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Tomato pappu recipe | tamata pappu dal | pappu tomato curry

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fantastic vegetarian recipes

Savory Fruit Recipes to Spice up Your Summer Meals

August 5 2019 Meatless Monday 

Savory Fruit Recipes to Spice up Your Summer MealsGrilled and savory fruit recipes are a great way to mix-up your summer menu with new flavors. Watermelon, peaches and pineapple are fantastic grilling options that are easy to make and add a delicious pop of sweet and smoky taste to a variety of dishes. Berries, mangoes and citrus fruits ramp up the style and flavor of any salad, grain bowl or soup. The possibilities are endless. Check out a few of our favorite savory summer fruit recipes that are packed with fresh and enticing tastes sure to impress your friends, family and dinner guests. Grilled Pineapple Watermelon Salad from Sweet Potato Soul   Grilled Watermelon Pineapple Teriyaki Burger from Beyond Meat   Strawberry Kale Salad with Almonds from Apples & Onions Apple Basil Paninis from the Verdant Life Mango Chayote Sunflower Seed Salad from Sprouts in the Hood Sunrise Citrus Salad from Healthy Happy Life Pineapple Ginger Tofu over Edamame from The Pink Apron Curried Red Quinoa and Peach Salad from Oldways Want more recipe inspiration? Weve got tons of plant-based recipes to keep you cooking all summer long. Check them out here . Let us know which recipes are your favorites by tagging @MeatlessMonday in your plant-based cooking posts! #MeatlessMonday Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Savory Fruit Recipes to Spice up Your Summer Meals appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Keema Madras with Red Lentils

August 2 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Keema Madras with Red LentilsVegan Keema Madras with lentils. Keema is usually a minced meat dish made with combination of spices to add a complex flavor. This Keema uses red lentils. Serve this with flatbread, rice or with dosa, appam. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe Nut-free Option  Jump to Recipe Here is another ridiculously delicious Indian meal. Indian Keema is a minced meat dish with various meats used depending on the region. North Indian Keema is cooked with spices and served with thick flatbreads. This South Indian Keema uses whole spices, poppy seeds, fennel seeds and coconut for a fantastic flavor base. The red lentils and potatoes are cooked to al dente. The spices are ground and roasted in a bit of oil, then the onion and garlic are added and cooked with the spices. The pureed tomato is then added and simmered until the sauce thickens. Then the cooked lentils are mixed in. By mixing the lentils later, the spices and the sauce get time and surface area to roast well and develop flavor. If you add lentils before the sauce has cooked, or along with the tomato to cook, the overall flavor suffers as the extra volume hinders the roasting. You can use other cooked lentils or beans and veggies of choice in this delicious sauce. As I always mention with the more involved recipes, don’t be intimidated by the spice list, and experiment with the flavor to preference. The flavors meld and get this meaty profile after sitting for a bit like most Indian recipes. Double the recipe and save a batch for the next day. This Keema Madras profile reminds me of the lamb keema being cooked in the neighborhood long ago. This one is All the meaty flavor without any meat. Lets make some!Continue reading: Vegan Keema Madras with Red LentilsThe post Vegan Keema Madras with Red Lentils appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Paul McCartney’s Super Vegetable Salad

June 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

This is a fantastic salad that can accompany whatever you fancy -- here it’s served with tofu, but you could just as easily serve it with veggie burger or vegetarian sausages, as well as chips and new or mashed potatoes. You can also vary the steamed vegetables according to whats in season. This recipe comes to us from Sir Paul McCartney and our friends at Meat Free Monday . It’s featured in The Meat Free Monday Cookbook . Foreword by Paul, Stella and Mary McCartney. Published by Kyle Books. Photography by Tara Fisher. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 28 cherry tomatoes - 1 head of broccoli - 12 green beans, cut into 2cm lengths - 2 carrots, peeled and sliced into 2cm pieces - 1 head of lettuce -- I like Romaine - 3 spring onions, finely chopped - 100g polenta - a handful of chopped herbs of your choice - 250g tofu, cut into slices - olive oil for frying   - FOR THE DRESSING - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar - 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard (optional) - 1 teaspoon maple syrup (if you like a bit of sweetness)   Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F) and roast the cherry tomatoes for 10 minutes. Cover the bottom of a pan with cold water and place a steamer above it. Put the broccoli, green beans and carrots in the steamer, turn the heat on quite high and steam for about 15 minutes, occasionally prodding the carrots with a fork to see if they are done. Some people like them slightly crunchy, others prefer them a little softer. While the vegetables are steaming, make a salad with the leaves and spring onions. Combine the polenta and herbs in a bowl. Heat some olive oil in a frying pan. Dip the tofu in the polenta mixture, then fry until golden. Whisk together the ingredients for the dressing, but only pour over at the last minute. Assemble your meal by first putting the salad on the plate, then the warm vegetables and finally the tofu. Pour over the dressing then add a little seasoning sauce such as Braggs or a sauce of your choice. The post Paul McCartney’s Super Vegetable Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From Plants

June 10 2019 Meatless Monday 

12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From PlantsProfessional athletes use their bodies in incredible ways. Whether serving as a human bulldozer or striking a ball with colossal force, their bodies require loads of fuel in order to function as powerfully and efficiently as possible. And as the athletes prove below, fuel can come in many forms, and plant-based fuel has helped many achieve great things. Read on to see what this diverse bunch has to say about running on plants.   Lewis Hamilton, Formula 1 Champion I have plenty of protein in my diet and Ive gained muscle, and Im healthier and happier than Ive ever been. Wish I did it sooner. Five-time Formula 1 world champion Lewis Hamilton, via Instagram , discussing the benefits of adopting a plant-based diet. According to Forbes, Hamilton was the world’s 12th highest-paid athlete in 2018 and is the highest-paid Formula 1 driver. Hamilton sites his concerns for the environment around climate change and animal welfare as his motivations for switching to a plant-based diet. He is vocal across his social media platforms about the benefits of plant-based eating and encourages his fans to also reduce meat in their diets.     Venus Williams, professional tennis player “I was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, and I wanted to maintain my performance on the court. Once I started, I fell in love with the concept of fueling your body in the best way possible [through raw, vegan food], she told Health . “Not only does it help me on the court, but I feel like I’m doing the right thing for me.”       Derrick Morgan, American professional football player “Overcoming the preconceived notions is the biggest part. I was a part of it. I used to believe athletes had to eat meat to maintain play, then I educated myself,” Derrick Morgan, NFL football player to ESPN . Morgan is a 100 percent plant-based athlete who has encouraged many of his Tennessee Titans teammates to join him in eating plant-based. He and many of the Titans players have also attributed improved energy, reduced inflammation and better performance to switching to a meatless diet.     Kyrie Irving, professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics I’ve been on more of a plant-based diet, getting away from all the animals [products], Irving told ESPNs Chauncey Billups . Irving also credits plant-based eating with giving him more energy and endurance, which helps him sustain a high performance level throughout games. So my energy is up, my body feels amazing.       Hannah Teter, American Olympian snowboarder “I feel stronger than I’ve ever been, mentally, physically, and emotionally, Teter told HuffPost . My plant-based diet has opened up more doors to being an athlete. It’s a whole other level that I’m elevating to. I stopped eating animals about a year ago, and it’s a new life. I feel like a new person, a new athlete.”       Scott Jurek, American Ultramarathoner I grew up hating vegetables, eating meat and potatoes, he told GQ . When I was in college I started reading more about different diets and the vegetarian and vegan diets really came up quite a bit. As I worked in hospitals through physical therapy school it became clear to me that I needed to change my diet to avoid the health problems I was seeing. It was definitely a long-term decision rather than one made for short-term performance gains.       Jermain Defoe, English professional footballer I think Ive managed [to adopt veganism] successfully, he told the Guardian . I dont find anything hard to give up, as such, because I know the feeling scoring goals gives me. So, while getting in an ice bath isnt nice, I just think: You know what? Im going to do this and be rewarded. Its hard but in another way its easy because all I want to do is play well and score goals.       Tia Blanco, Puerto Rican professional surfer “I feel really great eating a plant-based diet and love the way it makes me feel physically and mentally, she said in an interview with Teen Vogue . Many of us know the effects of diet on one’s health, but fail to realize that diet plays a huge role in more than just your personal well-being.”         Austin Aries, American professional wrestler Im usually concerned with keeping my calories up to maintain my size, though I adjust my calories depending on if I need to bulk up or cut weight, he told Mens Journal . I try to limit my intake of things like soy, gluten, and overly processed foods. The easiest way to do this is by making sure Im eating a variety of different foods every day. This also ensures I am consuming all different types of plant-based protein to cover the full amino acid profile as well as my vitamins and nutrients.     JJ Redick, American professional basketball player for the Philadelphia 76ers During the season, my main focus is staying healthy and feeling strong, he said in an interview with Mens Journal .  Ive always had a leaner frame, so balancing my intake of protein, fat, and carbs is an important focus that guides my food choices. Ive found that incorporating plant-based protein items like Beyond Meat into my diet can deliver just as much protein, if not more, than some traditional meat items, while making me feel healthy, fit, and agile.       David Carter, American professional football player Football is a machismo sport, which is great, but everything can’t be machismo. On the field and at practice, yes, you can be machismo, but when it comes to diet, you need to have compassion for your body, he told NFL.com in an interview.         Barny du Plessis, British professional body builder and Mr. Universe winner I am the best Ive ever been. I feel fantastic, no aches, pains or niggles. No delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMs) after heavy sessions, du Plessis said in an interview with the Thinking Vegan . All my workouts are on fire; endurance and energy are awesome, strength and power are as good as I want them to be. I feel really healthy, fit, and buzzing with energy. I feel lighter, and not bloated, but Im still as heavy as I was when eating meat and animal products. Being leaner on more calories - thats always a good thing!     FREE ORGANIC GOYA FOR A YEAR Dont miss your chance to win ONE YEAR of FREE ORGANIC GOYA PRODUCTS! Meatless Monday has teamed up with Goya to promote their Dont Panic, Its Organic giveaway. Check out Goyas organic products and enter to win Goya goodness for a year . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post 12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From Plants appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Rice is Nice, for so Many Reasons

April 8 2019 Meatless Monday 

Rice is Nice, for so Many ReasonsWe all love rice, and there are good reasons why! This naturally gluten-free grain is inexpensive, wildly versatile and can contribute to a nutrient-rich, meatless meal. When rice is paired with beans, for example, the dish becomes a complete protein . Pairing complementary foods, like rice and beans, is a great way to meet your plant-based nutritional needs (and, of course, satisfy your taste buds). This Monday, try a meatless meal with rice, whether you choose brown, white, long grain, medium grain, short grain, sushi rice, sweet rice, Arborio, Jasmine or Basmati. A little-known rice fact? About 85% of all rice consumed in the U.S. is grown on American farmland, according to our friends at USA Rice . For you trivia folks out there: Arkansas is the no. 1 rice producing state, followed by California. Buying U.S.-grown rice supports American farmers, which is always a good thing! Black Sesame Coconut Rice Pudding with Matcha Cream Were featuring something sweet for this weeks Meatless Monday recipe. This Black Sesame Coconut Rice Pudding with Matcha Cream uses U.S.-grown black japonica rice, which becomes almost chewy in this Japanese-inspired dessert pudding. Thanks to the FeedFeed and Phoebe Lapine of Feed Me Phoebe for sharing! More Recipes with Rice Rice is truly a jack-of-all-trades. Whether you want something sweet or something savory for breakfast, lunch or dinner this ingredient is an overachiever. Check out some other fantastic recipes from Think Rice below for some Meatless Monday inspiration. Banana Sticky Rice Spicy Vegan Burrito Bowls Japonica Rice Salad   Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya   Have a favorite meatless recipe that uses rice? Tell us about it by leaving a comment on our Facebook  page or post it using #MeatlessMonday. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration, be sure to check out our recipe gallery . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Rice is Nice, for so Many Reasons appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chocolate Pomegranate Granola Bites

November 16 2018 Oh My Veggies 

  These chocolate pomegranate cookies have a fantastic granola taste and, even though they’re small, they’re substantial enough that one is quite satisfying. This recipe makes 40 cookies and if you lack that self-control like I do, you’ll want to freeze a bunch–thaw them on the countertop or zap them in the microwave for a few seconds before eating.

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri

October 20 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Sana on the left Sana Javeri Kadri is the founder of Diaspora Co., a radically different spice collective dedicated to equity, sustainable agriculture, and decolonization. We’ve been fortunate to try Diaspora’s heirloom, organic, single-origin turmeric powder, and let’s just say it’s going to be very hard to go back to enjoying any other powdered turmeric ever again. Sana lives between Mumbai and Oakland, California. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I crave routine and am most productive when Im following a routine. However, Im unable to do deep thinking work or larger creative work in the middle of a hectic routine, so I like to keep at least one day of the week wide open for creative projects and giving myself the time and space I need to create something important. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I have been trying really hard to wake up, spend as little time on my phone as possible and then make myself a nourishing drink and most importantly, make myself some breakfast. One of my worst habits is to wake up, get on my phone, start responding to emails and then quickly get changed for work and dive straight into a full workday without taking any time to nourish myself or check in with my body. It means that by 1pm Im starving, cranky and already tired for the day. The life changing power of breakfast is something Im still learning… -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My girlfriend and I try not to spend too much time on our phones before bed, or looking at a screen. She recently introduced a 20 mins of reading before bed practice that were trying to stick to, its my favorite way to wind down and Im committing to not responding to work emails at 10:45pm, even if its 11:15am in Mumbai and my team there is just getting fired up. Work in progress. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  My therapist guides me into mindfulness during our sessions every week because I often come in feeling stressed, frantic and a bit fragile. Shes always able to help me get back in touch with my body and begin to feel grounded again. At her urging, I handle all my stressful work calls or emails sitting outside in the sunshine, ideally with my bare feet in the ground. This practice of grounding has been particularly helpful to me in the past few months of managing a stressful season. I also recently downloaded the Headspace app, and just the five minutes everyday of meditation has made a huge difference to me. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – In Oakland – Bread srsly gluten free sourdough, crispy fried egg cooked in ghee topped with smoked paprika, turmeric and salt, sliced avocado or smoky pinto beans or sliced tomatoes or any veggie leftovers I can wrangle from the fridge, maybe a slice of bacon if Im wanting some extra fat. In Mumbai – a loaded crispy veggie dosa. Either way, I love hot and savory breakfast. The cold and sweet breakfast tradition isnt common in India so, cereal and granola with milk culture is something I find very odd about the United States. Lunch – Leftovers express. My girlfriend and I both work long hours, so our saving grace is prepping large meals a couple times a week and then subsisting on leftovers. Gluten-free pasta with canned early girls (I can 80 lb every summer so that we never have to buy store bought tomato sauce) with every vegetable in the fridge/­­our imperfect produce box and ground beef is a family classic. Rosie is always joking that my stomach doubles when it comes to pasta and shrinks for everything else. Shes not wrong. Snack – My favorite snack is stovetop popcorn. Growing up in Mumbai we never had a microwave, it was my parents most loathed kitchen appliance. So now Im following that tradition of never owning a microwave. My favorite stovetop popcorn is popped in ghee and then topped with nutritional yeast, turmeric, and salt. Its perfect. Dinner - My perfect dinner is khichdi (spiced rice and lentils cooked in ghee and heavy on the ginger, turmeric and cumin), thick full fat yogurt, masala okra, a little bit of pickle (Brooklyn Delhi achaars are divine) and a side of spicy amaranth battered fish. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I used to do caffeine, in a delicious ghee, turmeric, cardamom and coconut sugar concoction, but over time Ive stopped being able to handle it. It started to make my stomach hurt and made me anxious. So I now drink either matcha with rice milk and date syrup, or hot chocolate with hemp oil, coconut sugar and adaptogens if Im needing the extra nourishment. Some days, if Ive slept enough and rested enough, I do better on just water and breakfast, no extra boost needed. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I had a notorious sweet tooth all the way until my early twenties – I couldnt be trusted with bars of chocolate and was known to sneak spoonfuls of cake first thing in the morning. However the older Ive gotten (Im still technically in the early twenties), sweets just give me a sugar crash and make me feel sluggish. As an avid lover of food, Id rather eat plenty of things that make me feel fantastic, than the things that make me feel terrible. Both Rosie and I have been surprised and how quickly our respective sweet tooths have disappeared since we started living together, and how easily weve been able to cut out sugar from our life once we could verbalize how terrible it made us feel. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I swear by cannabis tinctures. Im not big on cannabis in other ways, but I find cannabis to be the only way to really deal with chronic pain. Ive also started using Super Good Hemps Turmeric Full Spectrum Hemp Oil in my morning drinks, and I find that it has similar effects. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I used to weight lift and do Crossfit pretty intensely, but had a really awful injury in 2016. Since then, Ive really had to reframe my definition of exercise. Now, I consider it an extension of my healing process. Intense exercise just isnt possible for me in the same way, so I stick to swimming as often as I can (usually a couple times a week), doing Nike Training body weight workouts at home, and talking our dog for a long walk every evening. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love exercise and do best when Im outside and moving my body. Rosie and I try to take our pup Lilly out for a hike at least once a week, and we notice how much more present are with each other and our work when weve exercised.  That being said, Im also an incredibly competitive person, so reframing exercise to no longer be an intensely competitive thing has been very hard for me. I find it difficult to work up the enthusiasm to go on a leisurely swim, without a team to train with, or a competition to work towards. Switching off my producing strategy is my biggest challenge. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Both! It took me a long time to love my face, acknowledge that it was beautiful despite not looking like everything I saw on magazines and on billboards. But that acceptance and love for my external beauty definitely came from tending to, and growing confidence in my inner beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I grew up using raw honey as a face cleanser, handmade ayurvedic soaps for my body, and a mom who never used makeup. So that has informed a lot of my skincare today. My skincare guru is 300% Abena, the founder of Hanahana Beauty, I use her shea butter exfoliating body bar and swear by it, and I use Abenas recipe for a rose water, tea tree oil and jojoba oil soaked cotton pad as a cleanser morning and night, and it has been a complete game changer for getting my glow back. Ive also been using Curology, which is a custom dermatologist service, that is super affordable and came highly recommended by friends. They prescribed me their night cream, which has really taken care of my breakouts and blackheads. Im not usually big on using chemicals on my skin but have found Curology to be a minimalist option that really works. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Cutting out sugar and gluten entirely is the most obvious one – I break out as soon as I am eating sugar, so its first to go. I also use a turmeric, honey, hemp oil and cornmeal face mask every couple weeks that always makes me feel radiant. My dentist has noticed and commented on the huge difference in my teeth that shes seen since I stopped drinking coffee – theyre whiter than ever before and need much less cleaning, which for me is reason enough to skip the coffee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Abenas DIY rose water, jojoba oil and tea tree oil cotton pads! I used to be a ardent fan of Thayers Rose Witch Hazel Toner but in my experience with skincare – once you go DIY, its impossible to go back :) That being said – I will admit to being a Glossier believer, I didnt use makeup until I discovered Glossier concealer and highlighter. Its so easy and lazy but it works so wonderfully. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Taking our pup out for a long walk by the water is a really grounding activity for me. I have no idea how I managed my stress before she moved in with us. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Honestly Im a spokesperson for not really managing my stress well. My partner often comes home to a fuming, off the hook Sana and it takes significant chatting, massaging and cuddling to work me out of the state that I can get into if Im very stressed.  Im an extrovert and a peoples person so being around people that I love is my best coping mechanism. That being said – I have to be careful not to emotionally dump onto my loved ones, just because theyre willing to be there for me. Ive definitely been guilty of that in the past. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The first one is to make sure I get a really good nights sleep, and make sure Im not drinking alcohol, eating dairy or any processed food. Usually, managing my sleep and diet is the easiest way to kick a cold before it hits. If the cold cant be stopped, I usually start by accepting that my bodys way of asking for rest is by getting sick, and its important to just honor that and completely rest. Then – turmeric, ginger, honey tea all day long.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Ive been trying really hard to take weekends off, and any weekend that I succeed at that- the balance feels so much better. Honestly, as a young business owner, the hustle is so glamorized and romanticized. Youre told that now is your time to grind, and to get further in your career. Whilst this is true, Id also argue that now is the time to establish healthy boundaries and habits in your life so you learn how to maximize your productivity and your potential. Any day that I work a 16 hour day (which is too often), I know that I am not focusing on the bigger picture, and am actually sacrificing my long term goals as a business owner. Remembering that, and focusing on working more effectively, rather than working more, has been a huge step towards achieving healthier work life balance. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Therapy. Every week, no matter what. That perspective and process is something Im deeply committed to. Therapy rarely feels easy, but it is always in service of myself and my larger goals, so its the easiest way to feel on track. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating based on how it makes me feel, not how it sounds or tastes. As soon as I focused on how it made me feel, my taste buds changed, I lost weight, my skin issues cleared and I became a very healthy person, with remarkable ease. I know how obnoxious that sounds, Im sorry. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I fly home to India. I know this is incredibly privileged, and a bit excessive, but shuffling back and forth between two continents constantly gives me a broader perspective, and somehow – the psychology of taking an international flight is an incredibly cathartic and productive experience for me. I almost always come back from my trips to India with fresh eyes, new vision and a bigger picture. Thats true for all travel, in my opinion. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. The fundamental line of Crossfit – eat meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. has influenced my self nourishment beyond any book or movie. I may not be a competitive Crossfit athlete any more but eating to nourish my body is so much more fulfilling than eating to nourish my cravings. Knowledge --  What was your path to starting Diaspora Co.? You can read a lot more about that here, but long story short – Ive been working in the food industry since I moved to the United States in 2012 and I quickly noticed that whilst the farm to table movement felt at its zenith in the Bay Area, it only applied to certain things. Spices and imported foods were somehow excluded from those quality standards. The idea for a new kind of import export company formed in November 2016, and in February 2017 I quit my job and embarked on seven months of research visiting farms, research institutions and markets across India. Diaspora Co. was formally launched as a direct trade sustainable food company with our first offering of turmeric in August 2017. Its been a total rollercoaster since then. --  Can you tell us about the kind of turmeric you sell and how it differs from most turmeric one can buy at a store today? Im biased, but Im also overly honest so I dont think it would be an exaggeration to say that we sell the worlds best turmeric. Historically, there hasnt ever been a quality standard for how to define the highest quality, beyond arguments and branding largely based in exoticism and the colonizer/­­savior mindset. It is the freshest, as in it was harvested in 2018 and is milled every 3 months, versus powders that can be up to five years old and still on a grocery store shelf, stale as ever. It is the most potent variety of turmeric out there, with a tested 4.7% curcumin content. It is a fragrant and exceptional heirloom rhizome variety that compares to other turmeric powders out there as an heirloom summer tomato would to a grocery store store tomato grown for storage not flavor. Finally, it is organically farmed in a spice agriculture landscape where pesticide overuse and residue is notorious. Phew! --  Can you tell us about your decision to pay your turmeric producer really well and about owning the fact that your product costs more because of this? I think part of our work is that what the industry considers paying our producer really well, we consider basic human dignity of paying a living wage and for the price of sustainability, flavor and honest work. If we didnt pay our partner farmers the prices that we do, they wouldnt have the power or the incentive to produce at the standard that they do. To me, this big word decolonizing really just means how are you going to empower the people around you who have historically been stripped of their power? Paying our farmers well is actually the easiest embodiment of our decolonizing mission. As for owning our higher prices – we simply couldnt exist without charging what we do. And ultimately, were dedicating to riding the fine line between being affordable to the home cook and being a leader of sustainability and supply chains and therefore being regarded as a luxury product. I have to believe that we can do both. Turmeric latte blends or turmeric centered businesses that dont want to pay our prices or wholesale from us because theyd like to continue to exploit their sources and maintain their ridiculously high margins, Im in this for the long game and their reckoning will come. It always does. Apologies if I sound cold and jaded, business is vicious and Ive had to steel parts of myself to tolerate it all. --  What are some of your favorite ways to use Diaspora Co. turmeric? Honestly, turmeric was so woven into the fabric of my childhood that it was invisible to me. We cooked with it, made beauty treatments with it, and we used it to mark life and death. So even now, my favorite way to use turmeric is still in simple Indian vegetable dishes – lightly cooked okra tossed in cumin, turmeric and salt is the definition of comfort for me, or a coconut milk turmeric chicken broth with squash and long beans. Comforting, vegetable heavy home cooking is how I innately know how to use turmeric. Lattes just arent for me. --  We love your photos! How did you become a photographer? When I was 14 and going through a really tough phase at school (bullying, puberty, the patriarchy et all), my parents taught me how to use their DSLR. Ive used photography as the lens through which I make sense of and connect with the world ever since. When my academic pursuits turned to food and agriculture in college, my lens turned to it too. In so many ways, I recognize that I was never particularly talented or the best or the brightest, I was always just a really solid worker, and entirely self motivated, and that meant that once I started photographing, I just never stopped, and now here we are. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Ive found that balancing my role as a business owner with my role as a photographer is what gives me the most joy professionally. So I have a couple exciting photo shoots planned for the coming months that will be a welcome respite to the chaos of holiday e-commerce. That, and I havent seen my girlfriend and pup in almost a month since Ive been in India and I miss them terribly, so very excited to come home to my two favorite living beings. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Were so lucky to live in Oakland, where eating out is an incredible experience, especially at a time where women chefs are absolutely excelling in their field. So eating delicious meals by our favorite local women chefs is my favorite treat – Cosecha Cafe (Mexican), Nyum Bai (Cambodian), Champa Garden (Laotian) and 20th Century Cafe (Eastern European) to name a few.  -- A book to feed the soul:  I just finished reading Yvon Chounards Let My People Go Surfing and its been so deeply inspiring to me. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Akwaeke Emezi, they are my favorite writer, a member of this third culture/­­diaspora/­­immigrant excellence interweb community and has navigated their self care so beautifully and visibly through the years. Id love to learn more from them. Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Sophie Peoples, Assad Keval /­­/­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Ashley Neese Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Amanda Forcella Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Cheesy Steak-Out Sandwiches

July 24 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Cheesy Steak-Out Sandwiches If ever there was a recipe in need of veganizing, its the Philadelphia cheesesteak sandwich. The good news is, its easy to do and the result is fantastic. Made with thinly sliced Portobello mushrooms, onions, and bell peppers, these hearty Steak-Out Sandwiches are then topped with some creamy Cheesy Sauce, and enveloped in a crusty baguette. Note: Thinly sliced seitan may be substituted for the mushrooms. Cheesy Steak-Out Sandwiches If ever there was a recipe in need of veganizing, its the Philadelphia cheesesteak sandwich. The good news is, its easy to do and the result is fantastic. Made with thinly sliced Portobello mushrooms, onions, and bell peppers, this hearty sandwich is then topped with some creamy Cheesy Sauce, and enveloped in a crusty baguette. Note: Thinly sliced seitan may be substituted for the mushrooms. - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 medium yellow onion, thinly sliced - 6 Portobello mushroom caps, thinly sliced - 1 red bell pepper, seeded and thinly sliced - 1/­­3 cup ketchup - 1 tablespoon vegan Worcestershire sauce - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 3/­­4 cup Cheddary Sauce ((recipe follows)) - 1 French baguette, cut into quarters, each quarter sliced lengthwise - Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the bell pepper and mushroom slices and cook, stirring occasionally, to soften, about 5 minutes. Stir in the ketchup and Worcestershire sauce, and season with salt and pepper to taste. Continue to cook for 5 minutes longer, or until the vegetables are very soft. Spoon about half of the cheddary sauce onto the mushroom mixture and keep warm while you toast the bread. Divide the mushroom mixture among the baguette sections and top each with some of the remaining cheddary sauce. Serve hot. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson.   Cheddary Sauce Use this creamy, flavorful sauce anytime you want to add an exclamation point to whatever youre serving. I use this sauce to make mac uncheese or as a topping for baked potatoes and steamed or roasted vegetables. With the addition of some spices and a little heat, it can also be used to top nachos and enchiladas. Even more remarkable, just omit the nondairy milk and add melted coconut oil and you have the makings of a fantastic cheddary cheese log. If not using beer or sherry, add an extra 1/­­2 teaspoon of miso past - 1 1/­­4 cups raw cashews, soaked in hot water for 4 hours, then well-drained - 1/­­3 cup nutritional yeast - 2 tablespoons jarred chopped pimientos or roasted red bell pepper, drained and blotted dry - 1 tablespoon beer, white wine, or dry sherry ( (optional, but recommended)) - 1 tablespoon rice vinegar - 1 1/­­2 teaspoons light-colored miso paste - 1 teaspoon salt -  1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika -  1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder -  1/­­2 teaspoon prepared yellow mustard -  1/­­4 teaspoon turmeric - 1 cup plain unsweetened almond milk - Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender. Process until the mixture is pureed and smooth, scraping down the sides as needed. The sauce is now ready to use in recipes. Use as is, or heat gently in a saucepan for a minute or two, if desired, stirring in a little more milk, if needed, for a thinner sauce. Store leftovers in the refrigerator in a tightly sealed container for up to 5 days Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. The post Vegan Cheesy Steak-Out Sandwiches appeared first on Robin Robertson.

On-Point Vegan Eats At Green Point Restaurant In Cusco, Peru

January 2 2018 Happy Cow veggie blog 

If Cusco hasnt yet been named the vegan capital of South America, I would like to be the first to suggest that title. This bustling city, known for being the travel hub to get to Machu Picchu, is a fantastic place to see and while youre there, youll be blessed with some of the best vegan food known to mankind. It didnt take me long to find out about Green Point. Vegans and non-vegans alike flock to this place by the hundreds (seriously, its PACKED all-day, every day) to get some greens in before taking on the long trek to Machu Picchu. They offer an incredibly affordable and delicious daily lunch menu that will fill you up right and wont break the bank. Oh, and everything is 100% vegan, too. I met with the owners and they were gracious enough to have my come to the restaurant over 10 times during my week-long stay in Cusco to shoot their various menu items and taste all that they have to offer. Not only do they have two amazing locations in Cusco, Green Point and Green Point Patio, but they also run a vegan shop next to their main restaurant location where […] The post On-Point Vegan Eats At Green Point Restaurant In Cusco, Peru appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Eatin Good in Granada

November 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Although I dont think it formally deserves this title, so far Spain feels like the meat capital of the world. However, Granada (in the south of Spain) has a booming vegan scene thats growing every year!  I didnt get to spend much time in Granada, but I did have the opportunity to work with an incredible little vegetarian restaurant that offered a heap of superb vegan dishes by the name of AlLaurel. This cozy veggie bistro is centrally located by the famous Catedral de Granada and welcomes you in with chic styling, a delicious menu del día, and local artisanal wines and cervezas. While there I got to sample a few of their famous dishes including a leek and ginger soup, seitan skewers (drooling), and traditional tomato and avocado salad. The cuisine was fantastically fresh, obviously organic, and perfectly plated by Ále (short for Alejandro), the restaurants lead chef. I left AlLaurel with a happy tummy and a newfound respect for seitan. The next day, while in search for some lunch in town, I stumbled upon a little vegan tapas bar called El Ojú. You heard me right, a vegan TAPAS bar. You know, where you buy a drink and you […] The post Eatin Good in Granada appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Vegan Summer Berry Crumble

August 23 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Gaz Oakley of Avant-Garde Vegan always creates fantastic recipe videos on his Youtube Channel. And this video for his summer berry crumble is no different! This fruity dessert is vegan AND gluten-free. It’s a perfect summer snack that’s easy to make! Check out the video tutorial below on how to make your very own vegan summer crumble that you can impress family and friends with: Check out more of Avant-Garde Vegan here. The post Vegan Summer Berry Crumble appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

6 Ways to Use Pre-grated Carrots

July 20 2017 VegKitchen 

6 Ways to Use Pre-grated Carrots Carrots are a fantastic vegetable to incorporate into your daily diet -- filled with Vitamins A and C, theyre also a great source of fiber. Most kids and picky eaters dont object to carrots even if veggies arent their thing. Whole carrots, baby carrots, grated carrots -- theyre all good. Grated carrots can go into […] The post 6 Ways to Use Pre-grated Carrots appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Steamed Buns (Oil Free)

July 7 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Steamed buns are great for a dinner dish, or even to snack on. We love them because you can get really creative with what you fill them with! But if you need a little help coming up with a filling idea, Honeybunch of Onion Tops has created a fantastic, healthy filling with tofu, mushrooms and potatoes in this awesome video recipe. These steamed buns are vegan, plus they are oil-free! Can’t get much better than that. Here’s how to make them: Read the recipe in full here. The post Vegan Steamed Buns (Oil Free) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London

June 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London We love yogurt in our family*. The unsweetened, thick, creamy and tangy kind. We enjoy yogurt for breakfast (with fruit) and sometimes dessert (with dates + chocolate + nuts). We top our soups with yogurt, we add it to smoothies and ice pops and we also dress our salads with it (Isac likes to dress himself with it as well). Yogurt works remarkably well both with sweet and savory flavors. And yet, the thought of making a yogurt bowl with savory toppings instead of sweet, had never struck us before. But as we were playing around with this crunchy cucumber and melon salad with spiced chickpeas, we (and with we, I humbly mean ME, MYSELF and I - as in, not David) had the simple idea to put them on a bed of yogurt instead of doing the usual yogurt dressing. In theory, it’s more or less the same thing but in reality it’s so much better. The warm, rich and spicy chickpeas on a bed of cold, thick and tangy yogurt, with the addition of a fresh salad with lots of crunch. It’s simple but yet so very good. And quick too. I’m sure there are plenty of savory yogurt bowls all over internet, but now they are also in our kitchen. *David and Isac are actually intolerant to dairy but yogurt is their weak spot. We buy oat yogurt for them but David often chooses a day of stomach ache just to enjoy a bowl of plain yogurt. And Isac has literally been caught with his hand in the yogurt jar more than once. Coconut yogurt has a fantastic taste and consistency but is simply too expensive to enjoy more than as an occasional treat (very keen on giving Ashley’s versions a try though!). Hey hey hey, wait a sec. This is David acting as proofreader today and I just noted Luise’s attempt at hijacking my idea. This recipe = my idea. Just wanted to make that clear. I’ll give the word back to her now. The salad is super quick as you just need to chop everything up. We found that crunchy vegetables like cucumber, celery, sturdy roman lettuce and radishes work really well here, with the avocado and melon adding softness and sweetness. The yogurt is, well, just yogurt. It needs to be quite thick to hold up the topping - our preference is Greek yogurt but choose whatever you prefer. The only thing that needs a little more preparation and heat are the spiced chickpeas. Even if the ingredient list looks long, it’s simply spices, oil and chickpeas and the result tastes way better than just using plain chickpeas. They have a rich, spicy and slightly nutty flavor which works so well with the freshness from the yogurt and the crunchy and sweet salad. VARIATIONS There are plenty of ways to vary this recipe and we’re going to leave you with a few ideas. - Whisk some creamy goat’s cheese into the yogurt. It will dissolve, become smooth and give the yogurt a more mature flavor. - If you don’t have all the spices at home for the chickpeas, use what you find. A bread spice mix works great along with a little cayenne. A turmeric or curry version would be interesting too. - You can skip the salad and pour the yogurt into small sealable jars with spiced chickpeas on top. Store them in the fridge for a quick snack. - Vegans can of course use a vegan yogurt option or simply settle for the salad with warm chickpeas stirred through. - Roasting the chickpeas in the oven together with eggplant or pumpkin could be amazing on top of the yogurt as well. Let us know if you have any other favorite variations on savory yogurt bowls and we can include them in this list. Savory Yogurt Bowl with Spicy Chickpeas & Cucumber Salad Serves 4, or 2 very hungry persons Cucumber & Melon Salad 1 cucumber 1 small (or 1/­­2 regular) melon (we used Piel de Sapo but honeydew would also work) 1 spring onion 2 celery stalks 10-15 fresh mint leaves 1 avocado 6 radishes 1/­­2 roman lettuce 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil Spiced warm chickpeas 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 1 tbsp sesame seeds 2 tsp fennel seeds  1 tsp coriander seeds 1 tsp cardamom seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika powder 1/­­4 cup – 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed For serving 2 cups plain full-fat Greek yogurt  For the cucumber & melon salad:  Wash all produce. Cut cucumber and melon in large bite-size pieces. Trim and finely slice spring onion, celery and mint leaves. Cut the avocado in half and remove the stone, then cut into cubes. Trim the radishes and thinly slice them. And chop the roman lettuce. Place all prepared ingredients in a mixing bowl, squeeze over lemon juice, drizzle with olive oil and a little salt, give it a good toss and set aside. For the spiced warm chickpeas:  Add all seeds and spices (except for the ground spices) to a dry skillet, heat gently for a couple of minutes while stirring. When the spices starts to pop and smell fragrant, they’re done. Pour into a mortar and give them a few bashes with the pestle (alternatively on a cutting board and use the back of a chef’s knife). Transfer the seeds and spices back to the skillet. Now add oil (start with the lesser amount and add more later on if it looks dry), ground spices  and chickpeas and heat on low temperature for 2-3 minutes. Stir to combine. When the chickpeas are warm and covered in spices and seeds, remove from the heat. Dollop the yogurt into four bowls. Use the back of a spoon to smooth it out. Arrange the salad on one side of the yogurt and the spiced warm chickpea on the other side. Drizzle a little extra oil on top. Enjoy immediately while the chickpeas are still warm. ********* LONDON + BATH In all my excitement over a simple bowl of yogurt, I almost forgot to mention that we are coming to London and Bath next week for a couple of book events. We’re very excited and can’t wait to meet some of you! We’re having a supper club at Grace Belgravia on Monday 5 June, 7-10 pm. More info here. We’ll do talk and Q&A at Whole Foods Market in Kensington on Wednesday 7 June, 6.30 pm. More info and tickets here. We’ll also do a talk and cooking demo at Topping & Company Booksellers in Bath on Friday 9 June, 7.30 pm. More info and tickets here. Finally, we’re having a hands on cooking class at Bertinet Kitchen in Bath on Saturday 10 June, 10 am. Tickets here (only one left). Big love!

Fantastic Falafel

May 13 2019 Meatless Monday 

These flavorful patties are fun served family style. Letting everyone have the opportunity to assemble their own distinct creation is an excellent way to inspire kids to enjoy their food. If you like your falafel slathered with a savory spread, consider adding either hummus or eggplant dip to your offerings. For a super-simple tahini sauce option, whisk some water, a tablespoon at a time, into 1/­­2 cup tahini until it reaches the desired consistency, then season to taste with garlic powder, a squeeze of lemon juice, and salt. This recipe comes to us from OMD: The Simple, Plant-Based Program to Save Your Health, Save Your Waistline, and Save the Planet , by Suzy Amis Cameron. Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - For the falafels - 1/­­4 cup plus 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 onion, chopped - 4 garlic cloves, minced - 1 teaspoon ground cumin - 1 teaspoon chili powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground turmeric - 4 cups cooked chickpeas, rinsed and drained - 1/­­2 cup whole wheat flour - 1/­­4 cup chopped fresh parsley - 1/­­4 cup chopped fresh cilantro - 1 teaspoon salt - For serving - 6 whole wheat pitas - 12 butter lettuce leaves - 1 cup chopped tomatoes - 1/­­4 cup chopped red onion - 1/­­4 cup Kalamata olives, pitted and chopped - 1 cup chopped cucumbers     In a large skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion, garlic, cumin, chili powder, and turmeric. Cook until the onion softens, 4 to 5 minutes. Transfer the onion to the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Add the chickpeas, flour, parsley, cilantro, and salt. Pulse until smooth, stopping occasionally to scrape down the sides of the bowl. With a clean paper towel, wipe out the pan you used to cook the onion. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil over medium-high heat. Using a tablespoon measure, carefully place heaping scoops of the falafel mixture in the skillet. Do not overcrowd the pan (six at a time is ideal). Cook the falafel until golden brown and crispy, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Transfer the cooked falafel to a baking sheet and cover loosely with foil. Repeat with the remaining falafel mix, adding 1 tablespoon of the remaining oil to the pan before each batch. Serve the falafel family style and let each person build their own sandwich by topping their pita with the falafel and lettuce, tomato, onion, olives, and cucumber as desired.   The post Fantastic Falafel appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Restaurant Highlight: Unity Diner in London, England

December 11 2018 Happy Cow veggie blog 

One of the five episodes of Vegan Round the World: The Series showcases the most well-known and influential activists around the world and shares their stories and tells a bit about the behind-the-scenes of their lives as well as giving insights on their individual inspirations. I couldnt think of a better person to be featured in this episode than Earthling Ed. If youre vegan, youve most likely heard of him and if youre an activist, then you definitely have. Ed has made countless appearances on television and online platforms, but his newest project, Unity Diner, really is one for the record books. Located on a cozy street just a short walk from Hoxton square in London, Unity Diner is Eds first dive into the world of restaurant managing. And let me tell you; hes doing a fantastic job of it. Designed to match the vibes of an All-American diner, Unity is a hip London hot spot that pumps out trendy tunes and beautiful burgers. Their best seller is the Moving Mountains B12 burger, which has gained fame around the UK as being just like the real thing. I, of course, had to try it (for science) and I can confirm […] The post Restaurant Highlight: Unity Diner in London, England appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Sweet Potato and Lentil Mason Jar Salad

November 12 2018 Meatless Monday 

The recipe below makes one serving of a fantastic make-ahead salad, packed with plant-powered ingredients like lentils and sweet potatoes. So stock your fridge with a few servings and youll be set with nourishing lunches all week long! This recipe comes to us from our friends at USA Pulses. Serves 1 - For the Salad: - 1 cup sweet potato (diced) - 1/­­2 cup cup green lentils (cooked) - 1/­­2 cup couscous (cooked) - 1/­­2 cup arugula - 1/­­4 cup dried cranberries - 1 tbsp avocado oil   - For the Dressing: - 1/­­2 lemon, juiced - 1 tbsp olive oil - Salt and pepper to taste   Prepare French green lentils and couscous according to package directions Preheat oven to 400F, toss sweet potatoes with avocado oil and spread in a single layer on a baking tray. Roast sweet potatoes for 20 minutes, or until tender when pierced with a fork. Remove sweet potatoes from oven and set aside. Add dressing ingredients into a small mixing bowl and stir with a fork until combined In a mason jar add dressing, lentils, sweet potatoes, couscous, cranberries, arugula in that particular order, to make sure the greens stay crisp! Store mason jar in refrigerator until ready to eat. Mason jar will keep for 3 days refrigerated. Note: The above recipe makes one very large serving. Consider portioning the ingredients according to your own appetite if the portion seems large to you. The post Sweet Potato and Lentil Mason Jar Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Swedish Breakfast + Win a trip to Sweden!

October 3 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Swedish Breakfast + Win a trip to Sweden! Hi! We had to take some time away from this space while finishing the manuscript for our next book but we are super happy to be back here blogging again. We have got a couple of fun recipes lined up for the next weeks but are starting off with our favorite meal of the day and a competition with a seriously AMAZING prize! Keep reading to see how you can win a trip for two to Sweden to stay at forest restaurant and resort Stedsans in the Woods. First let us talk about this week’s recipe. If you are following us on social media you know how fond we are of porridge. Oat is the quickest and most common porridge grain but today we are sharing the recipe for another favorite - a simple and warming buckwheat and cardamom porridge topped with Swedish blueberries, nut butter and foamy oat milk. Buckwheat groats take a little longer to cook than oats but they provide a uniquely chewy and soft texture. We cook them with dried prunes or dates for a little sweetness and the trick for the best texture is to cook it until all water is absorbed. If you haven’t tried buckwheat porridge before, consider this your wake-up call! And now on to the competition. In collaboration with Visit Sweden, we are giving away a trip for two to Stedsans in the Woods, a fantastic restaurant experience and resort in the middle of the forest. To enter the competition, prepare a Swedish inspired breakfast (think porridge, muesli, berries, buttermilk, crisp bread, open faced sandwiches, boiled eggs etc) and share it on instagram using the hashtag #VisitSwedenFood. Together with a jury from Visit Sweden, we will choose the best contribution and announce the winner on 1 November 2018. The competition is open worldwide. The price includes flights/­­transportation for two people, transfer to/­­from Stedsans in the Woods and one night for two people in a double room at Stedsans in the Woods cabin/­­tent stay on Thursday, Friday or Saturday from May 2019. See whats included here. Buckwheat & Cardamom Porridge with Blueberries  Serves 4 1 cup /­­ 200 g whole buckwheat groats 2 cups /­­ 500 ml water 1 pinch sea salt 1/­­4 tsp ground ginger 1/­­4 tsp cardamom seeds (or ground) 3 dried prunes, stones removed and chopped Toppings wild blueberries (thawed frozen works well) nut butter Oat milk, foamed hazelnuts, chopped hemp seeds Rinse the buckwheat in hot water. Add buckwheat, water and the rest of the ingredients to a sauce pan, bring to a boil and lower the heat. Let gently simmer for about 20 minutes. Stir occasionally to prevent it to sticking to the bottom of the pan. When the water is absorbed the porridge should be just about ready, but keep stirring for another minute or so to get the perfect texture. Serve in bowls topped with blueberries, nut butter, oat milk, chopped hazelnuts and hemp seeds.   Crisp Bread Sandwich Serves 4  4 crisp breads or seed crackers 4 tsp butter (sub for olive oil for a plant-based alternative) 4-8 thin slices hard cheese (we use a variety called Prästost), use mashed avocad for a plant-based option 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced thinly 8 cherry tomatoes, sliced sprouts or mini greens salt & black pepper olive oil to drizzle Spread the crispbread with butter. Add a few slices of aged cheese to cover and top with thin slices of cucumber and tomatoes. Sprinkle with mini greens, salt and pepper and drizzle with a bit of olive oil over. This competition is arranged in collaboration with Visit Sweden. The value of the price is approx. 2 500EUR. Any tax will be paid by the winner.

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus

June 14 2018 My New Roots 

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus If there is one trick Ive learned in all of my years cooking, both at home and in restaurants, it is this: caramelized onions can make almost anything taste amazing. Theyre the ridiculously simple, yet magical ingredient that turns an ordinary dish into something so rich-tasting and satisfying that people go ...oh hi excuse me, this is incredible. I think the simple reason that caramelized onions taste so good, is because they are a labour of love. Not like an all-day stirring the pot kinda deal, but most definitely a food that you cant just leave on the stove and dive into an Instagram vortex. No. Caramelized onions take care and attention, at least for the better part of half an hour, and the results are so worth it I bet youll catch yourself multi-tasking at the stove tonight just to have some on hand to gussy up your omelet this weekend (boss move there, by the way). The more accurate reason that caramelized onions taste so good however, isnt technically caramelization - its called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction is a browning reaction similar to caramelization, but with one distinct difference: caramelization is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars, while Maillard is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids (proteins). And yes, there is enough protein in an onion to elicit this response - how thrilling for us! Although the Maillard reaction is very complex and complicated, what we do know is that it requires heat to transform and rearrange sugars and amino acids to create new and fantastic flavour molecules in and on your food, making it even more delicious. If youve ever eaten a golden slice of toast, enjoyed a rich cup of coffee, or nibbled on a grilled vegetable, youve experienced the pure pleasure that all of this this chemical commotion is responsible for. Science! Harnessing the power of the Maillard reaction can make you a better cook, because things that are browned properly taste more intensely, more complex, and well, better. Without even being aware of it, its the reason youll reach for the roasted veggies with the crispiest edges, or the reason that you prefer a fried egg over a boiled one (no judgement!). There are a couple ways of making this spectacular series of chemical reactions work for you, and the first is high heat. Maillard will not occur at very low temperatures, especially in situations where the food is not in direct contact with the heat, like it is on a skillet or grill for instance. When youre roasting veggies, make sure the oven is at least 400°F /­­ 200°C. When youre making pizza, you can crank it up even higher, to get those beautifully blistered crust edges that make your mouth water. The second way is to keep the food youre cooking on the dry side. For instance, have you ever noticed how if you wash mushrooms (which you should actually never do), theyll never really get brown and crusty? Too much moisture! Instead, brush those fungi gently to remove any dirt or debris, then put them in a screeching hot pan with some ghee and dont stir them. I talk more about this technique here. This is the same reason you need a large pan for these caramelized onions, since theyll need the space to allow the water to evaporate around them. If the onions are too close together, theyll only steam each other. Eew. If you’re oven roasting vegetables for dinner, cut them in the morning and leave them out all day uncovered so that the surface water will evaporate, and the veggies will brown more easily. Yes, this seems like a bit of a hassle, but the culinary nerd in me admits that its cool because it works. So, where does the hummus come into this story? Well, hummus is pretty much a food group in my world. Ive made so many variations with so many kinds of legumes, spices, alt seed butters, toppings, and stir-ins, that I could hardly believe I had never tried it with the ingredient that could single-handedly save humanity: caramelized onions. I knew that deep richness of the onions would meld perfectly with the creamy dip, and make the flavour even better. I wasnt wrong! The only thing that I wanted to improve upon, was the protein content - not because Im obsessed with protein, but simply because I thought it could be higher. To do that I simply swapped out the traditional chickpeas for white lentils, or urad dal. We not only get more protein from this change-up, but almost double the fiber, with less sodium, less fat, and less sugar. Sweet. This dip is the perfect, rich compliment to all the crisp and light, early summer veggies popping up. I went to my friends farm and picked some seriously beautiful radishes and young carrots, which paired so well with the caramelized onion flavour. I also had some Life-Changing Crackers on hand, which always make dipping more delicious. One thing I changed from the first version to the third, was the onions on top. Instead of blending all of them into the dip, I used about a third of them on top, which allows you to scoop a few tender morsels up with each bite. This delivers even more caramelized onion flavour and texture, which, let us be reminded, is the whole point of this exercise. Even though this hummus keeps well for at least five days in the fridge (you can even freeze it!), it is best eaten freshly made at room temperature, since the flavour is at its peak then. And because you’re wondering, you can find white or ivory lentils at Indian grocers, Middle Eastern markets, or some natural food stores. They are the skinned and split version of urad dal, which is black, so make sure you buy the huskless version! If you cant find them at all, simply use chickpeas - it will be just as delicious.     Print recipe     Caramelized Onion and White Lentil Hummus Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup raw white lentils (huskless split black mapte beans /­­ urad dal dhuli), soaked if possible 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. balsamic vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 tsp. ground cumin heaping 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1 batch caramelized onions (from the recipe below) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish Directions: 1. Start by cooking the lentils. If youve soaked them beforehand (even an hour helps!) drain and rinse them very well. If youre starting from raw, place the lentils in the cooking pot, cover with plenty of water and vigorously swish them around with your hands. When the water becomes murky, drain and repeat until the water is clear, or mostly clear (this can take 3-4 rounds). Place lentils in the cooking pot and cover generously with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook partially covered for about 20-30 minutes, depending on whether or not you soaked them. The lentils should be cooked until mushy. If the pot becomes dry during cooking, simply add more water. Once cooked, drain the lentils if there is any remaining water. Set aside to cool. 2. In a food processor pulse the garlic until finely minced. Add the tahini, lemon juice, balsamic, salt, cumin and pepper, then blend until combined. Add the cooked lentils and blend on high until smooth. Lastly, add about two-thirds of the caramelized onions, and pulse to incorporate them into the dip. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. 3. To serve, spoon the hummus into a serving bowl. Make a small divot in the center of the dip and spoon in the remaining caramelized onions. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with your toppings of choice (I used toasted black sesame and chive flowers for a splash of colour, but this is totally optional). Serve with crispy fresh veggies and crackers or toasted flatbreads. Enjoy. Caramelized Onions Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. neutral-tasting coconut oil or ghee 1 lb. /­­ 500g yellow onions 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Peel the onions and slice them as evenly as possible into half-rounds. 2. Melt coconut oil or ghee over medium heat in the largest skillet you have. Add the onions, then salt, and stir well to coat. Once the onions are coated, turn the heat down to a medium-low, stirring occasionally - more often towards the end - until theyve fully caramelized, about 25-30 minutes. If the pot becomes too dry during cooking, reduce the heat a tad, or add a teeny bit of water adn stir well. In the end, youre looking for soft, silky, and golden brown goodness! Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days, or freeze for 3 months. If it’s your first time caramelizing onions and you’re feeling intimidated, here is a stellar step-by-step tutorial from Bon Appétit. It varies ever so slightly from my method, but you’ll get the picture! Big love and happy hummus, Sarah B. Show me your hummus on Instagram: #mnrcaramelizedonionhummus  *   *   *   *   * Hello dear friends! There are only a few spots left for our January 2019 Wild Heart High Spirit retreat and we’d love to see you in Bali!  Join us along with 15 other women to unwind, reconnect, and find the inspiration to ignite you on your health journey. Our thoughtfully-designed program will awaken and nourish your entire being – body, mind, and spirit! This is a true celebration of life, and we get to do it together in paradise! Come see what all the magic is about.  Much love, Sarah B, Mikkala and the Golden Circle Retreats team The post Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Vegan Thanksgiving Leftover Wrap

November 22 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

It’s the day after Thanksgiving, and you’ve got tons of leftovers in the fridge. Looking for a creative way to enjoy all of that vegan deliciousness? This Savory Vegan has come up with a solution: the vegan Thanksgiving wrap! Simple and satisfying, a wrap is a fantastic way to combine all those yummy leftovers into one magical, handheld piece of perfection. And you can have total creative freedom with what to include in your wrap. Watch the video below to get inspired: Read the full recipe here. The post Vegan Thanksgiving Leftover Wrap appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Almost-Instant Fruit and Nut Rice Pilaf

September 21 2017 VegKitchen 

Almost-Instant Fruit and Nut Rice Pilaf A fantastic side dish for many kinds of meals, especially Indian specialties, what makes this fruit and nut rice pilaf so fruity and nutty is trail mix! Most trail mixes have a nice variety of dried fruits and nuts. As for the rice, you have options. Do you have already cooked rice in the fridge […] The post Almost-Instant Fruit and Nut Rice Pilaf appeared first on VegKitchen.

Delicious and Easy Salad Bar at Home

August 5 2017 VegKitchen 

Delicious and Easy Salad Bar at Home Salad bars are often an appealing option for healthy food fans at restaurants, so why not serve one in your own kitchen? Here’s how to put together a delicious and easy salad bar at home. It’s a fantastic way to put together a last-minute company meal or for building a dinner around fresh raw veggies when you’re too […] The post Delicious and Easy Salad Bar at Home appeared first on VegKitchen.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Street Fair Corn from NYC Vegan

June 6 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Street Fair Corn from NYC VeganI love New York — and I REALLY love NYC Vegan, the fantastic new cookbook by Michael Suchman and Ethan Ciment aka the Vegan Mos.  It’s such a fun book, billed with personal anecdotes and stories about New York City.  Best of all, of course, are the wonderful recipes — all the great food New York is know for, made deliciously vegan.  One of my favorites is the Street Fair Corn (below) which I will be making regularly this summer. Kudos to Michael and Ethan for a job well done and for bringing New York City into our kitchens!  If you don’t own NYC Vegan, do yourself a favor and order a copy today. Street Fair Corn Summer in New York City means weekend street fairs. The fairs have no rides or games. Instead, avenues are closed to traffic for several blocks, where dozens of vendors sell food. One of the most popular foods is Mexican Street Corn--freshly grilled sweet corn coated in a mixture of cheese and spiced mayonnaise. We created a vegan version of this dish that tastes even better than the original. (From NYC Vegan, copyright (C) 2017 by Michael Suchman and Ethan Ciment. Used by permission. Photo by Jackie Sobon.) Serves 4 Ingredients - 1/­­4 cup nondairy mayonnaise - 1/­­4 cup nondairy sour cream - 1/­­4 cup nondairy parmesan, plus more for serving - 1/­­2 teaspoon chili powder, plus more for serving - 1 medium clove garlic, finely minced - 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh cilantro or Italian parsley - 4 ears sweet corn, shucked - 1 lime, cut into wedges Preparation - Heat a grill for direct-heat grilling, or heat a grill pan over high heat on the stove. While the grill is heating, in a medium mixing bowl, combine the mayonnaise, sour cream, nondairy parmesan, chili powder, garlic, and cilantro. Stir until completely combined. - Place the corn directly on the hot grill and cook, rotating occasionally, until cooked through and charred in spots on all sides, about 8 minutes total. - Remove the corn from the grill and transfer to a serving plate. Use a pastry or basting brush to generously coat each ear of corn with the mayonnaise mixture. Sprinkle with extra cheese and chili powder and serve immediately with lime wedges.     The post Street Fair Corn from NYC Vegan appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Strawberry Almond Galette

April 29 2017 Veganpassion 

Strawberry Almond Galette I always love to be part of the german television show "Kaffee oder Tee". Showing my vegan creations just makes me happy. The crew is fantastic and I had lots of fun with the anchorman. If you're surrounded by such amazing people the baking becomes accessory. Makes one galette (9,8 inch diameter/­­25cm diameter) for 8 pieces Preparation time: 30 minutes Baking time: 30 minutes Ingredients: 1 2/­­3 cup whole spelt flour 1 tbsp. almonds, grounded 1 tbsp. sugar 1/­­4 tsp. baking powder 1/­­4 cup oil 1/­­4 cup + 2 tsp. dairy free drink 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar For the filling: 1 tbsp. almond butter 1 tsp. lemon juice 1 tbsp. sugar 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla 3 tbsp. dairy free milk 2 stalks of rhubarb 10 oz strawberries 1 tbsp. almond slices In a mixing bowl mix whole spelt flour, almonds, sugar and baking powder. Add oil and vinegar and mix with a spoon. Spread flour on the worktop and knead dough with your hands until it's smooth. Roll out the dough until it reaches a diameter of 11,8 inches. Put the dough on a baking paper. In a small mixing bowl mix almond butter with lemon juice, sugar, vanilla and 3 tbsp. dairy free milk until it's creamy. Spread the cream on the dough and keep a distance of 1,9 inches to the edge. Peel the rhubarb in slices and cut the strawberries in slices.  Arrange the strawberries in a circle and keep a distance of 1,1 inches to the edge. Fold up the edges of the dough over the fruits. Spread some dairy free milk on top of the cake edge and sprinkle almond slices on it. Put the galette with the baking paper on a baking sheet and bake at 356°F (180°C) two sided heat. Bake for 30 minutes and put a wooden spoon between the oven and the door for 10 minutes. This way the excessing water of the fruits can escape. Enjoy warm or cold with some ice cream!


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