 cups water for 7-8 minutes until soft but not mushy. Drain any remaining water and leave to cool off a bit. Add the remaining half of the dressing to a large bowl. Tear the kale leaves into smaller pieces, place in the bowl and use your hands to massage them until they soften up. Add the buckwheat to the bowl and toss so it’s all mixed. Arrange the kale and buckwheat on the tray (or a serving plate) together with the pumpkin wedges. Scatter with pomegranate seeds, pumpkin seeds and crumbled feta cheese. Enjoy! Wedding photos by Johanna Frenkel.

Chipotle Corn Chowder

October 24 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chipotle Corn ChowderThis sweet, satisfying Chipotle Corn Chowder is made with frozen whole kernel corn. The garnish of pimientos and parsley adds a dash of color. Chipotle Corn Chowder - 1 tablespoon safflower oil - 1 medium onion, minced or shredded - 1 carrot, finely chopped or shredded - 1 russet potato, finely chopped or shredded - 1/­­4 teaspoon celery salt - 2 cups vegetable broth - 1 16-ounce bag frozen corn kernels - Salt and ground black pepper - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon liquid smoke - 2 cups plain unsweetened almond milk - 1/­­2 cup raw cashew pieces, soaked for 3 hours, then drained - 1 chipotle chile in adobo sauce - 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley - 1 2-ounce jar chopped pimientos, drained - Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, and potato. Cover and cook for 4 minutes to soften. Stir in the celery salt, broth, corn, and salt and pepper to taste. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer, stir in the coriander, liquid smoke, and almond milk, and cook, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes. - While the soup is simmering, combine the drained cashews and chipotle in a blender with 1 cup of the simmering broth from the soup. Blend until smooth and creamy, then add 1 more cup of the soup and blend until smooth. Stir the mixture back into the soup. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Ladle the soup into bowls and garnish with parsley and pimientos. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. Save Save The post Chipotle Corn Chowder appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan 7 Cup Burfi – Chickpea flour and Coconut Fudge

October 19 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan 7 Cup Burfi – Chickpea flour and Coconut FudgeVegan 7 Cup Burfi – 6 Ingredient Diwali Sweet with Chickpea flour and Coconut veganized with almond milk and oil. Easy Traditional Indian Sweet 7 cup cake for Diwali or other festivals. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Nut-free option So here’s the deal. This recipe is called 7 cup Cake/­­ Burfi. It has a common (non vegan) recipe that uses 7 cup total ingredients..1 cup besan, 1 cup coconut (shredded), 1 cup milk. 1 cup ghee (clarified butter) and 3 cups sugar with a bit of variation here and there in the amounts , added cashews etc. Yes you read that right. I mean, there is no way these things (with vegan subs) together are not going to make a delicious result.  Those amounts are way out there for me. I use vegan butter for the vegan version and much less of it and less of the sugar as well. The fudge also works well with organic safflower or other neutral oil. Chickpea flour is roasted with a tbsp of oil,, then the coconut, sugar and milk are mixed in. The mixture is cooked to caramelize the sugar a bit. Cardamom adds the amazing flavor. These burfis are easier than many of the other burfis(I am looking at your mysore pak). Try these easy Sweet burfi bars with chickpea flour, cardamom, coconut and love. This week is all about the festive season in the house. Cooking up Indian food, snacks and desserts. It finally feels like Diwali! Continue reading: Vegan 7 Cup Burfi – Chickpea flour and Coconut FudgeThe post Vegan 7 Cup Burfi – Chickpea flour and Coconut Fudge appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Big Bang Tofu

October 10 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Big Bang Tofu The quick and easy sauce in this recipe is made with just three ingredients, but it provides a big bang of flavor as a coating for the lightly fried tofu. When making the sauce, mix in the sriracha a little at a time and taste as go, to be sure turns out at the heat level you prefer. I like to serve this Big Bang Tofu over rice or quinoa with sautéed greens on the side. The sauce also makes a great dip for roasted cauliflower florets.   Big Bang Tofu - 1/­­3 cup Asian sweet chili sauce - 1/­­3 cup vegan mayonnaise ((I like Just Mayo)) - 1 to 2 tablespoons sriracha sauce - 14 to 16 ounces extra-firm tofu, drained and pressed - 2 tablespoons cornstarch - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 tablespoon safflower oil or other neutral oil - In a small bowl, combine the chili sauce, mayonnaise, and sriracha. Mix well until thoroughly blended. Set aside. - Cut the tofu into 1/­­2-inch dice and place in a bowl. Sprinkle with the cornstarch and salt and pepper to taste and toss to coat the tofu. - Heat the oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the tofu and stir-fry until golden brown, about 8 minutes. Toss the tofu with the reserved sauce and serve hot. Recipe from MORE Quick-Fix Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing. The post Big Bang Tofu appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese

Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov

September 24 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Today’s self-care dialogue is with Tonya Papanikolov, holistic nutritionist, plant-based chef, and creator of The Well Woman. Tonya is a true renaissance woman, well-versed in all things wellness, mindfulness, and natural healing. We are constantly inspired by her otherworldly plant cheese plates and other whole food creations, as well as her radiance and spirit. In this interview, Tonya tells us about her approach to exercise and stress, the protocol she’s been implementing for skin integrity and gut healing, her favorite facial massage tool, her path to holistic nutrition, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly really need both! Routine is so important in keeping me aligned, on track and grounded however too much of it interferes with my natural creative process. I like routine for certain things like: waking up in the morning, meditation, yoga, bowel movements, meals. However, Im a very spontaneous person and I absolutely need the freedom to throw everything up in the air to do something unpredictable. Im distracted quite easily, which means I may go on a walk and begin to inspect the sap coming out of a cedar tree which derails my routine for dinner time, hypothetically speaking ;) Those are moments I happily take freedom over routine. But its all a fine balance. There cant be too much regimentation and there cant be too much freedom. The pendulum is always somewhere along the spectrum being balanced and fine-tuned. Right now in my life, based on various situations and work, I have very little routine and it is actually something Ill be working on in the fall! Calling in some solid routine. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Mornings do differ from day to day. It just depends on what I have going on. My ideal morning would be waking around 6:30-7am and having a big glass of lemon water before a 30-minute meditation, followed by a return to bed for a cuddle and hug. Next I would have a quick cold shower and head to the kitchen to make a morning elixir. This might be a coffee with nut milk and herbs or matcha, pearl, collagen or whatever else I feel like throwing in my blender that day based on how Im feeling! But definitely a warm beverage and some reading material. I would then begin to prioritize my day and make a list of everything I want to accomplish. I really like to save some time in the mornings to respond to emails, its been a goal of mine this year to get better at responding to emails in a timely manner. But if we had to strip everything down to the bare essentials: the absolute perfect morning is any morning that I have prioritized my meditation before everything else. This is absolute self-care time and if I do nothing else but this, I am ready for my day. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Not specifically at this time. I feel very lucky to be a great sleeper. Bedtime is funny because on the one hand I know I should be going to bed earlier but on the other Im never tired in the evening and am extremely productive during these hours. It is the time of the day I love to work the most! I am the clearest, calmest, there are so few distractions for me and I never feel my energy dip at night (for better or worse). I rarely feel tired at any point in the day so I will happily stay working until 11pm. I do try to limit computer time at night and if I cant then I always have f.lux on my screen to cast off the blue light. Im really working on this! Id like to begin shutting down work by 10pm latest but when you are working for yourself, its not always possible! I feel quite blessed that I fall asleep as soon as my head hits the pillow and that I wake with ease as well. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast - a big green smoothie, a green juice, a warm elixir in the winter time, often with cacao. I will usually add a plant-based, raw, fermented protein to my smoothie or elixir. Sometimes Ill have a piece of sourdough toast from a local organic bakery with nut butter or some avocado and lemon. Lunch - a salad with raw seasonal vegetables or some cooked vegetables like broccoli, squash, sweet potato. Or steamed greens with sauerkraut, hummus and sprouts. Snack - some of my plant-based cheeses with chia/­­flax crackers Dinner - Soup, dahl, kitchari I love making elaborate meals for dinner gatherings and special evenings but when Im cooking for myself I like to aim for simple, healthy and balanced. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do! But Im not that religious about it. I have one drink in the morning that is caffeinated which will alternate between a high-quality coffee or a matcha. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I cant say I do. I dont consume any processed sugar so this helps keep everything in check. When I do bake or use a sweetener I go for maple syrup, honey or dates. I dont feel fiendish about sweet stuff or have cravings for it. I feel lucky for this. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I am just getting through a protocol for strengthening skin integrity and gut healing. I was using a potent antioxidant Quercetin, vitamin C, collagen, an EFA supplement and a general clean diet free of the major allergens. My skin issue cleared up very quickly once I begun this protocol. I also got a good dose of salt water and vitamin D from the sun which played a huge role and were the missing pieces. But in terms of everyday stuff I take a vegan probiotic and ashwagandha. I rotate other things in and out like maca, he shou wu, schisandra. I also drink a nettle and astragalus tea. Id like to say I get everything I need from a healthful diet and clean water but Im a very sensitive being and have a long history of gut trouble like IBS (its really good now!) but this means that I do take extra care with supplementation and herbs when Im feeling sensitive or stressed. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  My day to day is extremely active and yoga is my main form of routine movement. I also dance a lot. I find it to be a wonderful way to start the day. Im usually on my bike for over an hour a day as well and this definitely gets my heart rate up. I go on the occasional run or to a spin class but as we move into Fall Im going to be looking for a new form of movement and exercise - something a bit more strenuous. This is part of the routine Ill be looking to form for fall. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I do find it pleasurable. I dont think Id ever describe the process as torturous (ha!) but I definitely think the hardest part is just getting to the class. Having the motivation to go every day or every other. Once Im there I feel good instantly. The moving and stretching make me feel stronger as the class gets more intense. And of course afterwards, the feeling is the best. Endorphins, detoxing, cooling the body down. Sign me up! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I like to think of beauty from an energetic, magnetism point of view. When I feel my most beautiful its generally an energetic state Im in where I exude magnetism. And Im not talking about a physical beauty magnetism but more of an energetic allure for life, a curiosity. I think other people notice that. I definitely notice that in other people. I find food and nature to have so much physical beauty and that definitely effects the final dishes/­­plates I make. Im an aesthete through and through. My eyes see such beauty in ordinary everyday life moments: the colour of someones eyes, their laugh, the way they move their hands, little unnoticed smirks, hair blowing in the wind, a cluster of sunflowers growing toward the sun, the sound of leaves in the wind. This is all so beautiful to me. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Im big on my skincare regime! If I had it my way Id go for natural facials every month but it usually turns out to be once a season. I use natural products from Pure and Simple in Toronto, Naturopathica and Living Libations which is a Canadian company. Nadine makes incredible skincare products from Haliburton Ontario, you can read her interview on The Well Woman. I only use natural products on my skin which should come as no surprise! My regime is the usual: cleanser, toner, serum and cream. I also have a jade facial gua sha tool that I massage my face with after serum. Best Skin Ever is a pretty remarkable product, its an oil based serum. I try to stay on top of a weekly exfoliation and mask. If you notice your skin getting dull the best way to correct it is with some weekly exfoliation. I use a fig enzyme peel and a clay mask. I try to do this once a week. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water! The easiest way to get beautiful, hydrated and glowing skin is from drinking 2L + water a day. Other things that help are drinking bone broth, colonics or coffee enemas always make my skin and eyes glow because they are so beneficial to our gut health. Getting good sleep is key and meditation is always elevating and leaves me with a glow. A plant-based diet with lots of veggies, greens and fermented foods is also key. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My facial gua sha massage tool! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Meditation, yoga, breath-work, moving my body, laughing at myself, dancing. I use ashwagandha daily too. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? All of the above! I also will talk it out with friends and my sister, family, my therapist. My therapist uses an amazing method that she has been teaching me called the Sedona Method (its an amazing book that I highly suggest). Shes not your usual therapist who you just talk to. She makes me release on all feelings and this has been an incredible tool for releasing stress, fear or any negative emotion. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Oil of oregano, lots of water, a tea with ginger, turmeric and raw honey, minimal food (so that the body can send all of its energy into fighting off the bug instead of to digestion) and LOTS of sleep! -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? There is such overlap for me! Life and work are very intertwined, one in the same. And although I love it that way Im trying to implement some more boundaries and turn-off time. But the fact is that I love what I do so much so working doesnt come with a burden. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Some of the tools have become engrained at this point. I have a morning gratefulness practice of putting my hands toward the ceiling and going over everything I am grateful for in that moment. Its really just about making new habits and setting them as priorities. I try to take 20 minutes a day for stillness in the form of meditation and breath work. I journal regularly as well. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating a plant-based diet that consists of mostly vegetables, lots of green smoothies and healthy fats. Diet has been number one, followed by yoga and meditation. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Many books along the way. Siddhartha. The Great Work of Your Life (which not-so coincidentally appeared on my door step one day). All the books I read while studying at The Institute of Holistic Nutrition. Knowledge -- Have you always been interested in the connection between wellness and sustenance? What was your path to studying Holistic Nutrition?  My interest started quite young. I ate really healthy as a kid, my favourite food growing up were carrots (?!). The trend continued as a teenager but I definitely had a lot to learn. I knew I wanted to get into nutrition in high school and chose a university school and program accordingly. I studied nutritional science for four years at the University of Guelph and thought I would become a naturopathic doctor but decided to switch directions after school. I got into a totally different line of work in fashion, where I worked for a Canadian retailer doing fashion direction! It was a really fun job but after a substantial amount of stress and awakening, I decided to pivot back into health, wellness and food. I went back to school, to the Institute of Holistic Nutrition in Toronto. -- You make your own plant cheeses and even developed a plant cheese plate for the Toronto restaurant Nota Bene! How did you come across the plant cheese-making practice and develop your own recipes? What’s your favorite cheese that you make? I learned the process to make the plant-based cheeses while studying at Matthew Kenney Culinary in California, from there its just been experimenting and playing with new flavor and consistency combinations! Thats a tough question, I really love the truffle and charcoal flavor and the freshness of the dill and chive! -- You cook plant-based dinners for groups of people, often centering the food around beautiful themes, like your Spring Equinox dinner. Can you tell us a bit more about the dinners and your approach? Its really just about getting a group together to share in a healthy meal and to show people how versatile, delicious and vibrant a plant-based meal can be. The themes often come from inspiration around the seasons, a book, or an artist. I love the idea of working with a theme for dinners to tie everything together. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Ultimate unwinding is a weekend getaway to a cabin on a lake! Unwinding in nature is always my preference. I treat myself with a facial or going for acupuncture, reiki or to a restorative yoga class. Unwinding can be as simple as a walk. But the classic Tonya move is a back-scratch before bed. My! Favourite! -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book - You Are a Circle and You Are a Message Song/­­Album - This song that I wake up to each and every morning: Ik Ardas Wahe Guru by White Sun Movie - The Scent of Green Papaya by director Tran Anh Hung Piece of Art - Ronan Bouroullec drawings -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Toronto? Awai, Dandylion, Actinolite, nutbar, Kupfert and Kim, Earth and City -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I love this! Here are some of mine: - Probiotics - Oil of oregano - Camera - 2L of water - A book - My recipe/­­poetry notebook - A good pen - A homemade trail mix - My favourite copper spoon - My Jesse Kamms - theyre comfortable and I love wearing them travelling -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Nikisha Brunson! Photos by Nathan Legiehn, Kelly Brown and Tonya Papanikolov. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta

September 20 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta I’m back with another recent weeknight dinner favorite. It’s a hearty pasta dish, and it’s a keeper. I can always count on pasta to get Paloma (9) eating dinner without too many negotiations, and I generally try to hide/­­pack as many vegetables as possible between the noodles. She would definitely be much happier eating plain pasta with a few grates of sheep’s milk cheese on top, but she’ll also tolerate most veggies when they’re interwoven with any pasta-like food. This one is made wholesome with a special, cauliflower ‘pesto’ with pistachios, herbs and golden raisins. We roast cauliflower florets pretty often around these parts, and I go through phases where I get very sick of roasted cauliflower. I’m in one of those phases now. I still automatically grab a head of cauliflower every time I buy groceries for the week, and that’s when I’m forced to be a bit more creative and figure out something else to do with it. If I’m lazy, I’ll just steam and freeze the cauliflower to use in the veggie-packed smoothies that Masha and I are obsessed with right now. If I’m a bit more motivated, I’ll experiment and generally come up with something really tasty like this ‘pesto’ number. I credit cauliflower with all my experimental success, since it’s one of the most delicious and versatile vegetables, in my opinion. Pulsed cauliflower sautéed with onion takes the leading role in the ‘pesto’, much like basil would in a traditional pesto. There are nuts, herbs and garlic, too, and it’s quite flavorful and almost like a chunky sauce in texture, hence the choice of name. Plumped, golden raisins take the whole thing to the next level – imagine sweet, juicy pockets in the midst of everything savory and carb-y. Delicious all the way. Any leftover cauliflower pesto is really good on toast, in salads or bowls. We are going to Italy next week, Rome and the Amalfi Coast to be more specific. If you’ve been there, we would greatly appreciate any recommendations you might have as far as things to see /­­ do /­­ eat. Thank you :) Cauliflower Pesto Pasta   Print Serves: serves 4 Ingredients half a cauliflower head - roughly chopped 2 tablespoons coconut oil 1 yellow onion - chopped 8 oz pasta (preferably noodle shape like fettuccine, linguini, spaghetti, etc.) sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced pinch of red pepper flakes juice of 1 lemon 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon smoked paprika ¾ cup golden raisins ½ cup chopped pistachios ¼ cup chopped parsley large handful of basil leaves (optional) Instructions Place the chopped cauliflower florets in a food processor and pulse into rice-sized pieces (some will be bigger, some smaller, and thats fine). Set aside. Warm the coconut oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onion and sauté for 7 minutes, or until translucent. In the meantime, bring a large pot of water to a boil, add salt and cook your pasta according to the time on the package. Drain, reserving ½ cup of cooking water and set aside. Add salt, garlic and red pepper flakes to the sautéed onion and cook for another minute. Add the riced cauliflower and lemon juice, increase the heat and stir around until the lemon juice is absorbed/­­evaporated. Lower the heat back to a medium. Add the reserved pasta cooking liquid, mustard, paprika, raisins and pistachios. Mix well and cook for about 8 minutes, until the cauliflower is cooked, but not mushy. Add the cooked pasta and toss to combine. Mix in the herbs and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Tahini Hot Chocolate Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Cauliflower ‘Pesto’ Pasta appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Meal Plan | Summer Socca, Cauliflower Scampi & Barbecue Tofu

September 8 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegan meal plan includes: summer socca with lemon basil yogurt dressing; Thai red curry with peppers and cashews; cauliflower scampi with garlic white wine sauce; barbecue tofu bowls; and cauliflower risotto.

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso

September 6 2017 My New Roots 

Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso I have to start by saying how incredibly moved I was by the comments on the last post, and the emails I received from you guys - a deep, heartfelt thank you. I knew that opening myself up would spark a lot of conversation, but I never imagined the impact it would have, not only in regards to the incredible outpouring of support, but for sharing your own stories and struggles. Time and time again I am reminded of the power in vulnerability and open communication. I feel truly blessed to have a community of conscious and loving readers, and that we can all share our journey with one another. That is what makes us stronger, and certainly healthier human beings in every sense of the word. Before I dig deeper into what Ive been doing to eat for balancing my hormones, Id like to just follow-up with the topic of orthorexia. Many of you expressed surprise at my struggles, thinking that because I do what I do, I must have had it all together. The truth is I thought that I did have it all together for a very long time, and creating My New Roots has been the most powerful catalyst in my healing. For the last decade, Ive felt very grounded in my choices and excited to celebrate them with you. But like I mentioned in the last post, the experience of changing my diet has brought back many of the challenges, dark thoughts and feelings that I had convinced myself were gone forever. Putting new restrictions on myself made me to put food into good and bad categories. This probably doesnt sound so terrible, but like I said before, this is a slippery slope into full-blown disordered eating for me. I see now that there is an incredibly fine line between caring about what I eat and caring too much. I believe that my relationship to food is something that I may have to keep in check for the rest of my life, or at least as long as I choose to use it as a tool to become a healthier person (so, like, forever). In the last four months of tuning into what I need right now, and eating more consciously, Ive really experienced a positive difference in how I feel, which is the biggest reward anyone could ask for! But Ive also had bad days where I wasnt prepared, and suddenly being at a wedding or a birthday party, or out for dinner with friends without much to eat in the good category, wasnt so rad. My blood sugar would crash, Id feel desperate, totally out of control and the voices would come back. What Ive learned from these experiences is that I need to be as prepared as possible in these situations, but if I can’t, I simply have to let go. I cannot control everything and I cannot always be prepared, but that in order to move forward, I have to maintain flexibility, and stop being so darn hard on myself! I firmly believe that there is more strength in being fluid and forgiving, than rigid and judgmental. I am just a person, after all. Since many of you were curious about the connection between food and hormone balance, Id like to discuss it in more detail, and share what Ive been doing to keep these miraculous chemicals in check, and keep them working for me, not against me! Upping my fat and protein intake – but especially fat Fats are an essential part of a healthy, well-balanced diet, and they are especially important for hormone balance. Fats actually create the structural components of hormones, and cholesterol specifically is responsible for our reproductive hormones; estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. The type of fat you choose however, is critical to achieving a positive effect, as the ones you consume become the building blocks for your hormones. Saturated fats like coconut oil, butter and ghee, and monounsaturated fats like olive oil, nuts, eggs, and avocados are excellent choices and should be consumed responsibly every day. Cut back on or eliminate corn, canola, sunflower, safflower and soybean oils, and replace them with the aforementioned instead. Ive also increased my protein intake, and consciously replacing more high-carbohydrate foods with more protein-rich foods such as tempeh, hemp, sprouts, activated nuts, eggs, and quality protein powder has really made a difference in stabilizing my energy levels and appetite. Getting enough protein on a vegetarian diet is totally possible, but I find that if Im not really paying attention, I can dip below the ideal 45 grams a day. Loosely (not obsessively) keeping track of my daily intake of protein has helped me feel my best. Keeping my blood sugar stable It may seem totally unrelated, but blood sugar and hormones are in fact inextricably linked. One of the main functions of the endocrine system (the system that creates and transports hormones in your body) is delivering glucose to your brain, muscles, and heart. So if anything in that process isnt working properly, than mismanaged blood sugar is the inevitable result. But whats worse is that it creates a cascade effect whereby none of the other parts of your endocrine system will work either. Sheesh! Walking the line between high and low blood sugar is something that Ive really been focusing on lately, and its working well, but it is an ongoing process that takes some getting used to. Including more fat and protein in my diet has been a game-changer for me, since those macronutrients digest slower than carbohydrates - even the complex ones from things like sweet potatoes, quinoa, and chickpeas. I try to eat a large and protein-rich breakfast within an hour of waking up (after the lemon water, of course!). Lunch is where I get the majority of my calories since that is when I need the most energy. I like eating roasted vegetables, avocado, eggs, and sprouted pseudo-grains like quinoa and buckwheat. I snack in between meals when Im hungry, but instead of reaching for a slice of rye bread or a rice cake, Ill have veggies with a high-fat dip, or a handful of my Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola. Dinner is mostly grain-free these days and I stick to salads, soups and stews. I go to bed no longer than four hours after dinner so that Im not hungry right before I hit the pillow. Then I like to have a break of about 14 hours between dinner and breakfast the next day, as my digestion does well on the rhythm of intermittent fasting. Eating more vegetables (and less bread a.k.a. DUH) I almost always had a couple slices of rye bread at lunch. Not that there is anything wrong with doing so, but Ill admit to feeling pretty foggy-headed afterwards. And because it filled me up so much, I had less room for veggies. Now Im prepping raw and cooked vegetables ahead of time and keeping them on hand specifically for my big lunches. Some favourites to roast in the oven are cauliflower, sweet potato, pumpkin, red onion, zucchini, tomatoes, and broccoli. Ive also started cutting up a big plate of veggie sticks in the early afternoon, before I even get hungry, so that it is there and waiting for me - no excuses. Right before diving in I douse it in freshly squeezed lemon juice, Maldon salt and Aleppo pepper. Its honestly delicious. I dont have to tell you that vegetables are full of filling fiber, replenishing phytonutrients, and yes, protein. Especially dem green ones. Eat more plants. Habits + meal prep I think this was the other big hurdle for me when it came to changing things up with my eating habits. I knew that if I was going to start eating food differently, Id have to start preparing food differently too - and a lot more often. I already spend a lot of time in the kitchen (obvi) and I love it, but I am also a person who likes to spend her non-work hours away from the cutting board. Eating this way admittedly does take more time, and makes it more challenging to eat out, or just grab something on the go. Coming to terms with this was challenging, but Ive realized that I have to dedicate more time to my diet if I want to be successful. No matter how you slice it, meal preparation is a very big part of sticking to your goals, whatever they may be. Of course there are times when its just not possible to do, and divergent days are fine, but the majority of your food youre should fall into the category that helps you feel your best, however you define that. Instead of prepping one day a week, which I know a lot of people like to do, I actually prefer to pepper it throughout the week in a way that is a little more fluid for me. If the Life-Changing Loaf of Bread is in the oven for instance, Ill chop up a bunch of veggies, and put them in too. If Im washing greens for a salad, Ill do all of them so that theyre ready to chuck into a smoothie on a whim. Lee from Americas Fat Balls have also been a super snack these days. And like I mentioned before, having fresh veggies washed and sliced up for afternoon cravings is very helpful. I can prepare two or three days worth at a time and keep them in the fridge. Mindset Instead of looking at food in terms of good and bad which I think is a dangerously judgemental way to categorize what were eating, I like to say yes to certain things, and the others fall into the not-right-now basket. For instance, I love brown rice to the ends of the earth and back, but Im not eating it right now since it doesnt make me feel all that great. And just because Im not eating brown rice these days doesnt mean I’ll never eat it again! This leaves room for flexibility and creates a far more sustainable way to look at ones diet. Isn’t it relieving to know that if you are out for dinner and there’s only rice for example, that you could potentially eat it and not beat yourself up? Ahhhh…did you feel that?! What a relief, eh? Tomorrow you’ll get back on the horse, no big deal at all. Making changes should be fun, and keep those labels for tin cans! You’re a fluid being, ever-changing, so make space for that in your meal planning too. Self-care routine, stress-reduction, exercise, and sleep I used to see self-care as something that only people with time have. Well, after totally hitting the wall a while ago, I realized that it just has to be a priority, respected as a part of a holistic approach to health, and something to actually schedule in the calendar. Staying active, sleeping, and treating myself to some yummy stress-reducing activities like spending time in nature, bodywork, and cooking (go figure) keeps me feeling happy and relaxed. Squelching stress doesnt happen by accident: it is truly a daily practice and something to be mindful of. Listen to yourself. How can this moment be juicier and more relaxing? Its fun to love yourself! Keeping stress levels low means that your body will be relaxed and not producing hormones that should only be reserved for emergency situations. Cortisol is a stress hormone released by the adrenal glands. Every time we experience a stressful situation we secrete this hormone into the blood stream so that our bodies can deal with the stressor at hand. Although cortisol is our friend in acute situations, our systems arent designed to be pumping it out round the clock as we juggle and struggle with backlogged emails, fussy kids, and traffic jams. This is why chronic stress is so detrimental to our bodies: prolonged, elevated cortisol levels wreak all kinds of wrong inside of us, raising our blood pressure, causing unwanted weight gain, exhaustion, anxiety, impaired brain function, and weakening the immune response. All the more reason to take self-care seriously, and do the things you love more often. Its actually healthy. Sleeping 7-9 hours a night is another non-negotiable. Getting enough sleep helps us to control our cortisol production, balance our blood sugar, and put us back in line with our natural circadian rhythm. Turning screens off an hour before bedtime will help signal to your body that it is in fact, night time. Create a relaxed, cozy environment and spend the last hour before bed reading, stretching, or meditating. I still struggle with this one, as I love looking at Instagram right before turning out the light, but Im becoming more mindful and doing my best. Required Reading There are a few really amazing books out there that I recommend every woman reads, whether or not you’re seeking advice on a particular health issue. Understanding our bodies and cycles is the first step in helping ourselves become healthier, stronger, more connected women. Woman Code by Alisa Vitti has been hugely educational and supportive for me. Her book is a guide to figuring out what the heck is going on inside you, and how to correct it through diet and lifestyle. I appreciate her easy-to-understand language and humour in this book, because let’s face it: nothing is very funny when you’re hormones are raging! The Complete Natural Medicine Guide to Women’s Health by Dr. Sat Dharam Kaur has been and continues to be another excellent resource for me. This book is more of an all-round toolkit for lifelong health and healing, than specifically about hormone balance. I love the holistic approach to all conditions, and inspiring programs to get us back in touch with our natural cycles in connection to the earth. The third book I recommend is Hormone Balance by Carolyn Dean. Dean is a naturopathic doctor that utilizes both traditional and alternative solutions to help readers rebalance their hormone levels. Her writing is engaging and inspiring, and this book is full of ways for women to achieve greater overall health. Oh man, I havent even talked about the tacos yet! So. I got the idea for these this past summer when I was chopping up tempeh to replace ground beef with in a tomato sauce for pasta. It turned out so meaty, satisfying, and delish that I thought I could perhaps take that same idea, spice it up a little differently, and serve them in a taco. Woot! I knew that grilled veggies and red cabbage would help cut the richness, but that I would also need a boss sauce to put them over the top. During one of my retreats I made a raw queso in our cooking class and everyone went wild for it. It seemed like a natural fit! Topped with some lime, avo, pickled red onions, and cilantro these were the best tacos Ive ever had. Ever. Ever. And Ive had a lot of tacos. I know some of you are going to ask about the corn tortillas and probably remind me that corn is a “grain”. Yes, I am aware of that, and I’ll remind you that I am not grain-free, just cutting way back. I stick mostly to pseudo-grains and make sure they are soaked prior to cooking, and enjoy a treat like this once in a while. I only purchase tortillas made with sprouted corn, or from corn that has been nixtalmized (that topic is a whole other blog post!). I buy my corn tortillas from Hija de Sanchez here in Copenhagen. Their tortillas are made fresh daily using nixtamalized corn imported from Mexico, so they taste unbelievably good. Of course taco fillings are important to a good taco, but the tortilla quality should not be overlooked! It makes the dish. Go find the good ones.     Print recipe     Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso Serves 3-4 Tempeh Taco Meat 250g /­­ 8.8oz organic, non-GMO tempeh 1 medium red onion 4 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chipotle or smoked hot paprika, to taste 2 Tbsp. tamari 2-5 Tbsp. water, as needed Grilled vegetables 1 medium zucchini 1 medium red onion 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 tsp. ground cumin a couple pinches of cayenne, if desired 12 small corn tortillas (try to find organic, non-GMO if possible) 1 batch Raw Cashew Queso, recipe below Optional add-ins: 1 ripe avocado 1 small bunch cilantro pickled red onion or thinly sliced red onion shredded red cabbage tossed with a little salt and lime juice limes for serving hot sauce Cooking and assembly: 1. Start by making the Raw Cashew Queso (see recipe below). 2. Heat your grill or barbecue to medium-high. If not using a grill, simply cook everything in a skillet on the stove. 3. Finely chop or crumble tempeh into whatever size appeals to you (mine were rather small to mimic ground beef). Set aside. Mince red onion and garlic. Set aside. 4. Soak wooden skewers in water while you prepare the vegetables, or longer if you remember. If using metal skewers, skip this step. 5. Wash and cut the zucchini and onion into rings, the peppers into chunks. Place in a large bowl and toss with the salt and spices. 6. Skewer the vegetables so that their largest surface will lay flat on the grill (see photo). Alternate veggies until youve used them all. Place on the grill and cook until stating to char on the underside, anywhere from 5-10 minutes, depending on your cooking method. Flip and cook on the other side. 7. While the vegetables are grilling, cook the tempeh. H eat your cooking oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and a few pinches of salt. Cook until starting to brown, about 7-10 minutes. Add garlic and cook for another minute until fragrant. Add crumbled tempeh, cumin, chipotle, and stir well to incorporate. Pour in the tamari, followed by a couple tablespoons of water. Stir well and add water as needed - youre after a moist mixture. Taste and adjust seasoning as desired. Cook for a total of 10 minutes. The mixture should be golden brown, hot and delicious! 8. Warm the tortilla shells on the grill or in a pan over medium-high heat. 9. Spoon the desired amount of tempeh into each tortilla shell. Followed by the roasted veggies, avocado, cabbage, cilantro and pour on the Raw Cashew Queso. Enjoy! Raw Cashew Queso Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 150g cashews, soaked for 4-8 hours or overnight 1 red bell pepper 1/­­2 tsp. salt 2 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2-3 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste 1/­­2 clove garlic 1 small piece fresh turmeric ground cayenne, to taste 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml water Directions: 1. Drain and rinse the cashews. 2. Put all ingredients, except water, in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend, adding water one tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. If you want a thick cream, use less water, for a thinner sauce, use more. (You will not achieve a perfectly smooth sauce with a food processor, but it is still delicious!). Before I go I just want to reiterate how wonderful it felt to be met with such open arms after the last post. I wish I could write back to every single one of you who shared their story with me, and everyone else here, but I simply couldnt get to them all. I am moved beyond words that so many of you felt open and supported in this space too, and I will urge you to seek out help if you need it. And if you know someone who you think may struggle with disordered eating, reach out and help them in a loving, and non-judgmental way. We are all in this together. In love and light, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   *   * http:/­­/­­www.goldencircleretreats.com/­­portugal/­­index.html Dear friends! I am thrilled to share the location for my next wellness retreat in magical Comporta, Portugal, November 5-11, 2017. Join Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I at Sublime Comporta for seven days of luxurious living, divinely delicious meals, inspiring cooking classes and nutrition seminars, yoga, Pilates, meditation, and breath work. Come press the reset button with me! Ride horses on the beach, dance under the stars, and cozy up by the fire. This will be a week to remember. I cant wait to see you there! Click here for more info and tickets. The post Tempeh Tacos with Raw Cashew Queso appeared first on My New Roots.

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower

September 5 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Vegan Pesto Pasta & Cauliflower Now that we are back doing more frequent recipe posts again, we also wanted to throw some super simple, everyday type dinners into the mix. Family style! The hands-down easiest dish that I (David) know (and make when I’m alone with the kids and have max 10 minutes to prepare dinner) is to cook a package of fresh gnocchi, mix a store-bought pesto with mashed avocado, add a little extra lemon and olive oil and just stir everything together with some canned chickpeas and cherry tomatoes on top. Its a lazy dinner but the kids devour it, its super easy and most importantly QUICK. Today’s recipe is a riff on that. We are fully aware that you hardly need yet another recipe for spaghetti al pesto. But we have got a few twists that turn this simple Italian classic into a rather nutrition packed meal. And a really tasty one as well. Although our version is so far from the original that we probably never will be allowed back into our beloved Italy again ... - Try chickpea (or lentil) pasta. These new-style pastas made on chickpea or lentil flour taste good, have surprisingly pleasant texture and are more protein packed than regular pasta. If you want to use ordinary pasta, we’d recommend adding some cooked chickpeas to the dish as well. They taste great tossed with pesto. - Add avocado to your pesto. It will be much creamier, fluffier, richer and rounder. It will also be more fat, but it’s the gooood fat. If you want to make it lighter, replace half of the oil in the pesto with water. Also, use half basil and half baby spinach for a more affordable and nutrient packed pesto. - Make it vegan by adding nutritional yeast to your pesto and make a quick nut dust instead of parmesan. - Add roasted vegetables. Pesto pasta is good, but adding roasted vegetables is simply better. You get more flavors and something to actually chew on (because we all slurp spaghetti, right!?). It takes like 5 minutes to prepare one tray of roasted vegetables (oven time obviously not included), so if you have 5 minutes to spare, do it. Also, if you are smart, you’ll roast a second tray of vegetables simultaneously and you are halfway through dinner prep for tomorrow. We went with roasted cauliflower and zucchini coins this time because it was what we had at home and we know that the kids love ’em. Broccoli or parsnip or carrots would of course be just as good. - If you are not vegan and want to make a luxury version of this, try serving it with some torn burrata cheese on top. Vegan Pesto Pasta with Roasted Cauliflower & Cheesy Nut Dust Serves 4 We’ve kept this dish vegan but if you are not vegan you probably don’t have nutritional yeast at home and in that case you can just grate vegetarian parmesan or pecorino instead. The obvious shortcut here is to buy a pesto, mix it with avocado and follow the rest of the recipe. Roasted veggies 1 cauliflower 1 zucchini 2 tbsp olive oil sea salt Cheesy Nut Dust and Vegan Pesto 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70 g almonds 1 tbsp nutritional yeast 1 large handful basil 1 large handful spinach 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80 ml olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice a few pinches salt 1 small avocado (use half if you have a large and serve the rest on the side) chickpea pasta or pasta of choice, for 4 persons To serve  Lettuce or baby spinach cherry tomatoes, quartered Set the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F. Break the cauliflower into small florets and chop the stem inte bite-size pieces. Slice the zucchini. Toss cauliflower and zucchini with a little oil and salt and spread out on a baking sheet. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until soft and golden. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to instructions on the package (reserve a little bit of pasta water when draining) and start making cheesy nut dust and pesto. Add almonds, 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast and a large pinch sea salt to a food processor. Pulse on high speed until all nuts are mixed/­­pulverized into coarse sand/­­dust. Place half of the cheesy nut dust in a small bowl and leave the rest in the food processor for the pesto. Add 1 more teaspoon nutritional yeast, basil, spinach, olive oil, lemon juice and a little more salt. Mix until smooth, taste and adjust. This is your basic vegan pesto. Now add avocado and pulse for an even creamier pesto, you might want to add a little more lemon and olive oil at this point. Toss half of the pesto with the cooked pasta and a little bit of pasta water (add chickpeas, if using regular pasta). Arrange the pasta on four plates, add roasted cauliflower, zucchini slices, lettuce, tomatoes and a few dollops pesto on top. Sprinkle with cheesy nut dust and a little olive oil. Enjoy! ************ PS - Here are a few other things that we have been up to recently! Some of you might remember my trip to Turkey, meeting displaced Syrian families last year? Echo and UN’s World Food Programme have made this little video from my trip and from our home here in Stockholm. I talk a bit about how similar our priorities are even though our situations are vastly different. And the importance of the support these families get from WFP to gain a sense of normality again. I don’t like hearing my own voice and I had an eye infection when we filmed this but there are lots of cute kids in the footage and the topic is very close to my heart. You can watch it here. We have also shared a week’s worth of family friendly recipes in the latest issue of Jamie Magazine which is out now (in the UK). The feature is photographed by Simon Bajada.  And we recently shot a Fridge Raider feature talking about a few of our favorite ingredients in the latest issue of Olive Magazine. Also out now (in the UK). Aaaand, we have also worked on a campaign for Swedish organic brand Kung Markatta with recipes, tips and videos focused on reducing food waste at home (only in Swedish though).  Phew, looking at it like this, I now realize why this summer felt so intense ;)

The How Not to Die Cookbook

November 10 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

The How Not to Die Cookbook It gives me great pleasure to announce the upcoming release of The How Not to Die Cookbook by Michael Greger with Gene Stone — especially because the recipes are by yours truly.  The book comes out of December 5th, but you can pre-order now. The recipes in the book are based on Dr. Greger’s best-selling book, How Not To Die, and feature a variety of whole foods plant-based recipes, including Whole Roasted Cauliflower with Lemon Tahini Sauce: Roasted Vegetable Lasagna: Black Bean Burgers: and Super Salad with Garlic Caesar Dressing: If you’ve been wondering how to incorporate more of Dr. Greger’s “Daily Dozen” into your diet, then The How Not to Die Cookbook is the cookbook for you. The post The How Not to Die Cookbook appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat)

November 6 2017 Meatless Monday 

Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat)Mark Bittmans original How to Cook Everything Vegetarian was such a hit the first time around that the award-winning food writer decided it was time for an update. On November 7, Bittman will release a new edition which includes new recipes and information about the benefits of reducing meat consumption. We spoke with Bittman about whats different in How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition and the many reasons why he felt it was time for a do-over. 1. What do you think has changed about plant-based eating since the first edition of your book was published? What compelled you to do a new edition? Everyone wants to eat healthier than they did 10 years ago, and most people know that that means eating less meat. (When I ask audiences whos eating less meat than they were 10 years ago, almost everyone raises their hand.) And there are so many resources available to vegetarians - and more importantly, semi-vegetarians or flexitarians - that it seemed worth an update. Plus, frankly, I was a little disappointed with aspects of my approach in the original, so I got to fix that. 2. Do you think that more people understand the benefits of eating less (or no) meat now? If so, what has contributed to that change? If not, why do you think people are resistant to that change? Most, but not everyone. That goes without saying. (And see above.) Why? Overwhelming evidence that overproduction of meat is harmful to the environment and overconsumption is harmful to individuals. Not to mention producing animals as if they were widgets. http:/­­/­­www.meatlessmonday.com/­­images/­­photos/­­2017/­­11/­­59d5122651a0c_­Smart_­Bites-_­How_­Meatless_­Monday_­Improves_­YOUR_­Health_­and_­the_­Health_­of-the_­Planet.mp4 Courtesy of HealthGuru.com 3. Do you believe its easier to cook vegetarian? Anyone who only cooks animal products is missing out on a universe of flavors and textures that cant be found elsewhere. Foods from the plant kingdom are generally easy to cook, but theyre also healthy, theyre inexpensive, they can be cooked in bulk, and they last for a long time. Thats not about cooking vegetarian - its about cooking. Period. 4. It says on your site that your mission is to make food understandable. What are people not understanding about food and how do you like to explain it to them? The sheer amount of information out there--much of which is misinformation--is overwhelming, to say the least. Im constantly reminding people that food can be delicious without being complicated; you can make something great with three ingredients. Once theyre on board with that mindset, its a good idea to get comfortable with substitutions and winging it. The goal of the recipe variations in the How to Cook Everything books is to get people to understand that they dont have to follow a recipe word for word. In fact, its better if they dont because whatever variation they use, whether its one of mine or something they come up with, will be tailored to their particular tastes. 5. Some people arent quite ready to change their entire diet or give up meat completely. What are some recipes that work for quick, weeknight Meatless Monday dinner? Heres the first line of HTCEV: Im not a vegetarian, nor am I invested in you becoming one. Many foods are naturally meat-free, and the point is that we need to be eating more of those than we do now. That doesnt mean not eating animal products - it means changing the focus. There are no sacrifices here. Consider recipes like Cream of Spinach Soup, Cauliflower Salad with Olives and Bread Crumbs, the infinite ways to make Beans and Greens (black beans with kale, cannellini with escarole, lentils with fennel, etc.), and the zillions of non-meat pasta dishes, like Pasta with Walnut Sauce and Pasta with Caramelized Onions. How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition is available on Amazon beginning November 7. The post Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat) appeared first on Meatless Monday.

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte

October 22 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte This happens to me pretty much every day at around 3 o’clock, providing that I’m working from home. I get up from my desk, put on the teapot, throw a bunch of things in the blender, whirl it all together, and end up with a cozy and satisfying latte-ish drink that gets me through to dinner time. I don’t drink caffeine anymore, because I’ve always been very sensitive to it, and found that avoiding it altogether really helps with even energy levels (I may have made a few exceptions in Italy :)). But this little ritual takes me back to the days when 3 o’clock meant a cup of really good tea or a matcha. There’s really nothing better. I end up making a different drink every time, based on my mood and the ingredients I have on hand, but the general formula is the same. There’s always something for creaminess, something for flavor, something for an energy boost… So I thought I’d give a ‘no-recipe’ recipe here, as well as a few of my favorite combinations. Midday super-latte making is a really fun routine to add to your day if you’re around a blender, and it’s good for your in a number of ways: it gets you out of the busyness of the day and nudges you to take a break, it’s creative, and the beverage you’ll end up with will likely be good-for-you, warming and tasty. Tahini Hot Chocolate This was one of our most popular recipes last winter. It’s an incredibly satisfying blender hot chocolate that comes together in seconds. Rosemary Hot White Chocolate Another hot chocolate, but this one is a white hot chocolate infused with rosemary. A great case for using cacao butter in drinks, which lends both its chocolatey flavor, as well as a richness and a froth. Spirulina Latte Another blender latte, but this time boosted with all the green benefits of spirulina, without the swampy taste. Chamomile Latte The most grounding and delicious latte to drink before bed. Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca Playing off New Orleans-style coffee, this herbal mocha is a great option for those trying to take a break from coffee and missing it dearly. Chicory brings a coffee-like richness, while maca and cacao boost energy. Honey Miso Latte This is basically a golden milk latte, but boosted with the flavor and health benefits of miso and raw honey. I like to drink this one before plane journeys, since miso might be helpful when it comes to countering the radiation we are exposed to on any given flight. Hibiscus Ginger Latte This latte gets is beautiful color and a pleasant sour note in the flavor from steeped hibiscus flowers. Pear Cranberry Chai Any modesty aside, this is the best chai I’ve ever had or made in my life. A great example for how creative you can get with your beverages, this one uses both fruit and a bunch of healing spices to achieve an otherworldly flavor. No-Recipe Vegan Cozy Latte Start With: This is your base liquid, which will determine what other ingredients you will add to your blender. Choose one or a couple. Hot water is a blank canvas, while herbal coffee and tea will give you a base flavor, which you can play off off with your other ingredients. - hot water - chicory coffee or Dandy Blend - tea – herbal, black, green, etc. - hot plant milk – coconut, almond, cashew, oat, etc. Creamy: Add one of these ingredients or a combination of a few of them for a rich, extra-creamy latte, especially important to include if you are just using hot water as the base. - coconut butter - tahini - almond butter/­­cashew butter/­­any other nut butter - tocos - cacao butter Frothy: This is optional if you already have a creamy element, but adding some extra fat to your latte contributes to the most beautiful froth. Also, if your base is something with caffeine like a black or green tea, this will help slow the absorption of caffeine for a more even boost of energy (like in Bulletproof coffee). - Coconut oil/­­MCT oil - Ghee Sweet: Add as much sweetness as you need, tasting as you go. - dates - raw honey - maple syrup - date syrup Flavor: Play off your drink base while adding some flavor. Both cacao powder and turmeric do well in creamy, milky drinks, while spices, herbs and vanilla can be used millions of ways (just see the drink round-up above). - cacao powder - cacao butter - turmeric - other spices like cinnamon, cardamom, nutmeg, ginger - vanilla - herbs - miso Extras & Boosts: My absolute favorite energy-boosting ingredient for drinks is maca powder – it instantly wakes me up and tastes so delicious. But there are a ton of other boosters you can add to your lattes, some ideas below. - maca powder - cacao butter - other adaptogens: chaga, reishi, lion’s mane, cordyceps, ashwagandha - more: pearl powder, tocos, mucura pruriens, spirulina, etc. etc. Blend all your components until frothy and enjoy :) You might also like... Berry Kombucha Float Peach and Zucchini Smoothie Avocado Kiwi Smoothie and a Jus by Julie Cleanse Giveaway Honey Miso Latte .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post No-Recipe Cozy Vegan Latte appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin

October 11 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Amy Chaplin is an author and chef, whose approach to whole foods and cooking is endlessly inspiring. Her cookbook is nothing short of a kitchen bible to us. We had the pleasure of meeting up with Amy in NYC a few years ago and had the best time chatting about our favorite subjects like sprouted flours, cookbook publishing, and acupuncture. Needless to say, we were excited to get a peak at her self-care routine. In this interview, Amy tells us about the valuable self-care tips she learned from her mother, her favorite meals made with pantry staples, the skincare brand she’s been using since she was a teenager, her approach to exercise, stress, and so much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I like both. I like to have a morning routine and create a work routine for whatever project Im working on but I also like to have time for free thinking and spontaneously connecting with friends. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I get up early, 6 am  is the usual time but sometimes eariler depending on what Im working on. I make warm lemon water, light a candle and mediate for 10 to 15 minutes. In late summer the sun is coming up just as I finish and I usually sit for a bit and often reply to messages from Austrlia (they are going to bed around that time). Then I feed our two dogs (my wife takes them out on a long morning walk) start making breakfast and make sencha tea. Sometimes I skip the sencha and have a matcha latte after breakfast but I try not to have too much caffeine, as much as I love it! If Im working on recipes from home, I quickly shower, dress and get started right away....sometimes before breakfast but it depends on what Im testing :) -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I stop working on the computer before dinner and leave it closed. I leave my phone downstairs so its far from my bedroom. I get into bed and usually read cookbooks or watch an episode of any series Im currently obsessed with :) Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast –  soaked oats + chia (recipe is in my book) or activated grain porridge with homemade nut milk, cardamom and berries. I usually eat grains once a day and its usually in the morning. Lunch – Beans of some kind --depending on recipes Im testing. Kraut or other fermented veg, greens--salad or steamed depending on weather. I usually add some toppings too: hemp seeds, toasted seeds, sunflower sprouts, scallions anything to make it tasty Snack – Seeded crackers and nut butter/­­avocado/­­bean pate or chia pudding or coconut yogurt Dinner – An egg or tempeh, avocado, steamed veg and a dressing of some kind--this is often quite small as Im not always hungry if I have a good lunch or if Im testing and sampling recipes. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? Yes. I love green tea. Sencha is my favorite for its fresh, grassy umami taste. Rishi Tea First Flush Sencha is sublime. I also love their ceremonial grade matchas with foamed, homemade almond milk. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to but I havent eaten sugar on a regular basis for years. If Im craving something sweet I eat a few spoons of Anitas coconut yogurt--it has a naturally sweet flavor from coconut with no sweetener. If I have a berry compote around Ill have some of that with it but I never sweeten them as Ive gotten used to just the sweetness of the berries. Of course there are times when Im testing recipes for cakes and muffins and I do enjoy tasting them and the same goes for good raw chocolate. Im not rigid about it as its part of being a chef but I dont seek out sugar on a daily basis. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I change depending on what my acupuncturist recommends in the way of Chinese herbs. I have been taking spirulina to increase protein and greens lately. I take a vitamin D. Ive been adding maca powder to my breakfasts for years so dont really consider it a supplement. I like adding locally grown ashwagandha (from Furnace Creek Farm) and reishi or chaga mushroom powder to hot cacao drinks. I drink nettle tea everyday because I love it, especially when you can get it fresh from the farmers market. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  With my job being so physical, these days I gravitate towards Qi Gong and yoga--the gentler classes. I also tend to exercise by default. Walking everywhere, long dog walks, biking and general schlepping around the city and up and down stairs with heavy bags of veggies! -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I used to push myself with torturous classes and long runs but now I do less and enjoy it more. I know that I am more productive when I make time for movement but it has to be mindful.  I do yoga at home and love it when I have the time for long luxurious classes...especially restorative. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Beauty to me is an inner glow that comes from something beyond what and how we take care of our bodies. Mostly it comes with time and a spiritual sense of oneself, our path, the world and other beings around us. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Ive used Dr. Hauschka since I was a teenager. I have a huge respect for biodynamic growing practices and love the way they preserve their products naturally. I think its one of the most difficult things with natural skin care products--preserving. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Local organic veggies, lots of greens, seeds… -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I notice a difference in my skin when I use a warm compress of essential oils (Dr. Hauschka calls them bath oils). You put a few drops in warm water and soak a face cloth, squeeze it out and press it into your skin. I use lemongrass in the morning and lavender at night. Then you cleanse and use the same water to wash the cleanser off. They smell so good and your skin feels really clean and enlivened afterwards. Its my mothers beauty secret, she looks amazing! :) Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Mainly daily meditation and breathing. I dont feel as clear or grounded without it. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Hot shower and miso soup :) -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Make miso soup with lots of ginger and scallions and I also take Woodstock C & F Seasonal Support. It always helps with a sore throat or when Im feeling under the weather. Gargling sea salt with warm water. Colloidal silver spray. Hot lemon drink with grated ginger and turmeric. Bath and sleep. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely overlap. I love what I do and have found comfort in the kitchen for as long as I can remember. Of course there are days when work completely takes over but even when my schedule is jam packed, I try and make time to spend with my partner, cuddle the dogs and see family--it just means well be eating recipes that are being tested and theyre grilled for feed back! Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I aften find myself saying “everything is working out for my highest good and remembering that everything is perfect as it is. I grew up with Louise Hay books. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Over time my lifestyle and diet has improved and I have a much more balanced approach. I used to be quite strict at times and I know that its not the way to great health for me anyway. I think now I have better overall health so I dont get thrown off on a regular basis. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. Paul Pitchford’s “Healing with Whole Foods has been in my life for over 20 years and I still consult it. It always gets me in the mood for pure, simple temple-like food. My self care is also influenced by my mother. She has a deep connection to nature and a daily ritual of foot baths, lemon water in the morning and making a nightly hot water bottle (in the cooler months) Ive carried on these rituals...but dont seem to get the foot baths in as often as she does. Knowledge -- Your recipes are so well thought out and always turn out delicious, as well as incredibly nourishing. What is your process when it comes to recipe development? Thank you so much! My recipes all begin with what I crave, which is mostly deeply nourishing food with clean uncomplicated flavors. They have to make sense to me and not only be healthy but also be visually beautiful. Nature and beauty are what inspire me most. When I am developing recipes I want the steps to be clear and thorough. I spend a lot of time with new recipes before they are published. Theyre all tested over and over again by myself, friends, family and recipe testers. I feel a lot of responsibility to readers who spend time and money and a lot of effort making my recipes...they have to work and taste delicious! -- You are a big proponent of keeping a well-stocked pantry. What are some of your favorite meals that you like to throw together with pantry ingredients? Simple wraps with nori, fermented veggies, avocado (not really pantry but I always have a few of varying ripeness around). Barrys tempeh, which is made from white beans and adzuki beans and sold frozen, it tastes amazing just panfried in coconut oil. In Australia you can get fresh fava bean tempeh and Im missing it so much! Red lentil soup with lemon and spinach from my cookbook. That is perfect for right now when the weather is getting cooler and if you dont have much in the way of veg. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Drive to the country with my wife, play with my nephew, drink tea and sit in the morning sun. Have a pedicure. Travel and be in nature. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – “The Power of Intention” by Wayne Dyer Song/­­Album – Blue by Joni Mitchell Movie – I recently saw Lion and was so moved Piece of Art – Yoko Onos simple, whimsical pieces -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in NYC? ABC V, Via Carota, Ilbuco Alimentari, De Maria -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – Good tea selection + strainer for infusing – Activated or toasted nuts – Spirulina – Pajamas and cosy sox (no matter the season) – Large scarf/­­shawl – Cardigans -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Luise from Green Kitchen Stories, Henrietta Inman, Elenore from Earthsprout, Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme..... Photos by Amy Chaplin and Stephen Kent Johnson. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates

October 2 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh PiratesLast Monday, September 26th, Meatless Monday Pittsburgh hosted the first ever Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates! The event was a great success with over 300 tickets sold. Each ticket included a corner box seat for the Pirates vs. Orioles game, as well as access to the exclusive vegan menu. Guests dined on delicious meatless fare including: - Pretzels, chips and dips (house chips with French onion dip, corn chips with smashed avocado salsa, pretzel sticks with local PA maple mustard) - Power chop salad (kale, cabbage, grilled vegetables, garbanzo beans, sunflower seeds, pepitas, citrus-dijon dressing) - Ultimate vegan burger (beefless beef patty, lettuce, tomato, dill pickles, vegan house sauce, sesame seed bun) - Buffalo cauliflower with vegan ranch dipping sauce - Sweet potato tacos (black beans, cilantro, salsa verde, tortilla threads, nondairy sour cream, flour tortilla) - Watermelon and berries for dessert     The delicious meat-free menu was enjoyed by vegetarians, vegans, and flexitarians alike. Everyone left the ballpark full and the Pirates bringing home a win was the cherry on top! The post Meatless Monday Pittsburgh Hosts Vegan Night with the Pittsburgh Pirates appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cajun Tofu with Cilantro Lime Rice

September 29 2017 Vegan Richa 

Cajun Tofu with Cilantro Lime RiceCajun Tofu Bowl with Cilantro Lime Rice. Baked Cajun Spiced Tofu, over greens, cilantro lime rice, and tomatoes. Easy Spicy Bowl. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Recipe. Use Chickpea tofu to make soy-free. I go through these weeks where I will obsess about one particular spice blend or combination or play around with similar flavor profiles. This past few months have been about Cajun. Exhibit 1 Cajun Cauliflower over Garlic pasta, so Good!, exhibit 2 Cajun Spiced Sloppy lentils, oh my gosh! This week serve up this easy Cajun Tofu Bowl however you want it, but make some! The Tofu is rubbed up with Cajun spice blend and lime. Then baked to dry and infuse the tofu. Meanwhile, make the other bowl components like a refreshing cilantro lime rice. Add roasted veggie,  chopped up tomato/­­crunchy veggies or pico de gallo, some greens or lettuce. Slice the baked tofu and serve. You can use the cajun blend paste over chickpea tofu, chickpeas/­­beans or hearty vegetables as cauliflower, eggplant, sweet potato, zucchini and roast them until tender and use those in the bowl instead of tofu. Fall Comfort in a bowl.  The book work has kept be on my toes the past few weeks (its out, get your copy!) so I haven’t been cooking up much new stuff. Catch up on the book being reviewed on magazines and blogs here. There are many new recipes in the drafts, but they all need post edits and photos/­­video editing and I am trying to get back into the schedule of editing and scheduling today. I always end up cooking more for a break rather than edit. Wait maybe I need a vacation first! Continue reading: Cajun Tofu with Cilantro Lime RiceThe post Cajun Tofu with Cilantro Lime Rice appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Super-Quick Aloo Gobi

September 21 2017 VegKitchen 

Super-Quick Aloo Gobi Aloo Gobi is a delectable Indian specialty that features cauliflower, potatoes, and usually peas in a mild, tomato base. Im not sure my family has ever placed an order, whether eat-in or carry out, that didn’t include it as one of our choices. And fortunately its almost always already vegan, which means it doesnt need […] The post Super-Quick Aloo Gobi appeared first on VegKitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Cauliflower Gratin – Creamy, Spiced, No Bake

September 6 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Cauliflower Gratin – Creamy, Spiced, No BakeVegan Cauliflower Gratin – Creamy, Spiced Cauliflower Casserole. No Bake Skillet Gratin or Bake with a garlic breadcrumb topping. Vegan Soy-free Recipe, Can be gluten-free and nut-free.  It is hot out here this week. It is also pretty ashy and humid with the many wildfires around (hope everyone is keeping safe) and difficult to heat up the house to bake. I made this gratin in a skillet for days like this and tested it out in the oven as well. The cream sauce is very versatile. I like Kashmiri garam masala(in my second book), Baharat(in my second book (Pre-order Now, starts shipping in 2 Weeks!!), Berbere or Jamaican Curry Blend in this cauliflower and the creamy sauce combination. You know me. Add spices of choice or just herbs. The gratin is sprinkled generously with toasty breadcrumbs which have garlic and pepper flakes for a smoky heat. This crunchy garlicky topping is a must! Amazing, Creamy and ready within 25 Minutes! Add other vegetables for variation.Continue reading: Vegan Cauliflower Gratin – Creamy, Spiced, No BakeThe post Vegan Cauliflower Gratin – Creamy, Spiced, No Bake appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Easiest Buffalo Tofu Bites Ever

September 5 2017 VegKitchen 

Easiest Buffalo Tofu Bites Ever Im not sure who invented that Buffalo wings combo that contrasts spicy BBQ flavors with celery and creamy dressing. Its kind of weird, but obviously theres something about it that people love, because there are hundreds of vegan variations, let alone thousands of the non-vegan variety. In plant-based versions, cauliflower or tofu stand in for […] The post Easiest Buffalo Tofu Bites Ever appeared first on VegKitchen.

Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie

September 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie Smoothies are my absolute favorite breakfast. I always get sad once the mornings start getting cooler, because an ice-cold smoothie bowl no longer seems like a very appropriate breakfast option. I continue making them into October anyway :) For years, I’ve had the same smoothie formula that consisted of frozen banana, frozen berries, as well as any greens and super-powders I had on hand. This past year though, I decided to start packing more stuff into my smoothies, specifically more veggies. If you have a blender, especially a high-speed one like a Vitamix, it’s so easy to ‘hide’ all kinds of things in your smoothies. I’ve been favoring steamed and frozen cauliflower, sweet potato, and zucchini in place of frozen banana. I’ve also been adding things like raw beets, red cabbage, and even mung bean sprouts into the blender. At first, eating a barely sweet smoothie was strange, but now I can honestly say that I’ve grown to appreciate and love having a less sugary breakfast. I realized that it’s more important to me to have a smoothie, any smoothie than to have a sweet, dessert-like one in the morning. This red cabbage and sweet potato smoothie has been my favorite variation since I randomly decided to throw some leftover red cabbage into the blender. Its flavor is barely noticeable in the final product, but it adds excellent color and nutrition into the mix. Steamed and frozen sweet potato contributes some sweetness and creaminess, while making the smoothie quite filling and satisfying. Avocado ensures an even silkier smoothie and brings all of its healthy fats to the table. Frozen berries make the whole thing seem and taste like an actual smoothie. I like to add maca, because I swear it gives me all kinds of energy in the morning, as well as puts me in a really great mood. You can also add cacao, medicinal mushroom powder, or any other super-powders you like. I doctor it up quite a bit with nut butter or coconut yogurt, more berries and seed sprinkles, and eat it with a spoon. I love seeing the rainbow of color that all the ingredients create in the blender. To me, it’s the best thing. Would love to hear about your favorite smoothie combos! Have a nice Sunday. Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie   Print Serves: 2 big smoothie bowls Ingredients about an eighth of a small head of red cabbage (should be a small wedge, smaller than in the photo) half of an avocado ½ cup cubed, steamed and frozen sweet potato ½ cup frozen blueberries, plus more for garnish ¼ cup frozen strawberries 1-2 teaspoons maca powder (optional) handful of any greens of choice (optional) 1½ - 1¾ cup purified water almond butter or coconut yogurt - for garnish sprinkles like chia seeds, cacao nibs, bee pollen or any other nuts/­­seeds of choice - for garnish Instructions Combine the red cabbage, avocado, sweet potato, blueberries, strawberries, maca, if using, greens, and water in a high-speed blender. Blend until smooth. I like to start out with just 1½ cups of water for a spoonable smoothie consistency and add more water if needed. If you would like the smoothie to be drinkable, add 1¾ - 2 cups of water. Serve right away, garnished with more berries, almond butter/­­coconut yogurt and sprinkles. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder Grapefruit Smoothie Blueberry Cheesecake Truffles Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Cabbage and Sweet Potato Smoothie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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