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10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet

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10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet

November 19 2020 Vegetarian Times 

With the new year just weeks away, the media is honing in on the top nutrition trends we can expect to see in 2021, and to no surprise increasing plant-protein remains at the top. Whether youre eating more plant-based for sustainability, health, or just because, rest assured there are a variety of whole food options you can choose from to meet your protein needs. But, before you head straight into the freezer department at your local grocer to pick up the latest faux meat product, lets take a look at 10 whole food sources of plant-based protein you may just want to toss into your cart instead! Reader beware, you may end up saving a few bucks once you realize how convenient and affordable many of these options are. Lentils Just one cup of cooked lentils provides nearly 18 grams of plant-protein and 16 grams of fiber for just 225 calories. Lentils also contain many important nutrients, like iron, potassium, zinc and choline (a nutrient that 90% of Americans arent getting enough of!) Plus, theyre budget-friendly with a 16-ounce bag of dried lentils coming in at just $2.99.  Registered Dietitian Kim Rose of www.kimrosedietitian.com recommends making a pot of seasoned lentils on the weekends. Divide them into individual 1 cup servings, and then add them to different meals throughout the week!  Youll find me turning lentils into meatballs, or for a really quick fix, adding a little bar-b-que sauce to them to make tasty, vegan sloppy joes. Hummus This plant-based spread can be made from a variety of beans and legumes, not just the traditional garbanzo bean you may think! Depending on the bean used, the protein content will vary slightly, but a standard 1/­­4 cup serving (or about 70 grams by weight) has roughly 6 grams of protein for just 180 calories. Plus, it often packs heart-healthy unsaturated fatty acids that help keep you fuller for longer too! Brynn McDowell, Registered Dietitian and cookbook author of The Mediterranean Diet Made Easy recommends using hummus in place of mayo on sandwiches or spreading it on bagels or toast! She suggests thinning it out and using it as a creamy salad dressing to add more plant-based protein to meals. Pistachios Pistachios are a good source of plant-based protein with a 1-ounce serving of the nut (shelled) providing 6 grams of it! Plus, they pack dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants that help keep your body in tip-top shape. While the shelled variety tends to be a tad pricier, you can still pick up a 10-ounce in-shell bag for about $5.49 at most markets. Lauren Manaker, Registered Dietitian, and author of Fueling Male Fertility, recommends to use shelled pistachios as a salad topped in place of grilled chicken or shrimp. The plant-based protein boost that also gives you fiber and healthy fats for staying power. You can also toss pistachios in trail mixes and in oatmeal as a topping for added nutrition and crunch! Related: Healthy Late-Night Snacks Chickpeas One of the most common forms of plant-based protein on the market is the good ole chickpea (aka, the garbanzo bean!) With nearly 7.5 grams of protein, 6.5 grams of fiber, and 3.7 mg of iron in just 1/­­2 cup serving of cooked chickpeas, its a great way to increase the total nutrient density of your diet. The best part: a pound of chickpeas (dried) often comes in at less than $3.00! NYC-based Registered Dietitian, Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD, is a big fan of adding chickpeas to both meals and snacks! From grain bowls to veggie burgers, or roasted as a protein-filled snack, chickpeas offer a convenient and affordable plant-based protein to nearly every diet. Edamame (Soybeans) Edamame is the immature form of the soybean that is often eaten from the shell (or shelled) alongside traditional Asian dishes. Regardless of the form of soybean you eat, they can easily be incorporated into a balanced diet with two servings being a reasonable goal for adults. A half-cup of shelled edamame packs nearly 9.5 grams of plant-based protein and 4 grams of fiber, as well as iron, potassium, folate, and choline! Sarah Koszyk, Sports Nutritionist and author of 25 Anti-Aging Smoothies for Revitalizing, Glowing Skin, recommends pureeing edamame in a hummus, dip, or pesto. Spread the edamame purees on a sandwich or wrap, add it to a burrito, or toss it with a salad, pasta, or rice dish. If youre looking to venture into the other forms of soybeans (like tofu), Registered Dietitian Sylvia Klinger of Hispanic Food Communications suggests blending silken tofu with oil, spices and herbs makes for a delicious high protein dressing, or adding a soy-based curd to pancakes to boost the protein there as well! Tempeh Tempeh is a fermented product made from soybeans in addition to some whole grains, seasonings and other flavorings. A 4-ounce serving of this soy-based protein packs nearly 20 grams of protein, in addition to a host of nutrition benefits. For starters, tempeh is filled with nutrients like manganese, magnesium, phosphorus and B vitamins in addition to its role as a probiotic. Jenna Braddock, Florida based at MakeHealthyEasy.com recommends spending a little bit of time prepping it to make the perfect dish! Braddock suggests crumbling the tempeh, then marinating it and finishing with a sear in a hot pan to add instant protein to salads, wraps, bowls and tacos. Pill Nuts Pronounced peel-y, this nut is native to the pili tree often found in Northern Australia and the Philippines. While lower in protein comparatively speaking per serving size (a 1/­­4 cup serving provides 3 grams in comparison to some of the other nuts), it packs a nutritional punch in that it contains essential amino acids the human body needs. This nut is harder to find at local markets, and you will need to likely shop online and be willing to spend about $16.99 for a one-pound bag. Maya Feller, nationally recognized nutrition expert and author of The Southern Comfort Food Diabetes Cookbook, recommends enjoying this mildly flavored nut in yogurt form (yes, brands are now popping up incorporating this nut into their yogurts!) smothered over a stack of pancakes or in their raw form as a crunchy snack. Hemp Seeds Three tablespoons of hulled hemp seeds provide nearly 10 grams of plant-based protein to your meal for just 170 calories. Plus, theyre full of iron and unsaturated fats while offering a great nut-free alternative for crunch. While a bit more pricey than other seeds (a 12-ounce bag is roughly $12.99), theyre an easy addition to boost plant-protein on simple foods. Plant-based sports dietitian, Kelly Jones of kellyjonesnutrition.com recommends adding them to oatmeal, sprinkling them onto pancakes, using as a topper for soups and salads, and incorporating into homemade energy bites! Lupini Beans Lupini beans are a staple of the Mediterranean diet and making a name for themselves in the US due to their high protein content. In just a 1/­­2 cup cooked serving of the bean it packs nearly 13 grams of plant-based protein. But, where it packs in protein it lacks in fiber, with that same 1/­­2 cup serving providing only 2 grams. Found traditionally in the jarred food section of the market, there are a few ways you can cook with them! Amy Gorin, a plant-based registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats recommends draining and rinsing the beans as you would do with any other canned beans. Then, use them in your favorite dishes, like her delicious plant-based lupini salad! Quinoa One of the only whole grains that is a complete source of protein (containing all 9 essential amino acids), this is an excellent (and affordable) gluten-free, plant-based protein addition to nearly any diet! One cup of cooked quinoa contains nearly 8 grams of protein for just 220 calories (plus nearly 5 grams of fiber.) Quinoa also contains many important B vitamins as well as potassium and antioxidants. Registered Dietitian Tamara Hoffman of Unbeetable Nutrition and Wellness recommends adding quinoa to your taco Tuesday menus with a spicy Mexican seasoning or sauteing it into your stir-fry dishes with a soy sauce. The post 10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

The Sticky Debate About Honey

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

If theres one hot-button issue among vegans, its honey. While some vegans will eat it and use it, others wont, which can cause some heated debates among this group. So why not just get right to the point: Is honey vegan? The basic buzz on honey Honey bees collect nectar from flowering plants, which they regurgitate into honeycomb cells. With a little fanning from their wings to remove excess moisture, the end result is honey. The amazing fact? Making one pound of honey requires 556 worker bees, and the average worker bee will only make one-twelfth of a teaspoon of honey in its lifetime, according to the Ontario Beekeepers Association. Because honey is so high in sugar, it then becomes an energy source for the bees, helping fuel the roughly 12,000 beats their wings take every minute. Of course, bees have been making honey ever since their existence, and its said theyve been around for about 30 million years. How long humans have been eating honey isnt entirely clear, but honey has certainly found its way into the human food system, showing up on breakfast tables, getting baked into breads and muffins, and being mixed into granolas. Honeys also a popular medicinal cure. The case against honey being vegan The first argument against honey not being vegan (though it certainly is vegetarian) is the obvious one: Honey comes from an animal, and vegans eschew any animal-based products. Animals arent ours to use, steal from or manipulate as we see fit, says Amber Canavan, senior campaigner and spokesperson for PETA in Portland, Ore. And while you might not equate bees with farmed animals like chickens, pigs and cows, there is cruelty in the raising of bees. Theyre killed and harmed in the process, Canavan says. She points to commercially bred honey bees who are kept crammed in file-cabinet type hives. When hives are ready for harvesting, its nearly impossible to open the hive and get honey out without crushing numerous bees who are trying to protect the hive, she adds. Now move to queen bees, who are often treated like female cows in the dairy industry, being artificially inseminated by force, Canavan says. Beekeepers might even clip the wings of queen bees so they cant escape and move the hive. And speaking of moving, bees are often trucked around the country, especially in the commercial industry, to pollinate plants in a given destination. Because honey bees arent native to this country, moving them around like this could introduce issues for local pollinators, she adds. Related: How to Choose Sugar Substitutes Finally, taking honey from the bees may threaten the bees health, according to The Vegan Society. Not only is their honey supply then decreased, many commercial beekeepers will take the honey off and feed them high-fructose corn syrup, which isnt good for their health, says Paul Cronshaw, co-founder and director of operations for the Santa Barbara Beekeepers Association in California, vegan and hive keeper whose hives are cruelty- and chemical-free. Putting honey on the table In spite of the above arguments, there are vegans who do consume and use honey, Cronshaw being one of them. My philosophy is that the bees are using honey as a survival food in a house that Im providing, and I take only a minimal amount for rent, he says, adding that this was the first year hes taken from them in years because of the now-ended drought in California. As a result, the bees produced more honey this year and were able to pay more rent. Whats his rationale for using honey? I use honey for medicine and other reasons, he says. Those reasons include helping with sore throat, improving oral health, and aiding with wound healing. Case in point: He was bitten on the hand by a dog recently and used Manuka honey to heal while honey helped him survive a foot injury on a nine-day backpacking trip in the Sierras a few years ago. And while nobodys advocating supporting commercial beekeepers, supporting local ones can help the bee population survive. Numerous studies, after all, point to the collapse of bees who help pollinate numerous food crops. Although honey bees arent in danger of extinction, they are in decline, albeit a big slower because humans are their shepherds or keepers, he adds. If you do decide to use honey, Cronshaw recommends connecting with local beekeepers to find out how they practice beekeeping. Most local beekeepers arent trucking their hives around the country, arent using harmful fillers after taking the bees honey and are working hard not to kill bees. You can raise bees without killing them, he says. The good news is that you dont have to eat or use honey if you dont want to. There are so many alternatives on the market now, Canavan says. Not only can you choose from things like maple syrup, stevia, blackstrap molasses and agave syrup, theres even vegan honey. You can also help local pollinators by planting plants they like and creating a pollinator-friendly yard.   The post The Sticky Debate About Honey appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Coconut Date Caramel Snack Bars

September 28 2020 Vegan Richa 

Coconut Date Caramel Snack BarsThese easy no-bake vegan coconut date caramel snack bars are made with 8 simple ingredients and make for an amazingly delicious energy bar or on-the-go snack! Refined sugar-free, no added oil and grain-free option included. Jump to Recipe These Vegan Coconut Date Caramel Snack Bars are a wonderful thing. For anyone who hasnt discovered the beauty of date caramel before, its just softened dates, pureed a little liquid like a splash of non-dairy milk and a bit of fat (in this case, I used almond butter). The rich, molasses-like notes of the blended dates is just so similar to cooked caramel, but way easier to achieve. I mean, blending dates is quite a bit easier than making caramel from scratch. For this recipe, we use exactly that glorious combination of dates and almond butter to lend a gorgeous caramel note to these vegan date snack bars – no burnt pans, no endlessly waiting for sugar to melt.  There is still a tiny bit of stove-time involved as these vegan date caramel snack bars also involve toasting some shredded coconut. You will love the round nutty flavor the toasted coconut shreds add to these bars. Oats add a nice chew and make these more filling. These taste like a healthier samoa cookies! They can be made grainfree and Nutfree. Continue reading: Coconut Date Caramel Snack BarsThe post Coconut Date Caramel Snack Bars appeared first on Vegan Richa.

12 Road Trip-Worthy Snacks

September 25 2020 Vegetarian Times 

If the walls of your home feel like theyre closing in, youre not alone. Two-thirds of Americans (67%) say that staying home due to the COVID-19 pandemic has made them want to take a vacation, according to a survey conducted by Harris Poll on behalf of Shell.  But with so many travel restrictions and concerns about health safety while flying, its no wonder that many people trying to scratch their travel itch are turning to good, old fashioned road trips -- 36% of Americans say that they are more likely to take a road trip now than they were prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and 61% of Americans are now more interested in taking a local road trip to explore areas close to home.  Before you hit the open road, theres plenty to do: packing, creating a playlist that captures the vibe of your destination, planning your itinerary and, of course, stocking up on car-friendly snacks. While vacation may seem like the perfect excuse to indulge in junk food, those snacks could leave you feeling lethargic and bloated during a time when youd much rather feel energetic and carefree.  Thankfully, theres no shortage of vegan-friendly snacks that are mess-free, nutritious, and tasty. Weve rounded up some of our favorites: Quinn Grain-Free Pretzel Chips Nothing beats the crunch of a pretzel -- and everyone living a gluten-free lifestyle knows that grain-free pretzel replacements typically leave a lot to be desired. Not the case with Quinn Grain-Free Pretzel Chips; youd never know it was grain-free thanks to its near-identical texture (they are made from cassava flour, a gluten-free root vegetable) and spot-on flavoring (shout out to the Cracked Black Pepper variety!). Theyre non-GMO, gluten-free, vegan, dairy-free, and the shape makes them perfect for dipping into your favorite condiment (but maybe not in the car, okay?). Shop now Pans Mushroom Jerky Beef jerky is a classic road-trip snack -- but who needs the beef? Pans mushroom jerky is made from shitake mushrooms, which is one of the meatiest mushrooms. Plus, mushrooms impart that beloved umami flavor everyone craves. These fiber-filled snacks are rich in vitamin D, vegan, gluten-free and theres flavor for any mood youre in: Zesty Thai, Applewood BBQ, Salty & Pepper and Original.  Shop now SkinnyDipped Nuts When you cant decide if you want salty or sweet or chocolate, reach for a bag of SkinnyDipped Super Dark + Sea Salt almonds -- these almonds are dipped with extra dark 73% artisan cacao, and sprinkled with a hint of sea salt. A serving size of these vegan goodies offers 5 grams of plant protein and less sugar than an apple. The whole line is vegetarian, including the SkinnyDipped Cashews in Dark Chocolate Cocoa and Dark Chocolate Salted Caramel. Shop now Undressed Salad Bar Salads arent exactly considered a portable snack, which is why Anne Klassman founded Undressed to throw in her purse or glove compartment -- its a salad in a bar form, with 5-7 grams of protein from its toasted almond base and a full serving of vegetables. Choose from Chipotle Cranberry, Cilantro Lime, Honey Mustard and Sesame Ginger depending on your craving. Theres no sugar added, and these vegan bars are gluten-free, too. Shop now Omnom SuperChocoBerryBarleyNibblyNuttylicious Nope, that wasnt a typo -- when something is this tasty, it deserves a name that stands out from the crowd! Picture a delicious, nutritious dark chocolate bar made from organic Tanzanian cocoa beans thats sprinkled with cranberries, salted almonds, puffed Icelandic barley and cacao nibs. And voila, you have a SuperChocoBerryBarleyNibblyNuttylicious bar. Hot tip: Theres no need to relegate Omnoms superfood creation to your car -- its also a great way to boost your energy on a hike. Shop now Natures Garden Omega-3 Deluxe Mix No road trip is complete without a healthy dose of trail mix, but traditional peanuts and granola dont hold a candle to Natures Gardens Omega-3 Deluxe Mix. This blend of ingredients was thoughtfully chosen for its nutritional qualities: almonds for vitamin E, pecans for fiber, walnuts for omega-3 fatty acids, cranberries for adding more fruit to your day, pistachios for protein and vitamin B6, and pepitas for magnesium and iron. Bonus: The bag is resealable, so you wont have any messy spills in the car. Shop now LesserEvil Veggie Sticks A salad you can eat with your fingers? Its not rude, its LesserEvils new Grain Free Veggie Snacks! The two flavors -- Himalayan Pink Salt and Vegan Ranch -- offer up grain-free goodness made with organic olive oil. Organic veggies are the first ingredient (a blend of vegetable flours and powders), and they are certified USDA organic, vegan, paleo, non-GMO, grain-free, gluten-free and kosher to boot. Pro tip: Your kids will love them and have no idea they are ingesting an extra helping of veggies. Shop now Seven Sundays Muesli While road trips may evoke fond memories of your childhood, the sugar-laden and gluten-packed muesli of your formative years are best left behind. Instead, choose Seven Sundays Muesli, which is chockfull of nutrient-dense superfoods. The Rise & Shine Strawberry Banana Nut Mix -- a cereal/­­trail mix hybrid, so feel free to add almond or oat milk as desired -- has only 5 net carbs, and is grain-free, gluten-free, and keto-friendly. Plus, you can easily pronounce every ingredient: Almonds, coconut, sunflower seeds, dates, Bing cherries, pecans, chia seeds, sesame seeds, bananas, flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, strawberries, cinnamon, and pure vanilla extract.  Shop now Biena Chickpea Snacks Chickpeas to go? Yes please! Bienas Chickpea Snacks are light, crispy roasted chickpeas that boast 5-6 grams of plant protein and fiber. The vegan varieties include Barbecue, Habanero, Ranch and Sea Salt -- and they are non-GMO, grain-free, gluten-free, and nut-free. They are perfect to pop in your mouth on the road, and back home they work well as salad and soup toppers. Shop now CaPao Smoothie Balls Missing your morning smoothie while on the road? CaPao Smoothie Balls may help keep your routine intact. These plant-based snacks are made from zesty cacao fruit pulp, nuts and seeds. Choose from Apricot, Plant Protein and Golden Berries, Golden Berries, Apricot and Chia Seeds, and Mango, Cashew and Coconut. Cacao is the same magical plant that gives us chocolate -- but 75% of the cacaofruit is underutilized or simply thrown away after the cocoa beans are extracted for making chocolate, leaving behind husk, pulp and cocoa butter. So, CaPao uses the wasted nutrition found in the pulp and husk in its products, as these components contain magnesium, iron, zinc, potassium, fiber and many essential B vitamins. Shop now ZENB Veggie Bites Veggies are one of the healthiest snacks, but who has time to peel and prep a bunch of produce before a road trip? When youre away from home, rely on ZENBs Veggie Bites. They offer a full cup of vegetables in each pouch and use the whole vegetable -- stems, skin, seeds and all -- so you get extra nutrition, like fiber. The vegan, non-GMO, organic and gluten-free bites come in a resealable package with five flavors: Edamame, Red Bell Pepper, Summer Beets, Sweet Potato and Sweet Corn. Shop now The Goods Mart Vegan Snack Box Dont have time to shop for individual snacks? Want to try something new? Let The Goods Mart -- a socially conscious convenience store in Soho, NYC -- curate and ship a vegan snack box especially for you. Simply choose the size of your box, let them know whether youre craving salty, sweet or savory, and alert them to any allergies. All the snacks are non-GMO, contain no artificial colors or flavors, and are sure to satisfy any craving that pops up during your travels. Shop now The post 12 Road Trip-Worthy Snacks appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook

August 5 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook With the publication date of The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook less than one week away, I want to share more of the amazing support for this book, this time by the No-Meat Athlete himself, Matt Frazier. Matt and other plant-based athletes prove that you dont need meat and dairy to build a strong, competitive body with energy to spare. For my new book The Protein Revolution Cookbook, Matt has this to say: “Think protein is a problem on a plant-based diet? Think again!  The Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook makes it easy (and delicious) to get all the protein you need to fuel even an active lifestyle -- without relying on fake, processed meat substitutes, and instead choosing healthy whole foods.  The first vegan cookbook I ever bought was by Robin Robertson, and I’ve been a fan ever since. This new book shows why she’s one of the best at creating healthy, easy, plant-based recipes that the whole family will love. – Matt Frazier, vegan ultramarathoner and author of No Meat Athlete and The No Meat Athlete Cookbook I hope you’ll spread the word about this book to all the runners and other athletes you know.  You can pre-order a copy of The Plant-Protein Revolution Cookbook today and it will ship right out to you on August 11. The post Plant Protein Revolution Cookbook appeared first on Robin Robertson.

COVID-19 Hits Home (I will not allow my family to be a "statistic")

April 23 2020 Vegan Thyme 

COVID-19 Hits Home (I will not allow my family to be a This is my sister, Julie. She's the world to me, to my husband, to her husband, to her friends. She's strong, beautiful, brilliant and everything else you'd want in a sister, friend, wife, doggie-mom. Yesterday she called with the news that shook me to my core: her whole house is under 14-day quarantine. It's not pretty. It came on fast. It zapped her energy, the fever--textbook version. The day before she'd been super busy with life: housework, workouts, chatting with me, face-timing with friends, making dinner...just your usual busy "Julie Day."  In a heap. Crying. Worried. Crying more. Calling/­­texting my girlfriends, neighbors.  Hearing my baby sister telling ME: It's going to be okay. No dammit. This virus is insidious and goes from mild to ventilator in a matter of hours. It's effing NOT going to be okay. We pray it WILL be a mild case. . . we bargain, beg and hope for all things to maintain as they are right now. And testing? What about testing? Good luck with that unless you have A-list status/­­wealth or some shit. She's getting tested, her doctor ordered it. The results take three days. Three days!  I'm sick of watching people "march/­­protest/­­demand" we Open for Business like this is just another issue of "rights being violated" moment. It's anything but that. It's about supporting ideology over medicine while this country crumbles. It's about sitting comfortably in your ignorance and joining with a chorus of others who subscribe to poisonous political views (and feel righteous and protected while Group Think takes over) when people are dying and our medical system fights to keep others alive.  To those demonstrating an unwillingness to believe science (I'm married to a scientist)...I become less and less inclined to maintain my "observer" status. I'm furious right now.  If you aren't part of the solution--you ARE the problem. 

Vegan Coconut Caramel Energy Balls (Coconut Caramel Bites)

April 5 2020 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Coconut Caramel Energy Balls (Coconut Caramel Bites)These easy Vegan Coconut Caramel Energy Balls are a healthy 3 ingredient snack that you can whip up in minutes in your food processor. Samoa  Cookie Bites in 5 mins! Naturally sweetened, paleo, and the perfect healthy treat both kids and adults will love. Jump to Recipe These vegan coconut caramel balls (aka bliss balls) are a nice healthy sweet treat to have around the house for whenever you feel like a little pick-me-up. They are so easy to make and can last a while in the fridge. To make these healthy date caramel coconut balls, all you need is a food processor and 4 ingredients, one of them being salt, so it’s really more like 3 ingredients. No baking required! They are wonderfully soft and creamy and taste a bit like salted caramel candy /­­ samoa cookies! thanks to the combination of toasted coconut and fiber-rich dates. A healthy snack I feel good about reaching for any time. These babies are wholesome and decadent at the same time!Continue reading: Vegan Coconut Caramel Energy Balls (Coconut Caramel Bites)The post Vegan Coconut Caramel Energy Balls (Coconut Caramel Bites) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Granola Candy Bars

March 12 2020 My New Roots 

Granola Candy Bars When I was a kid, I always wanted to go to other peoples houses for playdates. Not because I didnt like my own home. Because of the snacks. ?? Although my childhood diet included a fair amount of donuts and microwaved hot dogs, my mother had very distinct ideas of what was okay to eat on the regular, and what was not. Honey Nut Cheerios, okay. Lucky Charms, not okay. Granola bars, sure. Granola bars covered in chocolate, nope. My friends pantries were stocked with these things, also known as Kudos, which are somehow legally sanctioned to be labelled granola bars and marketed as a healthy snack, but definitely wouldnt pass my moms test by a long shot. So, I had to get creative to have access to said saccharine granola bar slathered with oozy, sweetened peanut butter, covered in a thick coating of milk chocolate. My teeth hurt just thinking about them now, but holy heck were they transcendent to my seven-year-old self. I would put up with all kinds of games I didnt want to play, cartoons I didnt want to watch, even annoying little sisters, just to have access to the cupboard of Kudos bars after school. My version of this recipe came from a craving, as they often do. Maybe I was longing for a little nostalgia, or a connection to a simpler time when my only goal for the day was ingesting as much sugar as possible without my parents knowing. Good times, haha! Anyway, I have successfully re-created Kudos bars, with massively improved ingredients and adult upgrades. My version is naturally sweetened (duh), uses dark chocolate instead of milk chocolate, and I swapped out the peanut butter for hazelnut butter, because it is just way more delicious! I added figs to the granola bars, since they pair so well hazelnuts. And last but not least, I included a healthy amount of salt for balance. Under-salted desserts make me want to light my hair on fire. Altogether, these Granola Candy Bars are serious craving-crushers. Crunchy, crispy, creamy, oozy, sweet and salty, totally rich and mouth-wateringly delicious. Im almost through my second batch and already planning my next one. I feel like a stockpile of these in the fridge would get me through just about anything, even ??the fifth, mind-numbing round of Candyland with my son, who bless his heart, just wants to eat sugar as badly as I did. Candyland is as close as he gets.    Chocolate and Energy ?For those of you following along on Instagram you know that each month in 2020 has a theme, and March is Energy. I thought it would be appropriate to talk about chocolate and how it affects us on an energetic level. A lot of people think that chocolate contains caffeine, and it does have a little bit, but caffeine is not in fact the most stimulating compound that cacao contains. Its something else called theobromine. ?? Theobromine is an alkaloid that gives chocolate its distinctive bitterness. The darker the chocolate, the more bitter, and the more theobromine it contains. Theobromine and caffeine are almost identical at a molecular level, which makes them behave in similar, energizing ways. The difference is that theobromine has one less methyl group (one carbon with three hydrogen attached), which makes it a less powerful stimulant, since it does not cross the blood-brain barrier as easily as caffeine does. Translation: theobromine offers a more relaxed, longer-lasting energy than caffeine, instead of the classic spike-and-crash. Both compounds act on our central nervous system, but only caffeine can make us feel anxious and jittery. Bonus: theobromine is also non-addictive (although I cannot help you if you get addicted to these Granola Candy Bars ?A 1 1/­­2 ounce /­­ 43g serving of dark chocolate (70% cacao solids) will give you about 115mg of theobromine and 20mg of caffeine. By comparison, an 8 ounce /­­ 250ml cup of coffee contains about 95mg of caffeine and no theobromine. The maximum recommended daily intake for caffeine is around 400mg, while theobromine (thankfully) is higher at around 1000mg a day. ??We need to keep in mind however, that most chocolate contains sugar or other sweeteners and additives that are very stimulating. It is no wonder then, that for sensitive individuals, the theobromine in cacao combined with sugar and a little caffeine can give us a serious blast of energy and make chocolate feel like more than a cup of coffee! Be mindful of your chocolate intake during the later hours of the day, especially if you struggle to fall or stay asleep at night. ???  Lets get to the recipe! I use honey to sweeten the granola bars, and to help bind all the ingredients together, but a good, vegan alternative could be date paste. Just make sure it has a high viscosity (like, real sticky). ??This recipe is gluten-free, just make sure you buy gluten-free oats if you are sensitive.?? Hazelnuts may be hard to find and depending on where you are, can be expensive. If youre looking for an alternative, almonds or cashews would be the best! The almonds may need more time in the oven, up to 25 minutes, but keep a good eye on them, as they can burn quickly. ?? Of course you dont have to make your own hazelnut butter for this recipe, but I highly highly recommend that you do. Its really easy and a step that will fit into making the granola bars anyway. Just add 2 extra cups /­­ 270g of hazelnuts to the baking sheets and roast as you would with the other ingredients. Blend hazelnuts in a food processor, scraping down the sides every so often, and eventually, youll have hazelnut butter. It can take up to ten minutes, so be patient. Add a splash of olive oil to get it going, if absolutely necessary. This will make about 1 cup /­­ 250ml, which is exactly what you need for the recipe. Youre welcome! ?????         Print recipe     Fig and Hazelnut Granola Candy Bars Ingredients: ? 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 150g rolled oats ?1 cup /­­ 135g raw hazelnuts (plus two more cups if making your own hazelnut butter, see headnote) ?2 Tbsp. coconut oil (I recommend flavour-neutral) ? 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml thick honey (creamed or white)? 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml tahini? 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract ?1/­­3 cup /­­ 60g chopped un-sulfured dried figs? 1 cup /­­ 20g puffed brown rice cereal? 1/­­4 tsp. flaky sea salt, plus more for garnish? 1 cup /­­ 250ml hazelnut butter ? 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup? 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt? 200g dark chocolate (80% or higher), have more on-hand for drizzle and just in case! ?????   Directions: ? 1. Preheat the oven to 325°F /­­ 170°C. Place the oats and hazelnuts on a rimmed baking sheet, trying to keep them as separate as possible, and bake stirring once or twice, until the oats are golden and smell toasty, 12 to 15 minutes. Remove from the oven, let cool, and roughly chop the hazelnuts. ? 2. In a small saucepan, melt the coconut oil over low heat. Add the honey, tahini, and vanilla; whisk thoroughly until fully combined. ? 3. Roughly chop the dried figs and set aside.  4. In a large bowl, combine the cooled oats and chopped hazelnuts with the figs, puffed cereal, and salt. Pour the wet ingredients over the dry and stir quickly to mix.? 5. Line an 8×8 brownie pan with plastic wrap or parchment paper. Spoon the mixture in and using slightly damp hands, press it firmly into the pan, especially around the edges and corners. ? 6. Combine the hazelnut butter with the 1/­­2 teaspoon fine salt and maple syrup - it should transform from runny, into a more solid paste. Spread over the top of the granola bars. Set in the freezer to firm up for at least 4 hours. 7. When the bars are ready to coat in chocolate, remove them from the freezer and cut the base into 12 even pieces. 8. Set a double boiler up on the stove, over a low simmer. Chop the chocolate into chunks. Melt in a double-boiler over medium heat. Dip each piece in melted chocolate, then place on a piece of parchment to cool and set. Drizzle remaining chocolate over the top, then sprinkle with a little more flaky salt. Once cool, enjoy! Store bars in the fridge for up to one month, or the freezer for 6 months. I know that this recipe will land with the child inside you, who is just trying to convince her parents that the chocolate-covered granola bars are healthy. Because at least now, well, they actually are. All love and happy treat-making, Sarah B Show me your treats on Instagram: #mnrgranolacandybars   *   *   *   *   *   * Okay, one more thing before I go, just because I’m pretty stoked about it…I have a show! It’s called The Substitute Baker, and it’s going to be on Food Network Canada’s digital platform. The series premiers March 25th on Facebook Watch, so you can see it no matter where in the world you are! I’ll be dropping more details about it on Instagram and Facebook, so please stay tuned there. Thank you to everyone who has sent a supportive comment or email – it means so much to me, and this opportunity was possible because of YOU. So thank you!  The post Granola Candy Bars appeared first on My New Roots.

Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based Foods

March 1 2020 Meatless Monday 

Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based FoodsFats and carbohydrates have faced their fair share of scrutiny over the decades, but protein has managed to coast through years of fad diets and conflicting-nutritional recommendations unscathed. Protein is essential for healthy body functions, responsible for growing and repairing muscle tissue, aiding in digestion and energy production, and helping bolster your immune system. With a lengthy list of benefits, its no surprise that getting enough protein is a dietary priority. Thankfully, theres an abundance of this crucial macronutrient in a variety of plant-based foods and ingredients. This Monday, kick-start a healthy week with delicious high-protein, plant-based foods.   Almonds A handful of almonds is a satiating snack that will keep a grumbling tummy at bay, but the tree nut is also a good source of protein. A quarter cup of almonds contains 6 grams of protein and plenty of fiber. Eat them on their own or incorporate them into your own custom snack mix . Black Beans Easy to prepare, cheap to buy, versatile, and nutritionally dense, the black bean is the ultimate pantry staple for people looking to incorporate more plant-based protein into their diet. Cooked black beans contain 8 grams of protein per half cup. Purchase them canned, or, if ambitious, dried, and transform them into plant-based burgers, taco fillings , soups, or meat balls . Chickpeas Cooked chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and boast nearly 15 grams of protein per cup. And remember, when using canned chickpeas, save the liquid -- also known as aquafaba -- for a terrific, plant-based egg white replacement. Edamame Popular in Japan and other areas of East Asia, edamame is as close you can get to a perfect food : One cup of cooked edamame contains 8 grams of fiber, 17 grams of protein, and is only 189 calories. Farro One of the lesser known ancient grains, farro needs to be on your radar . A quarter cup of uncooked farro contains 6 grams of protein. Its toothsome texture adds a pleasant chew to grain bowls and salads. Kidney Beans These hefty beans are dense, nourishing, and nutrient-packed. One cup of cooked kidney beans contains roughly 13 grams of protein (as well as 13 grams of fiber). Lentils With tons of fiber and almost no saturated fat, look to use lentils as the foundation of multiple meals throughout the week. A cup of cooked lentils contains 18 grams of protein and more than half your recommended daily value of fiber. Peanuts A staple of almost every pantry, the peanut (and peanut butter) is a tremendous source of plant-based protein and health fats. With nearly 10 grams of protein per quarter cup, the peanut is a great snack to take to the office or incorporated into this sweet and spicy Sweet Potato Peanut Stew.   Quinoa The trendiest of grains (well, its technically a seed), quinoa is a splendid source of protein that can serve as the foundation of any meatless meal . A cup of cooked quinoa boasts around 8 grams of protein. Tofu There are imitators and then there are originators. Tofu -- made from soy beans -- is sold in a variety of textures and forms, but no matter the type, youre guaranteed to get a solid dose of plant-based protein, with a half-cup offering around 10 grams. Our recipe for Jamaican Jerk Tofu (the most popular recipe on our website) will make you a lifelong tofu loyalist.   Click here for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Pile on the Protein with These 10 Plant-Based Foods appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lisa O’Connor

December 8 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Lisa O’Connor Lisa O’Connor is a Toronto-based Holistic Nutritionist, Healing Alchemist, and host of the Glow Deep Podcast. We interviewed Lisa about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, healing and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Both! Im a naturally disciplined soul, so I have no problems at all committing to something. I thrive off of routine, but Ive been learning to be way more in flow these past few years. Especially with creating my own schedule and building my business /­­ practice, and now with the arrival of our puppy. My schedule got shifted around quite a bit, as he needs A LOT of attention and training at this moment! Im learning to find my own rhythm between routine, and free flow. Which I believe is always a dance for us as we transition through different seasons, and times of our lives. -- What do your mornings look like? Now with a puppy things have shifted! -We are morning people – getting up anywhere between 5-6am -A liter of water first thing -A walk in nature with the pup -A little play time with him & then putting him in his crate for a nap, so I can have me time -Kundalini -Meditation -Matcha latte -Reading – I commit to 30-45 min daily reading in the morning -Smoothie or whatever else Im feeling -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? To be honest, I dont have a lot of bedtime rituals, as I dont really have a problem with sleep. Whats important for me is turning my phone on airplane mode a good 45min- 1 hour before sleep, having a shower to shift my energy, magnesium cream, and reading a book in bed with my husband, or sometimes we watch a little something on Netflix to just switch completely off! -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  -Meditation -Walking in nature and being present -Kundalini -Im not a massive journal writer, but when it calls I listen! Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Smoothie & homemade matcha latte (I have the matcha first, and probably wait an hour or so and then have the smoothie!) Lunch – Honestly on client days I often keep it light and just snack – green juice here, smoothie there, some veggies, coconut water! And some days I just have liquids (juices, smoothies, water until dinner) on other days it could be a light salad, or a lunch out with a friend at a local healthy restaurant Snack – Im not too much of a snack person! But I would say nuts /­­ seeds, green juice, maybe a piece of fruit in the summer Dinner - Green salad, roasted veggies, curries, soups, brown rice -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do :) I drink matcha during the week, and on the weekend when I can savour a beautiful organic Americano when Im at a cafe with my husband, its just that much more special. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your cart? We do our big haul on Saturdays at a place here called Organic Garage. Everything is organic, and is so reasonable in price. In the summer I also add in local markets, and farmers markets. That being said, I feel like Im always grocery shopping on the daily, as Im always picking up fresh greens, or picking up supplemental things for dinner that we didnt get during our big shop on Saturday morning. Things that we always include: -Variety of leafy greens -Olives -Bananas -Apples -Mushrooms -Celery -Lemons -Frozen berries -Avocados -Brown Rice -Fresh herbs -Variety of proteins -Cucumbers -ACV -Pumpkin seed butter -Zucchinis -White & Sweet potatoes -Garlic -Ginger -Dates -Variety nuts & seeds -Seasonal vegetables -Hemp seeds +++ More but those are always staples!  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I know people wont like this answer, but I actually dont! I can eat 95-100% chocolate, and feel super satisfied. If Im sweetening anything I use dates, bananas, and/­­or a touch of raw honey. -- Are there any particular foods that you find to be helpful with your energy levels and general wellness? Greens!!! I am a greens monster, and feel so deeply connected to them. I love to consume their liquid sunshine properties. Potatoes are also a huge staple for me, as they are easily digested, high in fiber, and the natural sugars are burned as energy for me. Berries – I love wild blueberries and raspberries Spices /­­ herbs – Ginger, garlic, cayenne, nettle, turmeric Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I dont have anything particular right now! My favourite form of exercise is walking! Its highly underrated in my opinion. I live in a big city, without a car, so my mode of transport is Me. I find it meditative, calming, and great exercise. I also practice Kundalini yoga, and will sometimes do some resistance work (P.Volve). -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I find it to be an extension of me, and I dont ever have to force it. I trust my body and flow with what it wants and feels in the season of life that Im in. At the moment Ive been the least active Ive ever been, but its what feels best for me, and my body is welcoming it, and responding beautifully to it. In other seasons of my life Ive done intense and hard workouts at least 4 -5 x per week, and other times Ive done daily exercise. If there is anything Ive learnt along the way, is that nothing good comes from force. When we practice, and learn to tune- in, we will always be guided to what our body needs. In 2020 I want to get back into doing Ballet Beautiful though, as I did it for over two years and felt so graceful, feminine, yet toned. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty, both internal and external? My idea of beauty will always be that is stems from within. And not just the foods that we eat, or supplements we take, but the thoughts we think, our mood, mental state, stress levels, how kind we are...etc. I struggled with really bad acne for years, and addressing all of the above, with nutrition + curated herbs /­­ supplements, actually brought my skin back better than before! Beauty in my eyes is always a projection, and energetic force with regards to whats going on inside. When things are aligned within, I feel beauty just radiates regardless of how we *think* we look. This beautiful energetic force truly knows no bounds. I do still enjoy to take care of my external skin, and body, but I would say its only about 10% of my regime. Everything else stems from internal work! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? MINIMAL. People are so surprised how little I do, as I really do practice what I preach. When we focus on the internal, the external will always reflect that. I use all natural products – Face wash, rose spray, and oil (I rotate a few of my favourite brands – including Living Libations, F. Miller & Marie Veronique) In the summer I mask more (May Lindstrom or just the Aztec Clay mask) I find them too harsh for the winter, so I love a good Manuka honey mask during the winter. -- Do you have any beauty tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Less is more. When I was healing my skin I tried EVERYTHING. I used too many products, stripped my skin, and it all just made it worse. I find my skin is the best the less that I do. Sweating is key, so are hot /­­ cold (contrast showers), kundalini (breathwork) and again coming back to nurturing and feeding (Physical & Mental) your Internal Self, which then shows up Externally. The key is to get things moving & flowing. Digestion, lymph, liver, as this ultimately shows up on the skin. No flow, no glow. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress?  -Meditation (nothing fancy, or prescriptive, just sitting with myself) -Dog walks in nature -Kundalini Yoga -Reading -Nutrition -Seeing loved ones -Spending time with my husband, and puppy -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? -REST /­­ SLEEP – seriously the simplest thing one can do, I just believe we feel as a society that we cant just Be, or cant just take a break -Green juicing -Hot /­­ cold showers to stimulate lymph flow and detoxification -Ginger tea -Broths /­­ soups Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Im quite simple, easy-going, yet Ive always been disciplined, and my husband might say stubborn (my Ukrainian genes :) ). I dont find it that difficult to honour my body, mind, and soul. Ive also been on a deep healing journey since 2006 (got diagnosed with Lyme Disease in 2012), so truly these arent even actions or steps I take, they are just Me. I dont force anything, and allow for flow, ease, while still knowing, and honouring when I need to heal something deeper, take a new direction, and take care of my inner child. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Hmmmm I dont think there is just one thing, as I see things very holistically, and connected. I would say mind work. Focusing on mental strength, vitality, and honouring my subconscious mind, as this is where all of our habits, programs, and deep belief systems live. Our mind is everything, as the body is the unconscious mind.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Take a break! It could be an afternoon, a day or even a few. I have a tendency to force things, and when I do nothing flows. Ive learned this the hard way many times over, so I create space to go within. On the other hand, I can get inspired easily via images, nature, people, environments, so its always there for me. Its cheesy, but inspiration can hit at any moment, so I stay open. But when Im stuck, I take a step back or I schedule a brainstorming session with my husband. Just so I can talk things through, get a different perspective ( hes very smart, yet practical). In my business its just me, myself, and I, so it can get pretty insular. Although my goal for 2020 is to hire my first employee!  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. To be honest, nothing outside of myself influenced this or my view. It was losing my health, and healing on a deep level that has brought me to where I am with self-care. Its never been anything to do, if anything its how I practice Being. Ive come to see, and know deeply that our relationship to Self – On a body, mind, and soul level is everything. If we dont show up for ourselves, than we cant for others. But if I were to pick anything in terms of external energy, I would say the book Magdalen Manuscript, its a channeled script of Mary Magdalen. It speaks about Ka energy (life force), and the power of energy that courses through all of Us. The only way to channel this energy, is to nourish ourselves from the inside out. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a holistic nutritionist? When I started to become ill in 2006, it set me on my path. At first it started with my own experiments, lifestyle changes, and reading /­­ self-knowledge for close to six years. Then from there, I took it further to get certified, and study formally. While Im a HN, Ive expanded my view of my work, as I go *much* deeper than just food. My story is WILD, so I wont go into all the details, but when you experience something so deep, intense, and beautiful on your own, you want to help others heal via your journey, knowledge, and gifts (which I believe we all have! Its just up to us to cultivate them). I dont believe I chose this profession, as Ive never felt more called to something. Knowing how crazy, and wild it is to lose one’s health, its my mission to help others tap themselves into their own innate healer. -- What is your healing philosophy? How do you approach working with clients? Ive come to see healing as alchemy. As a society weve been taught that we should just focus on one body part, one thing, one pill, and weve become so singular in our view point and scope of healing /­­ practice. I.E. if we are having back pain, focus on the back. Where as I see everything, and I mean everything holistically. I see the alchemy, and connection between it all – Body, Mind, and Spirit. While we might be having physical pain some place (i.e. back), yes we must look and take care of the cellular body (which I do), but we also have to look at our emotions, trauma, history, and deeper work into the soul, and subconscious. While this isnt the easy work, to me its the only way I know! So when taking on a client, this is where we go. I look at each soul as a unique and individual being. No one is alike, so there isnt a pill or protocol that fits just because someone has been diagnosed with X, and so has their friend. Those two people are so different, have been raised uniquely, have most likely experienced trauma in their own way, and are navigating different life pathways, and stressors. We navigate the deeper parts, so we can heal holistically, sustainably, and in connection with our whole Self. We arent just a body, we are so much more. When we focus on just the body, I dont believe we do ourselves any favours. This is whats often missing in chronic care of  humans and why so many people are just living and coping with pain and dis-ease. We are seeking greater depth, purpose, and fulfilment, yet were left confused, hopeless, and overwhelmed. If I can just bring someone to see that they DO have the power to heal, than man oh man, it just means everything to me! Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Our new puppy Rumi! Hes a Rhodesian Ridgeback, so he will grow to be a big boy, but we are soaking up all the puppy cuddles right now. Also ending off a decade, ushering in a new one , and entering into the year 2020. There is a lot of potent energy coming forth, and Im feeling really charged, clear, and ready for it all. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Nothing really special, I love just the simple things in life. A hot shower, getting into my robe or a grey sweat suit, eating a nourishing dinner, and cuddling with my husband & puppy! Sometimes I will treat myself to a facial, and when I can infrared sauna sessions.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit and Course in Miracles Song/­­Album –   Anything by Bon Iver or Ben Howard or White Sun Movie –   Dirty Dancing (forever & always my favourite) Piece of Art –  I adore a lot of art  /­­ creative work, but some of my favourites include: Renaissance art, Matisse, Unconditional Magazine, Picasso, Christiane Spangsberg. This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Lisa O’Connor appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets — Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween Treats

October 28 2019 Meatless Monday 

Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets  —  Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween TreatsHalloween season is here, so its time to bust out the bloody bandages, clean out the old cast-iron cauldron, and study up on your seances. And theres no better way to honor the scariest holiday of the year than with a proper Halloween bash (or monster mash, or graveyard smash)? Whether its a spooky soirée for you and your friends or a party for some little monsters , the focal point of the celebration (as with all parties) is the finger food -- minus the fingers, of course. You can always go with the traditional frightening fare -- candy apples, ants-on-a-log, popcorn balls, devils food cake -- but we wanted to offer some more imaginative options that are not only tasty, easy to make, and freaking cute, but theyre also better-for-you! Check out the list below for some hauntingly yummy Halloween treats. Peanut Butter Apple Monsters With sunflower-seed teeth and a strawberry tongue, these gremlin-looking green apples are the perfect snack for guests who are scared of eating too much sugar. Photo courtesy of @nutriacure . Fiendishly Frightening Fruit Platter Ghostly red peppers, Frankenstein kiwis, and cantaloupe tombstones make for a very frightening fruit platter. Photo courtesy of @foodbites . Ghostly Chocolate Cupcakes These are not your ordinary cupcakes. Tucked away within each fluffy chocolate cake is a hint of tangy guava and sweet beet puree. Topping each cupcake is a crown of coconut-milk frosting. Drizzle some thinned out guava juice over the top for an even more ghastly effect. Photo courtesy of Goya . Mummys Favorite Jalape?o Poppers These jalape?o poppers are almost too cute to eat... almost. Photo courtesy of @thepurplepumpkinblog . Ghastly Gluten-Free Zombie Fingers These are almost as scary as someone with a gluten intolerance eating a piece of bread. Made primarily from dates, peanut butter, and oats, these zombie fingers are easy to assemble, and they most definitely look the part. Photo courtesy of Recipes from a Pantry . Boo-nana Popsicles The ideal non-dairy frozen treat for your guests. Not too messy, these popsicles will be gone so fast youll begin to wonder if they ever existed at all... Photo courtesy of Well Plated . Candy Corn Parfait These have the candy-corn look, but with added tropical flavor. Just layer some pineapple, tangerine, and a shot of whipped cream to capture the aesthetic of classic candy corn.  Photo courtesy of Family Fresh Meals . Bat Energy Bites All you need is 20 minutes, a microwave, and a mixing bowl to put these scary snacks together. These ones are just as fun to make as they are to eat. Photo courtesy of Chelsea’s Messy Apron . Tangerine Pumpkins Rushing to complete the Halloween party preparations? These tangerine pumpkins dont require much assembly: Just peel and pop a little wedge of celery on top to give them that pumpkin look. Photo courtesy of Bren Did . Ahhhhh Vegetables! For some, nothing is scarier than a platter of roasted vegetables, but we think these spooky shaped beets, carrots, and squash are just devilishly delightful. Photo courtesy of Live Eat Learn .   Making one of these creepy creations? Tag @meatlessmonday and well repost the scariest photos (and maybe the cutest). The post Don’t Get Spooked by Sweets — Try These 10 Better-for-You Halloween Treats appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cozy Pantry Stew

September 29 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Cozy Pantry Stew Hello friends! We’re back from a little hiatus having to do with my wedding. I married my love of many years under the September full moon in upstate NY, and it was such a fun party. The wedding took all of our time and energy, since we did everything we could ourselves together with friends and family. That’s why it’s been extra quiet around here. I’m sharing a few wedding photos at the bottom of this post, but otherwise it’s back to regular programming around here! We’re excited to cook with all the fall produce popping up right now and have a few digital cookbook projects in the works for the coming months. We missed this space and YOU. On to this life saver of a stew. I don’t know if this is the case for you, but in our house, when we say we have nothing to eat, most of the time it’s not really true. That type of talk usually comes from laziness or not being in the mood for whatever ingredients we do have on hand. Both my husband and I are avid home cooks and generally obsessed with good food, so we have a well-stocked pantry. This year, we’ve been trying to be more mindful of those ‘nothing-to-eat moments’ and have been cooking more from the pantry. The results always save us money and end up tasting more nourishing than any takeout ever would. This stew is something that we make all the time, using pantry staples and odds and ends from the fridge. It’s flavorful, soul-warming, and so easy. Scrapping together meals out of seemingly nothing is one of my favorite ways to cook – I love anything having to do with economy in the kitchen. (Tamar Adler’s An Everlasting Meal is one of my favorite books). It’s like a game and so endlessly satisfying when that meal appears out of ‘thin air.’ I know everyone’s pantries are vastly different, but if you’re a vegan/­­vegetarian-inclined cook, I have a hunch that you’ll have at least some of these ingredients on hand. I love keeping red lentils around because they cook almost instantly and taste great – these make up the base of our stew. Then come the aromatics. Dig up those unused carrots and celery out of the crisper (soak them in cold water for a few hours if they’re really limp) and find an onion (or an unused half of one!), shallots, or leeks. That classic trio of onion, celery, and carrots help build great flavor for soup like nothing else does. Then, see if you have some leftover white wine in the fridge and grab a few cloves of garlic. Wine gives this stew that extra something and truly takes it to the next level. If you don’t have an open bottle, you could also open one to cook with and enjoy with dinner. Any other extras are up to you and your pantry/­­fridge. When it comes to spices, dried herbs are great, as well as turmeric, but you could also add coriander, cumin, or even curry. The stew pictured here has cherry tomatoes and sweet potato. Tomatoes add umami and I wouldn’t skip them, but if you don’t have fresh ones, you could add a little bit of canned tomatoes or even tomato paste. Sweet potato is totally optional, but use it here if you have one, or a regular potato, squash, or even cauliflower. At the end, wilt in some greens and finish the stew off with lemon juice for brightness. Add any garnish you like or have, like yogurt, herbs, or pan-fried mushrooms (as pictured), and you’re done! The description is long because I wanted to lay out our logic, but the stew itself comes together very quickly. Hope you’ll give this one a try

Raw Vegan Brownie Bites (Grain-free)

August 26 2019 Vegan Richa 

Raw Vegan Brownie Bites (Grain-free)5 Ingredient Raw Vegan Brownie Bites! These brownie balls are fudgy, quick to make, and make a great snack. No Bake, Paleo Brownie Energy Bites. Vegan Gluten-free Grain-free Recipe.  Jump to Recipe Hubbs has been loving snacks that are decadent and more like dessert like these no bake cookie dough bites!.And these brownie bites fit the there just perfectly! A Mix of nuts make up the base for a rich fudgy snack with a good amount of cocoa. Dates are the binder and sweetener. The bites mixture takes just 5 mins and then shape them as you like into balls or bars. Add toppings of choice and snack for the energy boost or for when you want a lighter brownie! Make a double batch of these and freeze for later! Add other nuts or seeds or some protein powder for variation. Let make these!Continue reading: Raw Vegan Brownie Bites (Grain-free)The post Raw Vegan Brownie Bites (Grain-free) appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Cookie Dough Bites

August 5 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Cookie Dough Bites7 Ingredient Vegan Cookie Dough Bites! these chocolate chip cookie dough balls have no grain, gluten and no added oil. Can be made without the sugar. Vegan Paleo Gluten-free Grain-free Recipe.   Jump to Recipe Its summer, long days, that means longer times outside. And between all the activity, we need fun snacks that taste like cookie dough (right!) and are energy bites as well. These nutty fudgy balls are just that. Full of all the good stuff, just a few ingredients and taste like healthy chocolate chip cookie dough! Cashews and coconut are processed to make a nice neutral base. Then dates, flavors are added in. and some chocolate chips of course! You can drizzle some melted chocolate on them for additional chocolate or roll in seeds.Continue reading: Vegan Cookie Dough BitesThe post Vegan Cookie Dough Bites appeared first on Vegan Richa.

No Bake Vegan Snickerdoodle Bites

August 18 2020 Vegan Richa 

No Bake Vegan Snickerdoodle BitesThese healthy vegan snickerdoodle bites taste just like a holiday cookie but are actually good for you. Just 6 ingredients and 10 mins.  The perfect easy and kid-friendly snack for anyone in need for some energy on-the-go! Grain-free option included. Jump to Recipe These Vegan Snickerdoodle Energy Bites are the perfect thing to have on hand anytime. But especially around fall and winter when youre really craving a holiday cookie but dont actually want to deal with 1, baking and 2, all the cookie-snacking consequences (hello sugar coma). Because these simple vegan snacks are made from wholesome plant-based ingredients only - no added refined sugar, gluten, or oil- they are a festive treat Im happy to enjoy anytime and kids love them too.Continue reading: No Bake Vegan Snickerdoodle BitesThe post No Bake Vegan Snickerdoodle Bites appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Enlightened Miso Power Bowl

May 29 2020 VegKitchen 

Enlightened Miso Power Bowl This Enlightened Miso Power Bowl is a fun recipe that will keep your energy high for hours. Miso is a fermented food that aids in digestion and adds a wonderful umami flavor to foods. If you are new to miso, Orange-Maple Miso Dressing is a great way to incorporate it into your diet. The post Enlightened Miso Power Bowl appeared first on VegKitchen.

Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this Monday

April 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this MondayOur daily food choices have a direct impact on the health of the planet. And while its true that all foods need resources to produce, research shows that meat and dairy have the greatest impacts on the environment. This isnt too hard to picture; raising animals to feed billions of people requires huge inputs of land, feed, water, and energy to be processed, stored, and transported. While the environmental impacts of food production can seem daunting, thankfully there are easy and delicious ways to reduce our individual and collective foodprints through eating a more plant-based diet and reducing food waste . But you dont need to go vegan to make a difference; starting small, like going Meatless Monday, is meaningful and can also lead to eating more plant-based foods throughout the week. Meatless Monday Tips for Plant-based Eating Add more fruits and vegetables to your meals Make meals from the Meatless Monday recipe gallery Stock your pantry with plant-based staples for quick and easy meals Enjoy a wide variety of plant-based proteins Load up your spice cabinet for flavorful meatless meals Reduce food waste with inexpensive foods that wont go bad Get the whole family involved with The Kids Cook Monday meatless recipes Just how much of a difference does it make replacing animal products with plant-based foods? To help quantify the power of plant-based eating, weve collaborated with our academic partners at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future to gather the facts and figures behind plant-based foods and the environment. According to calculations from Johns Hopkins, if sixty percent of Americans ate plant-based just one day, it would save the equivalent of 104,000 Olympic swimming pools of water and the land area of the California Redwood Forests. Hungry for more reasons to go Meatless Monday? Check out the facts below to see the impact that livestock production as on the environment, and how you can help minimize those effects by reducing meat and adding more fruits, vegetables, legumes, and grains into your diet. Water Animal agriculture is responsible for about 70 percent of the worlds freshwater use. By 2050, water demand for livestock production is expected to leave half the worlds population living in water-stressed environments. Research shows that eating a more plant-based diet can decrease agricultural water use by 50 percent. Deforestation The meat industry is the most significant driver of deforestation, clearing approximately 50 million square miles of forest for agricultural purposes each year. Combining pasture and land used for feed crops, 80 percent of the worlds farmlands are used for livestock production. Soil Health Animal agriculture damages soil quality and compromises the health of the ecosystem. Industrial livestock production, through its intensive land management practices, reduces soil fertility and leaves previously fertile regions barren and more prone to natural disaster such as wildfires, flooding, and dust storms. Wide-scale shifts toward more plant-based diets would carry tremendous benefits for soil health and biodiversity. Biodiversity Livestock production has led to over 60% decline in species populations since 1970. Animal agriculture disrupts delicate eco-systems, making it one of the greatest human contributors to species decline. Global Emissions Meat and dairy production remain the most significant contributors of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and of these sources, livestock production is the largest, accounting for an estimated 14.5 percent of global GHG emissions from human activities, according to the United Nations. Interested in learning more about the connection between the food system and the health of the environment? Click here for more facts and figures from our academic partners at Johns Hopkins University. The post Protect the Planet by Going Meatless this Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Power Smoothie (Romaine and Superfood Seeds)

March 27 2020 VegKitchen 

Power Smoothie (Romaine and Superfood Seeds) Typically in raw circles, expressions like power food refer to Himalayan berries and maca powder and deep sea algae. What I mean by it is pretty simple: foods that are nutrient dense, easy to assimilate, and that give a boost of energy and focus. The post Power Smoothie (Romaine and Superfood Seeds) appeared first on VegKitchen.

In Case of Quarantine: Cook the Pantry

March 10 2020 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

In Case of Quarantine: Cook the Pantry With a possible pandemic on the horizon, I’ve stocked up on toilet paper and hand sanitizer — just in case.  But I’ve also stocked up on enough food supplies to get us through the next couple of months, in case of quarantine. I’ve been using the tips and recipes in my book, Cook the Pantry, to dictate my grocery list and keep my pantry full if the situation worsens.  The quick and easy recipes in Cook the Pantry use mostly items from your pantry and freezer (along with some optional fresh produce, if you have it on hand). One of my favorite recipes from the book is the Artichoke Muffaleta Po Boys.  It’s the best of two popular New Orleans culinary icons joining forces to create the ultimate sandwich made with artichokes and a piquant olive relish. Here’s the recipe: Artichoke Muffaleta Po Boys Makes 2 servings Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. - 3 scallions, chopped - 1 garlic clove, crushed - 1/­­3 cup pickled vegetables, well-drained - 1/­­3 cup pimiento-stuffed green olives, well-drained - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 (14-ounce) can artichoke hearts, well-drained and halved - 1/­­2 teaspoon Cajun spice blend - 3 tablespoons Creole mustard - 3 tablespoons vegan mayonnaise - 2 small sub rolls - 1 cup shredded lettuce - 1 large tomato, thinly sliced - Pickled sliced jalape?os - Tabasco or other hot sauce, to serve 1. In a food processor, combine the scallion and garlic and process until finely minced. Add the pickled vegetables, olives, and pulse to make a relish. Set aside. 2. Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the artichoke hearts, season with the spice blend, and cook until nicely browned, about 5 minutes per side. 3. To assemble the sandwiches, spread the mayonnaise and mustard on the inside top and bottom of the bread. Spread the lettuce onto the bottom of each sandwich, followed by tomato slices. Top with the relish mixture, a few slices of jalape?os, and the artichokes. Serve at once with Tabasco. In case you don’t already own Cook the Pantry, below is a list of the 100 recipes in the book. Check it out — you don’t need to be quarantined to enjoy these easy and delicious recipes. Cook the Pantry: Vegan Pantry-to-Plate Recipes in 20 minutes or Less Soup, Stew, Chili Tortilla Soup Chipotle Corn Chowder White Beans and Greens Soup Hot and Sour Noodle Soup Black Bean Soup with a Whisper of Sherry Shiitake Happens Mushroom Soup Pretty Good Gumbo Minestrone Soup Curry-Spiced Pumpkin Bisque Creamy Peanut Soup Pantry Plus Gazpacho Vegetable Bricolage Everyones Favorite Black Bean Chili Red Bean Chili Moroccan-Spiced Vegetable Stew Chana Masala Bowls Salad Savvy Five-Minute Couscous Salad Amazing Technicolor Chickpea Salad Moroccan Couscous Salad Tabbouleh Salad Pantry Pasta Salad Hearts of Palm Ceviche Composed Marinated Vegetable Salad Pinto, Corn, and Red Pepper Salad Threes a Crowd Bean Salad White Bean Niçoise Salad Taco Salad with Corn and Black Bean Salsa Southwest Salmagundi Asian Noodle Salad with Peanut Dressing Zucchini Pasta Salad Suddenly Sushi Salad Asian Noodle Slaw Avocado Goddess Salad Three-Tomato Pasta Salad Sesame Soba Salad Sandwiches, Burgers, and Pizza Crab-Free Sandwiches Bean and Spinach Burritos Artichoke Muffaleta Po Boys BBQ Jack Sandwiches Homestyle Hash Burgers Black Bean and Walnut Burgers Samosadillas Artichoke Tartines Black Bean and Spinach Quesadillas Chunky Chickpea Sandwiches Texas Caviar Wraps Artichoke-Spinach Pizza Pizza Nicoise Black and White Pizza BBQ Chickpea Pizza Cheeseburger Pizza Jalapeno-Hummus Pizza Pinto Bean Nacho Pie Stovetop Suppers Hoppin John and Collards Paella from the Pantry Cheesy Grits and Greens with Smoky Mushrooms Polenta Fiesta Quick Quinoa Pilaf Asian-Style Vegetable Pancakes with Dipping Sauce Dinnertime Scramble Tofu and Broccoli Stir-Fry Layered Tortilla Skillet Lemongrass Jasmine Rice Greek Freekeh and Spinach with White Beans Pantry Bulgur Pilaf Tuscan Chickpea Fritatta Red Beans and Quinoa with Chipotle Queso Chickpea-Artichoke Cakes with Dill Aioli Black Bean Picadillo Jerk Tempeh with Coconut Quinoa Top Shelf Couscous Pilaf Pantry Pasta Plus Giardiniera Mac and Cheese Capellini with Palm-Heart Scampi Sauce Penne and Broccoli with Red Bell Pepper-Walnut Sauce Kitchen-Sink Capellini Ramen Fagiole Pasta Marinara Puttanesca in a Pinch Rotini with Creamy Pumpkin Sauce Penne with White Beans and Olivada Speedy Lasagna Rice Noodles with Spicy Peanut Sauce Spaghetti Lo-Mein Artichoke-Cannelini Pasta Manchurian Black Bean Noodles Sweet Treats Rawklava Easy as Chocolate Pie Peanutty Energy Balls Almond-Cranberry Haystacks Coconut Lime Drops No-Bake Oatmeal Cookies Bananas Foster Dessert Nachos No-Fuss Chocolate Fondue Stovetop Peach-Blueberry Crumble Ginger-Walnut Rum Balls Chocolate-Almond Truffles Pecan Pie Squares Mangos with Pistachios and Cranberries Fudgy Brownie Mug Pastry-Wrapped Chocolate and Walnut-Stuffed Dates The post In Case of Quarantine: Cook the Pantry appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Dates and Nuts Bar

January 26 2020 Manjula's kitchen 

Dates and Nuts Bar (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Dates and Nuts Energy Bar, Healthy Bar, All-Natural Nutritional Bar 2020 is the start of a new decade and like most people Im sure you have thought about eating clean and healthy. My next recipe is for any new year resolutions and is called Dates and Nuts Bar. This healthy gluten-free energy bar is also vegan and sugar-free. The bars have a great nutty texture that tastes so delicious. This yummy treat is so satisfying for any sweet cravings! Because we all live busy lives, these bars make great snacks because they are so easy to take on the go. You can even give them to your kids as an after -school snack. Because dates are so sweet, they provide the perfect natural alternative to added sugars. They are sure to be a hit with friends who are avoiding sugar but still crave something sweet. Try these bars as a healthy alternative to cookies and other sweet treats. You will feel amazing. Course Snack Keyword All Natural, Almonds, Badam Burfi, Besan ki barfi, Candy, Cocoa Powder, Coconut, coconut Ladoo, Cooking Video, Dates Bar, Delightful, Diabetic, Flax Seed Burfi, Flax Seeds, Gluten Free, Gourmet food, Home Made, Jain Food, Kids Friendly, Lunch Box, Natural Alternative, Nutritional Bar, Nutty, Quick And Easy, Sattvic Food, Snack, Sugar Free, Swaminarayan, Sweet, vegan, Walnuts Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Total Time 20 minutes Servings 16 pieces Ingredients1 1/­­2 cup pitted dates cut into small pieces 2 Tbsp cocoa powder 1/­­3 cup coconut powder 1/­­3 cup flax seed meal 1/­­8 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 cup roasted Walnuts roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup roasted Almond roughly chopped 1/­­2 cup roasted Cashews roughly chopped 2 tsp sesame seeds 2 tsp pumpkin seeds InstructionsSoften the chopped dates in microwave for 30 seconds, doing this makes dates soft and easy to work. Blend the dates in the food processor until they become to the paste, this should take about 15 seconds. Add flex seed meal, and cocoa powder and salt to the food processor and blend it until all the ingredients incorporated. This should take about 15 second. Add the roasted and chopped nuts walnuts, almonds, and cashew nuts. Blended it until all the ingredients incorporated, but nuts should be still chunky this should take about 20 seconds of blending. Remove the mix from food processor, and make it into 2 balls, roll it into about 1/­­4-inch-thick, sprinkle the sesame seeds and pumpkin seeds to the rolled bar and lightly press the seeds, so they stay into the bars. Cut them into your desire shape. I decided to cut them in bars. NotesThese are some more healthy choice you would like to know Quinoa salad, Stuffed karela, Lentil Vegetable soup, Mango panna cotta The post Dates and Nuts Bar appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Your Diet and Diabetes: What You Need to Know

November 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Your Diet and Diabetes: What You Need to KnowChances are you know someone affected by diabetes, a condition that impacts the lives of about 30 million Americans. Approximately one in three American adults has prediabetes -- a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes -- and of that population, 90% dont know they have it. Think you or a loved one may be at risk? Take (or share) the 60-second American Diabetes Association (ADA) type 2 diabetes risk assessment quiz and find out. The good news is that most cases of type 2 diabetes are preventable through simple lifestyles changes. The three most important things to do: lose weight, if needed; eat healthy, and be active. Reducing meat and increasing plant-based foods in your diet is one important step in lowering your risk of type 2 diabetes. This November is Diabetes Awareness Month, so to help make the connection between diet and diabetes, weve introduced a new hashtag -- #DontLetDietBeatUs - along with social media graphics to to increase awareness of how eating more plant-based foods and less meat can help lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. All throughout the month, we will be posting recipes, cooking hacks, and shopping tips with the hashtag #DontLetDietBeatUs to help manage and prevent a prediabetes or diabetes diagnosis. You can also download our new set of creative materials , so you can help spread the word on how a meatless diet can reduce your risk of diabetes. Weve also collaborated with our experts at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future to compile a list of eating tips that can help you or a loved one reduce your risk of diabetes. Incorporate More Plant-Based Food Choices into Your Diet Substitute red meat with nuts, whole grains, beans, peas, lentils, legumes and other meat alternatives like tofu, and tempeh. Whole grains are especially important, as they are packed with nutrients like selenium, potassium, and magnesium, low in fat, and fiber rich.  Additionally, research shows an inverse relationship between whole grains intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes.  Dont forget according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, at least half of your grains for the day should be from whole grains. Make Half Your Plate Fruits and Vegetables Here are two ideas on how to make it easy: 1) eat seasonally, when produce is fresher and lower cost, and 2) if you cant find it fresh, frozen fruits and vegetables are picked at peak ripeness and are quickly frozen, preserving their nutrient content and flavor. Buy them when they are on sale and keep a few bags handy for stir fries, soups, quiches, or casseroles, and smoothies. Choose Heart-Healthy Fats Use healthy oils for cooking, like canola and olive oil.  Nuts, seeds and avocado are good for an afternoon snack and best of all, theyll keep you full when those mid-afternoon munchies strike. Limit Fried Foods and other Foods High in Saturated and Trans-Fat These foods are associated with a high risk of cardiovascular diseases. Saturated fats are found mostly in meats and high fat dairy. Trans-fats are common in processed foods, such as cookies and crackers. Reduce Intake of Added Sugars Avoid sugar-sweetened beverages such as juice, soda and energy drinks and sweets such as baked goods, candy, ice cream. For more information on the relationship between diet and diabetes, click here If youve already been diagnosed, a couple of extra tips to manage your diabetes: o Be active all days of the week o Work with a health professional to manage your diabetes. Remember knowing your ABC (A1C, Blood pressure, and Cholesterol levels) of diabetes is important in helping you manage the disease successfully.  To help you understand the A1C test better, click this link on the ADA website . The post Your Diet and Diabetes: What You Need to Know appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pumpkin Spice Energy Bites

September 30 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Yes, I am jumping on the pumpkin spice bandwagon. I couldn’t resist doing a pumpkin recipe (it is fall after all) and if you do a sweet pumpkin recipe, you have to add pumpkin pie spice, right? This kind of reminds me of the time I accidentally wore the school colors on spirit day when I was in high school and I had to spend the whole day explaining to everyone that no, I didn’t have school spirit, and that the navy blue t-shirt I was wearing was just a coincidence. “Hey Kiersten, do we have a quiz today in biology?” “I DIDN’T MEAN TO WEAR THIS SHIRT TODAY! IT WAS AN ACCIDENT! I HATE THIS SCHOOL!” That was the worst day. Sometimes I throw things together just to eat, not really intending to blog about it; this is one of those recipes. I bought an adorable little pie pumpkin and made puree with it for another recipe and had just a little bit left, so I added a little almond butter and maple syrup, folded in oats and raisins and pepitas, put in a little sprinkle-sprinkle of pumpkin pie spice, and rolled the mixture into balls. Random! But they […]

Nut-and-Seed Energy Balls

September 2 2019 VegKitchen 

Nut-and-Seed Energy Balls These intensely rich, super-seed and nut butter treats are meant to be consumed in small portions -- one or two at a time -- not scarfed down! Unlike other energy snacks, you need no blender or food processor to make them. This makes a great late-afternoon pick-me-up, post-workout snack, or even a good way to start the day. The post Nut-and-Seed Energy Balls appeared first on VegKitchen.

An Indonesian Dream In Gothenburg

August 16 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Sweden is a good country to be vegan in, even though traditionally thoughts of meatballs and pickled herrings come to mind when thinking of the land of Vikings and IKEA. Gothenburg is situated on the west coast and is Sweden’s second biggest city. It is full of vegan and vegetarian restaurants ranging from brunch and fika (coffee and cake) to plant based gastronomy places. One of my favourite vegan restaurants in Gothenburg is Sayur and even though it has only been open a few months, the food is unbelievably good. The couple who own this plant based Indonesian warung (Indonesian for restaurant) used to have one in Bali and have come to Sweden to introduce great Indonesian food. They believe that eating plant based helps not only the planet but also gives you more energy and keeps you feeling young. They want to show how good plant based vegan food can taste and they truly succeed.   Sayur is situated in the trendy area of Linnegatan, down a quiet side street. The food is Indonesian-based and full of homemade tempeh and tofu with plenty of flavour. Sayur has a very simple three dish menu and all items are vegan. The […] The post An Indonesian Dream In Gothenburg appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Green Tiger In Chiang Mai, Thailand

July 8 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

There are so many wonderful things about Thailand, and even more so in the northern city of Chiang Mai. One of those things is a Green Tiger. Tucked in a quiet alley inside the quaint Old City of Chiang Mai, the Green Tiger House, and its plant-based Reform Kafé, is a peaceful oasis that awaits you, where you can enter a delightful world. Many hotels have various free amenities, and even a pool, but Green Tiger goes further with solar-heated water, energy-saving LED lights, natural body care products, and an area for used books and magazines. And there is outstandingly friendly service, who is ready to help you with whatever you need -- and even some things you didnt yet know you needed! Green Tiger House isnt just remarkable because its a fully plant-based hotel. Green Tiger House and Reform Kafé stand on their own merits as truly excellent places to stay and eat at, regardless of your diet. Reform Kafé serves both Thai and Western food, including khao soi, Chiang Mais delectable signature dish, as well as scrumptious curries, stir fries, pad thai, and soups, in addition to sandwiches, veggie burgers, and pasta, plus salads, smoothies, fruit and vegetable […] The post Green Tiger In Chiang Mai, Thailand appeared first on The Veggie Blog.


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