expensive - vegetarian recipes

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expensive vegetarian recipes

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites

August 15 2019 My New Roots 

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites This post is a long time coming! And Im so excited to finally be sharing my bedroom with you all. Weve now been in our home for a year and a bit, and although its (still!) not complete, were enjoying working on the finishing details here and there. Honestly, I dont think we will ever be done, and that is okay. This entire experience has made me way more patient, realistic, and Ive learned to set my expectations super low on every project so that instead of being disappointed, Im often positively surprised! We moved with just boxes, zero furniture, and essentially had to start over in that department. That meant a new bed, a new mattress and all new linens, since we decided to make the jump from a queen size mattress to a king (literally one of the best life decisions, ever). My husband and I are both DIY-ers, and serious thrift store shoppers, and we knew that we wanted to build a bed ourselves, then find the rest of bedroom furniture second-hand. The one place where we knew we wanted to really take our time considering was a mattress and the bedding. If you read this blog, you probably care about your health to some degree. Like me, you may prioritize buying organic produce, splurge on environmentally-conscious clothing, and look to sustainable skincare and beauty products. But have you ever thought about your bedroom environment? We spend a third of our life in bed (at least we should), so its just as important to consider the things that we interact with in our homes, not just what goes in and on our bodies. In fact, the greatest exposure to chemicals you can have in a day, could be while youre sleeping. When I started looking into buying a mattress, I found the options were totally overwhelming. And with so many retailers moving to online platforms and selling directly to consumers, prices have been slashed considerably, and the deals are tempting. Mattresses are one of those things that seem pretty innocuous, and maybe even a place to save a few bucks. But dig a little deeper and youll see that the thing you spend so much time on, is not the thing you should spending less money on, as youll be paying for cheaper materials with your health. Modern, conventional mattresses are made with a laundry list of harmful substances that can be affecting you and your family. One of the most offensive ingredients found in conventional mattresses is memory foam made from polyurethane; a highly flammable, petroleum-based material. Polyurethane foam emits Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) that can cause eye, nose and throat irritation, headaches, nausea, and can also damage the liver, kidneys and central nervous system, according to the Environmental Protection Agency and the Occupational Health and Safety Administration. Un-ironically referred to as solid gasoline, polyurethane foam is typically wrapped in or treated with fire retardant chemicals to meet the Federal and State flammability standards in the US, otherwise it would be totally unsafe. Which brings me to the second thing to watch out for in mattresses, and that is chemical fire-retardants (CFRs). These are compounds added to the materials in a mattress to protect you, and they are an inexpensive way to meet safety standards. The issue is that CFRs do not fully bind to materials, and are released into the air through the mattress, then build up in the body causing some people lifelong health issues.   Formaldehyde, antimony, boric acid, and halogenated flame retardants are some of the most damaging CFRs found in modern mattresses, and the frustrating thing is that companies are not required to disclose which ones they are using. Unless a mattress company is explicitly eliminating these chemicals from their production and using a natural material alternative, they are likely using one of the harmful chemicals listed above. I looked at a number of organic /­­ natural mattress companies in my research, and the one that stood out to me was Naturepedic. They are made with certified organic cotton, wool, and latex. For heavy-duty support without any health or allergy concerns, Naturepedic only uses the highest quality innersprings available made from recycled steel.. , and steel, with Naturepedic ensured  the purity of every material used, along with fair labour practices. I reached out to Naturepedic, to see if they would be open to me trying a mattress out and blogging about it. They agreed, and sent me their EOS  (Ergonomic Organic Sleep) mattress that allows for fully customized layers for finding the exact right amount of firmness (you can even choose different support styles from your sleep partner, or swap out the layers down the line in case your preferences change). Id never heard of anything like that before, and though it was so brilliant! I went to the showroom in Toronto to try out the mattress in person, which was very helpful, but you can also just order online if you know what kind of consistency you like. The mattress components were delivered to my door, and it was easy to assemble, as everything gets zipped into a giant, certified organic cotton casing. After spending the last twelve months on this bed, I can confirm that its been the best year of sleep in my entire life (even post-child, haha!). Besides the fact that I love going to bed knowing that I am breathing completely clean air, and that the materials that went into the mattress were made with a deep commitment to protecting the environment, its simply the most supportive and comfortable mattress Ive ever tried. Period. I cannot recommend this mattress enough! The other thing to consider when outfitting your bedroom is the bedding itself. Because we come into direct, skin-to-product contact with these textiles, its essential to choose something non-toxic. Most bedding on the market is made with cotton, one of the most chemical-laden crops grown. According to Pesticide Action Network North America, Conventionally grown cotton uses more insecticides than any other single crop and epitomizes the worst effects of chemically dependent agriculture. Each year cotton producers around the world use nearly $2.6 billion worth of pesticides -- more than 10 per cent of the worlds pesticides and nearly 25 per cent of the worlds insecticides. If youre going to sleep in cotton, choose organic whenever you can. Linen is a great alternative material because it is a much lower impact material on the environment, and requires very little intervention to be grown. Coyuchi is a brand recommended to me by my dear friend Elenore, who has the highest standards I know of Coyuchis textile line is not only 100% organic, but also consciously processed, meaning that they use low-impact dyes for colour that is kind to the planet and our sensitive skin. Coyuchi offered to send me some bedding to try out and I was instantly obsessed. Their textiles are beyond delicious, super soft, and incredibly comfortable. For a duvet cover, I chose the Crystal Cove pattern in white. I loved this choice since its reversible - a textured weave that looks cozy in the winter, and a crinkled cotton underside, which I like to face up in the summer. I also love their Topanga Matelasse blanket, shown here in warm stripe, which is also reversible (super convenient if you want to change up the look of your bedding with a quick flip!). For winter, their Cloud Brushed flannel sheets are super luxurious, and especially enjoyable its very hard to find organic flannel! Words cannot describe the feeling of slipping into these on a chilly night. The giant back pillows in the bed are also from Coyuchi, and are perfect if you have an open-frame bed without a headboard. I like to sit up and read in bed, and these pillows are firm enough to act as a headboard itself. When youre shopping for any kind of textile (bedding, furniture, or clothing), the most important mark to look for is the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) certification. GOTS is recognized as the world’s leading processing standard for textiles made from organic fibers. It defines high-level environmental criteria along the entire organic textiles supply chain and requires compliance with social criteria as well. Unlike most textile and mattress companies, both Coyuchi and Naturepedic are GOTS certified and adhere to their strict standards for agriculture and labour. Okay, lets get to the recipe! I experimented with these breakfast bites for a long time. At first, I was blending up cashews to make flour, but that got expensive, and ultimately I wanted the recipe to be allergen-free (so the nuts had to go!). As an alternative, I opted for hemp seeds, which worked beautifully. Its easy to make your own hemp flour in a food processor in a few seconds. Ive been using it baked goods lately and love how moist and tender the results are! I used strawberries and rhubarb for these nuggets of joy, but since were moving into stone fruit season, Ill soon be switching it up and using peaches, plums, pluots, apricots, and cherries in their place. Any fruit will work as long as its not super moist (like melons). Raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries would be lovely here too. Simply use 1 cup of chopped fresh fruit in any combination that tickles your fancy. To change up the flavour even more, add orange zest, warm spices like cinnamon and cardamom, or even some cacao powder for a chocolate version. Yum! I really wanted to make a successful vegan version of these, so I tried using banana in place of the egg. The results were decent, but a little too moist. If I made these again, I would use the banana plus a tablespoon of ground flax seeds. If any of you do that, please let me know in the comments!     Print recipe     Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites Makes 12 Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 215g hemp seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g arrowroot 1/­­4 tsp. flaky salt, plus more for garnish, if desired 1 tsp. baking powder 1 egg (or 1 ripe banana, mashed) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract (or 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla powder) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g chopped strawberries 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g chopped rhubarb (2-3 slim stalks) expeller-pressed coconut oil for greasing (or use muffin liners Directions: 1. Lightly grease a 12-cup muffin tin with coconut oil. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. 2. Wash the strawberries and rhubarb well. Slice the rhubarb into small discs, and cut the strawberries into small chunks. Reserve 3 strawberries for topping the breakfast bites, if desired (remove greens, then slice them top to bottom). Set fruit aside.  3. In a food processor, blend hemp seeds until theyre a fine powder (dont go too far or youll end up with hemp seed butter!). Add the arrowroot, salt and baking powder and pulse a few times to combine. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk the egg or banana, maple syrup, and vanilla extract together. Add the hemp seed flour blend, and stir to combine. Fold in the rhubarb and strawberries. 5.  Spoon a heaping tablespoon of the batter into each prepared muffin tin. If desired, place a slice of strawberry on top of each bite. Set in the oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, until lightly golden. 6. Remove from the oven and let cool completely. 7. Enjoy! Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for five days. Aside from getting the chemicals out of your space, here are five other ways to improve the health of your bedroom, and your sleep! Add plants - having a couple of living things in your sleeping space keeps the air clean and fresh. Snake plants, areca palms, aloe vera and orchids are especially helpful, since they absorb CO2 at night, even when they are not photosynthesizing.  Consider airflow - keeping a window cracked at night is a good way to get some fresh air while you sleep. If its noisy outside, keep your window open during the day to ensure full air exchange, and close it right before bed. It’s very important to keep the air in your space fresh and moving. Salt rock lamps - these are said to purify the air by omitting negative ions. I cannot confirm this in any way, but I can confirm that the light they give off is incredibly soothing and helps me wind down at the end of the day. Overhead lighting is very stimulating (and let’s be honest, not overly sexy). Keep the devices out - dont work in bed, and avoid using your phone before snoozing. Blue light from screens inhibits our bodys ability to make melatonin, our sleep-wake hormone. If you choose to keep your phone in your room overnight, set it to airplane mode while you sleep so youre not exposing yourself to radiation from EMFs (Electromagnetic Field).  Beeswax candles - yes, its cozy to burn candles before bed, but paraffin candles pollute the air, full stop. Soy is a better alternative, but beeswax is my favourite since it actually helps purify the air by omitting negative ions, and removing dust and dander. Show me your Hemp Breakfast Bites on Instagram: #mnrbreakfastbites Special thanks to my dear friend Sara for taking these photos of me (and putting up with my awkwardness for at least two hours!). http:/­­/­­matandsara.com/­­ The post Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites appeared first on My New Roots.

Chipotle Black Bean Quinoa Burgers with Sweet Corn Relish

July 15 2019 Oh My Veggies 

The only reason I ever remember my wedding anniversary is because my Grandma sends Chris and me a card in the mail every year. (Thank you, Grandma!) And whenever someone asks me how long I’ve been married, I freak out a little bit and have to do some quick math in my head. Did we get married in 2005? Or was it 2006? (It was 2006.) What year is it now? What’s 13 minus 6? OH NO WHAT’S 13 MINUS 6??? I really should just throw out a random number because how would they know, right? Also, I really should buy some flashcards and practice basic math. So today is our anniversary! We used to use it as an excuse to get an expensive dinner, but now we don’t really do anything for it. And that’s okay! With both of us! I’m lucky to have married someone who is as into anniversaries and birthdays and holidays as I am. Which is to say, not at all. Anniversaries just seem kind of arbitrary to me. Like, hey, the Earth has rotated around the sun 7 times since we got married--here’s a box of chocolates! I’m not really into grand gestures, you […]

Tomato Egg Noodle

June 15 2019 Oh My Veggies 

These tomato egg noodles are an inexpensive meal that will please the whole family!

Legendary Layer Bean Dip - Vegan, Grain-free

April 26 2019 My New Roots 

Legendary Layer Bean Dip - Vegan, Grain-free     Dips are my favourite food group. Yes, food group. If I ever got a tattoo, it would probably say something like: pass the hummus. I was recently hosting a party-for-no-reason, and like most of my get togethers they involve a lot of food. But I didnt feel like making a fallback dip, like tzatziki, or baba ganoush. No. I felt like leveling up and creating something I hadnt tried to before. Something with BIG DIP ENERGY – a chunky, spicy, creamy, and above all impressive layer dip. Id cooked pinto beans the night before, had a little tin of chipotle chilies kicking around the pantry, and I knew that if I cut a couple corners, this thing would come together so Id still have time to tizz myself up before the guests arrived. My childhood memories of layer dip involve many cans and jars of processed food being dumped into a large bowl, but the current-reality-holistic-nutritionist version definitely involves making every single one of those things from scratch. Mama dont have time for that! So I simplified things by cutting out the guacamole (dont yell at me like that - add it if you want to!), and using jarred salsa. Everything else was homemade, but came together quickly and easily.       First, I sautéed the pre-cooked pinto beans with onions, garlic, spices, and the chipotle peppers. While that was on the stove, I whipped up the hemp seed queso (no soaking required!). And the salsa got an upgrade with some fresh, chopped cherry tomatoes. This is such an easy hack btw, since it makes the salsa taste more alive and juicy, while giving it a lot more texture, which I personally dig. All it takes after that is mushing the beans up a bit in the pan, which you can do with a bean masher, or an immersion blender, if you dont want to haul out yet another large piece of equipment. Then layer away! All in all, this took me about 20 minutes, start to finish, and the party people hung around this bowl like it was the last dip on planet earth. The delicious, creamy cheese sauce is a riff off my cashew queso, but in the interest of keeping this allergen-free, I used hemp seeds instead. I love this change-up, since its less expensive, and contains way more omega-3 fats and protein. You can dial up the heat here if you like, but because both the salsa and the bean layer have quite a kick to them, I kept the queso pretty mild. Did I mention that this is delicious on its own next to a platter of veggie sticks?! Or chips. Lets be honest.          Pinto Bean Dreams Just look at those beautiful beans! Dont they look gorgeous in all of their tone-on-tone mottled-ness? Pinto actually means painted in Spanish, and when you take a close look at pinto beans you can clearly see how theyve earned their moniker. Their speckles fade when cooking, and turn a lovely pale pink colour. They also gain a super creamy interior that is perfect in soups and stews, but also dips. Pintos, like all beans, are a mixture of protein and complex carbohydrates, making them incredibly filling, but wont spike blood sugar levels. Pinto beans are low in calories and fat, but contain the highest amount of fiber out of all the legumes (wow!). Key nutrients in pinto beans include potassium to maintain normal blood pressure, calcium for supporting muscle and nerve function, iron to enhance oxygen transport, and zinc for skin health.  Like all beans, pintos can cause an increase in intestinal gas (burps! farts! abdominal discomfort!), due to the oligosaccharides in the beans fermenting in the lower intestine. Because these starchy molecules live in the skin of the beans, a simple soak in water overnight usually does the trick. The soaking process will help leach out many of these fermenting properties, which is why it is so important to discard the soaking water and then boil them in fresh water. Adding a strip of kombu seaweed to the pot will further help to reduce the gas-producing potential of pinto beans (and all legumes), acting like a sponge to absorb those raffinose sugar toot culprits. Try these two tricks to reduce your toilet tunes, and stay social!          I used a clear glass bowl to serve the dip in so that they layers are visible, and it was not until after pouring in two layers did I have the idea to put cilantro stems up on the sides of it. Doh! But knowing it would be #worthit, I painstakingly scooped out the beans and salsa trying to keep everything separate, cleaned the bowl, and started over. I lightly brushed the tiniest amount of olive oil on the leaves to act as glue, then pressed them to the walls of bowl. This is completely unnecessary, but it makes the dip look less monotone and more enticing in my opinion – green always does it! This step takes an extra two minutes and adds a decorative touch, but its your call. Maybe you need those two minutes to tizz yourself up?  If you want to change up the recipe, try using black beans or kidney beans in place of the pintos. If you want to add another layer to this already boss situation, go on and add the guac! I was just trying to keep things a little easier for yall.  And if youd like to make your own salsa, I have a stellar raw recipe right here. Lastly, I want to add that my bowl for this was roughly 1 1/­­2 quarts /­­ litres capacity, and everything it fit perfectly. I would only suggest sizing up if you don’t have this exact container size.         Print recipe     Legendary Layer Bean Dip Serves 8-10 Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (or ghee) 1 medium yellow onion, diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 clove garlic, minced 2 tsp. ground cumin 1 tsp. dried Mexican oregano (substitute with regular oregano) 1/­­2 tsp. ground sweet paprika 3 cups /­­ 500g cooked pinto beans (about 2 cans) 1/­­2 can chipotle peppers in adobo sauce (use more or less to suit your taste) water as needed 1 small bunch cilantro, washed and dried 1 pint /­­ 280g cherry tomatoes, divided 1 green onion, sliced (white and green part) 1 small jar (15.5 oz. /­­ 415ml) store bought salsa, mild medium or hot, depending on your tastes 1 cup /­­ 145g hulled hemp seeds 1 medium red bell pepper, seeds removed and roughly chopped 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2-3 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste 1/­­2 clove garlic 1 small piece fresh turmeric, chopped (substitute with 1/­­2 tsp. dried) ground cayenne, to taste 3 Tbsp. water, if needed Directions: 1. Melt oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onions, salt, and stir to combine. Cook until lightly caramelized (about 10 minutes), then add the garlic and cook for a couple minutes until fragrant. Stir in cumin, oregano and paprika, cook for 2 minutes, then add the beans and chipotles in adobo (use as much or as little as you like). Cover and cook on low heat while you make the queso. If the pot becomes dry, add a little water and stir. 2. To make the queso, put all ingredients, except water, in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend until smooth and creamy. If needed, add water one tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. If you want a thick cream, use less water, for a thinner sauce, use more. (You will not achieve a perfectly smooth sauce with a food processor, but it is still delicious!). 3. Slice the cherry tomatoes into quarters. Add half of them to the salsa and stir to combine. Save the other half for later. 4. Smash the beans with a bean masher, potato masher, immersion blender, or put them into your high-speed blender (remove the queso first, but dont worry about cleaning it). The goal is to get the beans creamy, but not perfectly smooth. Add water if necessary, and season to taste.  5. Pick out a few stems of the most attractive cilantro, brush them with a little olive oil and stick them to the inside wall of the bowl (this step is optional). Chop the remaining cilantro and set aside. 6. Combine the remaining cherry tomatoes and combine them with the sliced spring onion. Sprinkle with a little salt, and fold to combine.  7. To assemble the dip, Spread the bean layer in the bottom first, followed by the salsa and finally the hemp queso. Top with the chopped cilantro, and finally the fresh tomato mix. Serve with whatever you like to dip! Party on!      Hope you’re all doing well out there. If you are experiencing any semblance of Spring weather where you are, please send some my way. K thanks. Happy dipping! xo, Sarah B The post Legendary Layer Bean Dip – Vegan, Grain-free appeared first on My New Roots.

Recipe | Broccoli Quinoa Quesadillas + A Cast Iron Cookware Primer

February 15 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Back when I first started cooking, I didn’t know that there was such a thing as non-non-stick cookware. (Stick cookware?) Non-stick cookware made for easy clean-up! It let you use less oil and butter in your cooking! It was pretty much the best invention ever, right? And then suddenly you started hearing bad things about non-stick cookware. Although they say it’s perfectly safe to use as long as it’s not scratched, my cookware was constantly scratching. It made me kind of uneasy, so I decided to switch out my non-stick pots and pans for cast iron. Since cast iron tends to be a little bit pricier, it’s been an ongoing process, one that began before I even started blogging. As my old pots and pans wore out, I replaced them with new cast iron versions, usually scouring discount stores and the Le Creuset outlet for good deals. I’ve finally replaced my last few pieces with cast iron and I’ve learned a few things along the way: Cast Iron Is Expensive (In the Short Term) The biggest hurdle for me in switching to cast iron was the cost. But if you’re replacing your non-stick cookware every few years like I was, […]

VegReady – Vegan Meal Subscription Service

December 18 2018 Happy Cow veggie blog 

When will we reach the tipping point of a global transition to veganism? This is the question Mark Perlmutter, Founder and CEO of the new startup VegReady.com, has been asking himself throughout his nearly 40 years as a vegan. I can see clearly that now is the time, said Perlmutter. VegReady has been designed for this very moment. His vegan meal subscription company was born from this idea: more and more people are becoming aware that a vegan diet can dramatically benefit their health and the fate of our planet, but making or maintaining the switch feels too difficult. To someone starting out, a vegan diet can seem inconvenient, expensive, and bland. Perlmutter has positioned VegReady to address this in a number of ways. For maximum convenience, the meal delivery is a subscription service. The food comes pre-cooked and ready to eat. Unlike other meal delivery services that have frozen foods that require refrigeration, VegReady meals have a 12-month shelf life without refrigeration. This means subscribers dont have to fuss with delivery schedule coordination or food waste. And once theyve received the meals, they can be stored in the cabinet or even in a desk at work - making it […] The post VegReady – Vegan Meal Subscription Service appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Grain-free Holiday Tahini Cookies, 2-ways + A Gift Guide

November 23 2018 My New Roots 

Grain-free Holiday Tahini Cookies, 2-ways + A Gift Guide You know the feeling: its twenty minutes after dinner. Youre full and seemingly suffonsified, when it hits you. I NEED A TREAT. Raisins will not help. Granola won’t cut it. Coconut chips? Pfff. That teeny square of dark chocolate you were keeping as a fallback has mysteriously gone missing (blame the kid!) and youre desperate for an indulgence without anything in sight...sound the alarm! Thats what happened to me recently, which lead me to frenetically probe the internet for something that could satisfy me in a hurry, which lead me to a 5-ingredient Almond Tahini cookie recipe from Cook Republic. The cookies looked really tasty, super simple to make, and I had everything I needed to get baking right away. Within 20 minutes I was eating said cookies, and I hadn’t even panicked. That much. This recipe turned out to be so brilliant that I made the cookies again a few nights later. Then about a week after that. Each time, adjusting and adding ingredients for more flavour and texture each time until they were perfect. And now, I really feel like these cookies are my go-to, since theyre grain-and-gluten-free, high in protein and good fats, naturally sweetened, and endlessly customizable! The best thing about these cookies however, is their dream texture: crispy outsides, and super chewy insides. And they are so satisfyingly dense that they really feel like food - not just a treat to curb a craving.  They are also deliciously not-too-sweet, especially with the flaky salt on top that comes at you like firework flavour sparks.     For this post, Ive made two variations for those who can’t decide on which festive flavours they love most: sweet and warming Orange-Spice to put us all in the holiday mood, and a rich and piquant Ginger-Molasses that is delightfully reminiscent of classic gingerbread. I used maple syrup to sweeten both cookies, but cut the amount in half for the Ginger-Molasses to make room for the blackstrap goodness! If youd like to keep this version even lower on the glycemic index, you can replace all the maple syrup with molasses, just know that they will be very intense, and for molasses-lovers only. If youd like to learn more about the health benefits of blackstrap molasses, how to purchase the right kind, and how to store it, check out my blog post here. Youll notice down below that I specify runny tahini in the recipe. This is because the tahini acts as part of the liquid component here, along with the maple syrup and molasses. If you only have thicker tahini, I suggest warming it together with the syrup(s) on the stove over low heat to achieve the runniness you need for the recipe to work. I got my tahini at a local grocery store that has a pretty decent ethnic food section. Its perfect for baking since its inexpensive, and because the flavour of it gets overwhelmed by the other ingredients anyway. Save your expensive tahini for toast!       Print recipe     Grain-free Orange-Spice Tahini Cookies Makes 20 cookies Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 220g almond flour (not almond meal) 1 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. ground cardamom 1/­­4 tsp. ground star anise 1/­­2 tsp. flaky sea salt, plus more for garnish pinch black pepper, optional 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml tahini 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract zest of 1 orange (preferably organic) 2 Tbsp. crushed cacao nibs to garnish Directions: Preheat oven to 325°F /­­ 170°C. Lightly grease, or line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large bowl, combine the almond flour, cinnamon, cardamom, star anise, black pepper and salt. Set aside. Whisk tahini, maple syrup, vanilla, and orange zest together in a small bowl. If it is too thick, warm it in a small saucepan over medium heat until runny. Pour over dry ingredients and stir well to combine. The dough will be thick and you may need to use your hands to finish mixing. Roll about a tablespoon and a half worth of the dough in the palm of your hands, into a ball. Flatten slightly, then place on the prepared tray, sprinkle with cacao nibs and a pinch of flaky salt. Lightly press the toppings into the dough. Bake for 10-12 minutes until the bottom is golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool completely. Store in air tight containers at room temperature for up to a week. Grain-Free Ginger-Molasses Tahini Cookies Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 225g almond flour (not almond meal) 1 Tbsp. ground ginger 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. ground cloves 1/­­4 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg 1/­­2 tsp. flakey sea salt, plus more for garnish 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml runny tahini 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml unsulphured blackstrap molasses 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract 2-3 Tbsp. chopped pistachios to garnish Directions: Preheat oven to 325°F /­­ 170°C. Lightly grease, or line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large bowl, combine the almond flour, ginger, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and salt. Set aside. - Whisk tahini, molasses, maple syrup, and vanilla together in a small bowl. If it is too thick, warm it in a small saucepan over medium heat until runny. Pour over dry ingredients and stir well to combine. The dough will be thick and you may need to use your hands to finish mixing. - Roll about a tablespoon and a half worth of the dough in the palm of your hands, into a ball. Flatten slightly, then place on the prepared tray, sprinkle with chopped pistachios and a pinch of flaky salt. Lightly press the toppings into the dough. - Bake for 10-12 minutes until the bottom is golden brown. Remove from oven and let cool completely. - Store in air tight containers at room temperature for up to a week.   If cookies arent your thing (are you a robot?), then check out the list below for a bunch of edible presents from My New Roots that are the perfect make-ahead gift to bring to all of those holiday parties, family get-togethers, and work socials. Some are sweet, some are savoury, but they all can be made in large batches and have a long-ish shelf life. I will also mention that were taking holiday orders for the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box up until this Sunday, November 25th. That means if you order your box for yourself (or someone else to send as a gift!), it will arrive before the holidays. If you decide to order after November 25th, the box will come in the New Year. Remember that each box contains the ingredients for two loaves of Life-Changing Loaf! Thank you to everyone who has already ordered - your box is on the way!    My New Roots Homemade Edible Gifts   Drink mixes Big Batch Golden Milk Superfood Haute Chocolate Masala Chai Things in jars Infused Syrup Gift Jars Party Nut Butter Simple Gourmet Granola Chunky Chocolate Buckwheat Granola Maple Cinnamon Grain-Free Granola   Spice blends Zaatar Spice Blend  Everything Bagel Spice Blend Dukkah Spice Blend   The post Grain-free Holiday Tahini Cookies, 2-ways + A Gift Guide appeared first on My New Roots.

Matcha Butter Balls + Changes

October 15 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Matcha Butter Balls + Changes Hey friends! It’s been a little while. We took a break from posting, while we were in Italy hosting our first Abruzzo retreat. It was a dream come true, and we’ll be sharing more about that very soon. Before we get into our favorite snack lately, we wanted to talk a little bit about growth and evolution as it relates to this space. We’ve been posting recipes here for close to nine years. It’s a practice that has almost unfailingly kept us inspired and excited about the daily ritual of cooking and nourishing ourselves and others. This whole blog is sort of a family album at this point, since we can pinpoint certain posts to the life events that were happening around us while cooking the dishes. It’s also surreal to be able to put something out there and know that a certain number of people will check out the recipe or even cook it in their own kitchens. It’s a special form of connection that we have with the world, and every time we hear from someone who has made and enjoyed one of the recipes is amazing. It never feels normal or old, truly. Throughout these years, our interests have expanded beyond but not away from cooking. There are so many things that have had a magical effect on our lives in the same way that healthy, plant-based food made with our own hands has. These things range from small daily practices or rituals, to life-changing books that we’ve read and dog-eared excessively. At this point, we feel compelled to share more about those things here, as well as about some of our struggles, and expand the type of things we talk about. The food is not going anywhere, though! We already do a little bit of that with the self-care interviews, which you seem to enjoy, but we now feel ready to share from our own perspectives as well. We toyed around with the idea of making a whole new website for this stuff, but in the end, Golubka Kitchen is where our hearts are, and it feels right to have it grow alongside us. Here are the things you can expect to see on here going forward. We hope you’ll follow along, but if some of this is not your cup of tea, that’s ok too. - Weekly plant-based recipes - Seasonal meal plans - Self-care interviews - Skin-care and home-care recipes - Rituals/­­practices that we find supportive to our wellbeing - Book Club (read along with us, our first book of the month is Renegade Beauty by Nadine Artemis) - More videos! Onto the matcha butter balls. Keeping nourishing snacks at arm’s reach is definitely a priority around here, since it helps prevent things like: snacking on handfuls of chocolate chips, impulse purchases of expensive and/­­or less than healthy snacks with wasteful packaging, hangriness, lightheadedness, etc. etc. I’m absolutely in love with cacao butter as an ingredient and use it in desserts and snacks (and even in homemade skincare products) all the time. This generally involves gently melting the cacao butter in order to incorporate it into the other ingredients. It was Elenore who recently turned me onto the idea of skipping the melting step for recipes that involve a food processor. For example, in this recipe, the chopped up cacao butter just gets thrown into a food processor with the rest of the ingredients for a few minutes, where it gets melted by the heat of the motor and makes a beautiful, quick snack ball batter. I love this shortcut. These balls are full of good stuff, like essential fatty acid-rich seeds and energy-boosting matcha powder. The texture is velvety thanks to the cacao butter, and the flavor is only slightly sweet and a bit grassy, thanks to the matcha. One to two of these balls usually work well as a mid-afternoon pick-me-up (be careful with the amounts if you are sensitive to caffeine), and they are kid-approved as well. I use this matcha. It’s definitely not the best ceremonial grade matcha out there, but it’s the best one I’ve found for the price, since good matcha can be very pricy. Hope you’ll give these a try! Matcha Butter Balls   Print Ingredients 1 cup raw pumpkin seeds ⅔ cup raw sunflower seeds ¼ cup hemp hearts ¼ cup flax seeds 1 cup chopped or shredded cacao butter 3 tablespoons maple syrup, or more to taste 2 tablespoons maca powder 2 teaspoons matcha powder 1 teaspoon ashwagandha powder (optional) Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a food processor and process for 3-4 minutes, or until the heat of the motor melts the cacao butter completely, and you have a nicely formed batter. Taste for sweetness and adjust if needed. Shape the batter into bite-sized balls or bars. Sprinkle with more matcha, if desired. Keep in an airtight container in a freezer or refrigerator. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Chunky Monkey Cookies, Vegan and Gluten-Free Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Matcha Butter Balls + Changes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Rhubarb, Ginger & Strawberry Soup

April 23 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Rhubarb, Ginger & Strawberry Soup My grandma had rhubarbs growing in her garden and would cook them into a sweet, tangy and unfortunately quite stringy soup with lots of little bits in it. I never liked that soup. She passed away while I was still young so I dont remember a lot about her. But I do still remember that soup. How annoying is that!? One of the few memories you have of a person is something they cooked for you that you didn’t like. Eight year old David preferred supermarket box carton soups and powder soups that you just added water to. That ungrateful little schmuck. Since then, I have of course come to my senses and learned to appreciate any food that someone cooks for me. Even tangy and stringy rhubarb soup. But since I don’t want to risk being remembered for a stringy soup, we give you a smooth one instead. It’s approved by eight year old David. And his children. We made this video for our youtube channel to show how easy it is. We like this soup because its so simple and fresh and comes together in just over 10 minutes. You only need a handful ingredients that you simmer, blend, (chill, if you like) and serve. It has a fruity and tangy flavour and a nice punch from fresh ginger. Its ideal as a weekday dessert, weekend breakfast or on a brunch table. The soup begs to be topped with something creamy. We used greek yogurt, but mascarpone, whipped cream, ice cream or any dairy free option would also work. All to your preference. I’m a licorice fan and was surprised by how well it matched the flavors when sprinkled on top of this soup. However if you don’t like licorice, cardamom or vanilla would also be great flavor additions. We also sprinkled some edible flower petals on top because it looked pretty but chopped pistachios will probably taste better and add some crunch ;) Rhubarb, Ginger & Strawberry Soup Serves 8 Don’t focus too much on the exact amounts. You can use more or less rhubarb, strawberries, dates, water etc. It all depends on how sweet or tart the different fruit is, how large the dates are and how sweet flavor you want. We usually add vanilla powder to this but it’s so expensive at the moment so we left it out. If you have some at home, add it together with the rhubarb in the sauce pan. 5 stalks rhubarb (1/­­2 kg /­­ 1 lb /­­ 2 cups chopped) 350 – 500 ml /­­ 1 1/­­2-2 cups cold filtered water 1 big chunk fresh ginger 1 lime, zest 250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb strawberries 8-12 soft dates To serve Yogurt (or mascarpone, whipped cream or ice cream) Licorice powder  Edible flowers (or replaced with chopped nuts or seeds) Trim the rhubarb and chop into 1 inch bits. Add to a wide sauce pan along with 1 cup filtered water and freshly grated ginger and lime zest. Bring to a boil, turn down the heat and let simmer until the rhubarb is starting to dissolve, around 5-8 minutes. Pour over into a blender. Add strawberries, dates and a little more water. Mix until smooth. Taste and add more dates, strawberries, lime juice or ginger, if needed. And more water if you like it thinner. Place in the fridge too cool or serve it warm. Top with a dollop yogurt and sprinkle with licorice powder and some dried edible flower petals.

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan

November 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Chi San Wan is a creative consultant, mama, entrepreneur and author based in London. We love Chi’s beautiful cookbook, her aesthetic, and down-to-earth approach to wellness, and we were very excited to get a peak at her everyday routine. In this interview, Chi tells us about her morning and bedtime routines, her ways of dealing with stress, the simple beauty tricks she’s learned from her mother, making space for the occasional cake and wine, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I enjoy routine, especially in the mornings. Before Marloe came along, routine was the only thing keeping me grounded. I have all sorts floating around in my head, and working for myself means one day can be very different to the next, so I need my mornings to be predictable in order to get me in the right mind-set for the rest of the day. However, now that those routines are governed by Marloe, our one year old, things are somewhat less predictable, and I have learnt to let go of the importance of routine a little. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. They vary slightly from day to day, depending on whats on the agenda, but in an ideal and average world my morning would be waking up around 6am, do some stretching, then 20 mins of meditation. Around 6:30am Marloe wakes up and we like to cuddle in bed together as a family (shes really into giving kisses at the moment). We get out of bed around 7am and take turns to shower whilst the other one plays with Marloe, makes lemon hot water and preps breakfast. We sit down together for breakfast between 7:30am-8am and have our mornings chats – most of the time theres food throwing involved. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I like to stop any computer work by 9pm, make myself a small hot drink and climb into bed to do some reading – usually self-help or study. I try to sleep by 10pm latest, but sometimes me and my boyfriend just end up chatting about the day until 11pm or midnight… Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Typically… Breakfast – multi-grain porridge with almond milk, topped with whatever seasonal fruits are around and some nut butter Lunch – quinoa, roast veg, salad, some kraut, some seaweed – usually leftovers Snack – sourdough and avocado, or an apple with cheese /­­ nut butter, whatever I find on my travels Dinner – salmon and veg, or daal /­­ curry with rice, yoghurt and lots of freshly chopped herbs -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? If I have the time, I will make myself a matcha latte in the mornings or for a snack. If we have eggs, maybe I will have an Earl Grey tea or some fresh juice. I only ever drink coffee when I fancy a croissant! Then it would have to be a flat white with fresh almond milk or oat milk.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I never used to! But somehow, during pregnancy and since Marloe was born, I have developed a sweet tooth! Maybe its to keep energy up? As the weather is colder now in London, I have been obsessed with searching for the best hot chocolate (always disappointing and not chocolatey enough!). When I get the urge for something sweet, its usually something very specific, not any old sweet thing will suffice, and I will have to go on a hunt for it. Though usually after dinner, I am happy with a piece of raw chocolate from the fridge.  -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I try and have a wide and varied diet to keep things in check, and food is the first thing I look to when trying to manage my general wellness. I try and listen to my body, even if sometimes its asking for wine or cake! Usually, it needs just that and feels much better for it. In terms of taking anything else, since pregnancy and the birth of Marloe I have taken a high DHA Omega 3 supplement and probiotics daily (just in case I dont get the chance to eat it in food form). Once a week I will make some water steeped in goji berries, longan (when my mum visits, she will always leave me some) and any dried herbs I have on hand and sip on that. I have some adaptogenics on hand too – chaga, cordyceps, reishi, ashwaghanda, schisandra – but I dont make a habit of taking them everyday, only when I need to. -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Do you try to guard her from all unhealthy/­­processed foods, or are you more relaxed about it all? Do you have any advice for parents who want to raise their kids to be comfortable with real, whole foods? For her first year I was a little precious about what I gave her to eat – everything was made at home and organic produce only. I went with baby led weaning which is so messy, anyone who knows me knows I cannot handle mess so this was, and still is, a learning curve for me. But it gives me great pleasure watching Marloe enjoy her food, and try anything I give her. She has days where she is super picky, but generally she is a happy eater. I am more relaxed and realistic about what she consumes now, because I cant always control where we are – she has predominately home made food, but when we are out she will have bits of whatever we are eating, and its fun to watch her try new things! I really recommend baby led weaning. If you read up on it, it makes a lot of sense to get kids to eat real, whole foods this way – who wants to eat mush? It could be anything! Real food looks and tastes much more exciting and it makes them more adventurous with food, and less fussy. Eating together at the table is important to me as well, and for Marloe to have what we are eating – she knows if we have given her a different meal and will shout until we feed her some of ours.  Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I love to fit yoga in when I can and I walk a lot (at a very fast pace), but other than that, its chasing the baby around. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I dont do any form of exercise that I find torturous, such as spin or anything high adrenaline; it doesnt work for me. I enjoy yoga – dynamic or kundalini, and walking in nature a lot.  Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I think if youre comfortable in your own skin, that is beautiful. But for everyone, that could be down to many different factors and it will chop and change with time. Someone who is confident but grounded with integrity – their beauty will shine through. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Its pretty simple and not that exciting! I try and dry-brush when I can, I use Dr. Bronners Baby soap for the body, and then after a shower, whilst the body is wet, I will rub a concoction of almond oil, sesame oil and essential oils that I fancy, all over. For my face, I take the day off with coconut oil and rose water (I make my own with 3/­­4 organic rose water and 1/­­4 colloidal silver). For my morning shower, I will use a thin flannel to scrub the face and spray with rose water, followed by a tiny bit of Nucifera, The Balm – a recent find in LA. Its been amazing for the change in weather in the UK.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water, water, water. Not eating so much dairy, wheat and sugar, but consuming more good fats like avocado, coconut and ghee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mum looks so good and youthful, but she has never drank much, never smoked, never wore make-up...thats her trick! I have never smoked, I drink less now naturally, as I am breastfeeding and I’m too busy to do any make-up, so usually a go at the eyelash curlers will do for the day! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I think fitting in meditation everyday greatly reduces stress for me and puts things into perspective. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Acupuncture. Talking it out with my boyfriend and friends. Knowing that ‘this too shall pass’. Treating myself to whatever food and drink I desire (within budget of course).  -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I take Wellness tablets. I make sure to be hydrated and wrap up warm at all times, especially the throat and chest. I make congee or daal, something warming and easy to digest so the body can rest.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? At the moment, I am very much governed by my daughters day to day antics, and I try and fit everything else around her. This does stress me out at times, but then I try and remember to enjoy these first years with her. I am lucky to have this time together with her, because I am freelance. I just try and plan my time carefully (shared iCal helps!), but not everything always goes to plan – which I am learning to let go of.  Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Things generally fall better into place when I take time to be kind to myself, so I just keep reminding myself that self-care is important, especially for a working mum. Setting routines like bed times for myself etc helps with this and saying no to some friends, projects, events etc when you just need the time to sort stuff out, so that everything else can run more smoothly. Obviously there is room for spontaneity, thats what keeps me feeling alive!  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Meditation. Making the time for it. It keeps me feeling focused, rested and puts things into perspective. Its a form of self-care and love for myself, and is incredibly nurturing. I dont always do it every day twice a day, but when I do, it helps immensely. I learnt from Jacqui at The Broad Place in the summer and, hands down, they’re the best teachings of meditation I have come across, because its real and it works.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Its easier said than done, but I try not to stress about it, and just trust the process rather than sit and wallow. Ill meet up with friends and my peers and we chat it out – usually its something that is felt by a few people, and I find that it usually reverberates between similar minds, like theres something going on with the energy around us. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I cant pinpoint one thing, its a zeitgeist thing, its in the air...maybe because we are entering a revolution, the age of Aquarius. I am constantly  inspired and influenced by the people I surround myself with, the internet, social media, so books /­­ movies /­­ classes suggested through those mediums are naturally the ones I gravitate to.  Knowledge -- You co-authored A Simple Table, a beautiful cookbook that focuses on fresh and simple meals. What was the key message that you aimed to communicate with the recipes and lifestyle tips in the book? Thank you. The key message was that everyday nourishment neednt be difficult or a chore. It could be simple acts of kindness to yourself, or simple recipes that dont require crazy expensive ingredients. Its to encourage the reader to explore what makes them feel good inside and out, as everyone is different and there is no one formula. Most of all, it was to enjoy the simple pleasures.  -- Tell us a bit about the fresh almond milk company that you co-founded, The Pressery. What inspired you to start it and what did you learn from having that business? I felt a change in me, and the start of a movement back in 2013 when I became a little disillusioned working in fashion, and more excited about food and drink and the effects it has on us. I have always been a food fanatic, so it was natural for me to explore this familiar and yet unknown territory. My business partner had been feeling the same for a while, so it felt like the right time to launch a small business in something we were both passionate about. I was already making almond milk at home, and after some research we settled on focusing on making the one product the best we could. There is a lot to learn through starting a business from nothing (I was a freelance fashion stylist before that), and building a brand from scratch – we started selling at a market and then got into Selfridges, and I grew the social media following from 0 to 22k organically in 2 years. Ive met many people through the business, with whom I am still good friends now and work with today, as a creative consultant. It was a natural progression for me and I wouldnt be where I am now if it wasnt for The Pressery.  Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I like to have a glass of red wine, make dinner with my boyfriend and possibly have a candle lit bath with Epsom salts and essential oils.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – salt. by Nayyirah Waheed, there is always a piece that speaks to me at any point in my life Song/­­Album – I will never tire of Your Hand In Mine by Explosions In The Sky Movie – In The Mood For Love has been a long favourite – the soundtrack, the colours, the feelings… Piece of Art – anything by Agnes Martin really does feed and soothe my soul, when the exhibition was at the Tate Modern, I went about 5 times! -- What are your favorite places to eat in London? Leilas  for breakfast, Esters  for brunch, Towpath  for lunch, Granger & Co Kings Cross  for work meetings, Violet  for cake and tea, P. Franco  for wine and small dishes and for dinner – Primeur , Campania and Jones , Uchi , Westerns Laundry , Legs , Luca ...too many!  -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list . What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – comfy t-shirt and shorts for sleep – current book  – Nucifera The Balm – rose water spray – essential oils to mix – Weleda lip balm – Dr. Bronners Baby soap (which doubles up as shaving foam) – x2 pairs of jeans (one boyfriend, one flares) – x1 sunglasses – x1 rucksack, x1 fancy bag, x1 tote bag – x1 black trousers (usually wide culottes) – x3 different style tees – x1 cashmere sweater – x2 white shirts  – x1 jumpsuit /­­ playsuit  – x1 dress for day or evening – x2 sandals (one Birkenstocks, one Isabel Marant) – x1 trainers – x1 smart shoes (for me, its Doc Martens) – x1 jacket or coat (depending on the destinations temperature) – x1 light cashmere scarf -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Id love to hear from Julie from Rudy Jude, Rosa from Cereal Magazine, Serena Mitnik-Miller from General Store and Holly from The Acey. Photos taken by Jessica MacCormick, Emma Lee and Chi San Wan. 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Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

how to celebrate diwali festival | eco friendly diwali festival information

October 17 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

how to celebrate diwali festival | eco friendly diwali festival informationcelebrating diwali festival does not have to be all about spending huge amount on crackers and expensive gifts, but instead one can always use innovative and homemade ways to do the house! it can be completely eco friendly and it can be fun too. Continue reading how to celebrate diwali festival | eco friendly diwali festival information at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk

August 14 2017 My New Roots 

Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk It is easier to change a man’s religion than to change his diet. – Margaret Mead Yup. Pretty much. This entire shift began when I had a particularly gnarly couple of months with manic mood swings that rivaled my adolescence, acne flare-ups, bloating, low energy, night sweats, and all-round malaise. Knowing what I know, I looked at my diet first to see what could be adjusted. Everything was organic, whole, plant-based and totally healthy by most peoples standards. But it just wasnt working anymore. I knew something had to give. Delving in deeper, a typical day for me was a whole-grain porridge in the morning, topped with all kinds of seasonal fruit, homemade granola etc. Lunch was a couple slices of organic sourdough rye bread from the local bakery, with homemade hummus, avocado, sprouts etc. Dinner was often a mixed bowl, the base of which was brown rice, quinoa, millet or buckwheat covered in a rainbow of vegetables, homemade pickles, superfood-loaded sauce, and fresh herbs. I wasnt eating sugar, drinking coffee, I was keeping up with my exercise and sleeping well. So what was the problem? In this case, I had a feeling it was a big ol grain overload. The idea of cutting back on my morning oats, bread, and grain bowls was literally devastating to me. I cried. On multiple occasions, just talking about giving up muffins made me weep, and I felt like there was just no way I could make even more changes, or think about my diet even more than I already did. I have had two serious experiences with orthorexia in my life. For those of you who dont know what orthorexia is, it is defined as an obsession with healthy eating. It is considered an eating disorder, and one that is becoming more prevalent in Western culture as healthy eating becomes increasingly trendy. The first bout happened the year I moved out of the house to study at university. While many of my friends were bingeing on junk food and beer, I swung in the opposite direction entirely and took advantage of the incredible meal program that was offered at school, and fueled myself with enormous salads, delicious sandwiches and wraps, veggie-heavy soups and stews, and protein-rich smoothies. I also signed up for the free fitness classes at the university gym, got hooked on kickboxing, step aerobics, boot camp drills, and the weight literally fell off me. I lost about 25 pounds that year, and for the first time in my life I felt like I was in control of the way I looked. The sudden attention from guys – which I had never had before – further stoked the fires for my desire to be even thinner, even though my initial motivation to eat this way stemmed from a desire to be healthy. As my attitude towards food morphed from friend to enemy, I flirted with a full-on eating disorder at this point, playing games with myself to see how long I could go without eating, how many exercise classes I could fit in between classes and study groups, how long I could make my bean salad from lunch last (too long!). Eventually my energy levels dropped to the point where I had a very hard time getting out of bed in the morning and I couldnt concentrate well in school. I realized that I had taken things too far and started eating in a more balanced way again. I put the experience behind me without giving it too much thought. The second time this resurfaced was, ironically, while studying holistic nutrition. While I was learning all about foods and how my body worked, I became almost afraid to eat, toxifying my body, or poisoning it with sugar, gluten, dairy and the rest. I became obsessed with detoxing and subsisted only on clean foods; mostly vegetables. I was stressed, my hair started falling out, my acne came back and my energy hit an all-time low. Despite my obvious physical misery, I somehow felt validated since I wasnt putting anything bad in my body. Eating as healthy as possible became obsessive for me and my classmates, and wed all proudly bring our lunches to school, subtly scrutinizing each others Tupperware contents. Again, food had lost its pleasure, its joy, and had become something that I saw as more of an enemy than a friend. And that really scared me. After graduating, I finally got a grip, and once again slowly re-established a healthy relationship to what I was eating. It is for these reasons that food is such a tender subject for me, and changing my diet dangerous territory. I spent so many years struggling to achieve a positive connection with food, and when I finally got there and it felt like such a relief. The prospect of having to go back to that place of thinking about food more than I already did felt unsafe for me, and slipping back into an obsessive place felt like an inevitability. Meanwhile, the negative self-talk voices were loud and overpowering, telling me how I was fat, flabby, weak, old - things that I KNEW werent true. But thats the sad thing about internal monologues, they dont need to make sense to play like broken records in our minds all day every day. Its enough to drive a person insane. The cruel voices coupled with my extreme fear of reverting back to my old thought patterns and eating habits absolutely terrified me. I felt like I had hit a wall of hopelessness. And all I wanted to do to feel better was to eat a piece of eff-ing bread. The reason I suspected the grain thing was because of the unique relationship that blood sugar has to our hormones. If were consuming carbohydrates at a faster rate than our bodies are utilizing them for energy, that extra glucose gets stored in the fat cells of the liver, which decreases its ability to breakdown excess estrogen, and allowing it to hang around in our systems longer than it should. This excess circulating estrogen causes a whole host of symptoms, including, you guessed it: mood swings, bloating, sluggish metabolism, tender breasts, fatigue, foggy thinking, PMS, and many more less-than-desirable issues. Now, these things can be exacerbated by stress (shocker), inadequate fat and protein intake, and environmental factors, all of which I was likely suffering from. I set out by making a plan, since I know how hard it is to make positive changes without preparation. Instead of focusing on the all the things I wanted to reduce or eliminate, I focused on the foods I could have, foods higher in fat and protein, since I knew that those things would naturally elbow out the things I would normally fall back on (Im looking at you, banana bread). I made a list that I could refer to when I was grocery shopping for ingredients. I cooked and froze things. I stocked the fridge and pantry. I was ready. Within the first few days I already noticed a difference: my energy was incredibly stable, my emotions were in check, the bloating in my stomach dissipated, and I just felt good. As the days rolled on my compulsive urges to down half a dozen muffins subsided, and it was like I could clearly see that what I had actually been battling was blood sugar issues - not just too many grains or carbohydrates. It became clear that I had been taking my bod on a wild rollercoaster of high and low blood sugar for years, which had in turn been tossing my hormones around like a pair of sneakers in a washing machine. Stabilizing blood sugar is the first step in managing your endocrines system ability to do its job properly. I realized that if I was going to eat grains (or any carbohydrate-heavy food), I had to eat them in smaller amounts, balance them out thoughtfully with enough fat and protein, and make sure that I was actually using that energy instead of letting it sit around in my body. So far, things have been going incredibly well, and I am so darn proud of myself for not only identifying the issue, but actually doing something about it. We are fluid beings with needs that evolve and change over time. Our diets need to reflect that, which is why its imperative to listen to our bodies and be advocates for our own health. No one knows your body better than you, and once you quiet all the noise out there telling you how to eat in black-and-white terms, youll be able to hear yourself, without judgement, and choose the way of eating that is just right for you, right now. It may be different tomorrow, and that is okay too. In sharing this all with you, I am trying to set an example, because you too have this intuition that is telling you just what you need to eat and do right now. Its actually fun to be connected to yourself, your unique rhythms and needs. Learning about how you operate and designing a plan that caters to your exceptional self means that you can celebrate, instead of berate your body the whole month through, and experience pleasure in every stage of our cycle. I promise. This is undoubtedly a huge topic, and one that I plan on chipping away at over the next few blog posts. Some things I want to reiterate here are, that I do not believe that grains or carbohydrates are bad. No natural food group should be vilified, just as no macronutrient should be either. If youre thinking about giving up carbs, Id advise you not to. Glucose, the sugar found in carbohydrates is your brains primary fuel source, and when consumed responsibly, carbs will help you on your wellness journey, not hinder you. I still stand behind each and every one of the recipes that I have created for this blog, the app, and both of my cookbooks, and I believe that they are appropriate for many people to enjoy. However at this stage of my life, some of the recipes do not serve my needs any longer, and Ive had to make small changes to them, or put them on the shelf for another time. Im okay with that. Whew! Now for some notes on the recipe. The base recipe for my Cinnamon Toast Crunch-inspired cereal is grain-free, but it does rely on almond flour, which can be expensive. If you can tolerate pseudo-grains, feel free to top up the base with buckwheat flour. This will bulk up the cereal considerably so youll have more for less money. This cereal is r-i-c-h. You really only need a small amount to fuel you in the morning - not like the bottomless bowls of that were used to consuming in the morning without every really feeling satisfied, ya know what I mean? And paired with a luscious liquid like my Super Creamy Hemp Milk will keep you full for even longer, help stabilize your blood sugar, not to mention flood your bod with the delicate nutrients and powerful enzymes that store-bought, plant-based milk is missing. This recipe is dead simple and pretty much like cream – I shouldnt even call it milk, since its so rich and thick. And since were thinking outside the cereal box here, dont stop at breakfast...this milk is amazing in coffee and tea, in raw treats and baked goods, soup, smoothies, ice cream and popsicles. Youre gonna love it! I made the cereal the first time with just almond flour and a full half-cup of applesauce. It was definitely delicious, but I loved it just as much when I cut this amount in half. If you dont want all the sweetness, use just 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml of applesauce instead of the full amount. If youre using buckwheat flour, you will need the full amount of the applesauces moisture to bind it all together. I havent tried a version without the coconut sugar, so if youre not into that stuff feel free to play with the recipe on your own.     Print recipe     Grain-free /­­ Gluten-free Cinnamon Crunch Cereal Makes 5-7 servings Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup ground flax seeds /­­ 50g 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 150g blanched almond flour 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g coconut sugar 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml - 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml applesauce ( 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml if using buckwheat flour) 1 Tbsp. coconut oil, melted optional: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g buckwheat flour Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F/­­160°C. 2. Combine the ground flax seeds, almond flour, cinnamon, salt, and sugar in a large mixing bowl. Stir well. Then add the desired amount of applesauce and coconut oil, and stir to fully incorporate (you made need to use your hands if it gets too dry). Gather dough into a rough ball. 3. Place dough ball on a sheet of baking paper with another sheet on top. Using a rolling pin, roll the dough as evenly as possible, about 2mm thickness (not quite paper thin). If youre using buckwheat flour, youll need to separate the dough into two batches to achieve this. Remove top sheet of baking paper, and using a paring knife, score the dough into small squares of your desired size (mine were about 1.5cm /­­ .5 square). 4. Place in the oven to bake for about approximately 25 minutes until turning golden around the edges, then turn the oven off and let the cereal sit in there until cool (this will help dry it out and make them extra crisp). 5. Once the cereal is completely cool, break up the pieces into squares and place in an airtight glass container. Store for up to one month at room temperature. Super Creamy Hemp Milk Makes 1 liter /­­ 1 quart Ingredients: scant 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water 3/­­4 cup hulled hemp seeds /­­ hemp hearts Totally optional add-ins: sweetener (stevia, dates, honey, maple syrup...) vanilla sea salt raw cacao powder Directions: 1. Place all ingredients in the blender and blend on high until smooth (this make take a couple minutes). 2. Pour directly into a sterilized bottle and store in the fridge for up to 5 days. Initially, I was really afraid to come out about any of this stuff - the changes my diet is undergoing, the orthorexia, the internal voices! But I know in my gut that if Im going through it, someone else out there is too. And the reason I wanted to start My New Roots in the first place was to create a safe space for everyone to share and support each other on our health journeys, so I have to be as transparent and honest as I feel I can be to set that example. I want to say a huge heartfelt thank-you to all of you who have stood by me all of these years and continue to do so. It feels pretty amazing to have you, and to be getting better all together. In light and gratitude, Sarah B.   ***** Also… There’s one spot left for the upcoming retreat in Ibiza, click here to join me for a week of total inspiration and rejuvenation! The post Cinnamon Crunch Cereal and Hemp Milk appeared first on My New Roots.

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin

July 16 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline ChardinToday’s self-care dialogue is with Pauline Chardin, a Parisian, a pro-traveler, and the author of our favorite wanderlust blog, The Voyageur. Pauline is a freelance art director and trend consultant in fashion, who looks to travel as a steady source of inspiration. Her blog is unlike any travel blog you’ve ever seen. Each story is accompanied by photo essays that are aesthetically sensitive to their environment and attentive to details that might otherwise go unnoticed. The documented destinations are always interesting and full of beauty that feels raw and true, captured from a less expected angle. From a secluded cabin in the mountains of Central France, a Moss Temple in Japan, to a lush sculpture park in Brazil, Pauline’s got us daydreaming and plotting future adventures any chance we get. In her self-care, Pauline is refreshingly down to Earth, with a bit of that inevitable, French chic thrown into the mix. Here, she tells us about her upcoming move to the South of France as a way to be closer to nature, her bedtime and beauty routines, her ways of dealing with jet lag, why she makes a point of packing parmesan and olive oil to bring on her journeys, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Making the best of time and things is definitely a big preoccupation of mine. I like to plan and think ahead, I guess that puts me in the routine camp. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I’m in the process of becoming more of a “morning person”, we’ll be moving from Paris to the countryside next year, and I have this image of myself getting up at 6am  and having all the time of the world. I’m not there yet, but here’s a typical morning from these last weeks. I wake up at 7:30 , before my husband, open all the windows while the air is still fresh and the street not too noisy. I spend some time in the bathroom before sitting at my desk to start working on some not-too-demanding tasks. An hour or so later, I prepare breakfast for us two. We’re both mostly working from home, which gives us the leisure of enjoying rather stress-free breakfasts and the time to have a nice conversation before digging into work. Everything is rather quiet until 10am , that’s when e-mails start to arrive and phones start to ring. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I found that there are three things that help me find a deep, relaxing sleep : the first one is the Sarvangâsana posture (also supposed to keep you from growing older if you do it 30 minutes every day, but I’m far from being that disciplined), my husband giving me a head massage and watching episodes of Cosmos (I’ll never know the secrets of the universe because I always fall into the most blissful sleep after 10 minutes). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – homemade fare, like vanilla millet pudding with fresh mango and almonds. Lunch – cereals with vegetables, like polenta fries with peperonata and fresh ricotta. Generally no dessert but an espresso with a piece of chocolate. Snack – I don’t really eat much between meals, except fruits in the summer. Dinner – mostly vegetables, cold or hot depending on the season, like a beet and cucumber carpaccio with green peppers. I have fruits for dessert, cooked in the winter and fresh in the summer, often with a bit of ice cream! -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink Mariage Fr?res tea in the morning and rarely have more than one espresso a day, at lunch. I only break that rule in countries where the coffee is very good, in Italy of course, but also in Japan because I love their milk coffee. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I really do, but I also find that I don’t like very sweet things anymore. My rule is to almost only eat pastries I’ve prepared myself. I’ve also realized that fruits are often enough to fulfill my cravings.  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I’m a big fan of Yotam Ottolenghi’s cooking and his sincere and generous approach to cooking, I have a few of his books, and his recipes rarely disappoint me. I have also been very inspired by my trips to Japan and Japanese wisdom in general, from their ‘it’s the journey that matters’ philosophy to their culture of bathing, or their ceramics. I find these things really help my happiness. More broadly, my way of living and eating is and was influenced by my parents, whose health would put any twenty-year old to shame! Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I’ve been doing pilates and yoga for years. I try to do at least one lesson a week, but lately it’s been more small home-sessions, by myself, two or three times a week. I also love to hike and swim whenever I have the opportunity. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it?  I really enjoy it and would love to do more (hopefully having a big house instead of a small apartment will help). I’ve been working a lot lately and I’ve been finding it hard to take a break during the day to do it. It’s a pity because I know the benefits all too well! Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I feel it’s very important to be comfortable in my body, to take good care of it and to be healthy, but I don’t like to dwell too much on the idea of my own beauty. I’m much more interested in what others project. Partly because of my line of work, I’ve learned to appreciate and enjoy all the subtleties of female beauty (much more than men, I must admit). I should also mention that I work in a very feminine environment that definitely puts style and personality before plastic beauty and basic seduction. I find it very freeing! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Like a lot of people, these last years I’ve been trying to embrace more natural products. I aspire to low maintenance but find as I get older that being a woman is definitely high maintenance. For now I put in the time because I find it relaxing and a good break from working. My favorites include Nuxe Huile prodigieuse, almond oil, Océopin pine powder scrub, and Aesop déodorant herbacé. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Not really, I think I haven’t graduated to supplements yet. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mother often used an eyebrow pencil and it has become a make-up staple of mine. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Yoga, cooking and being close to nature are the three simple things I strive to include in my daily life to keep things relaxed. So far I’ve been really good with the cooking part, I could definitely do better with the yoga, and the nature is still a work in progress. At the moment I live in Paris, so it’s complicated, but I look forward to a future where I can just open the window and hear the cicadas. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I find it ironic, and well, sad, that stress tends to keep you from doing anything that would make you feel better. It’s paralyzing in a way. Besides the solutions cited above, I find that making something with my hand (be it a cake, a dress or a drawing) helps me get centered again. Another good measure is travel or any form of exploration, if I manage to get excited and curious again, then I’m on my way to feeling better. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I cook your magical broth! I really do, even when I’m in good shape…which probably makes me too energized for my own good. Apart from that, working mostly from home means I’m rarely sick. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? It’s complicated. I’m very passionate about my job, which is relatively stress-free but also quite time-consuming. After ten years of doing it, I’m only realizing now that I may be working too much. This being said, I totally embrace the overlap, for me everything is connected, everything could and should be a source of inspiration, I “just” need to be careful about keeping some time to explore new things… I stopped counting the people around me who are in pain because of their job, so I try to be extra vigilant about the choices I and my loved ones make on the subject. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Most of my work requires that I spend a lot of my time in front of a computer and it would not come off as shocking to say that this isn’t a good thing. I’ve found out it has a way of making me feel like I’m not accomplishing much, even though I’ve been working for hours, maybe it’s because tasks get blended with one another, I don’t know. In any case, this “distortion” has the added drawback of not making me feel really good about myself, like I’m spinning in a wheel. On the other hand, when I spend a day, of even half a day, off my computer, I feel like I’m moving mountains, even if I’m only attending to mundane things. This is a great feeling and I wish it didn’t feel like some sort of luxury! -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Picking up yoga and pilates years ago was life-changing. I wasn’t into sports before that, and the body awareness it creates is an endless source of fascination. Knowledge -- You have a talent for seeking out the less traveled paths, hidden corners and beautiful places to stay wherever you travel. What is your approach when it comes to planning a trip? Coming up with the destination is a rather subjective process, which is often more about fantasy and pieces of information than reality. It might come from photographs I’ve seen, or a movie, or a conversation I’ve had. It’s a difficult balance to pick a place that sounds promising but which still remains a bit mysterious. Today with instagram, you sometimes feel like you’ve been there already, and it’s nice when you’re on your couch but a bit disheartening when you’re planning a trip. I sometimes also like to pick a rather touristic place and go there to see if it could be done off the beaten track, or photographed differently, like when we went to Rome, or to see the Giza pyramids. Besides that, I find that doing a lot of research is key if you want the trip to be both relaxing and interesting. It takes a lot of time and might ruin the surprise a little bit, but unless you’re traveling for a month, I find it too frustrating to “fail” a destination because you were too lazy to check opening hours and interesting spots. It’s a complicated task though, because you have to find recommendations from people whose sensibility is close to yours. It’s easy enough to find adresses of shops and restaurants, but when it comes to knowing that little neighborhood with a fantastic atmosphere, or that incredible building from the 70’s, or that little-known museum, then it gets complicated. For me travelling isn’t necessary about “consuming” or doing “breathtaking” things, it’s about finding inspiration. I’m doing The Voyageur to make it easier for others! -- Do you practice any special self-care routines while traveling, especially when it comes to jet lag? Sadly I’m not immune to jet-lag, on the contrary I find it totally messes up my digestion (in addition to my sleep). Jet-lag or not, I found that the best way to feel good abroad was to cook for myself as much as I can. To me it’s a win-win, it’s cheaper, I feel better and lighter, and I get to shop groceries and cook in a totally different setting. It has become an important part of our travels, one that I enjoy very much. I pack a whole battery of pantry essentials and then I buy fresh produce when I’m the ground. Every destination has its on treasures, things you’ll probably have a hard time finding back home, and it’s not necessary what you would get in restaurants : mountains of berries in Finland, cheap zucchini flowers in Venice, sour cream in St Petersburg or sweet muffin bread from the Azores islands. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I tend to believe I allow more time for packing than most people (I’m puzzled when I hear someone telling me they just throw random stuff in a suitcase an hour before their flight). I like to really think through what clothes I’m bringing, so it will fit the atmosphere of the destination, but also obviously local constraints and the kind of adventure I’m embarking on. I don’t really believe in a standardized list, I’m actually rather depressed by this packing advice of people bringing the same standard black and white things everywhere. I’m more about having the right equipment for each situation, it might be a stylish rain cloak if you go to Yakushima island, a fan for Egypt or a scarf in Andalucia that echoes the local ceramic patterns. It’s about those items that will be useful but will also make you happy. I find that objects can take on a new life when you bring them somewhere far-flung, they become the green dress you couldn’t stop wearing in Kerala or the perfumed oil you wore in Brazil. It builds new connections, it’s somewhere between a science and an art! Whatever the trip, beside the obvious items, you’ll have a good chance of finding in my luggage : – a camera – a Mason Pearson comb and brush – a swimsuit, even when swimming doesn’t sound like an option – A homemade meal for the trip, which makes a world of difference, and was actually initiated by your article on the subject. I recently acquired a wood bento box which makes it even greater! It also means that I have a box at hand if we’re having picnics during the rest of our stay. – If I know I’m going cook, I’m bringing a few ingredients, but most certainly there will be olive oil, a box of pasta and a chunk of Parmesan, which sounds pretty weird. It’s kind of a survival kit, when I have that, I know that we’re only a couple of tomatoes away from a comforting meal. Also, I’ve been to countries where finding all three ingredients would prove quite challenging, and expensive, which makes you cherish them even more. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Pretty much what I do to keep stress at bay, but if we’re taking things to another level of indulgence, I’d say anything water-related : a Japanese onsen bath, hammam, a swim in the sea or even just a plunge in the pool. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Way of the World by Nicolas Bouvier, and, any of his books really. He’s a Swiss writer and traveler who documented his journeys with a lot of wisdom and poetry. Song/­­Album – Nina Simone and Piano, even though it might be more soul-wrenching than soul-feeding. Movie – The Vertical Ray of the Sun by Tran Anh Hung, makes me want to book a ticket to south-east Asia right away. Piece of Art – Crépuscule by Felix Vallotton, strangely the landscape in the painting appeared to me on a stormy evening on Yakushima island in Japan… -- What are some of your favorite places to eat in Paris? Mokonuts, 5 rue st bernard, 75011 Paris A Japanese and a Lebanese in a tiny kitchen. I’m in love with their olive and white chocolate cookie and their carrot soup. They’re only open for lunch and you have to book ahead. Café Ineko, 3 Rue des Gravilliers, 75003 Paris Freshly opened vegetarian restaurant. Sincere and flavourful, my favorite of late. Their breakfast sounds fabulous and I’m planning to go very soon! Rice and Fish, 16 Rue Greneta, 75002 Paris Delicious fusion-style makis in a super relaxed atmosphere. Come early to get a seat. Pizzeria Dei Cioppi, 44 Rue Trousseau, 75011 Paris It’s easier than ever to find good pizza in Paris, but we’re faithful to this tiny one. Light, sophisticated pizzas in a quiet street with good music, what else? Osteria Ferrara, 7 Rue du Dahomey, 75011 Paris A slightly high-end italian restaurant with to-die-for risotto. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Tina of tforia.com, I love her very low-profile and delicate approach. All photos are from Pauline’s travels (and kitchen), courtesy of Pauline Chardin. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spanish Bell Pepper Sauté

June 2 2017 VegKitchen 

Spanish Bell Pepper Sauté Summer is the perfect time to make the luscious Spanish bell pepper sauté, also known as piperade. When peppers of all colors are abundant and relatively inexpensive, this is a great side dish on its own, or it can be used to top pasta or open-faced sandwiches. Switching cuisines, you can also use leftovers to […] The post Spanish Bell Pepper Sauté appeared first on VegKitchen.

Rice is Nice, for so Many Reasons

April 8 2019 Meatless Monday 

Rice is Nice, for so Many ReasonsWe all love rice, and there are good reasons why! This naturally gluten-free grain is inexpensive, wildly versatile and can contribute to a nutrient-rich, meatless meal. When rice is paired with beans, for example, the dish becomes a complete protein . Pairing complementary foods, like rice and beans, is a great way to meet your plant-based nutritional needs (and, of course, satisfy your taste buds). This Monday, try a meatless meal with rice, whether you choose brown, white, long grain, medium grain, short grain, sushi rice, sweet rice, Arborio, Jasmine or Basmati. A little-known rice fact? About 85% of all rice consumed in the U.S. is grown on American farmland, according to our friends at USA Rice . For you trivia folks out there: Arkansas is the no. 1 rice producing state, followed by California. Buying U.S.-grown rice supports American farmers, which is always a good thing! Black Sesame Coconut Rice Pudding with Matcha Cream Were featuring something sweet for this weeks Meatless Monday recipe. This Black Sesame Coconut Rice Pudding with Matcha Cream uses U.S.-grown black japonica rice, which becomes almost chewy in this Japanese-inspired dessert pudding. Thanks to the FeedFeed and Phoebe Lapine of Feed Me Phoebe for sharing! More Recipes with Rice Rice is truly a jack-of-all-trades. Whether you want something sweet or something savory for breakfast, lunch or dinner this ingredient is an overachiever. Check out some other fantastic recipes from Think Rice below for some Meatless Monday inspiration. Banana Sticky Rice Spicy Vegan Burrito Bowls Japonica Rice Salad   Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya   Have a favorite meatless recipe that uses rice? Tell us about it by leaving a comment on our Facebook  page or post it using #MeatlessMonday. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration, be sure to check out our recipe gallery . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Rice is Nice, for so Many Reasons appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Recipe | Chewy Chocolate Strawberry Cookies

December 31 2018 Oh My Veggies 

Does your grocery store put out samples? The ones I go to do and, really, it’s pretty ingenious on their part because I always end up buying things I wouldn’t have otherwise. I am just that impressionable. And this is how I ended up getting dried strawberries. I tried them and they were so yummy and chewy and strawberry-y that I had to get them. Even though they were $7 and look like rabbit poop. I usually don’t buy a lot of dried fruit because, although it’s healthy, it’s pretty dense when it comes to calories. A serving size is usually a quarter cup, which is meager. Meager! So what do I do with dried fruit? I bake with it. I really wouldn’t have bought these super expensive rabbit-poop looking dried strawberries if I hadn’t had the idea to use them in cookies. And not just any cookies–chewy chocolate strawberry cookies! (Yes, if you read my blog regularly, you might recognize most of this recipe from my Chewy Chocolate Candy Cane Cookies–hush! It’s not plagiarism if you’re stealing from yourself!) With the chocolate chips and strawberries, these are kind of reminiscent of chocolate covered strawberries. If you can’t find chewy […]

Leftover Cranberry Sauce Bread

November 30 2018 Oh My Veggies 

Back in the day, when I was all anti-establishment and down with the man, I would have never found myself partaking in Black Friday madness. But this year, I’m counting down the days to Black Friday because we need a new couch. Couches are expensive! Sales on couches are good! Do you know what four cats can do to a cheap couch in three years? Terrible things. Oh, the horror. (Cats: This is why we can’t have nice things.) So yes, I’m doing the Black Friday thing this year. 20-year-old me would want to kick 32-year-old me in the shin. One thing I won’t be doing the day after Thanksgiving is eating leftovers because, since it’s just the two of us for Thanksgiving this year, I decided not to make a big dinner. Sad, right?! Now that we live several states away, it seems silly to go home for Thanksgiving and then go back a month later for Christmas, so we’re opting for Christmas this year. But if you do happen to have Thanksgiving dinner leftovers, save some cranberry sauce to make this Leftover Cranberry Sauce Bread. Yes! You put the sauce in the bread! It has to be the […]

Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt

October 24 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt This is a recipe that we’ve been excited to share for a while! The number of plant-based yogurt options has been growing like crazy on health food store shelves, which is amazing, and I always love seeing how companies innovate in this field. Still, I rarely buy yogurt. There are a few things that I find less than ideal about it: the single-use (mostly plastic) packaging, the presence of weird ingredients or additives (gums, etc.), and/­­or the price, which can often be quite steep. Knowing that I can easily make really good vegan yogurt at home is another huge reason. This recipe takes care of a few common problems that I’ve personally noticed when it comes to homemade, plant-based yogurt making: it’s not at all finicky (unlike coconut yogurt), and it’s not overly bland (looking at you, 100% cashew yogurt). Coconut yogurt is notoriously tricky to make at home. The ingredients couldn’t be simpler (just coconut milk + probiotic), but achieving the right texture is not easy. It’s common for coconut yogurt to refuse to thicken and remain the texture of milk, albeit a probiotic one. This is when you start getting into the nuances of which brand coconut milk works and which doesn’t, and what probiotic capsules to use. Not very universal. There are some incredible coconut yogurt brands out on the market (like Anita’s and Coconut Cult), but they are very expensive, hard to find, and honestly so incredibly rich that I can only handle one spoonful at a time. On the other hand, perfectly creamy cashew yogurt is very easy to make at home, but I find it to be pretty bland. It can also end up being fairly pricey to put together, since you are only using cashews, water, and probiotic, and you need quite a bit of cashews to bulk it up. Enter this cashew-oat yogurt recipe! It’s foolproof in my experience, always comes out luxuriously creamy, and has an interesting yogurt-y savoriness from the addition of oats. You don’t have to use as many cashews, which cuts down on price, and it seems to work with many probiotic brands. Here are a few more things to expect from this yogurt: - This yogurt does not taste like dairy yogurt, but it does have a satisfyingly creamy, fatty body, which goes well with fresh fruit, much like regular yogurt. - The texture of this yogurt is unique. It’s not fluffy like well-made coconut yogurt and not pudding-like, like store-bought yogurt that contains gums. It’s thick but pourable. - The flavor is unique, too. The cashews contribute fattiness and richness. The oats, once fermented with a probiotic, acquire a pleasantly sour, almost cheesy/­­yogurt-y type of flavor that I personally find delicious. We hope you’ll give it a try :) Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 cup raw cashews or cashew pieces - soaked in purified water for 4 hours or overnight ⅓ cup gluten-free, old-fashioned rolled oats - soaked in ½ cup purified water overnight ¾ cup purified water 2 probiotic capsules (I use this one) Instructions Drain and rinse the cashews. Combine them with the soaked oats (the oats should absorb the water by now, so no need to drain) and water in an upright, high-speed blender and blend until smooth. Pour into a glass container, leaving some room at the top for the yogurt to expand. Open the probiotic capsules and pour the powder into the yogurt mixture. Stir with a wooden (or any non-metal) spoon to incorporate thoroughly. Cover the container with a piece of cheesecloth or breathable fabric, fixing it in place with a rubber band (or I use my nut milk bags here) and let culture in a dark place (no direct sunlight), at room temperature for 24 hours. Taste the yogurt. If it tastes good and yogurt-like enough to you, its ready. If not, leave it to culture more, for up to 48 hours total. The timing will depend on the temperature in your house and the probiotic you use. Once ready, keep refrigerated in an air-tight container. Notes When you are ready to make the next batch of this yogurt, you can save a few tablespoons of yogurt and use it as a starter for your new batch. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Banana Toffee Tart Cauliflower Pesto Pasta Yellow Split Pea Chowder from Power Plates Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Easy Homemade Cashew-Oat Yogurt appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Authentic Gaspacho Soup

September 22 2018 VegKitchen 

Authentic Gaspacho Soup An authentic gazpacho, prepared according to the Spanish method--perfect on hot summer days! This typical dish is nothing less than a cold soup made from tomatoes and peppers. It is spicy and seasoned with sea salt. Its a simple recipe, refreshing, nutritious and not expensive to make. The recipe is basic and open to any addition or removal of ingredients according to your preferences. Prep Time: 20 minutes Servings: 8 Ingredients cold water as needed 50 ml of extra virgin olive oil 25 ml of red wine vinegar salt to taste 1 kg of tomatoes 1 garlic clove, peeled 1 onion, chopped, 2 cucumbers in sections, 2 chopped green peppers, Preparation Dip the tomatoes in a pot of boiling water for 30 seconds. Remove and steep into a bowl of ice water to stop cooking. Let stand for a minute, then peel the tomatoes. Remove the hard part of the core. In the blender bowl, combine tomatoes, chopped onion, chopped cucumber, chopped pepper, clove garlic, olive oil, red wine vinegar, and a little salt; reserve a little of the chopped cucumber, chopped pepper and chopped onion for presentation. Reduce to a smooth puree. Use the amount of water needed to […] The post Authentic Gaspacho Soup appeared first on VegKitchen.

Sweet Potato Sandwiches

February 9 2018 My New Roots 

Sweet Potato Sandwiches Necessity is the mother of invention, and when youre missing all of your kitchen equipment, you get creative. Weve been living out of a single suitcase for some months now, and although I have found a couple of major necessities in the mountain of unpacked moving boxes, I havent been able to locate my silicon loaf pan. As someone who makes the Life Changing Loaf of Bread on the reg, its been a challenge living without, but a stellar opportunity to come up with bread alternatives that dont involve a lot of ingredients or special equipment. As I was chopping up some sweet potato for a soup a couple of weeks ago, it dawned on me: what if I cut the sweet potato the other way and turned it into a slice of bread?! It was just crazy enough to work. And it did. Ever since then, Ive been roasting sweet potato slices once a week, keeping them in my fridge and having a sandwich-like-thing when the mood strikes. Its delicious! Not to mention wildly satisfying and so easy to make. Ive experimented with different herbs and spices on the sweet potatoes, using special salts, and even drizzling with flavoured oils once theyre out of the oven. So far, Im digging smoked salt and garlic powder, but the cinnamon, ginger, and cardamom combo was a close second at breakfast, smeared with chunky hazelnut butter.    The spread Ive come up with as a pairing to this sandwich sitch, is a horseradish and beetroot schmear. Partly because I like saying the word schmear, but mostly because its incredible in combination with the sweet potatoes. Its earthy, spicy, and complex - a great counterpoint to the sweetness of the spuds. I also like the texture difference: the sweet potatoes are so smooth and creamy, while the beet schmear is chunky and toothsome. If youve never had fresh horseradish before, be prepared to be blown away! This stuff is so, so special and delicious, I have no idea why its such an under-utilized root veggie. A part of the Brassicaceae family, horseradish shares ties with mustard, broccoli, cabbage, and wasabi. In fact, most commercially-available wasabi is made of horseradish (along with mustard, starch, and green food dye) since wasabi is challenging to grow and therefore much more expensive. But that familiar and addictive rush of sinus-clearing pleasure-pain? Thats the action of isothiocyanate, the compound found in wasabi, horseradish, and strong mustard that gives off heat when crushed, grated, or chewed. This stuff tends to mellow out once it hits the air, which is why horseradish snobs (they exist!) insist on grating it fresh. In the case of my schmear here, it will still taste delish a day or two after youve made it, but you may want to grate a little fresh over the top for a boost. Its the best way to clear out those nasal cavities this side of a neti pot! Horseradish has been used as powerful winter medicine for hundreds of years. Widely recognized for its expectorant capabilities, it is incredibly effective at removing mucus, and aiding with bronchial and lung disorders. Horseradish is a good source of vitamin C and zinc, two key players in immune system support, so consuming it in the colder months will help ward off the seasonal bugs flying around. For sore throats and coughs, combine one tablespoon of freshly grated horseradish with one teaspoon of raw honey, and one teaspoon of ground clove to some warm water. Sip the brew slowly, or use it as a gargle. This is more of a concept than a recipe, and a chance to try out sweet potatoes in a new way. Cut them as thick or as thin as you like. Mine are around 1cm, but that is just my personal preference. Remember that the slices will definitely shrink a bit during cooking, so slice them a tad thicker than you would want the finished roasted slice to be. You can even make shapes with a cookie cutter – great for kids lunches! Let your imagine run with this one, and keep me posted on which spreads and seasonings youre vibing on.     Print recipe     Sweet Potato Sandwiches Makes 6-8 sandwiches 2-3 fat, stubby sweet potatoes (organic if possible) coconut oil for rubbing (optional) salt and pepper + other spices or herbs 1 batch Horseradish Beet Schmear (recipe below) sliced fresh veggies: bell peppers, cucumber, avocado, sprouts, grated carrot etc. Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 375°F /­­ 190°C. 2. Wash and scrub sweet potatoes well, then slice lengthwise into 1 cm-thick slabs (approximately .4 inches). Place on a baking sheet and rub with coconut oil if using, and sprinkle with salt and pepper, plus any other spices or herbs youd like. 3. Place in the oven and bake until tender, about 20-25 minutes. Remove from oven and use immediately or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days. 4. To assemble, spread one slice of sweet potato with the Horseradish Beet Schmear. Top with your favourite sliced veggies, sprouts, salt and pepper and another slice of sweet potato. You can also add mustard, vegan mayo, or any other condiment that you like. Enjoy! Horseradish Beet Schmear Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g beets (about 4-5 small) coconut oil for rubbing 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. freshly grated horseradish, or more to taste 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt, to taste 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Rub beets with a little coconut oil, set on a baking try, and place in the oven. Roast for 20-30 minutes until you can easily pierce the beets with a sharp knife tip. 2. Remove baking tray and let cool until you can handle them. Slide off the skins, or use a vegetable peeler. Roughly chop the beets and set aside. 3. In a food processor, pulse garlic until minced. Add horseradish, tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper, then blend on high to combine. Add the chopped beets and pulse to chop. Blend as much or as little as you like – I like my spread a bit chunky. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. Some may like more horseradish - go for it! Remember that the bite will mellow out when its mixed with everything in the sandwich. 4. Use immediately, and store any leftovers in a tightly sealed container in the fridge for up to five days. Although the past few months of life limbo have been pretty frustrating, there are so many exciting things on the horizon that I cannot wait to share with you! First, my family and I are getting closer and closer to our new move-in date (you can watch house renovation updates on my Instagram Stories). Second, Im heading to Palm Springs for an EPIC bloggers retreat organized by my friend Sasha Swerdloff at the end of this month. And Im finishing up details on a sweet collaboration with one of my favourite juice bars in Toronto, that we will launch with a free public event! Stay tuned for more details on all the things. Love you guys. Now go have a sandwich, Sarah B   The post Sweet Potato Sandwiches appeared first on My New Roots.

Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat)

November 6 2017 Meatless Monday 

Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat)Mark Bittmans original How to Cook Everything Vegetarian was such a hit the first time around that the award-winning food writer decided it was time for an update. On November 7, Bittman will release a new edition which includes new recipes and information about the benefits of reducing meat consumption. We spoke with Bittman about whats different in How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition and the many reasons why he felt it was time for a do-over. 1. What do you think has changed about plant-based eating since the first edition of your book was published? What compelled you to do a new edition? Everyone wants to eat healthier than they did 10 years ago, and most people know that that means eating less meat. (When I ask audiences whos eating less meat than they were 10 years ago, almost everyone raises their hand.) And there are so many resources available to vegetarians - and more importantly, semi-vegetarians or flexitarians - that it seemed worth an update. Plus, frankly, I was a little disappointed with aspects of my approach in the original, so I got to fix that. 2. Do you think that more people understand the benefits of eating less (or no) meat now? If so, what has contributed to that change? If not, why do you think people are resistant to that change? Most, but not everyone. That goes without saying. (And see above.) Why? Overwhelming evidence that overproduction of meat is harmful to the environment and overconsumption is harmful to individuals. Not to mention producing animals as if they were widgets. http:/­­/­­www.meatlessmonday.com/­­images/­­photos/­­2017/­­11/­­59d5122651a0c_­Smart_­Bites-_­How_­Meatless_­Monday_­Improves_­YOUR_­Health_­and_­the_­Health_­of-the_­Planet.mp4 Courtesy of HealthGuru.com 3. Do you believe its easier to cook vegetarian? Anyone who only cooks animal products is missing out on a universe of flavors and textures that cant be found elsewhere. Foods from the plant kingdom are generally easy to cook, but theyre also healthy, theyre inexpensive, they can be cooked in bulk, and they last for a long time. Thats not about cooking vegetarian - its about cooking. Period. 4. It says on your site that your mission is to make food understandable. What are people not understanding about food and how do you like to explain it to them? The sheer amount of information out there--much of which is misinformation--is overwhelming, to say the least. Im constantly reminding people that food can be delicious without being complicated; you can make something great with three ingredients. Once theyre on board with that mindset, its a good idea to get comfortable with substitutions and winging it. The goal of the recipe variations in the How to Cook Everything books is to get people to understand that they dont have to follow a recipe word for word. In fact, its better if they dont because whatever variation they use, whether its one of mine or something they come up with, will be tailored to their particular tastes. 5. Some people arent quite ready to change their entire diet or give up meat completely. What are some recipes that work for quick, weeknight Meatless Monday dinner? Heres the first line of HTCEV: Im not a vegetarian, nor am I invested in you becoming one. Many foods are naturally meat-free, and the point is that we need to be eating more of those than we do now. That doesnt mean not eating animal products - it means changing the focus. There are no sacrifices here. Consider recipes like Cream of Spinach Soup, Cauliflower Salad with Olives and Bread Crumbs, the infinite ways to make Beans and Greens (black beans with kale, cannellini with escarole, lentils with fennel, etc.), and the zillions of non-meat pasta dishes, like Pasta with Walnut Sauce and Pasta with Caramelized Onions. How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition is available on Amazon beginning November 7. The post Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat) appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Cream of Asparagus Soup

September 20 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Cream of Asparagus Soup This gorgeous vegan cream of asparagus soup is a nice introduction to meals as a first course, since it’s nice and light. It used to be that asparagus was primarily available in spring (and that’s still when it’s best and less expensive), but now that it’s become more year-round, you can enjoy this soup nearly […] The post Vegan Cream of Asparagus Soup appeared first on VegKitchen.

6 Unique Kitchen Gadgets for Easy Summer Produce Prep

July 18 2017 VegKitchen 

6 Unique Kitchen Gadgets for Easy Summer Produce Prep Summer is the time to enjoy lots of fresh produce and herbs straight from the garden or farm market. Here are a few unique kitchen gadgets -- tools that are inexpensive, compact, and will help ensure that you use up and enjoy your market finds to the fullest! 6 Cool Kitchen Gadgets Cherry Pitter Midsummer […] The post 6 Unique Kitchen Gadgets for Easy Summer Produce Prep appeared first on VegKitchen.

Spicy Homemade Vegan Sausage

July 13 2017 VegKitchen 

Spicy Homemade Vegan Sausage Everyone who tries this homemade vegan sausage recipe prefer these links to commercial brands--and they’re a lot less expensive, too. Preparing the mixture in the food processor and baking the sausages in the oven are both time-savers. Once baked, they’re ready to brown up in a skillet to enjoy as is or in other recipes. Recipe from […] The post Spicy Homemade Vegan Sausage appeared first on VegKitchen.

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London

June 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London We love yogurt in our family*. The unsweetened, thick, creamy and tangy kind. We enjoy yogurt for breakfast (with fruit) and sometimes dessert (with dates + chocolate + nuts). We top our soups with yogurt, we add it to smoothies and ice pops and we also dress our salads with it (Isac likes to dress himself with it as well). Yogurt works remarkably well both with sweet and savory flavors. And yet, the thought of making a yogurt bowl with savory toppings instead of sweet, had never struck us before. But as we were playing around with this crunchy cucumber and melon salad with spiced chickpeas, we (and with we, I humbly mean ME, MYSELF and I - as in, not David) had the simple idea to put them on a bed of yogurt instead of doing the usual yogurt dressing. In theory, it’s more or less the same thing but in reality it’s so much better. The warm, rich and spicy chickpeas on a bed of cold, thick and tangy yogurt, with the addition of a fresh salad with lots of crunch. It’s simple but yet so very good. And quick too. I’m sure there are plenty of savory yogurt bowls all over internet, but now they are also in our kitchen. *David and Isac are actually intolerant to dairy but yogurt is their weak spot. We buy oat yogurt for them but David often chooses a day of stomach ache just to enjoy a bowl of plain yogurt. And Isac has literally been caught with his hand in the yogurt jar more than once. Coconut yogurt has a fantastic taste and consistency but is simply too expensive to enjoy more than as an occasional treat (very keen on giving Ashley’s versions a try though!). Hey hey hey, wait a sec. This is David acting as proofreader today and I just noted Luise’s attempt at hijacking my idea. This recipe = my idea. Just wanted to make that clear. I’ll give the word back to her now. The salad is super quick as you just need to chop everything up. We found that crunchy vegetables like cucumber, celery, sturdy roman lettuce and radishes work really well here, with the avocado and melon adding softness and sweetness. The yogurt is, well, just yogurt. It needs to be quite thick to hold up the topping - our preference is Greek yogurt but choose whatever you prefer. The only thing that needs a little more preparation and heat are the spiced chickpeas. Even if the ingredient list looks long, it’s simply spices, oil and chickpeas and the result tastes way better than just using plain chickpeas. They have a rich, spicy and slightly nutty flavor which works so well with the freshness from the yogurt and the crunchy and sweet salad. VARIATIONS There are plenty of ways to vary this recipe and we’re going to leave you with a few ideas. - Whisk some creamy goat’s cheese into the yogurt. It will dissolve, become smooth and give the yogurt a more mature flavor. - If you don’t have all the spices at home for the chickpeas, use what you find. A bread spice mix works great along with a little cayenne. A turmeric or curry version would be interesting too. - You can skip the salad and pour the yogurt into small sealable jars with spiced chickpeas on top. Store them in the fridge for a quick snack. - Vegans can of course use a vegan yogurt option or simply settle for the salad with warm chickpeas stirred through. - Roasting the chickpeas in the oven together with eggplant or pumpkin could be amazing on top of the yogurt as well. Let us know if you have any other favorite variations on savory yogurt bowls and we can include them in this list. Savory Yogurt Bowl with Spicy Chickpeas & Cucumber Salad Serves 4, or 2 very hungry persons Cucumber & Melon Salad 1 cucumber 1 small (or 1/­­2 regular) melon (we used Piel de Sapo but honeydew would also work) 1 spring onion 2 celery stalks 10-15 fresh mint leaves 1 avocado 6 radishes 1/­­2 roman lettuce 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil Spiced warm chickpeas 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 1 tbsp sesame seeds 2 tsp fennel seeds  1 tsp coriander seeds 1 tsp cardamom seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika powder 1/­­4 cup – 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed For serving 2 cups plain full-fat Greek yogurt  For the cucumber & melon salad:  Wash all produce. Cut cucumber and melon in large bite-size pieces. Trim and finely slice spring onion, celery and mint leaves. Cut the avocado in half and remove the stone, then cut into cubes. Trim the radishes and thinly slice them. And chop the roman lettuce. Place all prepared ingredients in a mixing bowl, squeeze over lemon juice, drizzle with olive oil and a little salt, give it a good toss and set aside. For the spiced warm chickpeas:  Add all seeds and spices (except for the ground spices) to a dry skillet, heat gently for a couple of minutes while stirring. When the spices starts to pop and smell fragrant, they’re done. Pour into a mortar and give them a few bashes with the pestle (alternatively on a cutting board and use the back of a chef’s knife). Transfer the seeds and spices back to the skillet. Now add oil (start with the lesser amount and add more later on if it looks dry), ground spices  and chickpeas and heat on low temperature for 2-3 minutes. Stir to combine. When the chickpeas are warm and covered in spices and seeds, remove from the heat. Dollop the yogurt into four bowls. Use the back of a spoon to smooth it out. Arrange the salad on one side of the yogurt and the spiced warm chickpea on the other side. Drizzle a little extra oil on top. Enjoy immediately while the chickpeas are still warm. ********* LONDON + BATH In all my excitement over a simple bowl of yogurt, I almost forgot to mention that we are coming to London and Bath next week for a couple of book events. We’re very excited and can’t wait to meet some of you! We’re having a supper club at Grace Belgravia on Monday 5 June, 7-10 pm. More info here. We’ll do talk and Q&A at Whole Foods Market in Kensington on Wednesday 7 June, 6.30 pm. More info and tickets here. We’ll also do a talk and cooking demo at Topping & Company Booksellers in Bath on Friday 9 June, 7.30 pm. More info and tickets here. Finally, we’re having a hands on cooking class at Bertinet Kitchen in Bath on Saturday 10 June, 10 am. Tickets here (only one left). Big love!


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