fantastic - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

49 Savory Vegan Breakfast Recipes to Start Your Day Right

Vegan Ravioli with Pink Beans

Vegan Ceviche

Masala Paratha (Besan Ka Masala Paratha)










fantastic vegetarian recipes

Vegan Summer Berry Crumble

August 23 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Gaz Oakley of Avant-Garde Vegan always creates fantastic recipe videos on his Youtube Channel. And this video for his summer berry crumble is no different! This fruity dessert is vegan AND gluten-free. It’s a perfect summer snack that’s easy to make! Check out the video tutorial below on how to make your very own vegan summer crumble that you can impress family and friends with: Check out more of Avant-Garde Vegan here. The post Vegan Summer Berry Crumble appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Delicious and Easy Salad Bar at Home

August 5 2017 VegKitchen 

Delicious and Easy Salad Bar at Home Salad bars are often an appealing option for healthy food fans at restaurants, so why not serve one in your own kitchen? Here’s how to put together a delicious and easy salad bar at home. It’s a fantastic way to put together a last-minute company meal or for building a dinner around fresh raw veggies when you’re too […] The post Delicious and Easy Salad Bar at Home appeared first on VegKitchen.

6 Ways to Use Pre-grated Carrots

July 20 2017 VegKitchen 

6 Ways to Use Pre-grated Carrots Carrots are a fantastic vegetable to incorporate into your daily diet -- filled with Vitamins A and C, theyre also a great source of fiber. Most kids and picky eaters dont object to carrots even if veggies arent their thing. Whole carrots, baby carrots, grated carrots -- theyre all good. Grated carrots can go into […] The post 6 Ways to Use Pre-grated Carrots appeared first on VegKitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Street Fair Corn from NYC Vegan

June 6 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Street Fair Corn from NYC VeganI love New York — and I REALLY love NYC Vegan, the fantastic new cookbook by Michael Suchman and Ethan Ciment aka the Vegan Mos.  It’s such a fun book, billed with personal anecdotes and stories about New York City.  Best of all, of course, are the wonderful recipes — all the great food New York is know for, made deliciously vegan.  One of my favorites is the Street Fair Corn (below) which I will be making regularly this summer. Kudos to Michael and Ethan for a job well done and for bringing New York City into our kitchens!  If you don’t own NYC Vegan, do yourself a favor and order a copy today. Street Fair Corn Summer in New York City means weekend street fairs. The fairs have no rides or games. Instead, avenues are closed to traffic for several blocks, where dozens of vendors sell food. One of the most popular foods is Mexican Street Corn--freshly grilled sweet corn coated in a mixture of cheese and spiced mayonnaise. We created a vegan version of this dish that tastes even better than the original. (From NYC Vegan, copyright (C) 2017 by Michael Suchman and Ethan Ciment. Used by permission. Photo by Jackie Sobon.) Serves 4 Ingredients - 1/­­4 cup nondairy mayonnaise - 1/­­4 cup nondairy sour cream - 1/­­4 cup nondairy parmesan, plus more for serving - 1/­­2 teaspoon chili powder, plus more for serving - 1 medium clove garlic, finely minced - 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh cilantro or Italian parsley - 4 ears sweet corn, shucked - 1 lime, cut into wedges Preparation - Heat a grill for direct-heat grilling, or heat a grill pan over high heat on the stove. While the grill is heating, in a medium mixing bowl, combine the mayonnaise, sour cream, nondairy parmesan, chili powder, garlic, and cilantro. Stir until completely combined. - Place the corn directly on the hot grill and cook, rotating occasionally, until cooked through and charred in spots on all sides, about 8 minutes total. - Remove the corn from the grill and transfer to a serving plate. Use a pastry or basting brush to generously coat each ear of corn with the mayonnaise mixture. Sprinkle with extra cheese and chili powder and serve immediately with lime wedges.     The post Street Fair Corn from NYC Vegan appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Strawberry Almond Galette

April 29 2017 Veganpassion 

Strawberry Almond Galette I always love to be part of the german television show "Kaffee oder Tee". Showing my vegan creations just makes me happy. The crew is fantastic and I had lots of fun with the anchorman. If you're surrounded by such amazing people the baking becomes accessory. Makes one galette (9,8 inch diameter/­­25cm diameter) for 8 pieces Preparation time: 30 minutes Baking time: 30 minutes Ingredients: 1 2/­­3 cup whole spelt flour 1 tbsp. almonds, grounded 1 tbsp. sugar 1/­­4 tsp. baking powder 1/­­4 cup oil 1/­­4 cup + 2 tsp. dairy free drink 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar For the filling: 1 tbsp. almond butter 1 tsp. lemon juice 1 tbsp. sugar 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla 3 tbsp. dairy free milk 2 stalks of rhubarb 10 oz strawberries 1 tbsp. almond slices In a mixing bowl mix whole spelt flour, almonds, sugar and baking powder. Add oil and vinegar and mix with a spoon. Spread flour on the worktop and knead dough with your hands until it's smooth. Roll out the dough until it reaches a diameter of 11,8 inches. Put the dough on a baking paper. In a small mixing bowl mix almond butter with lemon juice, sugar, vanilla and 3 tbsp. dairy free milk until it's creamy. Spread the cream on the dough and keep a distance of 1,9 inches to the edge. Peel the rhubarb in slices and cut the strawberries in slices.  Arrange the strawberries in a circle and keep a distance of 1,1 inches to the edge. Fold up the edges of the dough over the fruits. Spread some dairy free milk on top of the cake edge and sprinkle almond slices on it. Put the galette with the baking paper on a baking sheet and bake at 356°F (180°C) two sided heat. Bake for 30 minutes and put a wooden spoon between the oven and the door for 10 minutes. This way the excessing water of the fruits can escape. Enjoy warm or cold with some ice cream!

Meatless Monday in Israel Celebrates Four Fantastic Years

April 17 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday in Israel Celebrates Four Fantastic Years Its amazing how a good idea and some strong enthusiasm can make an incredible difference. Heres proof. Just four years ago, Miki Haimovich decided to launch Meatless Monday in Israel. Of course, it didnt hurt that Miki was a well-known and trusted figure in her country. She had worked as a TV news anchorwoman for nine years. When we brought the Meatless Monday global campaign to Israel four years ago, few people had heard of it. Whats more, most couldnt understand why reducing meat consumption was an issue that needed to be addressed, said Ms. Haimovich, Things have come a long way since. Over Half a Million Meatless Monday Supporters Based on a recent survey, nearly 65% of the Jewish population have now heard about Meatless Monday. More importantly, over 500,000 respondents say they are currently choosing not to eat meat one day a week. These results are particularly impressive because they were achieved only through public relations and word of mouth - not paid advertising. Meatless Monday Embraced by Leading Israeli Organizations The growing support for Meatless Monday is rooted in partnerships that have been developed at leading organizations, such as caterers Sodexo, ISS, Shultz and Idi, as well as health and environmental protection agencies and animal welfare organizations. We offer a win-win-win proposition, said Or Benjamin, Meatless Monday campaign manager for the past year and a half, Employees are happier because they get a greater choice of healthy foods. The service providers like it because plant-based meals cost less to make. And our countrys Corporate Social Responsibility officers are pleased because it reduces greenhouse gases. From left to right: Or Benjamin, campaign manager, Miki Haimovich, co-founder and Liat Zvi, co-founder. Photo by Menash Cohen. Gala Event to Celebrate Four Years of Meatless Monday Late last February, partners, volunteers, friends and family attended a special Meatless Monday event held in Tel Aviv to celebrate the four-year anniversary. Awards were presented to leading partners, including Intel, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Rabin Medical Center. This festive gathering doubled as a fund raiser to help finance future Meatless Monday campaign efforts. Catch up on their latest news on their Facebook page. Get Involved. Join the Meatless Monday Movement If youre reading this, chances are youre interested in eating healthier and maybe helping to protect the environment. Why not take a moment and think if you know someone who might also share these interests. You could talk to them about Meatless Monday, or send them an email, or maybe forward this article. Like to know other ways you can help? Please get in touch with us at info@MeatlessMonday.org Meanwhile, in honor of Israels four year Meatless Monday anniversary, heres a one of our favorite traditional Jewish meatless recipes. Enjoy! Eggplant Bell Pepper Kugel The post Meatless Monday in Israel Celebrates Four Fantastic Years appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Nasi Goreng

March 23 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Nasi Goreng I couldn’t even tell you how many times I had Nasi Goreng while I was in Malaysia. It was definitely often. Like, really often. Not only is this traditional vegetable fried rice dish usually totally delicious, it’s also usually easy to find and (with little to no effort) a great vegan option. Pretty much everywhere I went in the five weeks in Malaysia, this dish was on the menu or easy to order at almost any restaurant. Especially out of the big cities and in the countryside - and particularly on the islands and beaches - this is a vegan/­­vegetarian stand-by that is never hard to find. (By the way, based on my travels, this is true for most of Southeast Asia, including Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Myanmar… but the dish is found under other names and with local flavors.) This becomes an almost daily meal, if vegan options are limited. On Pulau Pangkor, there were two food places (more shacks than restaurants) that served fantastic Nasi Goreng and vegetable fried rice. And in Borneo, staying in the Permai rainforest, the local restaurant and the nearby food court had vegetable fried rice, or Nasi Goreng. There were also many breakfast or lunch buffets at hotels and restaurants that had rice dishes like this. Contrarily, when in Penang and Kuala Lumpur I was usually so blown away by other vegan choices that I didn’t eat Nasi Goreng as often. Nasi Goreng’s flavors and textures forge powerful memories for anyone who’s been to Malaysia or Indonesia - or even just a Malaysian or Indonesian restaurant - whether vegan, vegetarian, or neither. Just as with so many classic recipes - from region to region and family to family this dish is made a million different ways. This is mine… inspired by so many excellent meals on my adventures. When I created this recipe for the Malaysia cookbook, I made sure to hit all the best, unique flavors in a good Nasi Goreng: Fresh galangal root (or ginger), lime juice, spicy chili, and a thin, tangy sauce provided by the mix of Shoyu soy sauce, vinegar, and citrus zest. I also round out the savory flavors with some sweetness. Traditionally in Malaysia, this dish would be served with just a bit of chopped vegetables (and way more rice). For my recipe, I’ve got a lot of the good stuff, included the crumbled tofu - which, by the way, replaces scrambled egg - sometimes found in traditional Nasi Goreng. By the way, I have many similar recipes inspired by other travels and other countries and cuisines - including: Cambodian Fried Rice, Mexican Magic Rice, and Vegetable Fried Rice from my World, Mexico, and Sri Lanka vegan cookbooks. After you’ve tried my Nasi Goreng, check out the other recipes and decide which country’s classic fried rice is your favorite. Nasi Goreng traditional vegetable fried rice recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA available in English & German serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 40 min + - 3.5 oz (100 g) firm tofu - 1 cup (190 g) broken jasmine rice or short grain brown rice - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) water - 1 cup (100 g) chinese cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli or bok choy finely chopped - 1 medium (90 g) carrot finely chopped or sliced - 2-3 Tbs oil - 1 tsp sesame oil optional - 3 (50 g) spring onions chopped, separated into white ends and greens - 1 or 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 1 large red chili finely chopped optional - 1/­­2 in. (1 cm) fresh galangal or ginger finely chopped - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1/­­2 tsp black pepper ground - 2 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice or 2 tsp rice vinegar - 1 tsp lime zest or lemon zest optional - 1 tsp sugar or agave syrup - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - lime slices for garnish - Cut tofu in slabs, wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with heavy cutting boards to press out excess moisture. Let sit 20 min. Unwrap tofu and crumble into a bowl. - Wash and drain rice thoroughly. - Bring water to boil in a small pot. Add rice and salt. Stir. Return to boil. Reduce heat to low and cover. Simmer 12 to 20 min as needed. After water is absorbed, remove from heat. Fluff rice with a fork. Cover and let sit and cool, ideally an hour or more. - Heat oil in a large wok or frying pan on medium high. Add chopped spring onion ends, garlic, chili (if using), galangal (or ginger), ground coriander, and black pepper. Fry, stirring constantly, until lightly browned, 2-3 min. - Add chopped carrots. Fry, stirring constantly, 2-3 min. Add crumbled tofu. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu begins to turn golden brown, 3-5 min. Add chopped cabbage (or other vegetables). Fry, stirring constantly, until vegetables start to soften, 4-5 min. - Whisk soy sauce, lime (or lemon) juice, zest, sugar (or agave syrup), and sea salt in a small bowl. - Add cooked rice to frying vegetables. Mix well. Add soy sauce mix and spring onions greens. Combine well. Fry, stirring constantly until liquid has been absorbed and rice and vegetables are moderately browned, 5-7 min. Remove from heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Serve with lime slices. vegan recipe for Nasi Goreng from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA The post Nasi Goreng appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Penang Laksa

March 13 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Penang Laksa Incredibly, I’d been in Malaysia for almost two weeks before I got to try Laksa, the legendary noodle soup. Even before the trip, I’d read about the intensely loved, powerful and fiery, somewhat-sour soup in food blogs and food guides to Malaysia. I’d checked out plenty of recipes and seen lots of super tasty photos. Once I got to Malaysia, whenever I asked locals what dishes I had to try, I heard again and again: Laksa! Okay, great, but where? And the answer was: Penang! Penang was hands-down my favorite place to eat on the Malaysia trip. (Singapore was a fairly close second. Penang was just more artsy, soulful, and real). I collected maps with locations of the best street food in Georgetown (Penang) and scoured the web and my travel guides for addresses of must-try vegetarian restaurants. On my second day in town, I had lunch at the vegan restaurant Sushi Kitchen, and met the chef/­­owner, who made a list for me of Must-See places and dishes. That night I went to Luk Yea Yan, a vegetarian Chinese restaurant known for fantastic flavors and inexpensive eats. I ordered up the Laksa soup. Three minutes later my oversized bowl of hot, steaming, bright red soup arrived - with countless ingredients and toppings piled up to the rim. There were at least three kinds of noodles, tofu cubes, soya and seitan chunks, numerous vegetables, about four kinds of fresh herbs - and balanced on top: a soup spoon with a thick, red curry paste on it. I’d read about this… Traditionally Laksa is usually served with a generous spoonful of rempeh - spicy red curry paste for you to stir in to the hot red broth yourself. I knew what to do. I did it. A half dozen flavors immediately exploded in my mouth: tamarind, chili, lime, pineapple, cilantro, mint. This was followed by a second wave of flavors: an army of vegetables, tofu, and seitan slices. I slurped down the noodles and paddled pieces of everything with my chopsticks into my hungry jaws. I had to take a break a few times to catch my breath and cool the spice alarm with generous draws on my lemon iced tea. When I was done, my forehead was light with perspiration and my lips and tongue were tingling and alive. There was never a doubt whatsoever that I would include a vegan recipe for Penang Laksa in my new Malaysia cookbook. Several weeks later (after having tried vegan Laksa soup at least three other times in Malaysia) I was back in my kitchen in Germany and set to work. It took a few attempts to master the recipe, each try better than the last. And then I had it: my own epic Laksa recipe! Since then, I’ve made it probably ten more times, including for several dinner parties large and small, and plenty of times for lunch. It’s best on cold, cloudy days to fire up your mood and open you up! But I’ve also made it lots of other times, even in the summer, well… just because it’s so awesome and is always a dish guests talk about long after the meal. Penang Laksa classic Malaysian noodle soup recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 2 to 3 /­­ time 45 min - 5 oz (150 g) seitan sliced - 3.5 oz (100 g) smoked tofu sliced - 1/­­3 cup (45 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs vegetable oil  - 1 Tbs soy sauce or Vegan Fish Sauce - 7 oz (200 g) udon noodles (cooked) - 2 1/­­2 cups (600 ml) water  - 2/­­3 cup (150 ml) coconut milk  - 1 kefir lime leaf or 1 tsp lime zest  - fresh mint leaves chopped - fresh coriander leaves chopped - fresh thai basil leaves chopped - bean sprouts for garnish laksa spice paste: - 4 candlenuts or 2 Tbs cashews soaked 20 min in hot water, drained - 1 stalk lemongrass chopped - 1/­­2-1 large red chili chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 shallot chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh galangal or ginger chopped - 1/­­2 tsp paprika ground (more as desired, for red color) - 1/­­2 tsp fennel seed ground - 1/­­2 tsp coriander ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar or agave syrup  - 3/­­4 tsp sea salt  - 1 tsp tamarind paste (seedless) - 2 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice  - 2 Tbs vegetable oil  - If using dried Udon: Cook, rinse, and drain 3.5 oz (100 g) noodles according to package instructions. - Blend spice paste ingredients in a small food processor until smooth. - Heat 1 Tbs oil a large pot or wok on medium high heat. Add sliced seitan and smoked tofu. Fry, turning regularly until edges are browned and crispy, 3-5 min. - Stir in chopped pineapple. Continue to stir-fry, 2-3 min. Add soy sauce (or Vegan Fish Sauce). Fry 2-3 min. Transfer to a plate or bowl. - Return pot or wok to medium high heat. Fry blended spice paste until it darkens and oil starts to separate, stirring constantly, 3-5 min. - Gradually stir in water, coconut milk and kefir lime leaf (or lime zest). Bring to simmer. Add cooked udon noodles. Return to simmer. Cook until noodles have slightly softened, 3-5 min. - Stir in fried seitan, tofu, and pineapple. Turn off heat. Cover until ready to serve. - Portion soup and noodles into bowls. Garnish with chopped herbs and bean sprouts. Serve. Panang Laksa vegan recipe from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook - in English & German) The post Penang Laksa appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Hemp Seeds: Nutrition, Benefits, & Recipes

February 23 2017 VegKitchen 

Hemp Seeds: Nutrition, Benefits, & Recipes Hemp seeds are a fantastic addition to any healthy diet, packed with easily digestible protein and a multitude of nutrients. Rare among plant-based foods, they provide complete protein with all 10 essential amino acids. That makes them quite valuable to vegans and vegetarians.The post Hemp Seeds: Nutrition, Benefits, & Recipes appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Cheese Celebration for Vegans

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

Cheese Celebration for Vegans I got a package from Happy Cheeze - raw vegan cheese. I heard it is fantastic. Good ingredients and pure craftsmanship. Finally a product thats not from a factory. I was so excited when the package arrived. I tried: cream cheese spirulina chili cream cheese ramson soft cheese with herbs cashew camembert "happy white" cashew camembert "classic" cashew camembert "ramson" What makes theses varieties so special? They're raw, vegan and organic. They're handcrafted. The most special thing is that they are ripened. Which means they were added with fermented vegan cheese cultures. You can really taste that. Optics: The look of the food is just as important to me as the taste of it. The cheese has very nice packages. The soft cheese with herbs is decorated with herbs and looks very sweet. The cream cheese spirulina chili is gloriously blue which suprised me. Definitely an eyecatcher. The camembert is covered with mould, just like we know it from cow cheese. Inside it is a little bit darker but that doesn't bother. The soft cheese looks just like the goat cheese I know from the cheese counter. All different kinds of cheese can be served on a silver platter and they will suprise your guests. So thumbs up for the optics. Smell: The smell is very decent. It can't be compared to savoury cheese. A lot more enjoyable I think. In case you can store the cheese in the fridge without the package and you don't have to run away when you open the fridge again. Taste: I had to try the camembert at first because I was so interested about the taste with the mould. My expectations were very high. The "happy white" cheese tastes very good but it isn't as soft as an animal camembert is. I was very suprised by the spirulina chili cheese. I have tried a lot of different types of cream cheese before but this one tastes so fantastic. It has a sourly hot taste, very delicious. The rasmon cheese kinds are very delicious as well and not to intensive. It's very difficult to name a favourite out of all these different kinds. I really liked the soft cheese with herbs. Do you need this? I have tried to make cheese myself once. The manufacture is not that easy because it depends on the temperature and needs a lot of time. Who really wants to spend 6 weeks on making cheese. I could never be patient enough. The different cheese kinds cost from EUR 7,95 up to EUR 12,95 for 100-150g. Compared to animal cheese this cheese is a lot more expensive but I would definitely buy it. The cheese is worth every cent. In addition to it no one has to suffer for that cheese and it's a natural product. You can find the different types of cheese online or at a local organic store. For example at Boutique Vegan an online shop. Conclusion: The happy cheese is a good piece of handcraft and proves that small projects can have a big impact. They set new standards and you support a true initiative and expire true indulgence. Perfect for a dinner with the family. Thanks to Annika & Mudar for making this cheese. I hope your cheese is going to be known worldwide and lets everybodys hearts melt.

Double Batch Chickpea Cutlets

November 25 2016 VegKitchen 

Double Batch Chickpea Cutlets Chickpea Cutlets are a classic recipe from Isa Chandra Moskowitz, fantastic for Thanksgiving or Christmas menus, or everyday meals. They come together in no time at all, taste great smothered in gravy, and put your steak knives to work. Place a big pile of these in the middle of the table or stuff them into a sandwich--or just slice them up in a salad.The post Double Batch Chickpea Cutlets appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Latkes from Aquafaba by Zsu Dever

October 4 2016 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Latkes from Aquafaba by Zsu Dever Aquafaba (bean water) is an amazing ingredient that can be used instead of egg whites, making it a boon to vegans everywhere, including those who thought lemon meringue pie was a ting of the past!  In Aquafaba, Zsu Dever’s groundbreaking new cookbook, you will find everything you ever wanted to know about using aquafaba, including a meringue primer, tips and tricks, and Zsu’s fabulous recipes, complete with clear instructions and gorgeous photos throughout. In this book, Zsu shares her recipe for an amazing lemon meringue pie, airy macarons, and light and luscious chocolate mousse,among other confections.  There are also savory recipes for burgers, quiche, and much more, including the deliciously crisp latkes (below).  In addition, Zsu answers the question “What do we do with all the leftover chickpeas?” with an entire chapter filled with fantastic chickpea recipes such as Curried Caribbean Coconut Chickpeas, Korean Dak Galbi, Pulled Chickpea Seitan Roast, and Shiro Wat. If you’re interested in learning more about transforming the bean liquid you used to through away into amazing sweet and savory delights, you’ll want to own a copy of Aquafaba.  Now here’s that latke recipe…. Latkes These latkes are perfectly crisp on the outside and melt-in-your-mouth on the inside. The added potato starch increases their crispiness, but it is not essential. Some russet potatoes tend to be on the drier side, but to be safe, place them in a lint-free kitchen towel, fold up the edges and give them a good wring to remove excess water. Serve this the traditional way, with nondairy sour cream and applesauce. (From Aquafaba, copyright (C) 2016 by Zsu Dever. Used by permission.) - 2 pounds russet potatoes - 1/­­2 medium onion - 1/­­4 cup aquafaba (see Note) - 1/­­4 cup potato starch, optional - 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley, optional - 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt - 1/­­2 teaspoon baking powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper - High-heat oil, for frying, such as canola or peanut Peel the potatoes and shred them using either a food processor with the shredding blade or a box grater. Place them on a kitchen towel, fold up the edges, twist the towel around the potatoes, and squeeze out all the water that you can. Place the potatoes in a large bowl. Shred the onion and add it to the potatoes. Add the aquafaba, starch, parsley (if using), salt, baking powder, and black pepper. Mix very well. Heat about 1/­­2 inch of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add two or three kernels of popping corn and heat the oil until the corn pops; this is an indicator that your oil is hot enough. Remove and discard the popped corn. Using a 1/­­4-cup measuring cup, place 3 to 4 portions of the potato mixture in the hot oil and cook them until golden brown, about 2 minutes. Do not press down on the latkes. Flip the latkes and continue to cook another 2 minutes. Drain them on paper towels and serve as soon as possible. Make sure to give the potatoes a stir before measuring, and do not crowd the skillet or your latkes will not be crispy. Makes 14 to 16 latkes Note: Although aquafaba is best if homemade using the recipe provided in the book, you can use aquafaba from canned chickpeas. Use the organic, low-sodium, canned chickpeas and strain off the liquid into a measuring cup using a fine mesh strainer. Note the amount of liquid you acquired, then add it to a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until the liquid reduces by 1/­­3. Cool the aquafaba completely before using. The post Latkes from Aquafaba by Zsu Dever appeared first on Robin Robertson.

MALAYSIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 19 2016 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

MALAYSIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter On August 16th, 2016 I launched the Kickstarter Crowdfunding project for The Lotus and the Artichoke MALAYSIA vegan cookbook! This is my 4th Kickstarter project, and like the first three, it’s off to a terrific start. Cruise on over and check out the campaign. It’s a great way to support my creative endeavors and culinary adventures, and it’s a great way to pre-order the new cookbook which will be coming out in October. The Kickstarter will end on Sept 15th... make sure to get in before the fun is over. For the next few weeks, I’ll be posting cool updates and Behind the Scenes stories and photos of the design and production of the new cookbook. The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA After 3 successful Kickstarter projects and 3 internationally celebrated cookbooks, The Lotus and the Artichoke is back with a new cookbook... and back on Kickstarter! Earlier this year, I returned home to Berlin, Germany after 5 intense weeks exploring Malaysia, Singapore & Borneo: checking out the cities, cruising the coasts and countryside, island life during the wild Chinese New Year celebrations, staying in a rainforest treehouse, eating and cooking with the locals everywhere, and riding buses, trains, taxis, and boats all over the place. Since then, I’ve been recreating the insanely delicious eats, writing up new recipes inspired from the trip, spending hours at my art desk and computer with the illustrations and design, and photographing all the dishes for my next cookbook: The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA: A Culinary Adventure with over 70 Vegan Recipes. My 4th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide: - 160 pages - with over 60 full page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 5 weeks of travel in Malaysia, Singapore & Borneo - Explore amazing Malay, Chinese, and Indian cuisine from the fantastic foodie metropolises Kuala Lumpur & Singapore, culinary heritage highlights of Penang, rising star Ipoh, Sarawak’s quaint Kuching, the tribal highlands of Borneo and beyond - Everyday classics, mind-blowing mains, fabulous feasts, street food superstars, awesome salads & fresh treats, great snacks, and crazy delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and easy, awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Pre-Order my MALAYSIA cookbook on Kickstarter Some of the recipes: - Kelabit Mango Salad - Shredded Beet & Coconut Salad - Cucumber Zucchini Salad - Acar - pickled vegetables - Urap - traditional veg side - Penang Laksa Soup - Curry Mee - Nonya Noodle Soup - Spicy Mushroom Noodle Soup - Wonton Soup - Popiah Rolls - Otak-Otak - steamed quiche pockets - Satay Skewers w/­­ peanut sauce - Serunding Kelapa - roasted coconut & spices - Sauce Kachang - satay sauce - Sambal Belachan - red chili sauce - Pineapple Pepper Chutney - homemade red curry rempah paste - vegan faux-fish sauce - super 5-spice powder - Nasi Lemak - coconut creamy rice & ginger lemongrass tofu - Nasi Kandar - Malay street food feast - Nasi Kerabu - herbs, spices & olive mushroom rice - Nasi Goreng - fried rice classic - Mee Goreng - fried noodles with vegetables & crumbled tofu - KLFC - Kuala Lumpur Fried “Chicken” - Mushroom Murtabak - stuffed, grilled Indian flatbread - Sayur Campur - mixed vegetables w/­­ dark soy sauce - Sayur Lodeh - mixed vegetables w/­­ coconut gravy - Kang-Kong Goreng - stir-fried spinach - Bao - steamed buns w/­­ spicy seitan - Assam Tofu Faux-Fish - Asian casserole - Crispy Curry Tempeh Cubes - Soya Rendang - Black Pepper Seitan - Eggplant & Okra Tomato Curry - Szechuan (Kung Pow) Seitan - Char Kuey Teow - stir-fried rice noodles - Hong Shao Rou - roasted jackfruit - Mushroom Manchurian - Roti Canai - red curry & flatbread w/­­ chutney - Banana Leaf - Indian curry meal - Gobi 65 - Indochinese batter-fried cauliflower - Punjabi Sizzler - Apam Balik - crunchy peanut pancakes - Cendol - shaved ice, green noodles & syrup - Kueh Dadar - green pandan crepes - Kueh Lapis - multi-color cake - Ondeh-Ondeh - sweet, chewy dumplings - Kuih Kodok - fried banana fritters - Chocolate Mint Cake - Lychee Banana Sorbet - Coconut Ice Cream - Iced Ginger Lime Soda - Purple Dream - ... and more! Pre-Order my MALAYSIA cookbook on Kickstarter The post MALAYSIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Vegan Steamed Buns (Oil Free)

July 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Steamed buns are great for a dinner dish, or even to snack on. We love them because you can get really creative with what you fill them with! But if you need a little help coming up with a filling idea, Honeybunch of Onion Tops has created a fantastic, healthy filling with tofu, mushrooms and potatoes in this awesome video recipe. These steamed buns are vegan, plus they are oil-free! Can’t get much better than that. Here’s how to make them: Read the recipe in full here. The post Vegan Steamed Buns (Oil Free) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London

June 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London We love yogurt in our family*. The unsweetened, thick, creamy and tangy kind. We enjoy yogurt for breakfast (with fruit) and sometimes dessert (with dates + chocolate + nuts). We top our soups with yogurt, we add it to smoothies and ice pops and we also dress our salads with it (Isac likes to dress himself with it as well). Yogurt works remarkably well both with sweet and savory flavors. And yet, the thought of making a yogurt bowl with savory toppings instead of sweet, had never struck us before. But as we were playing around with this crunchy cucumber and melon salad with spiced chickpeas, we (and with we, I humbly mean ME, MYSELF and I - as in, not David) had the simple idea to put them on a bed of yogurt instead of doing the usual yogurt dressing. In theory, it’s more or less the same thing but in reality it’s so much better. The warm, rich and spicy chickpeas on a bed of cold, thick and tangy yogurt, with the addition of a fresh salad with lots of crunch. It’s simple but yet so very good. And quick too. I’m sure there are plenty of savory yogurt bowls all over internet, but now they are also in our kitchen. *David and Isac are actually intolerant to dairy but yogurt is their weak spot. We buy oat yogurt for them but David often chooses a day of stomach ache just to enjoy a bowl of plain yogurt. And Isac has literally been caught with his hand in the yogurt jar more than once. Coconut yogurt has a fantastic taste and consistency but is simply too expensive to enjoy more than as an occasional treat (very keen on giving Ashley’s versions a try though!). Hey hey hey, wait a sec. This is David acting as proofreader today and I just noted Luise’s attempt at hijacking my idea. This recipe = my idea. Just wanted to make that clear. I’ll give the word back to her now. The salad is super quick as you just need to chop everything up. We found that crunchy vegetables like cucumber, celery, sturdy roman lettuce and radishes work really well here, with the avocado and melon adding softness and sweetness. The yogurt is, well, just yogurt. It needs to be quite thick to hold up the topping - our preference is Greek yogurt but choose whatever you prefer. The only thing that needs a little more preparation and heat are the spiced chickpeas. Even if the ingredient list looks long, it’s simply spices, oil and chickpeas and the result tastes way better than just using plain chickpeas. They have a rich, spicy and slightly nutty flavor which works so well with the freshness from the yogurt and the crunchy and sweet salad. VARIATIONS There are plenty of ways to vary this recipe and we’re going to leave you with a few ideas. - Whisk some creamy goat’s cheese into the yogurt. It will dissolve, become smooth and give the yogurt a more mature flavor. - If you don’t have all the spices at home for the chickpeas, use what you find. A bread spice mix works great along with a little cayenne. A turmeric or curry version would be interesting too. - You can skip the salad and pour the yogurt into small sealable jars with spiced chickpeas on top. Store them in the fridge for a quick snack. - Vegans can of course use a vegan yogurt option or simply settle for the salad with warm chickpeas stirred through. - Roasting the chickpeas in the oven together with eggplant or pumpkin could be amazing on top of the yogurt as well. Let us know if you have any other favorite variations on savory yogurt bowls and we can include them in this list. Savory Yogurt Bowl with Spicy Chickpeas & Cucumber Salad Serves 4, or 2 very hungry persons Cucumber & Melon Salad 1 cucumber 1 small (or 1/­­2 regular) melon (we used Piel de Sapo but honeydew would also work) 1 spring onion 2 celery stalks 10-15 fresh mint leaves 1 avocado 6 radishes 1/­­2 roman lettuce 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil Spiced warm chickpeas 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 1 tbsp sesame seeds 2 tsp fennel seeds  1 tsp coriander seeds 1 tsp cardamom seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika powder 1/­­4 cup – 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed For serving 2 cups plain full-fat Greek yogurt  For the cucumber & melon salad:  Wash all produce. Cut cucumber and melon in large bite-size pieces. Trim and finely slice spring onion, celery and mint leaves. Cut the avocado in half and remove the stone, then cut into cubes. Trim the radishes and thinly slice them. And chop the roman lettuce. Place all prepared ingredients in a mixing bowl, squeeze over lemon juice, drizzle with olive oil and a little salt, give it a good toss and set aside. For the spiced warm chickpeas:  Add all seeds and spices (except for the ground spices) to a dry skillet, heat gently for a couple of minutes while stirring. When the spices starts to pop and smell fragrant, they’re done. Pour into a mortar and give them a few bashes with the pestle (alternatively on a cutting board and use the back of a chef’s knife). Transfer the seeds and spices back to the skillet. Now add oil (start with the lesser amount and add more later on if it looks dry), ground spices  and chickpeas and heat on low temperature for 2-3 minutes. Stir to combine. When the chickpeas are warm and covered in spices and seeds, remove from the heat. Dollop the yogurt into four bowls. Use the back of a spoon to smooth it out. Arrange the salad on one side of the yogurt and the spiced warm chickpea on the other side. Drizzle a little extra oil on top. Enjoy immediately while the chickpeas are still warm. ********* LONDON + BATH In all my excitement over a simple bowl of yogurt, I almost forgot to mention that we are coming to London and Bath next week for a couple of book events. We’re very excited and can’t wait to meet some of you! We’re having a supper club at Grace Belgravia on Monday 5 June, 7-10 pm. More info here. We’ll do talk and Q&A at Whole Foods Market in Kensington on Wednesday 7 June, 6.30 pm. More info and tickets here. We’ll also do a talk and cooking demo at Topping & Company Booksellers in Bath on Friday 9 June, 7.30 pm. More info and tickets here. Finally, we’re having a hands on cooking class at Bertinet Kitchen in Bath on Saturday 10 June, 10 am. Tickets here (only one left). Big love!

6 Fantastic Ways to Stuff Sweet Potatoes

April 22 2017 VegKitchen 

6 Fantastic Ways to Stuff Sweet Potatoes Sweet potatoes are vegetable heaven! If you do absolutely nothing other than bake or microwave them, theyre still as delicious as all heck. Not to diss regular potatoes, but sweet potatoes have them beat in nutrients, especially in vitamin A and C. Though sweet potatoes are super tasty in their own right, stuffing them with other tasty […] The post 6 Fantastic Ways to Stuff Sweet Potatoes appeared first on VegKitchen.

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus

April 7 2017 My New Roots 

Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus The first job I landed after moving to Copenhagen, was working as a chef in a little cafe. After a few weeks of consistently not burning lasagna and under seasoning everything, I was asked if I was interested in cooking on a few episodes on a local, public TV station. The producers suggested I choose a few dishes that I love, and filmed me in a friends kitchen, since mine was too small. My husband gently warned me beforehand that Danes dont respond well to overly-enthusiastic, hyperbolic Americans, so I faked it and was awkwardly not myself as I spoke lukewarmly about whole grains and beans, fermented things and dark leafy greens. The first recipe I made on the show was sprouted hummus, and although the recipe turned out well, I felt like a fraud. Because above all things, sprouts were, and still are, my true love. The show was on at 2 or 3 in the morning, and because I didnt have a television, I never actually saw it on air. Instead, I watched it on my computer on a borrowed CD, long after it had been on TV. Much to my dismay, the producers titled the show Cooking with Sareh, which still baffles me considering the fact that my name is spelled the exact same way in Danish. The program was poorly edited, badly lit, awkward in every sense, and in my attempts to come off as cool and nonchalant, I seemed utterly bored as I fondled chickpea sprouts - something that otherwise would get me pretty riled up. On the whole, this experience was totally mortifying, except for one small, redeeming factor. I was suddenly being recognized at work in the café, and on the bike paths of Christiania: hey sprout girl! theyd call at me. Its you! I didnt make your hummus, but your show is great, sprout girl, theyd say. If there was any consolation, this was it. I was Sprout Girl. So in case you missed my break out performance on Cooking with Sareh, and my reined-in, lackluster pitch about sprouts, here it is again. Because I am Sprout Girl forever and always. Sprouting is like any other kitchen endeavour: it seems pretty daunting until you actually do it, then youre left wondering what took you so long to try – a real facepalm moment. With simple equipment that you most likely have in your cupboard, and seeds that you already have in your pantry, its a fun and empowering practice that brings you one step closer to your food. Sprouts are so nutritious because they are life potential, ignited. When we soak a seed, we end its dormancy, and awaken the nutrition inside it needed to grow a plant which will in turn make more seeds and more plants. When we eat a sprout, we eat this potential! Pound for pound, sprouts have the largest amount of nutrients of any food. Did you get that? This is a big deal! And its all because sprouting increases vitamin content significantly, especially vitamin A, Bs, C and E, along with boosting calcium, iron, selenium, and zinc. The quality of protein and carbohydrates improves, as the sprouting process begins to break down the complex proteins and starches into amino acids, peptides, and simple carbohydrates needed by the seed to grow. At the same time, anti-nutrients such as phytic acid, protease and amylase inhibitors are neutralized. This makes a sprout very easy to digest with highly absorbable nutrients. Who is responsible for this influx of awesomeness? Its enzymes! Enzymes are compounds found in raw plants that are needed for nearly every biochemical process that takes place in our body, and something many of our modern diets are lacking. Sprouts are virtually loaded with them. There are up to 100 times more enzymes in sprouts than uncooked fruits and veggies! Enzymes are also what sets living food apart from raw food. Yes, raw foods still offer us enzymes, but eating a food that is alive guantees more enzymes, and in fact more nutrients altogether. As soon as a food is picked, it begins losing its nutrients. Imagine how much vitamin C is left in that orange, which has traveled hundreds, if not thousands of kilometers to get to your plate, and spent weeks, if not months in a storage facility before being dropped off at your local grocer. Sprouts are the remedy to this, pulsating with life and life-giving nutrients, and pretty much the freshest food you can eat outside of a garden. Sprouts are also incredibly low in calories, yet deliciously filling due to their high fiber and water content. A fantastic food to binge on, especially if youre trying to elbow out some of the other stuff from your diet. I love the versatility of sprouts, not only are there so many varieties, but they can be used in so many ways. Like this hummus for example! You can also go classic and top your sandwiches with sprouts, or fold them into grain salads, puree them into soups and even smoothies. I also love freshening up cooked dishes, like stir-fries, curries and pizzas with sprouts. Their crunch and earthy brightness are a welcoming balance to heavier, richer meals. If youre on a budget, sprouts are a sweet deal. Because the amount of food you sprout triples or quadruples in size, youll end up with way more to eat than you started with for the same price. Its kind of magical. Whats more, is that properly stored sprouts can last over a month, and some varieties up to 70 days. If youre prone to tossing away spoiled produce, sprouts will save you money, big time. Sprouting can take place anywhere you have access to fresh, clean water twice a day. Ive sprouted on road trips, beach holidays, visiting the in-laws...all over the place! And the groovy thing about taking your show on the road is that you can convince other people to get sprouting too. And sprouts are not just great for our health, but also the planet. Consider the fact that youre growing a garden right in your kitchen, using your own energy to make the magic happen. Its hyper-local food at its best! No chemicals or pesticides during the growing process, or fossil fuels for transportation. Could sprouts be the perfect food?! The answer is yes. But I may be a little biased. I am the Sprout Girl, after all. If you are concerned about mold or bacteria contamination, please understand that commercially-grown sprouts are propagated in an ideal environment for pathogens to proliferate. Just one more reason to grow your own sprouts at home where you can be sure of proper hygiene and care. Make sure that your jar or sprouting container is thoroughly clean, that youre rinsing your sprouts with cool water twice daily, and that your sprouts have plenty of airflow. After I drain my sprouts, I make sure that the seeds /­­ sprouts arent blocking the entire opening of the jar (see photo). If you follow these tips, you shouldnt have any problems. Scoring Seeds You can sprout just about anything, but the cheapest and easiest things are found in the bulk bin of your health food store! Lentils, beans, chickpeas, rice, buckwheat, wheat are all widely available and inexpensive. Its imperative that you choose organically-grown ingredients, as conventionally grown seeds are often irradiated, making them difficult, or even impossible to germinate. You can also purchase seeds online, especially the more specialty ones, like alfalfa, radish, onion, broccoli etc. Finding Equipment There are plenty of sprouting apparatuses that you can buy, but if youre just starting out, use a jar! I bet you already have one. – 1 sterilized, large-mouth, quart-sized glass jar with an airtight lid – small piece of cheesecloth – rubber band – a bowl or dish rack How to Sprout There are countless resources on this topic online, and even whole books written about sprouting, so I am presenting you with a very simple, yet rather foolproof technique. If you want to learn more (which I encourage you to do!) here’s a great place to learn about different methods, applications, as well as help and advice: Sprout People     Print recipe     Simple Sprouting Day 1 1. Prep (night) Take a quick glance at the seeds as you put them into the sterilized soaking container. Remove any stones, cracked /­­ damaged seeds, and rinse well. 2. Soak (night) A general rule is covering the seeds with 2-3 times the amount of water (e.g. 1 cup seeds : 2-3 cups water). Use pure, filtered, unchlorinated water. Skim off any seeds that are floating. Let sit for 8-12 hours. Day 2 1. Drain (morning) Put a piece of cheesecloth over the mouth of the jar and secure it with a rubber band. Drain the seeds letting all the water run out. 2. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 3. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 3 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) Day 4 1. Rinse + drain (morning) Run cool water through the cheesecloth, swish the seeds around and drain. Repeat, then set the jar in a bowl or on your dish rack at a 45° angle so that any remaining water can drain out, but air can easily get in. 2. Rinse + drain again (night) 3. Enjoy (night) Your sprouts are ready! The tail should be at least the length of the seed itself (if it is not quite there yet, continue with the rinsing and draining process until it is. Some seeds take a couple more days). If youre not going to eat all the sprouts right away, make sure you let the sprouts drain for at least 8 hours after their last rinse before you put them in the fridge. Never store wet sprouts, as they will spoil quickly. Store sprouts in the sprouting jar with an airtight lid for one month, or more.     Print recipe     Its Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus Makes 4 cups Ingredients: 2 cloves garlic 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml tahini 1/­­2 tsp. fine salt, to taste 2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (optional) zest of 1 lemon 4 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 4 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 4 cups /­­ 500g sprouted chickpeas (start with 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 300g dried chickpeas) Directions: 1. Pulse the garlic in the food processor until minced. Add all other ingredients, except for the sprouted chickpea and blend until you have a paste. Add the chickpeas and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Season to taste and adjust more salt /­­ spice if desired. To achieve an even smoother consistency, scoop hummus into a high-speed blender and blend on high for an additional 10-15 seconds. Serve immediately and store leftovers in an airtight container for up to five days. I hope that this process seems simple enough for you to try. I promise that once you start sprouting, you won’t be able to stop! It’s so easy, fun, and connecting – not to mention delicious. Good luck and happy sprouting, dear friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Copenhagen! I am thrilled to announce my first two cookbook events in CPH this Spring. The first will be an intimate talk and demonstration at SLOW Copenhagen, and the second will be a magical, celebratory dinner in collaboration with the local, organic grocer and kitchen, Kost. Click on the images for more info and tickets! Can’t wait to see you there.    The post It’s Alive! Sprouted Chickpea Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Nasi Lemak

March 15 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

Nasi Lemak In the five weeks that I spent exploring Malaysia, Singapore, and Borneo there were a few dishes that I just had to try whenever I had the chance. Nasi Lemak is a national favorite - and one of my favorites, too! The name technically means “fatty rice” but “creamy rice” sounds a least a little bit better. Traditionally, as with this recipe, Nasi Lemak is rice cooked in creamy, coconut milk - often along with fresh herbs and spices such as pandan (which you can replace with bay leaves if that’s what you’ve got.) The bright yellow hue comes from turmeric. Though it’s a breakfast dish, it can be eaten at any time of the day, and many variations cross firmly into Savory Culinary Territory. I eat this all times of the day: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Snack, whatever! I tried Nasi Lemak in lots of places: Kuala Lampur, Penang, Malacca, and Singapore. Inspired by those dishes and their accompaniments - and my own imagination, I’ve created a complete meal set: Coconut Pandan Rice served with stir-fried Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, crunchy, charred Spicy Nuts, and a delicious sweet-chili sauce known as Sambal Belacan. These are actually four different recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA which I’ve put together in this one post. You can of course substitute or simplify the dishes for a less involved meal set designed how you like it. Nasi Lemak is equally awesome even when it’s just served with the fresh cucumber, lime slices, and nuts. I love going all out and doing the Lemongrass Tofu cubes, too. Also, I find the hot, spicy Samabal Belecan completes the dish fantastically. How to eat it? Mix it up and eat it with your hands! Serve this meal set up on a banana leaf, wash your hands, mix everything together, and dive in… wild and forkless. (By the way, frozen banana leaves are often available at your local Asian import grocery shop. Just thaw them, rinse them, and eat off of them.) If you prefer a more modern approach: Make it all, arrange it perfectly on plates, eat it with a fork and spoon. It’s up to you! Nasi Lemak Malaysian Coconut Pandan Rice with Lemongrass Ginger Tofu, Spicy Nuts & Sambal Belacan recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA serves 3 to 4 /­­ time 60 min Coconut Pandan Rice: - 2 cups (375 g) broken jasmine rice or basmati rice - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) water - 1 2/­­3 cup (400 ml) coconut milk - 1/­­2 tsp sea salt - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric ground - 2 pandan leaves or bay leaves - fried onions for garnish - 1/­­2 small cucumber sliced - lime slices for garnish - Rinse and drain rice thoroughly. - Bring water and coconut milk to low boil in a medium pot with good lid. Stir in rice, salt, turmeric, and pandan (or bay leaves). Return to simmer. Cover and steam until most liquid is absorbed, 12-15 min. Remove from heat. Stir a few times. Cover and let sit 10 min. Remove and discard leaves before serving. - Garnish with fried onions, cucumber, and lime slices. Lemongrass Ginger Tofu: - 14 oz (400 g) firm tofu cut in cubes or strips - 1 1/­­2 cups (200 g) pineapple chopped - 1 Tbs oil - 2 shallots finely chopped - 2 cloves garlic finely chopped - 2 stalks lemongrass finely chopped - 3/­­4 in (2 cm) fresh ginger finely chopped - 1 tsp coriander ground - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice - 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - fresh coriander or parsley leaves chopped, for garnish - Cut tofu in slabs and wrap in clean kitchen towel. Weight with a heavy cutting board and press out extra moisture, 15-20 min. Unwrap and cut in cubes or strips. - Heat oil in a large frying pan or wok on medium high heat. Add chopped shallots, garlic, lemongrass, ginger, and ground coriander. Fry, stirring constantly, until shallots being to soften and brown, 2-3 min. - Add tofu cubes. Mix well. Fry, stirring regularly, until tofu cubes are golden brown and crispy on the edges, 5-8 min. - Add chopped pineapple, lime (or lemon) juice, soy sauce, and salt. Fry, stirring regularly, another 5-10 min. Remove from heat. Spicy Nuts: - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) peanuts - 1/­­2 cup (50 g) cashews - 1/­­2 tsp chili powder or paprika ground - 2 tsp coconut sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - Heat a medium frying pan on medium heat. Dry roast peanuts and cashews, stirring regularly, until light golden brown and dark spots begin to appear, 4-7 min. Do not burn. - Add chili powder (or paprika), sugar and salt. Mix well. Continue to cook another 2-3 min, stirring constantly, until sugar has melted and nuts are well coated. Remove from heat. Allow to cool. Sambal Belacan: - 2-3 Tbs vegetable oil - 5 large (90 g) red chilies chopped - 2 cloves garlic chopped - 1 Tbs soy sauce (Shoyu) - 1 Tbs rice vinegar - 1 Tbs lime juice or lemon juice - 1 Tbs coconut sugar - 1/­­4 tsp sea salt - Blend all ingredients in a small food processor or blender until smooth, adding more oil (or some water) as needed. - Heat a small frying pan on medium heat. Add blended spice paste to pan and fry, stirring regularly, until sauce darkens, thickens, and oil separates, 8-12 min. vegan recipes from The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA (available as printed cookbook & ebook in English & German) The post Nasi Lemak appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Veganize It! Blog Tour

February 28 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Veganize It! Blog TourIn less than a week, my new book Veganize It! Easy DIY Recipes for a Plant-Based Kitchen will hit the shelves. To celebrate, were having a blog tour.  Over the next few weeks, you can visit some fantastic blogs and websites to check out some sample recipes, photos, and reviews of Veganize It! and also enter giveaways to win a copy of the book. Having written more than 20 cookbooks, Veganize It! may be my most personal favorite of all because it comes full circle to when I first went vegan nearly 30 years ago and began to “veganize” all our favorite foods.  In this book, I’ve organize the recipes to share not only veganized ingredients but also recipes that use those ingredients.  So, whether you need basic DIY recipes such as vegan sour cream or seitan, or want to make a “soup to nuts” meal from appetizer to dessert, you’ll find the recipes in Veganize It! Heres a list of dates and locations of the blog tour…beginning with Vegan Huggs where you’ll find my recipe for Smoky BBQ Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches. Check back here frequently for changes, updates, and direct links to the posts as they happen.  Thanks in advance to everyone participating in this blog tour to celebrate the publication of Veganize It!  VEGANIZE IT! Blog Tour February 27        Vegan Huggs March 1                Dianne’s Vegan Kitchen March 2                JLGoesVegan March 5                Yummy Plants March 6                Veggies Save the Day March 7                V-Nutrition March 9                Vegan Mos March 13             Glue and Glitter March 14             Veggie Inspired Journey March 15             Lisa’s Project: Vegan March 16             HealthySlowCooking.com March 20            Chic Vegan March 23             Zsu’s Vegan Pantry March 28             Vegan Crunk March 29             Jazzy Vegetarian March 29             Fran Costigan March 31             From A to Vegan TBA                        Vegan Street   The post Veganize It! Blog Tour appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Sarah Bs Balinese Gado Gado

February 5 2017 My New Roots 

Sarah Bs Balinese Gado Gado First of all, hello you. Its been a while. I can hardly believe that the holidays are behind us and even the whole of January. What happened?! Well, before I launch into the recipe, I just wanted to update you all on a couple things. I need to start by saying that the Wild Heart High Spirit Bali Retreat was, without a doubt, one of the coolest projects Ive ever had the pleasure to work on. Mikkala Marilyn Kissi and I welcomed and held space for 16 women to totally transform, and come out on the other side of seven days, new humans. We all landed back into our physical bodies, rediscovering the euphoria of movement and breath, the taste of real food, the feeling of laughter in our cells, sun on our skin, smiles in our hearts. I could go on forever about how deeply moved I feel about the whole thing, but I will just say thank you to everyone who came, and that we are going to do another one very, very soon. There are a few photos from the retreat at the bottom of this post - I hope you enjoy, and join us next time. Also. Cookbook tour. Its happening. Naturally Nourished officially lands in North America February 14th and I am close behind. Ill be visiting New York, Toronto, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles. There are more details at the bottom of this post and on my Events page, so please have a look. For all other countries, please stay tuned! Now, its recipe time. If youre a vegetarian traveling through Indonesia, gado gado will save your life. Its the dish that is on every single menu, a veggie-loaded, protein-rich salad drenched in the most flavourful, luscious peanut sauce that youve ever tasted. Combining raw and slightly steamed or blanched vegetables and bean sprouts, it is typically served with fried tofu or boiled eggs and prawn crackers, but so easily made vegan. The first time I traveled to this part of the world, I ate gado gado so often, that I almost grew tired of it. Almost. What was my initial meal to celebrate the return to the magical island of Bali this time? Naturally, gado gado, and it did not disappoint. There is something incredibly satisfying about the dish, something that grabs a hold and makes you coming back for more - I believe it is the exquisite balancing act of flavours and textures. The veggies are light and tender (never mushy!), the sprouts are crunchy and fresh, but the true magic lies da sauce. It hits all the notes with its creamy, rich, salty, sweet, acidic, toasty and spiciness. While eating it youre coming up with ways to justify pouring it on everything (Rice? Yes! Spring rolls? Obviously! Roasted veggies? Of course! Bean salad? Why not?!). Of all the dishes I taught during my retreat cooking classes in Bali, this is the one that the ladies really went wild for. Because sauce. I will mention that I am taking major liberties with the traditional recipe, keeping my version vegan and soy-free, and switching out the peanuts for more health-supportive almonds. I realize that this is akin to making pasta out of vegetables (i.e. not at all pasta), but we often and readily make allowances for the promise of something healthier, so just roll with me on this one, okay? Thanks. But Sarah, whats wrong with peanuts? You may recall me tackling this subject before, but for those of you who are hearing just learning that peanuts and the things made with it are less-than-awesome, lets recap! Although there are a lot worse things you could be eating, there are also plenty of healthier choices than peanuts, and heres why. First of all, peanuts are a bit of an odd duck plant. Not a true nut, but a bean in fact, peanuts grow underground in their thin-skinned pods, which come into direct contact with the surrounding soil. Because this soil is often moist and warm, it presents the ideal environment for fungus to proliferate. Now, its not the fungus that is the issue in this case, but the poison it releases, called alflatoxin, which is a cancer-causing agent that attacks the liver. What is the most shocking news, is that the highest levels of alflatoxin arent found in big brand peanut butters, but in the peanut butter ground fresh in health food stores. Second of all, conventionally-grown peanuts are sprayed with very high levels of pesticides and are one of the most contaminated crops in the North America. They are also often genetically modified. Thirdly, peanuts contain very high levels of Omega-6 fatty acids, an essential fat that we consume too much of in general. Ideally, Omega-6 and Omega-3 fats should be consumed in a 3:1 ratio (like the ratio found in hemp seeds!), otherwise inflammation erupts in the body. If youre a serious peanut and peanut butter lover, there are a few things you can do. For starters, find a brand of peanuts that have been grown organically in a dry environment (New Mexico for instance). Dry environments mean drier soils, which means less fungus. Make sure the nuts you are buying are very fresh and raw, since the word roasted cruelly translates to deep fried. Dry-roasted are okay since they dont use oil in the cooking process, but these nuts are typically old. But the best alternative of all? Other nuts! Like almonds. Almonds are high in vitamin E, a potent antioxidant that makes our skin look radiant, and helps protect again heart disease. Almonds have been proven to help lower cholesterol, the risk of weight gain and diabetes. They have about half the amount of Omega-6 fats that peanuts do, along with fewer calories. I snack on almonds and almond butter whenever I can, and have successfully replaced peanuts with this healthier option. I hope youre inspired to do the same! The cool thing about this dish is that you can make it any time of year with seasonal veggies and prepare them the way that suits you and the outdoor temperature, while keeping the sauce exactly the same. I like to eat veggies almost entirely raw in the summer, and include things like cucumber, green beans, radish, and lettuces. In the winter however, gado gado is truly the prefect cold-weather salad since everything can be slightly cooked and enjoyed warm. For this version, I chose two kinds of cabbage, kale, carrots, sweet potato, and freshly sprouted mung beans. An improvement Ive made since teaching this recipe at the retreat was tossing the still-warm vegetables in virgin coconut oil - best decision. This adds a whole other layer of flavour and creaminess, plus adds even more richness, which need this time of year. Did I mention theres also sauce?! There are a couple ways of making my version of gado gado sauce. The best method, for sure, is roasting your own almonds and making your own fresh nut butter. The flavour will truly blow your mind if you go in this direction. But! If you are pressed for time and /­­ or dont feel like going through the rigmarole, you can totally use store-bought almond butter. Just make sure that it is unsweetened and made from roasted almonds, not raw. We want the full depth of flavour here - raw almond butter is too mild and will be overwhelmed by the other sauce ingredients.     Print recipe     Sarah B’s Balinese Gado Gado Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed coconut oil 1/­­2 small head savoy cabbage, shredded 1/­­2 small head red cabbage, shredded 6-7 lacinato kale leaves, ribbed and sliced into ribbons 2 medium sweet potato 4 carrots, julienned or spiralized 2 cups packed /­­ 180g mung bean sprouts (or any sprouts!) 2 shallots, sliced into rings 1 small bunch cilantro, roughly chopped a few pinches flaky sea salt limes for serving, optional Almond Gado Gado Sauce 350g almonds = 1 cup /­­ 250ml almond butter 1 small chili, to taste (use as much or as little as you like) 1 clove garlic 2 Tbsp. tamari juice of 1/­­2 lime 2 Tbsp. coconut sugar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml full-fat coconut milk 1/­­3 cup /­­ 85ml water, to thin as needed Directions: 1. Make the almond gado gado: preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. Spread almonds out evenly on a cookie sheet and roast until fragrant and golden, about 10-15 minutes. Check often - they burn quickly! Remove from oven and let cool. 2.  Place the almonds in a food processor and pulse to chop them up, then remove a good handful for garnish. Blend the remaining almonds on high, scraping down the sides every so often, until the mixture becomes smooth and liquid. Depending on your food processor, this may take up to 10 minutes - be patient, it will work! 3. Roughly chop the chili and garlic, add them to a food processor, along with the tamari, lime juice, coconut sugar and coconut milk. Blend on high and add water to achieve the correct the consistency: the sauce should be thin enough to pour, but not water-y. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. Store in a glass jar with an airtight lid (keep leftovers in the fridge). 4. Wash and prepare the vegetables: cut the sweet potato into wedges, spiralize or julienne the carrots, shred the cabbage and kale. Set a steamer over boiling water and place the sweet potato inside first, cover, and set a timer for 6 minutes. If the sweet potatoes are tender at this point, remove them from the steamer and set aside and toss with a little of the coconut oil, then cover to keep warm (if they are still raw, continue to steam until tender). Next place the carrots and cabbage in the steamer and cook for 2-4 minutes until tender-crisp, then toss with remaining coconut oil. In a large bowl combine all the steamed veggies with sprouts, shallots and cilantro. Sprinkle with salt and toss. 5. To serve, spoon a generous portion of sauce onto each plate. Lay the salad on top (or arrange it neatly as I have), sprinkle with chopped, toasted almonds, more cilantro and shallots, as desired. Top with more sauce, if desired. Dig in.   Here are some shots I took during the retreat in Bali. It was beyond magical. If you’d like to stay updated about the next one, please sign up for our newsletter and be the first to know once we announce! And now for the book tour! I am so insanely excited to get on the road with my latest cookbook, Naturally Nourished, which you can preorder here. I’ll be in New York City and Toronto first, and tickets for the events in those cities are now available. Check the Events page, Instagram and Facebook for the remaining cities, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles. See you soon! February 20th My New Roots x The Aerie Collective: WisdomShare “Turning Your Creativity Into a Career” Spend an evening with Sarah for an inspiring presentation about how she has grown her food blogging passion into a thriving career. Her book is available for purchase & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 21st My New Roots + Food52 Livestream Tune in to Food52’s Facebook at 3pm EST, for a live broadcast of Sarah Britton demonstrating two of her favourite recipes from her new cookbook Naturally Nourished. Live event link: www.facebook.com/­­food52 February 21st My New Roots + Jessica Murnane + Julia Turshen A very special night of inspiring conversation + a celebration + great women in food! Join us for the launch party of two beautiful & brilliant new cookbooks: Sarah Britton’s Naturally Nourished and Jessica Murnane’s One Part Plant With the conversation led by the highly acclaimed author & chef, Julia Turshen. Come for the bites, drinks, and book signings by all three women – stay for the good times & (selfies)! Click here for tickets and more details February 22nd My New Roots + Amy Chaplin + The Finch: Plant-based Dinner Celebration We’re thrilled to invite you to a very special dinner collaboration at Michelin-starred restaurant The Finch, celebrating two fantastic women in food. Join us for this inspired & intimate gathering. Click here for tickets and more details TORONTO February 24th My New Roots x The Aerie Collective: WisdomShare “Turning Your Creativity Into a Career” Spend an evening with Sarah for an inspiring presentation about how she has grown her food blogging passion into a thriving career. Her book is available for purchase & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 25th Naturally Nourished Book Launch at Appetito! We’re very happy to welcome you to join us for an excting interview with Sarah, Q&A, recipe tasting from the cookbook, book purchasing & signing. Click here for tickets and more details February 26th My New Roots + The First Mess: Cookbook Celebration Gathering Together with Sarah, Laura and an incredible community we would love to invite you to meet, feast & celebrate in their cookbook launch! Click here for tickets and more details The post Sarah B’s Balinese Gado Gado appeared first on My New Roots.

Curcuma Semolina with Berries

December 20 2016 Veganpassion 

Curcuma Semolina with Berries Hey guys! While preparing my christmas menus I want to introduce you to this delightful dessert: a curcuma-pumpkin semolina with red berries. The title is a little bit long that's why I call it curcuma semolina with berries. It tastes fantastic and it's suitable for breakfast as well because it ist all natural and without any refinded sugar. It is made out of whole grain semolia. I wish you lots of fun with cooking this dessert and maybe it fits perfect into the choice of your christmas menu. Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 250 g hokkaido pumpkin (220 g seedless) 100 ml orange juice 100 ml non-dairy-milk (almond milk) 600 ml non dairy-milk (almond milk) 150 g whole spelt semolina 1 heaped tsp. curcuma latte (spice mixture) 80-100 g maple sirup 2 tbsp. cocoa A pinch of cinnamon, vanilla and salt 200 g mixed red berries 1 pomegranate Remove seeds from hokkaido pumpkin and cut it in small pieces. Let it cook in orange juice with closed lid for about 10 minutes until it is done. Mash it up with 100 ml non-dairy-milk. Then add more milk and semolina and let it cook for 2-5 minutes and stir up meanwhile. Add curcuma, maple sirup and spices. Split semolina pudding in half and add cocoa to one half. Spice and sweeten it some more if you like. Put both semolina pudding halfs in a glass and put in layers on top of the other. Serve with pomegranate and berries.

Sourdough Salad Pizza

October 14 2016 My New Roots 

Sourdough Salad Pizza Along with ice cream, chocolate, and burgers, pizza was definitely on my hit list when I started eating healthier. But like every single one of those foods, I have come up with a way of making them not only not bad for me, but actually good for me. If you live in the pizza is junk food world, this is the post for you, as I will single-handedly convince you that this universally loved indulgence can in fact, be nutritious. It starts with the crust. The pizza youll get at your local restaurant, in the freezer section of your grocery store, or out of the backseat of a teenage kids delivery car, is typically made with white flour. It also likely contains commercial yeast, the magical ingredient that makes dough rise quickly and predictably. There are of course other ways of making dough or crust, but these ingredients and methods can be more expensive and take more time. Most places stick to the quick and cheap, which almost always compromises our health. How do we make a healthier crust? The answer is fermentation! Sourdough: whats the big deal? Sourdough is essentially fermented flour. And if youre familiar with fermented foods, youll know that they are easier to digest, and contain far more nutrients than the original ingredients themselves. Sourdough bread is made by combining flour and water together with the natural yeasts that live on everything - our hands, our food, swirling around in the air - and after letting it hang out for a few days, youll have whats called a starter.  This starter is added to a basic combination of more flour, water and salt, essentially inoculating it with all of the good bacteria and friendly yeasts. These organisms create lactic acid, which neutralize phytates, making nutrients more easily absorbed by the body. Lactic acid slows down the entrance of glucose into the blood stream, preventing the infamous glycemic index roller coaster. But my favourite of all, is that lactic acid helps break down the complex structure of gluten, making it far easier to digest. That means that people who have a sensitivity to gluten (except celiacs) can potentially eat sourdough bread without digestive upset, as the protein has been changed into a simpler arrangement that is easier to break down in the body. Three cheers for that, eh? Down below Ive included the recipe for both sourdough starter and making pizza from that starter. I think sourdough pizza is a great place to begin because it is far easier to pull off than bread, in my experience. No matter if your dough gets a solid rise or not, youll still end up with a gloriously crisp, chewy crust that will your body will also thank you for. Toppings: not just a pretty face The toppings on a pizza will make or break the overall flavour, but also the potential health benefits. It doesnt take a rocket scientist to know that gobs of cheese and pepperoni are not the most health-supportive choices. So, see topping your pie as an opportunity to get creative, while sneaking in all of those veggies! The best advice I can give you on this front, is to remember to prepare the toppings – meaning that they should be in the state that you’d enjoy eating them before putting them on the pizza. Since this style of pizza is cooked very quickly, things like garlic, onions, mushrooms, and greens are not going to change all that much in the oven. If you wouldnt mow down on a bunch of raw Swiss chard, take those leaves on a tour of a hot skillet first. Mushrooms should be marinated or cooked beforehand (unless you like them raw), and onions, in my opinion should be caramelized. Things like olives, zucchini, tomatoes, capers, and bell peppers can be added raw since they are delicious eaten that way. Sauce is optional, especially if youre going to use juicy toppings, but if you are using it, keep it sparse and dont let it sit on the dough too long, otherwise it will get soggy and sad. Pesto is a great alternative to traditional sauce, as is tapenade, roast veggie puree, romesco, chimichurri, and harissa. And while were on the subject of health, did you know that pizza is THE perfect vehicle for salad? I discovered this a couple years ago when trying to make my healthy pizza even healthier. Instead of putting salad on the side, I thought, why not pile it on top? This delivers a fantastic textural contrast, while delivering that much-needed hit of freshness and bright acidity to cut the richness of the pizza. How is this not a thing?  I posted a shot on Instagram some time ago and it received a lot of positive feedback, so it seems like many of you are down with the salad pizza idea. It’s two of the world’s best foods combined, and that equals true tummy happiness. Every summer I go to my friends cottage, just down the river from my own in the Thousand Islands. They are enthusiastic foodies and love to cook and eat good food as much as I do. They are also passionate about a plant-based diet, fermentation, pickling, and sourdough - all things healthy and delicious! Needless to say, this weekend has become the culinary highlight of my summer. The only difference between this year and previous ones, is that this time I was able to talk myself into snapping a few pics during this process and waiting to eat! Not an easy feat for me, you must know, but well worth it if it inspires any of you to try this recipe. Creating the sourdough starter Although it may seem daunting, creating a sourdough starter, culture, or mother is far easier than you may think, and only requires three simple ingredients: water, flour, and a little patience. A starter takes about five days to develop, but perhaps more or less depending on temperature, humidity, and the type of flour youre using. Nevertheless, its NOT complicated, and a very gratifying way to connect more to your food. Heres what you need: 4oz. /­­ 115ml filtered water (un-chlorinated) 4oz. /­­ 115g flour (choose whichever kind of grain-based flour youd like – 100% rye and spelt are great choices) a medium-sized glass container Method: 1. Stir the flour and water together for about 30 seconds until it is a consistent batter. Cover the container with a tea towel, secure with a rubber band and set in a warm place. 2. After 24 hours, feed the starter with the same amount of flour and water. Stir to combine. 3. After another 24 hours, repeat with the feeding. By this time, you should see bubbles forming and smell something slightly sour. This is a good sign, and means that the wild yeasts are active. If there are no bubbles or sour aroma, keep feeding the starter and looking for signs of life. 4. After 24 hours, repeat with the feeding. By this time, you should see many bubbles of varying sizes and the aroma should be pleasantly strong. 5. Around day five, the starter should have doubled in size from day four, and is ready to use. If the starter has not risen, continue with the feeding program until it has. This process can take a few extra days if youre in a colder environment. Dont give up! Storing your Sourdough Starter If you would like to use the starter daily, then I recommend feeding it daily. Keep it at room temperature on your counter top so that youll remember to do so, and remove half of the starter each time so that there is always room for the fresh flour and water. If you would however like to store your sourdough for occasional use, keep it in the fridge where the fermentation process will slow down and will only require a feeding once a week. To use again, simply remove the starter from the fridge about 12 hours prior to baking. Feed the starter to wake it up from hibernation. After about 12 hours from the last feeding, and once the starter is bubbly and smelling sour, its ready to go again! Resources and Troubleshooting There are so many resources for sourdough making out there, Ill leave you with a few that I really like in case you run into any issues. Cultures for Health Nourished Kitchen The Kitchn     Print recipe     Sourdough Salad Pizza Makes 4 individual pizzas Dough: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350ml sourdough starter 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 350ml wholegrain flour, I like spelt or light spelt for making pizza (plus more for dusting) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1. Combine all ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Stir with a large wooden spoon until incorporated. Then turn out dough onto a clean, floured surface and knead for 5-10 minutes, until it is no longer sticky (add additional flour, as needed, or add water if the dough is too dry). 2. Split the dough into four balls and put them on a floured baking sheet. Cover with a moist kitchen towel or plastic wrap put them in the fridge for 12-24 hours. 3. Take the dough of the fridge out about 30 minutes before you plan to make the pizzas. Toppings: Tomato sauce Local, seasonal veggies (our favourites include zucchini, eggplant, caramelized onions, fresh tomatoes, sweet and /­­ or spicy peppers, mushrooms, olives, sundried tomatoes, crushed chili flakes Greens such as beet tops, kale, Swiss chard, spinach Cheese such as Pecorino Romano, ch?vre, feta, goat or sheeps milk mozzarella Fresh herbs Salad greens such as arugula, baby spinach, leaf lettuce, tossed in lemon, olive oil, and salt Directions: 1. Preheat your oven to 500°F /­­ 260°C. If you have a pizza stone, place it in the oven while it preheats, or use a baking sheet. 2. Flour your work surface well and roll out the dough to desired size (tip: rolling out onto baking paper makes transferring the pizza much easier). 3. Spread a thin layer of sauce over the dough, followed by desired toppings (except for salad greens). Work quickly - you dont want the sauce sinking into the dough, as it will become soggy. 4. Slide the pizza (on the baking paper or not) onto the pizza stone or baking sheet. Let bake for 7-10 minutes until the crust is golden and the toppings are bubbly. 5. While the pizza is cooking, dress your greens with a little lemon juice, olive oil and salt. Toss to coat and set aside. (This step is optional, but delicious!) 6. Remove the pizza from the oven, let cool for five minutes, then top with greens, slice and enjoy!   I hope that this post puts you in touch with your inner baker, and that you commit to starting your sourdough culture TODAY. Through this miraculous process, you’ll be joining centuries of tradition, ritual, and connection. Not to mention that your pizza will suddenly be good for you. And that is the most important thing of all, amiright? Happy fermenting, friends! xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * In other THRILLING news, I’m co-hosting a retreat in Bali this coming January! Wild Heart, High Spirit is a 7-day revitalizing retreat for women, aimed to restore balance, cultivate inner peace, and nourish the body from inside out. Learn to take care of yourself on a deep level, and feel empowered moving forward in your life beyond our week together. Join Mikkala Marilyn Kissi of Living Yolates and I for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity on the enchanted island of Bali to connect with your wild heart and your high spirit! Click here to find out more.  The post Sourdough Salad Pizza appeared first on My New Roots.

Santana Apple Cake

September 26 2016 seitan is my motor 

Every year during spring and summer I put myself on an apple fast. I don’t eat them anymore because all of a sudden I think they are the most boring fruit in the whole world. In spring there’s rhubarb that suddenly seems so much more interesting. And then summer starts and brings fantastic berries andRead more The post Santana Apple Cake appeared first on seitan is my motor.

Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday!

August 8 2016 Meatless Monday 

Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday!National Farmers Market Week, August 7-13, is a wonderful time to explore the markets in your community and plan new and exciting meatless meals with local fruits and veggies. In honor of the week-long celebration, we’ve put together this list of protein-packed produce to look for at the market and add to your menu plan. These delicious (and nutritious) veggies make it easy to create balanced meals for Meatless Monday!     1. Green Peas At the farmers market youll often find fresh-picked green peas still in the peapod. Peas have a powerful serving of protein - up to 9 grams of per cup when cooked -and are also rich in fiber, potassium, iron, zinc, folate, B vitamins, vitamin A and vitamin K. Make them the star of your entrée or add them to soup, salad, or stir fry.       2. Broccoli Farm-fresh broccoli is as rich in flavor and fiber as it is in protein. Broccoli can be enjoyed raw, steamed, roasted, stir-fried, baked in casseroles or stirred into soups. Broccoli provides over 5 grams of protein per cup and plenty of vitamin A, niacin, vitamin E, vitamin C and vitamin K and high levels of potassium, calcium and phosphorus.     3. Mushrooms Mushrooms are a protein-rich food but are better known for their savory flavors, meaty textures, and versatility in the kitchen. On their own one cup of raw mushrooms has roughly 2 grams of protein – add them to dishes with other veggies for even more flavor and vegetable protein. Ask farmers in your local market which varieties you should try.       4. Brussels Sprouts If youve never seen brussels sprouts fresh on the stalk, youve got to find them in person at your farmers market this season. This tiny, protein-packed (about 4 grams of protein per cup) cruciferous vegetable may have gotten a bad rap in popular culture, but youll love what happens when you roast them with a little olive oil and your favorite spices.         5. Asparagus Asparagus is a wonderful vegetable for summer being perfect for the grill, roasting, quick blanching, or even eating raw. This veggie contains up to 4 grams of protein per cup and also adds a lot of fiber and minerals like potassium, calcium, iron, folate and chromium to your meal. Asparagus looks fancy, but its an easy-to-cook nutritional powerhouse.         6. Artichokes Artichokes might be known for their flavor and fiber content, but they have substantial protein to offer as well (roughly the same as spinach). These flowers can be blended, steamed, roasted, or transformed into a delicious dip. Get fresh artichokes at the farmers market and your dinner guests will be more than impressed with a meatless spread.       7. Spinach Spinach is probably the most famous protein-rich veggie in the bunch; this vibrant seasonal green is not to be missed. Spinach shines as a raw ingredient in salad, sautéed with other veggies, or blended in green juices and smoothies. With over 5 grams of protein per cup, spinach makes getting your daily servings of protein easy.         8. Kale Kale is a versatile, protein-filled green that works well in everything from salads and smoothies to soups and casseroles. With nearly as much protein per serving as spinach, kale offers fiber, vitamin A, and more vitamin C per serving than oranges. Farmers cultivate a variety of types of kale, including curly, frilled, and textured dinosaur leaves.         9. Cauliflower A cruciferous cousin of broccoli, cauliflower makes a moderate protein impact of its own while adding texture and body to meatless meals. Cut your fresh head of cauliflower into thick slices width-wise to make cauliflower steaks, chop into florets and swap in for broccoli in your favorite recipes, or mash it with potatoes to a less starchy alternative.       Farmers markets offer a huge variety of protein-rich foods to make your Meatless Monday fresh, tasty and healthy. Stop by your local market to find even more ideas for delicious meals this season!   Hungry for more fresh farmers market finds? Tour the Union Square Greenmarket with Chef Bryce Shuman of Betony Restaurant in NYC: The post Farmers Market Finds: Protein-Packed Produce for Meatless Monday! appeared first on Meatless Monday.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!