easter - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi

Custard cake recipe | eggless custard cream cake | custard powder cake

Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel

Brown Rice and Apples Salad










easter vegetarian recipes

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri

October 20 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Sana on the left Sana Javeri Kadri is the founder of Diaspora Co., a radically different spice collective dedicated to equity, sustainable agriculture, and decolonization. We’ve been fortunate to try Diaspora’s heirloom, organic, single-origin turmeric powder, and let’s just say it’s going to be very hard to go back to enjoying any other powdered turmeric ever again. Sana lives between Mumbai and Oakland, California. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I crave routine and am most productive when Im following a routine. However, Im unable to do deep thinking work or larger creative work in the middle of a hectic routine, so I like to keep at least one day of the week wide open for creative projects and giving myself the time and space I need to create something important. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I have been trying really hard to wake up, spend as little time on my phone as possible and then make myself a nourishing drink and most importantly, make myself some breakfast. One of my worst habits is to wake up, get on my phone, start responding to emails and then quickly get changed for work and dive straight into a full workday without taking any time to nourish myself or check in with my body. It means that by 1pm Im starving, cranky and already tired for the day. The life changing power of breakfast is something Im still learning… -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My girlfriend and I try not to spend too much time on our phones before bed, or looking at a screen. She recently introduced a 20 mins of reading before bed practice that were trying to stick to, its my favorite way to wind down and Im committing to not responding to work emails at 10:45pm, even if its 11:15am in Mumbai and my team there is just getting fired up. Work in progress. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  My therapist guides me into mindfulness during our sessions every week because I often come in feeling stressed, frantic and a bit fragile. Shes always able to help me get back in touch with my body and begin to feel grounded again. At her urging, I handle all my stressful work calls or emails sitting outside in the sunshine, ideally with my bare feet in the ground. This practice of grounding has been particularly helpful to me in the past few months of managing a stressful season. I also recently downloaded the Headspace app, and just the five minutes everyday of meditation has made a huge difference to me. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – In Oakland – Bread srsly gluten free sourdough, crispy fried egg cooked in ghee topped with smoked paprika, turmeric and salt, sliced avocado or smoky pinto beans or sliced tomatoes or any veggie leftovers I can wrangle from the fridge, maybe a slice of bacon if Im wanting some extra fat. In Mumbai – a loaded crispy veggie dosa. Either way, I love hot and savory breakfast. The cold and sweet breakfast tradition isnt common in India so, cereal and granola with milk culture is something I find very odd about the United States. Lunch – Leftovers express. My girlfriend and I both work long hours, so our saving grace is prepping large meals a couple times a week and then subsisting on leftovers. Gluten-free pasta with canned early girls (I can 80 lb every summer so that we never have to buy store bought tomato sauce) with every vegetable in the fridge/­­our imperfect produce box and ground beef is a family classic. Rosie is always joking that my stomach doubles when it comes to pasta and shrinks for everything else. Shes not wrong. Snack – My favorite snack is stovetop popcorn. Growing up in Mumbai we never had a microwave, it was my parents most loathed kitchen appliance. So now Im following that tradition of never owning a microwave. My favorite stovetop popcorn is popped in ghee and then topped with nutritional yeast, turmeric, and salt. Its perfect. Dinner - My perfect dinner is khichdi (spiced rice and lentils cooked in ghee and heavy on the ginger, turmeric and cumin), thick full fat yogurt, masala okra, a little bit of pickle (Brooklyn Delhi achaars are divine) and a side of spicy amaranth battered fish. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I used to do caffeine, in a delicious ghee, turmeric, cardamom and coconut sugar concoction, but over time Ive stopped being able to handle it. It started to make my stomach hurt and made me anxious. So I now drink either matcha with rice milk and date syrup, or hot chocolate with hemp oil, coconut sugar and adaptogens if Im needing the extra nourishment. Some days, if Ive slept enough and rested enough, I do better on just water and breakfast, no extra boost needed. -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? I had a notorious sweet tooth all the way until my early twenties – I couldnt be trusted with bars of chocolate and was known to sneak spoonfuls of cake first thing in the morning. However the older Ive gotten (Im still technically in the early twenties), sweets just give me a sugar crash and make me feel sluggish. As an avid lover of food, Id rather eat plenty of things that make me feel fantastic, than the things that make me feel terrible. Both Rosie and I have been surprised and how quickly our respective sweet tooths have disappeared since we started living together, and how easily weve been able to cut out sugar from our life once we could verbalize how terrible it made us feel. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I swear by cannabis tinctures. Im not big on cannabis in other ways, but I find cannabis to be the only way to really deal with chronic pain. Ive also started using Super Good Hemps Turmeric Full Spectrum Hemp Oil in my morning drinks, and I find that it has similar effects. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I used to weight lift and do Crossfit pretty intensely, but had a really awful injury in 2016. Since then, Ive really had to reframe my definition of exercise. Now, I consider it an extension of my healing process. Intense exercise just isnt possible for me in the same way, so I stick to swimming as often as I can (usually a couple times a week), doing Nike Training body weight workouts at home, and talking our dog for a long walk every evening. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I love exercise and do best when Im outside and moving my body. Rosie and I try to take our pup Lilly out for a hike at least once a week, and we notice how much more present are with each other and our work when weve exercised.  That being said, Im also an incredibly competitive person, so reframing exercise to no longer be an intensely competitive thing has been very hard for me. I find it difficult to work up the enthusiasm to go on a leisurely swim, without a team to train with, or a competition to work towards. Switching off my producing strategy is my biggest challenge. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Both! It took me a long time to love my face, acknowledge that it was beautiful despite not looking like everything I saw on magazines and on billboards. But that acceptance and love for my external beauty definitely came from tending to, and growing confidence in my inner beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I grew up using raw honey as a face cleanser, handmade ayurvedic soaps for my body, and a mom who never used makeup. So that has informed a lot of my skincare today. My skincare guru is 300% Abena, the founder of Hanahana Beauty, I use her shea butter exfoliating body bar and swear by it, and I use Abenas recipe for a rose water, tea tree oil and jojoba oil soaked cotton pad as a cleanser morning and night, and it has been a complete game changer for getting my glow back. Ive also been using Curology, which is a custom dermatologist service, that is super affordable and came highly recommended by friends. They prescribed me their night cream, which has really taken care of my breakouts and blackheads. Im not usually big on using chemicals on my skin but have found Curology to be a minimalist option that really works. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Cutting out sugar and gluten entirely is the most obvious one – I break out as soon as I am eating sugar, so its first to go. I also use a turmeric, honey, hemp oil and cornmeal face mask every couple weeks that always makes me feel radiant. My dentist has noticed and commented on the huge difference in my teeth that shes seen since I stopped drinking coffee – theyre whiter than ever before and need much less cleaning, which for me is reason enough to skip the coffee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Abenas DIY rose water, jojoba oil and tea tree oil cotton pads! I used to be a ardent fan of Thayers Rose Witch Hazel Toner but in my experience with skincare – once you go DIY, its impossible to go back :) That being said – I will admit to being a Glossier believer, I didnt use makeup until I discovered Glossier concealer and highlighter. Its so easy and lazy but it works so wonderfully. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Taking our pup out for a long walk by the water is a really grounding activity for me. I have no idea how I managed my stress before she moved in with us. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Honestly Im a spokesperson for not really managing my stress well. My partner often comes home to a fuming, off the hook Sana and it takes significant chatting, massaging and cuddling to work me out of the state that I can get into if Im very stressed.  Im an extrovert and a peoples person so being around people that I love is my best coping mechanism. That being said – I have to be careful not to emotionally dump onto my loved ones, just because theyre willing to be there for me. Ive definitely been guilty of that in the past. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? The first one is to make sure I get a really good nights sleep, and make sure Im not drinking alcohol, eating dairy or any processed food. Usually, managing my sleep and diet is the easiest way to kick a cold before it hits. If the cold cant be stopped, I usually start by accepting that my bodys way of asking for rest is by getting sick, and its important to just honor that and completely rest. Then – turmeric, ginger, honey tea all day long.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? Ive been trying really hard to take weekends off, and any weekend that I succeed at that- the balance feels so much better. Honestly, as a young business owner, the hustle is so glamorized and romanticized. Youre told that now is your time to grind, and to get further in your career. Whilst this is true, Id also argue that now is the time to establish healthy boundaries and habits in your life so you learn how to maximize your productivity and your potential. Any day that I work a 16 hour day (which is too often), I know that I am not focusing on the bigger picture, and am actually sacrificing my long term goals as a business owner. Remembering that, and focusing on working more effectively, rather than working more, has been a huge step towards achieving healthier work life balance. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Therapy. Every week, no matter what. That perspective and process is something Im deeply committed to. Therapy rarely feels easy, but it is always in service of myself and my larger goals, so its the easiest way to feel on track. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Eating based on how it makes me feel, not how it sounds or tastes. As soon as I focused on how it made me feel, my taste buds changed, I lost weight, my skin issues cleared and I became a very healthy person, with remarkable ease. I know how obnoxious that sounds, Im sorry. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I fly home to India. I know this is incredibly privileged, and a bit excessive, but shuffling back and forth between two continents constantly gives me a broader perspective, and somehow – the psychology of taking an international flight is an incredibly cathartic and productive experience for me. I almost always come back from my trips to India with fresh eyes, new vision and a bigger picture. Thats true for all travel, in my opinion. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. The fundamental line of Crossfit – eat meat and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruit, little starch and no sugar. has influenced my self nourishment beyond any book or movie. I may not be a competitive Crossfit athlete any more but eating to nourish my body is so much more fulfilling than eating to nourish my cravings. Knowledge --  What was your path to starting Diaspora Co.? You can read a lot more about that here, but long story short – Ive been working in the food industry since I moved to the United States in 2012 and I quickly noticed that whilst the farm to table movement felt at its zenith in the Bay Area, it only applied to certain things. Spices and imported foods were somehow excluded from those quality standards. The idea for a new kind of import export company formed in November 2016, and in February 2017 I quit my job and embarked on seven months of research visiting farms, research institutions and markets across India. Diaspora Co. was formally launched as a direct trade sustainable food company with our first offering of turmeric in August 2017. Its been a total rollercoaster since then. --  Can you tell us about the kind of turmeric you sell and how it differs from most turmeric one can buy at a store today? Im biased, but Im also overly honest so I dont think it would be an exaggeration to say that we sell the worlds best turmeric. Historically, there hasnt ever been a quality standard for how to define the highest quality, beyond arguments and branding largely based in exoticism and the colonizer/­­savior mindset. It is the freshest, as in it was harvested in 2018 and is milled every 3 months, versus powders that can be up to five years old and still on a grocery store shelf, stale as ever. It is the most potent variety of turmeric out there, with a tested 4.7% curcumin content. It is a fragrant and exceptional heirloom rhizome variety that compares to other turmeric powders out there as an heirloom summer tomato would to a grocery store store tomato grown for storage not flavor. Finally, it is organically farmed in a spice agriculture landscape where pesticide overuse and residue is notorious. Phew! --  Can you tell us about your decision to pay your turmeric producer really well and about owning the fact that your product costs more because of this? I think part of our work is that what the industry considers paying our producer really well, we consider basic human dignity of paying a living wage and for the price of sustainability, flavor and honest work. If we didnt pay our partner farmers the prices that we do, they wouldnt have the power or the incentive to produce at the standard that they do. To me, this big word decolonizing really just means how are you going to empower the people around you who have historically been stripped of their power? Paying our farmers well is actually the easiest embodiment of our decolonizing mission. As for owning our higher prices – we simply couldnt exist without charging what we do. And ultimately, were dedicating to riding the fine line between being affordable to the home cook and being a leader of sustainability and supply chains and therefore being regarded as a luxury product. I have to believe that we can do both. Turmeric latte blends or turmeric centered businesses that dont want to pay our prices or wholesale from us because theyd like to continue to exploit their sources and maintain their ridiculously high margins, Im in this for the long game and their reckoning will come. It always does. Apologies if I sound cold and jaded, business is vicious and Ive had to steel parts of myself to tolerate it all. --  What are some of your favorite ways to use Diaspora Co. turmeric? Honestly, turmeric was so woven into the fabric of my childhood that it was invisible to me. We cooked with it, made beauty treatments with it, and we used it to mark life and death. So even now, my favorite way to use turmeric is still in simple Indian vegetable dishes – lightly cooked okra tossed in cumin, turmeric and salt is the definition of comfort for me, or a coconut milk turmeric chicken broth with squash and long beans. Comforting, vegetable heavy home cooking is how I innately know how to use turmeric. Lattes just arent for me. --  We love your photos! How did you become a photographer? When I was 14 and going through a really tough phase at school (bullying, puberty, the patriarchy et all), my parents taught me how to use their DSLR. Ive used photography as the lens through which I make sense of and connect with the world ever since. When my academic pursuits turned to food and agriculture in college, my lens turned to it too. In so many ways, I recognize that I was never particularly talented or the best or the brightest, I was always just a really solid worker, and entirely self motivated, and that meant that once I started photographing, I just never stopped, and now here we are. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Ive found that balancing my role as a business owner with my role as a photographer is what gives me the most joy professionally. So I have a couple exciting photo shoots planned for the coming months that will be a welcome respite to the chaos of holiday e-commerce. That, and I havent seen my girlfriend and pup in almost a month since Ive been in India and I miss them terribly, so very excited to come home to my two favorite living beings. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Were so lucky to live in Oakland, where eating out is an incredible experience, especially at a time where women chefs are absolutely excelling in their field. So eating delicious meals by our favorite local women chefs is my favorite treat – Cosecha Cafe (Mexican), Nyum Bai (Cambodian), Champa Garden (Laotian) and 20th Century Cafe (Eastern European) to name a few.  -- A book to feed the soul:  I just finished reading Yvon Chounards Let My People Go Surfing and its been so deeply inspiring to me. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Akwaeke Emezi, they are my favorite writer, a member of this third culture/­­diaspora/­­immigrant excellence interweb community and has navigated their self care so beautifully and visibly through the years. Id love to learn more from them. Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Sophie Peoples, Assad Keval /­­/­­ This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Ashley Neese Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Amanda Forcella Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 29 2018 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterThe Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl This year I traveled to Ethiopia in the weeks before Easter - one of several special times of fasting, when the majority of the country eats entirely vegan! I explored the central cities, traveled overland to the north, went trekking in the highlands and stayed with families in remote villages. As with all my travels and culinary research, I am extremely grateful for the privilege to learn, share & exchange, and be guided & supported by many families and professional cooks who invited me in their kitchens and shared amazing meals with me. Since returning to Berlin, I’ve been cooking Ethiopian and Eritrean food practically non-stop, recreating recipes and dishes, constantly inviting friends and guests to my cooking studio for lunch and dinner parties. Abebech showing me traditional village cooking in the Ethiopian Highlands. Making Injera for the first time in Ethiopia The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA is my newest cookbook with original recipes, artwork, photography and stories inspired by these latest culinary adventures. It includes over 70 recipes based on the mouth-watering meals in bustling cities & towns, at road-stop eateries, and in rural highland villages. As with my previous 5 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. The Lotus and the Artichoke is the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. The ETHIOPIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 6th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 140 pages with 70+ recipes and over 60 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by my travels and culinary adventures in East Africa - Also based on experiences with international communities of Europe (London, Paris, and Berlin) and North America (Philadelphia, New York, and Washington D.C.) and over 25 years of vegan cooking - Ethiopian & Eritrean classics, familiar restaurant & family favourites, delicious delights, wonders & surprises, and creative culinary experiments - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Doro Wat – spicy seitan stew Spinach Dinach Butecha – Chickpea “Egg” Salad Minchet Abish – spicy soy mince & walnuts Duba Wot – pumpkin stew Shimbra Asa – chickpea “fish” Asa (Jackfruit) Tibs Fosolia – green beans & carrots Pizza Lalibela Ingudai Tibs – spicy mushrooms Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping Ambasha – sweet bread Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – ETHIOPIA - Traditional Berbere spice mix (simple + advanced) - Nitir Qibe – spiced butter/­­oil - Mitmita – extra hot spice mix - Yewot Qimen – black pepper spice mix - Shiro – chickpea/­­bean spice mix - Data (Yekarya Delleh) – roasted chili, garlic, onion & herb sauce - Traditional Injera – Ethiopian sourdough crepe - Quick Injera - Ambasha - sweet raisin bread - Doro Dabo – baked stuffed bread - Difo Dabo - spiced bread - Pizza Lalibela - with tomato sauce & roasted potato topping - Sambosa – savory pastry with lentil filling - Senig Karia – roasted spicy stuffed chilies - Injera Firfir – traditional flatbread with spicy tomato sauce - Yesuf Fitfit – chopped injera & lemon sunflower seed dressing - Kita (Injekita) – sweet breakfast flatbread & jam - Chornake /­­ Pasty – fried bread - Genfo – roasted wheat & barley porridge - Selata - super simple salad - Selata Delux - with mango, dates, avocado mixed greens & lentils - Butecha - chickpea “egg” salad - Selata Timtim - tomato salad - Selata Dinich - potato salad - Selata Bekarot - carrot salad - Telba - roasted flax dressing - Shiro Wot - chickpea puree - Misir Wot – red lentils - Doro Wot – spicy seitan - Soy Tibs - spicy soymeat strips - Ingudai Wot - spicy mushrooms - Bamia - spicy okra - Minchet Abish - spicy soy mince & walnuts - Shimbra Asa – spicy chickpea “fish” - Kik Alicha – yellow lentils - Atakilt Alicha – cabbage, carrots & potatoes - Keysir - beet root - Duba Alicha - pumpkin stew - Tikr Gomen - greens with garlic - Spinach Dinich - spinach & roasted potatoes - Fosolia – green beans & carrots - Asa Tibs – lemon pepper jackfruit fritters - Tofu Alicha - batter fried tofu in mild garlic & onion sauce - Ingudai Alicha – mushrooms w/­­ creamy cashew, lemon, pepper, thyme, parsley - Peppers & Potatoes - garlic ginger stir-fry - Inkulal Firfir – spicy tofu scramble & tomatoes - Ful – fava beans - Ayib – cottage cheese - Bedergan – roasted eggplant - Vegetable Lentil Soup - Vegetable Pasta – spaghetti with mixed chopped vegetables - Macaroni Firfir – noodles with garlic onion tomato sauce on injera - Shepherd’s Pie – lentil filling & mashed potato topping - Ethiopian Mashed Potatoes - Traditional Coffee Ceremony - Spiced Black Tea - Roiboos tea with lemon, ginger &cardamon - Mango Moringa Banana Smoothie - Injera w/­­ dates - Banana Bread - Fasting Muffins - Rooibos Tea Ice Cream Video: Justin P. Moore Music: Nils Kercher Nanfulle from Ancient Intimations (live) (C)2016 Ancient Pulse Music PRE-ORDER the ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2NrnNXl The post ETHIOPIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Creamy Spinach Penne with Watermelon

August 11 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Creamy Spinach Penne with Watermelon Hi friends, hope you’ve had a great summer. We took a little break from the blog as we have been in Copenhagen and Barcelona. But we are back now with a great little dinner recipe. It’s a version of something we have been eating all summer. It has been record-breaking hot in Europe so pairing lukewarm buckwheat penne with juicy and crunchy watermelon has been feeling very right, very often.  Satisfying, simple and soothing. Our kids love this buckwheat penne and that also plays a part why it’s been on repeat. In fact, our little Noah (soon two years old!) starts crying if we serve him spaghetti or any other pasta: “Noooooh, [I want] my pasta“. In this version we are dressing (almost drenching) the pasta in a herby spinach, herb and almond milk sauce that is inspired by something we saw in Deliciously Ella’s feed a while back. Its very good, creamy and quick! We then stir in chickpeas and avocado and top everything with watermelon, feta cheese, almonds and heirloom tomatoes. It is a pretty awesome little dinner that can come together in 15 minutes if you are quick with the knife and good at multitasking. There are plenty of ways to spin this. o If you cannot find buckwheat penne you can of course use regular or whole wheat penne. o Vegans can just skip the cheese (and perhaps add in a little nutritional yeast for extra flavour). o Fresh or roasted corn could be a great addition when they are in season. o You can swap basil and mint for cilantro and parsley for a more Middle Eastern take. o If you are allergic to nuts, use oat milk or regular milk and swap the almonds for toasted sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds. o For a wintery version of this, you can add in roasted broccoli and pomegranate seeds instead of watermelon. Buckwheat Penne with Creamy Spinach Sauce & Watermelon Serves 4 Buckwheat pasta penne for 4 persons (approx 400 g /­­14 oz) Creamy Spinach Sauce 1 onion 2 garlic cloves 1 tbsp olive oil 125 g /­­ 3 packed cups fresh spinach 400 ml /­­ 1 1/­­2  cups almond milk a good handful each of fresh basil and mint 1-2 tsp maple syrup 1 small lemon, juice a large pinch sea salt & pepper To Serve 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 oz tin cooked chickpeas 1/­­2 watermelon 1 avocado 10 heirloom cherry tomatoes 15 toasted almonds 10 fresh mint 100 g feta cheese Boil salted water in a large saucepan, add the pasta and cook according to the instructions on the package. Meanwhile prepare the sauce. Peel and chop onion and garlic. Heat olive oil in a saucepan. Sauté onions and garlic on medium high heat until translucent and light brown. Then lower the heat, add spinach and let it wilt down, pour in almond milk and let simmer for a couple of minutes. Add the remaining ingredients, take it off the heat and use a stick (immersion) blender to mix it smooth. Taste to check that the flavours are balanced. You can add more lemon juice, herbs, salt or maple syrup if you prefer. When the pasta is ready, drain the water in a sieve, give it a quick rinse and transfer the pasta back to the saucepan along with a splash of olive oil. Pour the spinach sauce over the cooked pasta and stir to combine. Drain the chickpeas and cut the avocado into cubes and add them to the creamy pasta. Cut the watermelon into cubes, divide the tomatoes in halves, chop almonds and mint and crumble the feta cheese. Arrange all those ingredients on top of the creamy pasta penne. Serve and dive in!

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus

June 14 2018 My New Roots 

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus If there is one trick Ive learned in all of my years cooking, both at home and in restaurants, it is this: caramelized onions can make almost anything taste amazing. Theyre the ridiculously simple, yet magical ingredient that turns an ordinary dish into something so rich-tasting and satisfying that people go ...oh hi excuse me, this is incredible. I think the simple reason that caramelized onions taste so good, is because they are a labour of love. Not like an all-day stirring the pot kinda deal, but most definitely a food that you cant just leave on the stove and dive into an Instagram vortex. No. Caramelized onions take care and attention, at least for the better part of half an hour, and the results are so worth it I bet youll catch yourself multi-tasking at the stove tonight just to have some on hand to gussy up your omelet this weekend (boss move there, by the way). The more accurate reason that caramelized onions taste so good however, isnt technically caramelization - its called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction is a browning reaction similar to caramelization, but with one distinct difference: caramelization is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars, while Maillard is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids (proteins). And yes, there is enough protein in an onion to elicit this response - how thrilling for us! Although the Maillard reaction is very complex and complicated, what we do know is that it requires heat to transform and rearrange sugars and amino acids to create new and fantastic flavour molecules in and on your food, making it even more delicious. If youve ever eaten a golden slice of toast, enjoyed a rich cup of coffee, or nibbled on a grilled vegetable, youve experienced the pure pleasure that all of this this chemical commotion is responsible for. Science! Harnessing the power of the Maillard reaction can make you a better cook, because things that are browned properly taste more intensely, more complex, and well, better. Without even being aware of it, its the reason youll reach for the roasted veggies with the crispiest edges, or the reason that you prefer a fried egg over a boiled one (no judgement!). There are a couple ways of making this spectacular series of chemical reactions work for you, and the first is high heat. Maillard will not occur at very low temperatures, especially in situations where the food is not in direct contact with the heat, like it is on a skillet or grill for instance. When youre roasting veggies, make sure the oven is at least 400°F /­­ 200°C. When youre making pizza, you can crank it up even higher, to get those beautifully blistered crust edges that make your mouth water. The second way is to keep the food youre cooking on the dry side. For instance, have you ever noticed how if you wash mushrooms (which you should actually never do), theyll never really get brown and crusty? Too much moisture! Instead, brush those fungi gently to remove any dirt or debris, then put them in a screeching hot pan with some ghee and dont stir them. I talk more about this technique here. This is the same reason you need a large pan for these caramelized onions, since theyll need the space to allow the water to evaporate around them. If the onions are too close together, theyll only steam each other. Eew. If you’re oven roasting vegetables for dinner, cut them in the morning and leave them out all day uncovered so that the surface water will evaporate, and the veggies will brown more easily. Yes, this seems like a bit of a hassle, but the culinary nerd in me admits that its cool because it works. So, where does the hummus come into this story? Well, hummus is pretty much a food group in my world. Ive made so many variations with so many kinds of legumes, spices, alt seed butters, toppings, and stir-ins, that I could hardly believe I had never tried it with the ingredient that could single-handedly save humanity: caramelized onions. I knew that deep richness of the onions would meld perfectly with the creamy dip, and make the flavour even better. I wasnt wrong! The only thing that I wanted to improve upon, was the protein content - not because Im obsessed with protein, but simply because I thought it could be higher. To do that I simply swapped out the traditional chickpeas for white lentils, or urad dal. We not only get more protein from this change-up, but almost double the fiber, with less sodium, less fat, and less sugar. Sweet. This dip is the perfect, rich compliment to all the crisp and light, early summer veggies popping up. I went to my friends farm and picked some seriously beautiful radishes and young carrots, which paired so well with the caramelized onion flavour. I also had some Life-Changing Crackers on hand, which always make dipping more delicious. One thing I changed from the first version to the third, was the onions on top. Instead of blending all of them into the dip, I used about a third of them on top, which allows you to scoop a few tender morsels up with each bite. This delivers even more caramelized onion flavour and texture, which, let us be reminded, is the whole point of this exercise. Even though this hummus keeps well for at least five days in the fridge (you can even freeze it!), it is best eaten freshly made at room temperature, since the flavour is at its peak then. And because you’re wondering, you can find white or ivory lentils at Indian grocers, Middle Eastern markets, or some natural food stores. They are the skinned and split version of urad dal, which is black, so make sure you buy the huskless version! If you cant find them at all, simply use chickpeas - it will be just as delicious.     Print recipe     Caramelized Onion and White Lentil Hummus Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup raw white lentils (huskless split black mapte beans /­­ urad dal dhuli), soaked if possible 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. balsamic vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 tsp. ground cumin heaping 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1 batch caramelized onions (from the recipe below) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish Directions: 1. Start by cooking the lentils. If youve soaked them beforehand (even an hour helps!) drain and rinse them very well. If youre starting from raw, place the lentils in the cooking pot, cover with plenty of water and vigorously swish them around with your hands. When the water becomes murky, drain and repeat until the water is clear, or mostly clear (this can take 3-4 rounds). Place lentils in the cooking pot and cover generously with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook partially covered for about 20-30 minutes, depending on whether or not you soaked them. The lentils should be cooked until mushy. If the pot becomes dry during cooking, simply add more water. Once cooked, drain the lentils if there is any remaining water. Set aside to cool. 2. In a food processor pulse the garlic until finely minced. Add the tahini, lemon juice, balsamic, salt, cumin and pepper, then blend until combined. Add the cooked lentils and blend on high until smooth. Lastly, add about two-thirds of the caramelized onions, and pulse to incorporate them into the dip. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. 3. To serve, spoon the hummus into a serving bowl. Make a small divot in the center of the dip and spoon in the remaining caramelized onions. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with your toppings of choice (I used toasted black sesame and chive flowers for a splash of colour, but this is totally optional). Serve with crispy fresh veggies and crackers or toasted flatbreads. Enjoy. Caramelized Onions Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. neutral-tasting coconut oil or ghee 1 lb. /­­ 500g yellow onions 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Peel the onions and slice them as evenly as possible into half-rounds. 2. Melt coconut oil or ghee over medium heat in the largest skillet you have. Add the onions, then salt, and stir well to coat. Once the onions are coated, turn the heat down to a medium-low, stirring occasionally - more often towards the end - until theyve fully caramelized, about 25-30 minutes. If the pot becomes too dry during cooking, reduce the heat a tad, or add a teeny bit of water adn stir well. In the end, youre looking for soft, silky, and golden brown goodness! Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days, or freeze for 3 months. If it’s your first time caramelizing onions and you’re feeling intimidated, here is a stellar step-by-step tutorial from Bon Appétit. It varies ever so slightly from my method, but you’ll get the picture! Big love and happy hummus, Sarah B. Show me your hummus on Instagram: #mnrcaramelizedonionhummus  *   *   *   *   * Hello dear friends! There are only a few spots left for our January 2019 Wild Heart High Spirit retreat and we’d love to see you in Bali!  Join us along with 15 other women to unwind, reconnect, and find the inspiration to ignite you on your health journey. Our thoughtfully-designed program will awaken and nourish your entire being – body, mind, and spirit! This is a true celebration of life, and we get to do it together in paradise! Come see what all the magic is about.  Much love, Sarah B, Mikkala and the Golden Circle Retreats team The post Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter

March 27 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Veggie Grain Platter Hi, David here. I’ll get to the recipe soon but first I just wanted to share a little scene from last night. Isac was watching a baking program for kids and as I was tucking him in, he thoroughly explained the whole process of making croissants to me. You have so much butter in croissants, dad. Like, a lot. You put it on the dough and fold it over the butter like this. And you hit it with the rolling pin like this, bam bam bam. When it comes to numbers and letters, he can be a little clueless, but the fact that our three year-old had memorized all the details in croissant baking from just watching it once on tv, made me all happy and proud. I’m not saying that mastering a croissant is more important than math, but teaching our kids how to cook has been one of the things I’ve really looked forward to as a dad. And he is really into it. The little kids stove has long been his favorite toy both at home and in kindergarten an he often serves imaginary pancakes to all his friends. I’ve promised him that we will make croissants together tonight so I’m off to prep a dough right after this (making the rye croissants from Green Kitchen Travels). I’ll report back with how it goes. Today’s recipe doesn’t have anything to do with croissants but Isac does play a little part as kitchen helper in the video below. So, the recipe. There is one obvious reason why grain bowls have become so popular in the last couple of years. Their looks. If you don’t know what a grain bowl is, it’s basically a mix of roasted and raw vegetables on a bed of grains and herbs arranged in a bowl. The mix of vegetables often make these bowls super colorful and therefore also very popular on instagram. Grain bowls are however more then just pretty. They are hearty and provide a variety of textures and flavors. They are also very easy to adapt to what you have at home and what’s in season. We often make grain bowls for lunch, with any cooked grain, millet or quinoa as the bed, adding leftover vegetables from the fridge on top. In this recipe, we have taken the grain bowl concept and turned it into a platter. It’s topped with roasted and fresh spring vegetables, feta cheese, egg halves and hazelnuts. It’s a beautiful dish and a great one to make for Easter dinner. If you want to take the Easter concept even further, you could add roasted asparagus as well. We use an organic five-grain mix (emmer wheat, barley, gamut, brown rice and oat groats) from Zeta as the grain base but if you can’t find something similar, go with your favorite grain. Grains thrive with flavor friends, so we have paired these with a quick salsa made from marinated bell peppers, olives, capers, herbs and lemon. And stirred in a bit of feta cheese and toasted hazelnuts as well. It’s all there, flavours, looks and textures. Roasted Veggie Grain Platter with Bell Pepper Salsa Serves 4 To make this vegan, you can simply skip the eggs and feta cheese. 1 x 250 g bag Zeta 5-grain mix (or grains of choice) Roasted vegetables: 1 bunch carrots 3 purple spring onions or 2 red onions 2 small zucchini 1 tbsp olive oil sea salt Bell pepper & olive salsa: 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup grilled marinated bell pepper 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup Lecchino olives 3 tbsp capers 5-6 stalks fresh parsley and mint 1/­­2 lemon, juice 4 tbsp olive oil Topping: 2-3 medium soft boiled eggs 150 g feta cheese 100 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup hazelnuts, toasted and chopped 2 handfuls mache lettuce 6 heirloom cherry tomatoes, halved 1 bunch radishes Preheat the oven at 200°C /­­ 400°F and cover a baking tray with baking paper. Peal or clean the carrots and trim off the outer layer of the onion. Cut the onion lengthwise and the zucchini in bite-size pieces. Place the vegetables on the tray. Drizzle with oil and salt and roast for 15-20 minutes. Cook the grains in a large bowl of salted water according to the instructions on the package and drain in a sieve once they are ready. Make the salsa by chopping all the ingredients finely. Place in a bowl, squeeze over lemon juice and drizzle with oil. Fold the salsa into the grains, reserving some of it for serving. Crumble 2/­­3 of the feta cheese into the grains and half of the hazelnuts. Toss so everything is mixed. Pour the grains onto a platter, top with the roasted vegetables, lettuce, tomatoes, radishes, egg halves, feta cheese and hazelnuts. Drizzle with olive oil and serve with the remaining salsa and some sourdough bread on the side. Disclosure: We were compensated by Zeta for creating this recipe and video using some of their products. All words are our own. 

Fattouche Salad

August 9 2017 VegKitchen 

Fattouche Salad Fattouche salad is a Middle Eastern classic that’s not as well known in western culture as is tabbouleh, though maybe it should be -- it’s just as delicious. It gets its characteristic touch from the use of small bits of toasted pita bread mingling with juicy tomatoes, cucumbers, and fresh herbs. It’s good all year round, though especially […] The post Fattouche Salad appeared first on VegKitchen.

Amazon Prime Day is Tuesday, July 11 2017

July 6 2017 VegKitchen 

Amazon Prime Day is Tuesday, July 11 2017 Did you know that Amazon Prime Day is Tuesday, July 11, 2017? If you didnt, you need to hear about the amazing deals you are going to get. For roughly 24 hours, Amazon Prime Members will be treated to a ton of deal offers, beginning July 10, at 9:00 PM Eastern Daylight time. Its basically Christmas […] The post Amazon Prime Day is Tuesday, July 11 2017 appeared first on VegKitchen.

chum chum recipe | cham cham sweet recipe | chomchom recipe

April 22 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

chum chum recipe | cham cham sweet recipe | chomchom recipechum chum recipe | cham cham sweet recipe | chomchom recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. it is believed that chomchom dessert originated from porabari, tangail, bangladesh but it is hugely popular in eastern india too. the texture and recipe is very similar to rasgulla or even rasmalai but has a unique taste of its own by stuffing mawa or khoya in between. typically is coated with dedicated coconut powder as a last step and decorated with cherries or tutti fruities. Continue reading chum chum recipe | cham cham sweet recipe | chomchom recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Carrot Cake (vegan & gluten free)

April 6 2017 Veganpassion 

Carrot Cake (vegan & gluten free) Spring is spoiling us and I'm enjoying it to the fullest. Soon we'll be searching egg alternatives between the grasses because it's easter time *yaaay!!!* As a spring treat I created a carrot cake. Gluten free and without any refined sugars it's full of flavours: from buckwheat, to hazelnuts, carrot, bananas and caramelized coconut sugar! What a celebration :-) The cake consists of a biscuit and a coconut cream and it's prepared very quick. If you don't like coconut you can use vegan whip cream if you like and garnish it with hazelnuts. Makes one cake with 18 cm diameter. For the biscuit: 1/­­3 cup + 1 tbsp. rice whole grain flour 1/­­3 cup buckwheat flour 1/­­4 cup hazelnuts, grounded 1 tbsp. starch 4 tbsp. coconut sugar 1 pinch xanthan or tapioca starch 1 tsp. bicarb each 1 pinch cinnamon and vanilla 1 banana 1 small carrot 2 tbsp. + 2 tsp. plant based baking oil 1/­­2 cup dairy free milk 1 tbsp. white wine vinegar 2 tbsp. maple sirup Preheat oven to 338°F (170°C) air circulation. In a mixing bowl, mix together rice whole grain flour, buckwheat flour, hazelnuts, starch, coconut sugar, xanthan and bicarb. Add vanilla and cinnamon. Mash the banana with a fork and grate the carrot. Add banana, carrot with oil, dairy free milk, vinegar and maple sirup to the flour mixture and mix until the dough is smooth. Mix with a egg beater but not to long so the dough stays fluffy. Grease a springform and fill in the dough. Bake at 338°F air circulation for 25-30 minutes. Take the form out of the oven and let it cool off. For the coconut cream: 2 cans of coconut milk (refrigerated for at least 8! hours) or 3/­­4 cup + 1 tbsp. whip cream 2-4 tbsp. maple sirup 1 pack stabilizer for whipping cream coconnut chips. hazelnuts daisys Take the coconut milk out of the refrigerator and take the fatty cream from the top. You can use to coconut water to create some delicious Currys. Take the stabilizer for whip cream and cream it with a mixer. Fold in the maple sirup. Take the biscuit out of the springform carefully and cut it in two small flan cases. Use the lower one and put it on a cooling rack and spread 2-3 tbsp cream ob it. Put the second flan case on top and spread the rest of the cream on it and around it. Garnish the cake with coconut chips, hazelnuts and daisys. The cake can be stored in the fridge for 3-4 days. Have lots of fun with baking and enjoy!

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles

April 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Roasted Rainbow Root Tangles Apart from discussing important topics like if it’s worth climbing a mountain of bureaucracy to change baby Gabriel’s name (long story…), if we would be much happier running a smoothie bar on a small tropical island than living in a cold and dark Stockholm (obviously that is a yes), and how ALL of Elsa’s leggings suddenly have huge tears around the knees (she swears that she is innocent), we have also spent the past week playing around with this super simple recipe based on root shoestrings. It turns out that if you spiralize (check notes below if you don’t have a spiralizer) root vegetables, toss them in a little bit of oil and salt, arrange into tangled nests and roast for 25 minutes, you get something similar to rösti or hash browns. These little root tangles are quick, cheap and easy, they are crispy towards the edges and soft in the middle, contain a lot more nutrients than just potatoes and since they are baked instead of pan-fried, they don’t cause a smoke alarm situation in the kitchen. Not to mention how pretty they look with the different colors combined. Our kids devour them straight from the plate (they call them root fries) and we have been using these root tangles as a base for a bunch of meals lately. In this recipe we’ve topped them with yogurt and a herby chickpea salad, which is perfect as you get something creamy, a few greens and proteins along with the roots. But they also work well paired with avocado mash, hummus or with a poached egg, asparagus and spinach on top, for an Easter twist. Instead of trying to convince you with words, we did a little recipe video for our youtube channel that shows how it’s done. Press play! We always have so much fun making these videos, can’t believe it’s been seven months since we last did one - that needs to change. You can basically use any roots or hard vegetable of preference to make these - beetroot, potato, sweet potato, carrot, parsnip, turnip and even butternut squash. If you choose organic, you don’t have to bother peeling them. It actually tastes better with the peel left on, just like sweet potato fries. You can obviously flavor these root tangles in lots of ways. Try tossing them with cinnamon or sumac, or add vinegar for an acidic twist. If you prefer them crisp all the way through, you can spread them out on the trays instead of arranging them like nests. If you don’t have a spiralizer, you can use a julienne peeler or the coarse side of a box grater instead (you can place the grated roots in muffin tins if you like them to hold together better). Although a spiralizer is pretty fun tool to have at home. It doesn’t cost much and it’s great for making vegetable noodles and slices that can be used in pasta dishes, salads or thai noodle dishes. Roasted Root Tangles with Yogurt and Chickpea Salad Serves 4 1 1/­­2 lb /­­ 750 g mixed roots (we used 1 sweet potato, 3 beetroots, 1 parsnip) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 tsp salt Herby Chickpea Salad 2 cups mixed baby leaf lettuce 4 sprigs cilantro /­­ coriander 4 sprigs fresh mint 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans 2 tbsp toasted sesame oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice To serve 1 cup Turkish yogurt or coconut yogurt 1 avocado 2 tbsp mixed sesame seeds sauerkraut (fermented cabbage), store-bought or homemade (we are sharing three varieties in our new book) Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F and grease or place baking paper on two baking trays. Rinse the roots and scrub off any dirt. Trim off the edges, attach to a spiralizer and make noodles/­­ribbons/­­shoestrings (or use a julienne peeler or box grater). Drizzle with olive oil and salt and toss and mix so all root ribbons are combined. If you have very long ribbons, you can cut them with a scissor to make it easier to mix. Arrange the tangled ribbons into nests and place on the baking tray, make sure that there aren’t too many loose ribbons on the sheet or they will burn quicker. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until crispy on the outside but not yet burnt. While the roots are roasting, prepare the salad. Chop the herbs and mix with the lettuce. Rinse the chickpeas thoroughly and add them to the lettuce. Drizzle with toasted sesame oil, lemon juice and sea salt. Toss and mix. Divide the avocado into quarters, remove the stone and use a sharp knife to slice each quarter thinly. Remove the roots from the oven. Arrange 2-3 root tangles on each plate. Add a dollop of yogurt on each root tangle, top with salad, sliced avocado, sesame seeds and a spoonful of sauerkraut. Enjoy! *********** PS! Today Green Kitchen At Home is released in Australia! And in just three weeks it will launch in the UK and next month in the US. Exciting! Here are some links in case you would like to order or pre-order it: Amazon.co.uk (UK). Amazon.com (USA). Booktopia.com (Australia & NZ).

Vegan Cholent

January 10 2017 VegKitchen 

Cholent is a Jewish classic that can be considered an early predecessor to slow-cooker recipes. In its original form, its put in the oven before the Sabbath and cooked at a very low temperature for about 12 hours so that it can be eaten for the Sabbath midday or late afternoon meal. Its one of the rare Eastern European Jewish specialties that highlights beans.The post Vegan Cholent appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug

December 21 2016 My New Roots 

Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug If youve been reading My New Roots for a while, youll be familiar with my obsession with Middle Eastern cuisine. Ingredients like tahini, lemon, pomegranate, sumac, zaatar, cardamom, thyme, and sesame have big, bold flavours, and act as strong backbones for plant-based recipes, so I enjoy them on a regular basis and rely on them heavily in my recipe development. And if I am out and about in the world, I seek out restaurants serving this style of food, knowing that theyll have a solid selection of vegetarian options with satisfying flavours. Speaking of which, whenever I am back home in Toronto, I love going to a restaurant called Fat Pasha. Its an Israeli place that serves the most decadent, delicious, over-the-top versions of all my favourites: falafel, hummus, fattoush, pickles, salatim, shakshuka...but the menu show-stopper is their whole roasted cauliflower. Brought to the table like a holiday roast, a giant knife sticking out of the top, ready to be carved, I love the ceremony of the entire thing, and the myriad of flavours and textures that it delivers. Slathered in tahini sauce, topped with glistening pomegranate jewels and golden toasted pine nuts, it is savoury, salty, sweet, herby, spicy, crunchy, creamy, nutty, BAM. Stunningly beautiful and deliciously satisfying. At Fat Pasha, they also serve the whole roasted cauliflower with an incredibly spicy, tasty concoction called skhug. Skhug is a Yemeni hot sauce made from chilies, spices and fresh herbs, mainly cilantro. It ranges from wicked hot to warmly herbaceous, with cumin, coriander, cloves, and black pepper providing added depth and complexity. I friggin love this stuff (*pours skhug over entire life*). Its delicious with hummus and pita, but also yummy folded into a grain salad, stirred into soups and stews, and drizzled over roast veggies, and to whisked into dressings and sauces. Skhug comes in two varieties, red (skhug adom) and green (skhug yarok). Both are delicious, but I chose green for my version since it tends to me more common, and I was trying to get into the festive spirit and looking for a contrast to the pommies, which were so assertively red. Use the kinds of chilies you can get your hands on, and add them to suit your taste. I (embarrassingly) only used one green Thai chili for my sauce, but I also wanted to enjoy the other flavours coming through (and also because I am a wuss). It was still very spicy, but not so much so that I couldnt generously dollop it on my cauliflower. Trying to recreate the whole roasted cauliflower dish at home is all too easy and the results are extraordinary. First, the cauliflower is doused in a spice-infused coconut oil before being roasted to golden perfection (this on its own is waaaay delish). But taking it to the next level is easy with a simple tahini sauce and the skhug, followed by a generous topping of toasted pine nuts and pomegranate seeds. This thing becomes unreasonably beautiful, just a warning, and if youre looking for something truly special to serve at a holiday meal this year - whether youre vegetarian or not - this recipe will impress the pants off anyone.     Print recipe     Whole Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 large head cauliflower 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. coconut oil 1/­­2 tsp. ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­4 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­4 cup /­­ 30g pine nuts 1 small pomegranate, seeds removed Skhug: 2 bunches cilantro (about 3 cups chopped) 1 clove garlic, minced 1-2 green chilies, minced (add more to taste) 1/­­2 tsp. cumin 1/­­4 tsp. ground cardamom Pinch ground cloves a couple grinds black pepper 1/­­4 – 1/­­2 tsp. fine grain sea salt, to taste 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 2 Tbsp. water, or more as needed Simple Tahini Sauce: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tahini 1 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 small clove garlic, minced pinch salt 1 tsp. honey or other liquid sweetener 4-6 Tbsp. water, as needed Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F/­­200°C. 2. In a small saucepan over low-medium heat, melt coconut oil and add spices and salt. Stir to combine and remove from heat. 3. Remove any outer leaves from the cauliflower and wash it well. Pat dry with a clean towel, then pour the coconut oil and spice mixture over the top and rub it in to all the nooks and crannies, making sure to coat the bottom as well. Place on a baking sheet and in the oven to roast for about 45 minutes. If it is getting too much colour before it is cooked, place a piece of foil over the top to prevent it from burning. The cauliflower is finished when it is tender. 4. While the cauliflower is roasting, make the sauces. Start by washing the cilantro well and spinning it dry. In a food processor or blender, add all the skhug ingredients and blend on high to make a smooth sauce, or pulse to make a chunkier one. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. (Store any leftovers in the fridge for up to one week.) 5. To make the tahini sauce, combine all ingredients together in a blender and blend on high until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. (Store any leftovers in the fridge for up to one week.) 6. In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the pine nuts, stirring often, until they are slightly golden. Remove immediately from the heat and set aside. 7. When the cauliflower is cooked through, remove it from the oven and place on a serving plate. Top with the various sauces, and sprinkle with the pine nuts and pomegranate seeds. Serve immediately and enjoy. This will be my last post before 2017, so I want to wish all of you out there a warm, happy, healthy holiday and an abundant new year! Thank you for all for your love and support with all of my projects this year: the My New Roots app, Naturally Nourished, the Gourmet Print Shop and the blog too. You will never know how much you all mean to me! For real. In health and happiness, Sarah B. *   *   *   *   *   * Exciting announcement! The Gourmet Print Shop is officially open! My vision of creating affordable and beautiful art for your walls is now a reality. After so many of you have requested high-res images of my food photography to print, Ive answered the call with larger-than-life photo files that you can download and print yourself. Its a fast, easy, and inexpensive solution to fill that blank space above the sofa, add some colour to the desk at your office, and keep you inspired in the kitchen. Did I mention it makes the most perfect holiday or hostess gift? Obviously. Check out the Gourmet Print Shop today and get printing! The post Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Skhug appeared first on My New Roots.

Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake

September 21 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Concord Grape Fruit and Nut CakeThis post was created in partnership with Nuts.com I have a whole lot of cozy fall and holiday recipe ideas bouncing around in my mind, even though it’s still warm out and even though we are still enjoying the sweetest of summer tomatoes daily (I swear the yellow cherry tomatoes truly taste like candy this year). This transitional time is always exciting to me – all the fall produce brings back so many new or forgotten possibilities. I think autumn is much more of vegetable territory than summer – all the stone fruit and berries come in a quick, bright and happy flash, and before we know it, we are left with squash, roots, and sturdy winter greens. But there are still a few sweet gems like apples, pears, figs (fig recipe hopefully coming next week), and grapes to grace our fall cobblers, salads and such, and I plan to take full advantage of them this fall. If you’ve been sticking around this space for a while or have my cookbook, you might know about my love for Concord grapes. I can never resist them at the store or market, being completely mesmerized by the stunning, cloudy berries. Their flavor is lovely too – deep and concentrated, much like the color. The main issue with Concord grapes lies in their prominent seeds. There is no way around them, so I usually end up making juice or compote with Concords – anything where the seeds can be strained out. I did so for this fruit and nut cake, where a myriad of dried fruit is gently cooked in Concord grape juice to soften the fruit’s skin and infuse them with the grape flavor. It’s worth mentioning here that, in the absence of Concord grapes, you can use all kinds of fruit juice for this cake – regular grapes, oranges or even apples would make for a fine juice substitute. This cake is dense and punctuated by comforting flavors of toasted nuts, along with aromatic sweetness from dried fruit and Concord grape juice. A small slice goes a long way. There is no added sugar, as the dried fruit and grape juice bring plenty of sweet to the plate. This is the kind of cake that can serve many purposes. It would make for a perfect edible holiday present, whether brought whole to a festive potluck, or divided into smaller, rectangular cakes, wrapped, tied with a ribbon and gifted. Little squares of this cake would also make a nice addition to a fancy cheese plate, if you’re into that kind of thing. Or it can simply be enjoyed as a dessert at home – it keeps well refrigerated for a good amount of time, and a slice makes for a good component to a kid’s school lunch (or adult’s work snack!). You can get crazy with the decorating like I did here, or not decorate it at all, depending on the occasion. I’ve been shopping on nuts.com for years (since the days when they were still called nuts online) and was thrilled to collaborate on a post with them. All the dried fruit and nuts in this cake came from their online store, which made for extra-delicious results, because their products are consistently fresh and delicious. If you aren’t familiar with nuts.com, they are a family-owned, premium bulk nut and dried fruit supplier, and so much more than that, really. The business has been in the family for three generations now, starting with a stand at a farmer’s market back in 1929,  and they’ve built up an amazingly extensive catalogue of natural bulk foods. In addition to nuts/­­dried fruit, they carry grains, beans, flours, teas, snacks, superfood powders, spices, and more. I feel like a kid in a candy store when I’m on their website. Their dried fruit are the juiciest I’ve ever gotten anywhere, and both Paloma and I are hooked on their dried mango. They also freshly roast their nuts the same day they are shipped out to customers, which is just so cool. The best news is that Nuts.com has a great offer for GK readers – follow this link and choose four free gifts (like chia seeds, goji berries, hemp protein powder, habanero pistachios and more) to receive together with an order of $25 or more. Enjoy :) Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake   Print Serves: one 10 cake Ingredients for the cake (inspiration from At Home in the Whole Foods Kitchen) 4 cups mixed dried fruit - figs, prunes, apricots, raisins - chopped (no need to chop raisins) 4 Medjool dates or 6-8 regular dates - pitted and chopped 1½ cups freshly squeezed Concord grape juice or other fruit juice - hot 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg other spices such as ground cardamom, cloves and allspice - to taste (optional) 1 tablespoon vanilla extract (optional) 1¼ cup toasted almonds - ground ½ cup toasted hazelnuts - chopped ½ cup toasted pecans or walnuts - chopped neutral coconut oil or other vegetable oil for oiling parchment paper for the decoration (all optional) cashews pumpkin seeds pistachios pecans dried apricots dried lemon slices dried cantaloupe dried mango Instructions to make the cake Preheat oven to 300° F (150° C). Place 1½ cup of mixed dried fruit and all the dates into a medium bowl. Pour hot Concord grape/­­fruit juice over them, cover and let soak for 15 minutes. Place the remaining 2½ cups of dried fruit into a medium saucepan and set aside. Drain the soaked fruit into a strainer, over the saucepan with the dried fruit, pouring the soaking juice into the saucepan. Bring contents of the saucepan to a boil over high heat, adjust the heat to a simmer and cook until most of the juice is absorbed, about 8-12 minutes. Transfer the cooked fruit into a food processor, add spices and vanilla extract, if using, and blend until smooth. Transfer into a large bowl, add ground almonds and mix to combine. Stir in soaked fruit, chopped hazelnuts and pecans/­­walnuts, mixing well. Line a 10 cake pan with well-oiled parchment paper and press the fruit-nut mixture into the pan, evening it out with a spoon. Optionally, decorate with nuts and dried fruit to your liking. Bake for 1 hour, until firm. Let cool completely before slicing. The cake stores very well refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 2 weeks. Notes 1. In the absence of Concord grapes, any other grapes, oranges or apples can be used to make juice for this cake. 2. If you dont have a juicer for juicing grapes, blend them in a blender and strain through a fine mesh strainer to get rid of any seeds and skins. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Raw Fruity Panna Cotta, Easter Style Raw Greenylicious Herb Soup and BBQ Grissini by Earthsprout Raw Lady Apple and Cranberry Cookies Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Concord Grape Fruit and Nut Cake appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Tabbouleh Pasta Salad

August 1 2016 Vegan Richa 

Tabbouleh Pasta SaladTabbouleh Pasta Salad.  Parsley, tomatoes, fusilli pasta dressed with olive oil, salt, pepper and lemon. Fresh Summer Salad. Vegan Soy-free Recipe. Can be made gluten-free with gf pasta. Pin this Recipe.  Tabbouleh or Tabouli  is a middle eastern salad made with tomatoes, onion, chopped parsley, mint, bulgur (or couscous)  olive oil, lemon juice, and salt. It is generally available in similar forms in middle eastern restaurants as a side or a part of the mezze.  This past week has been very hot in here in the PNW and I have been craving cold things to eat. I made this salad the other day with whole grain fussilli with the rest of the ingredients as a tabbouleh. Cook the pasta. Chop all the veggies and parley. Toss well with freshly sqeezed lemon juice, fresh extra virgin olive oil, salt and pepper. Let chill for a few minutes and serve this hearty Summery Tabbouleh Pasta Salad. Continue reading: Tabbouleh Pasta SaladThe post Tabbouleh Pasta Salad appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Green Pancakes - Three Ways

May 10 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pancakes - Three Ways We love green pancakes (aka spinach cr?pes) in our family and are constantly exploring more ways to incorporate them into various meals. We have got lots of examples and ideas in our cookbooks but here are three new favorites: 1. Add mustard, lentils, sliced tomato and cheese to you pancakes. Fold them up, bake them quickly until the cheese melts and serve with a fresh lentil and melon salad. 2. Fill them with sweet potato, spinach, feta, yogurt and zaatar. Then roll them up and slice them into picnic rolls. 3. Make a banana split pancake bowl with some whipped cream, yogurt, raspberries, nut butter and chocolate. We are sharing all of these recipes below. You can either make the pancakes from scratch or use fridge cold leftover pancakes for these recipes. They are not vegan but if you use our vegan chickpea pancakes as base, you can easily modify the fillings to suit a vegan diet. Hummus, pesto, ajvar or coconut yogurt are excellent creamy toppings on vegan pancakes instead of yogurt and cheese. The recipe for the batter comes from our Green Kitchen at Home cookbook and we have included it in the bottom of this post. They are the most easy flippable gluten free pancakes we know. Pancakes work as a quick dinner in our family as the batter literally takes 30 seconds to mix together so we can have the first pancakes on the table within 5 minutes (admittedly I don’t always let the batter rest even if I recommend it). Gruyere, Mustard & Lentil Pancake Melt Serves 4 as a lunch This is the pancake equivalent to melted cheese sandwiches. It’s a great way to give old pancakes new life. We love it with lots of mustard (obviously use less for kids) and a crunchy salad for balance. 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 8 slices gruyere cheese (or another cheese) 4 large teaspoons mustard 8 cherry tomatoes 200 g /­­ 1 cup cooked lentils (store bought are fine) 1 bag mixed lettuce 1 avocado 1 galia melon (or other melon) 10 cm /­­ 4 inches cucumber olive oil balsamic vinegar salt & pepper Make the batter and fry the pancakes if you haven’t done so already. Place two slices cheese in the middle of each pancake. Spread a layer of mustard on the cheese, slice the tomatoes thinly and lay them on top of the mustard along with a small handful lentils. Fold the pancakes into quarters and place in a baking dish with a drizzle of olive oil on top. Bake at 200°C/­­400°F for 10-12 minutes or until the cheese has melted. Meanwhile, chop up lettuce, avocado, melon and cucumber and place in a salad bowl. Add the remaining lentils. Drizzle with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper and toss. Serve the pancake warm with salad on the side. Sweet Potato & Za’atar Pancake Picnic Rolls Makes 20 rolls You can use almost any veggies in pancake rolls. Just make sure you have something creamy and sticky as base to bind them together. For a vegan version, use hummus instead of yogurt and tofu instead of feta cheese and sprinkle with nutritional yeast. Next time, we’ll add some crushed walnuts for crunch, pomegranate seeds for extra tanginess and maybe a couple of mint leaves for a fresh flavor twist. 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 1 large sweet potato cinnamon 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 cup full-fat Turkish yogurt 200 g feta cheese 2 handfuls spinach, chopped 1 cup cooked chickpeas 2 tbsp za’atar (an awesome spice blend that you can find in Middle Eastern stores) 2 tsp chili flakes (optional) Set the oven at 200°C/­­400°F. Cut a sweet potato in half lengthwise, brush each cut side with a little oil and cinnamon. Place on a tray and bake for 40 minutes or until the flesh is soft and golden. If you haven’t prepared the batter and fried the pancakes, now is the time to do so. When the sweet potato is ready, use a fork to mash the flesh (you can mash it in its own skin to save some dishes). Squeeze over lemon juice and extra cinnamon while mashing. Spread out sweet potato mash on one half of each pancake and thick yogurt on the other half. Cut the feta cheese into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­3 inch thick sticks and place them in the centre of each pancake. Add a small handful chopped spinach, a couple of chickpeas, a generous drizzle za’atar and some chili flakes (if using). Roll up the pancakes as tightly as possible and slice into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm rolls. Sweet Pancake Banana Split Serves 4 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 1 cup whipped cream 1 cup greek yogurt 4 bananas 1 cup raspberries 4 tbsp nut butter 4 tsp honey 30 g /­­ 1 oz dark chocolate 1 handful hemp seeds or slivered almonds Place each pancake in the bottom of a small bowl. Add dollops of whipped cream and yogurt. Cut the bananas into bite-sized pieces and spread out in the bowl. Add raspberries and drizzle with peanut butter and honey. Sprinkle with finely chopped dark chocolate, hemp seeds and top with a few mint leaves. Spinach Cr?pes (in our house they are know as Green Pancakes) Makes 10-14, depending on the size of your pan and thickness of your pancakes 5 eggs 150 g /­­ 1 cup rice flour (both light or wholegrain works, as does spelt flour) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups oat milk, or milk of choice a large handful spinach a small handful herbs (basil, mint or parsley) sea salt Crack the eggs into a blender or food processor. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend on high speed until smooth. Leave to rest for 20 minutes before starting to fry them (you can fry them right away but they will be a little harder to flip). For frying, add a little butter or coconut oil to a 20 cm /­­ 8 inch non-stick frying pan/­­skillet on medium heat. Once hot (this is important or else it will stick), whisk the batter then ladle 80 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup into the pan. Let fry for 1-2 minutes or until small bubbles form on the surface and the base is golden. Run a spatula around the edges to make sure it has detached from the pan, before carefully flipping it over and frying the other side for another minute. Transfer to a plate and repeat with the rest of the batter (you may need to reduce the heat slightly after the first cr?pes). To store the cr?pes, keep them in an air-tight wrap in the fridge and they will be good for 3-4 days.

Middle Eastern Lentils & Rice

November 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

In this Middle Eastern classic also known as Mujaddara, onions are caramelized until sweet and brown to season the green lentils and hearty brown rice. Cinnamon and cumin complement the caramelized onion to spice this traditional dish which wont break the bank. This recipe comes to us from Anne of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 1 cup brown rice - 2 cups green lentils, rinsed and sorted - 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided - 3 large onions, sliced - 1 teaspoon cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 teaspoon salt - freshly ground black pepper, to taste - 1 cup flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped - a sprinkle extra virgin olive oil, for serving Place the rice in a saucepan over medium high heat with 2 cups of water and a dash of salt. Bring the rice to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, cover and cook for 45-50 minutes, or until the rice is cooked through. Drain. While the rice is cooking, cover the lentils with 2 inches of water in another pot over medium high heat. Bring the lentils to a boil and continue boiling for about 20-25 minutes, or until the lentils are cooked through, but not yet mushy. Drain. While the lentils and rice are cooking, place the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, stirring to make sure the slices have separated and are coated in oil. Reduce heat to low and cook for about 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions have caramelized. When the rice, lentils and onions have completed cooking and caramelizing, toss them together in a large bowl. Season the rice, lentils and onions with the cumin, cinnamon, salt and black pepper to taste. Divide the lentils and rice into 6 equal servings. Sprinkle each serving with the parsley and drizzle with the extra virgin olive oil and enjoy! The post Middle Eastern Lentils & Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.

6 Health Benefits of Hummus

July 19 2017 VegKitchen 

6 Health Benefits of Hummus Hummus, the rich, creamy dip, is central to Middle Eastern cuisine. Most of us eat it because its so tasty; but we dont often consider the health benefits of hummus. But you can be sure that hummus is a good-for-you treat -- it consists mainly of chickpeas and sesame seeds. Lemon and garlic are also […] The post 6 Health Benefits of Hummus appeared first on VegKitchen.

A First Taste from Meatless Monday

June 26 2017 Meatless Monday 

A First Taste from Meatless MondayGet Ready for VegReady - Delicious New Plant-Based Meals Delivered to Your Door     Flavorful, Nutritious and Convenient Imagine being able to enjoy a delicious, ready-to-eat vegan meal whenever and wherever youd like. Thats the whole idea behind VegReady, a unique new food concept thats launching July 14 th on Kickstarter. VegReady is different for a number of reasons. First, the meals dont need refrigeration, defrosting or cooking. Theyre pasteurized and shelf-stable. So they can be eaten anytime and easily stored at room temperature. Next, theyll be sold online directly to you, rather than through retail stores. This is intended to develop a more personal relationship with each customer. Each meal will cost $7.50 and are ordered in quantities of 10 meals at a time. The meals arrive at your address in reusable pizza boxes. Initial VegReady Meals Sourced from Peru The first VegReady dishes will come from the mountains of Peru, where Quinoa is the traditional high protein dish. Quinoa was referred to as chisaya mama or mother grain by the ancient Incas. The meal will contain deliciously cooked Quinoa, sautéed greens and savory vegetables. Peru was selected because its the first country in the world to have a complete ban on GMOs. Following the initial launch, additional meals will be added with Middle Eastern, Southeast Asian, India and Pakistan cuisines. Meals Optimized for Your DNA VegReady plans to work with doctors to offer custom meals created to meet your specific health needs and taste preferences. Theyre also partnering with a DNA analysis firm called 23andme, so your meals can be matched to your individual DNA makeup. Better Health for You - and for the Planet At Meatless Monday, we always welcome new ideas that encourage more plant-based eating. Choosing not to eat meat just one day a week, like on a Monday, decreases your risk of cancer, obesity, diabetes and other preventable chronic diseases. Whats more, it reduces your carbon footprint and promotes more sustainable food practices. For you - and the planet - its a win-win. Click this LINK to get on their launch list and save 40% or more! The post A First Taste from Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Carrot Pudding with Cardamom – Carrot Kheer Recipe

April 11 2017 Vegan Richa 

Carrot Pudding with Cardamom – Carrot Kheer RecipeCarrot Pudding with Cardamom – Carrot Kheer Recipe. Shredded Carrots slow cooked with almond milk, roasted nuts and cardamom. Serve as is or top with toasted nuts, seeds and chia. Vegan Gluten-free Grain-free Soy-free Nut-free option This carrot pudding is is mix of gajar halwa and rice pudding /­­kheer. The carrots are shredded and roasted a bit then cooked further in non dairy milk. The pudding is flavored with cardamom. Use other spice of choice, such as cinnamon, nutmeg or saffron. Add in some turmeric for a breakfast pudding. This makes a great dessert or breakfast. Sweet carrots need only a bit of additional sugar added. you can omit the sweetener and add more of chopped dried dates, figs or currants and a touh of maple syrup if needed.  Gorgeous, simple, gluten-free and grain-free. Easily made nut-free. Perfect for Easter.Continue reading: Carrot Pudding with Cardamom – Carrot Kheer RecipeThe post Carrot Pudding with Cardamom – Carrot Kheer Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Best of the First Quarter 2017

April 3 2017 Vegan Richa 

Best of the First Quarter 2017 2017 Q1 is packed and done and I am ready for q2 to move on quickly so I can head into sunshine and some break. New Posts, Updates, Book work made up q1. I added some new categories like Instant Pot and One pot meals and tagged the Recipes that now have Videos. Posts on the blog will keep getting updated with the categories over the next few weeks. The coming few months like this first quarter, are going to be shuffling a lot of the Book 2 work and the blog work. You might see more lag times in responding to comments on social media. Ping me again on more responsive options as facebook or email.   Here are all the Recipes/­­Posts from the first quarter. If you make any of these, please do leave me a comment about how it turned out, how you served it, suggestions or changes if any that worked well. Your comments help me learn on the job!  What were your favorite recipes so far from 2017? What were a bit out of the comfort zone ?. I know I would do the General Tso’s Sandwih differently. For Easter Recipe, see here. Scroll below to read about what other things we are working on this year. Continue reading: Best of the First Quarter 2017The post Best of the First Quarter 2017 appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Easter Desserts and Treats

March 21 2017 VegKitchen 

Vegan Easter Desserts and Treats As part of the beloved spring celebration, vegan Easter desserts and treats are a must! Enjoy this list of delectable dairy-free sweets. 

Sweet & Smoky Glazed Tofu Ham

December 21 2016 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Sweet & Smoky Glazed Tofu Ham Have you gone mad? Dont put an adorable pig at the center of your table! Put an adorable block of tofu instead! This is a sassy take on ham that will definitely bring smiles (or at least curious side glances) to your guests faces. Its also, as the title suggests, sweet and smoky and elegant in a 70s kind of way, with notes of orange and maple. Its easy to double the recipe, or even triple, if this will be your main course. There were a couple of times when writing Superfun Times Vegan Holiday Cookbook that I had to call on friends for help, and this recipe was one of them. Since I didn’t grow up eating ham (you guys, I’m JEWISH!), I wanted to make sure I got it right. Luckily, Joni Newman was able to help develop this little guy into a real crowd pleaser. Thanks, Joni! This is in the Easter section of the cookbook, but it would be great as a Christmas centerpiece, or even Hannukah!

Chilli Tofu – Indian Chilli “Paneer” Recipe

October 12 2016 Vegan Richa 

Chilli Tofu – Indian Chilli “Paneer” RecipeChilli Tofu – Indian Chilli “Paneer” Recipe. Chilli Paneer is an Indo-chinese fusion stir fry served with fusion noodles or fried rice. Crisp Tofu replaces the Paneer cheese in this delicious and quick version. Vegan Gluten-free Nut-free Recipe Chilli Paneer is a popular dish from Indian-chinese cuisine. The cuisine evolved in the Chinese community who lived in Eastern India by adjusting and adding more Indian ingredients to chinese recipes. Indo-chinese is an extensive cuisine with options like Manchurian sauce with cauliflower or veggie balls(in my book), hakka noodles, Sichuan fried rice, hot and sour and manchow soups, chop suey, chow meins and others. These recipes even if they use a common/­­known name, are often different from their US or other country counterparts.  These fusion recipes are flavorful with abundant garlic and ginger, spicy and fun. In the vegetarian options, veggies or paneer make up the bulk of some dishes. There are specific sauces that have evolved for this cuisine like the chili garlic sauce or the vinegary green chili sauce that are often available in Indian stores or online. I make a quick chili ginger vinegar sauce from scratch for this Chilli tofu. The green chile sauce is flavorful and hot to preference (use mild to hot green chilies to preference). Tofu is cubed and crisped, then garlic, and veggies are cooked. The sauce is added and cooked lightly and tofu is tossed back in to coat. Serve this delicious dish with cooked rice or grains or over noodles of choice. Continue reading: Chilli Tofu – Indian Chilli “Paneer” RecipeThe post Chilli Tofu – Indian Chilli “Paneer” Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Metch – Oil Free Armenian Style Bulgur Salad

August 7 2016 Fatfree Vegan Recipes  

Metch – Oil Free Armenian Style Bulgur Salad More details and complete nutritional information can be found at LoveLowFat.com/­­eech-eetch-itch-metch-delish-quick-bulgur-recipe/­­. Bulgur wheat is a versatile and healthy way to get in your whole grains. Bulgur is a type of dried, cracked wheat, often used in European and Middle Eastern dishes, such as tabbouleh. The thing I like most about bulgur is its chewy, nutty texture. My favorite bulgur recipe is a simple but delicious Armenian dish called metch. Its also known as eetch, itch or etch. Its got very few ingredients, and because bulgur is par boiled before its dried and sold for retail, you dont even have to cook it! You just let it  sit in hot water for about 20 minutes or so before mixing it with your other ingredients. Be sure not to confuse bulgur wheat with regular cracked wheat. Regular cracked wheat is not precooked and would require different preparation. Also keep in mind when shopping for bulgur is that it comes in different sizes, some more coarse or more fine than others. The size is differentiated by number. For our recipe youll be using bulgur no 2. You can usually find it in a supermarkets grain or bulk aisle. Its also available online. Ingredients: 1 cup dry bulgur (no. 2) 2 cups hot water 1/­­2 large sweet onion, chopped Juice of 1 large lemon 1 tablespoon hot red pepper paste/­­sauce 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 yellow or red bell pepper chopped (optional) 1/­­4 cup chopped parsley (optional) Instructions: 1. Let the bulgur soak in hot water for about 20 minutes, or until it absorbs the water and plumps up. You can use cooler water but you will have to soak the bulgur longer. 2. After the bulgur is prepped, drain excess water, add the rest of the ingredients, and mix well. 3. Thats about it! Its pretty much ready! If youre like me, you wont want to wait and youll eat it right away. And you certainly can do that! But Ive noticed the more I let the ingredients meld with each other the better it tastes. This bulgur recipe is flexible since you can modify the ingredients and their measurements to suit your taste. For instance, Im inclined to add more lemon and more hot pepper sauce for extra zing, but some people might prefer their metch on the milder side. And, as mentioned in the ingredients list, for an option you can add some chopped bell pepper, preferably red or yellow. Chopped parsley goes nicely as well. Some people even like to add chopped scallion. For myself I prefer it the simple way as described above. Recipe makes roughly 4 servings. (C) ayalnaor for Fatfree Vegan Recipes, 2016. | Permalink | No comment | Add to del.icio.us Post tags: McDougall, Quick & Easy

Reading Between the Lines

June 26 2016 Vegan Thyme 

Reading Between the Lines I opened the door to walk out and get the paper in this godforsaken heat at seven in the morning, and this fellow was staring at me. First of all, it must have taken him all day to get up the gigantic hill in our back yard to our FRONT door. Omg. Poor creature.  Then, working in the book biz continues (to my utter shock and dismay). At times, my intermittent dealing with the public slowly erodes my faith in the future of humanity. Not that all book lovers are dealing a blow to my sensibility of our plight, but let's say if I have one more seventy year old woman ask me to look up five erotic-romance titles for her while she steadies herself on her walker, well, I think I might just leave the whole entire job behind with utterances of "WTF?!" I cannot make this up. I wish I could. But nope. When I come home and share these stories with DH, he laughs hysterically, shaking his head in disbelief. On a good note: working around books, I find my personal love of reading has been put to the test as I work with some really brilliant folks who, for probably the same reason I landed in a book store, are there as well: the books. (And maybe not so much the "people".) There are speed readers who devour books like I devour pints of Ben & Jerry's vegan ice cream. I have great conversations about books. It's like having my own personal book club around me forty hours a week. I love it.  Right now I'm reading: Before The Fall by Noah Hawley. Let's just say I speed read my way through the first hundred pages yesterday. There's a private plane that crashes. Two survivors. The book is written in quick-paced prose with plenty of questions raised as you begin to learn the past of each of the passengers on board--which may or may not lead to who or why or how the plane went down. Keeping me interested, on my toes and will finish it today--well, I'll try. Then there was the book, Dodgers by Bill Beverly. This book became a store Must Read as one of our resident readers one day shared as I was perusing titles: LOTS of buzz about this book. Read it and let me know what YOU think. Hmm. Well, I thought it both gripping and I could not put it down. (Even mailed it to my sister.)  It's about two young brothers East and his brother Ty and two others who are from the "drug-infested" inner-city of LA who are instructed to travel with each other to Wisconsin on a "mission" given to them by a leader of the clan to kill a witness in an upcoming trial. If there is ever a movie made of this book (and I'm sure there will be)--I know exactly who I'd root for to play East. You read this book and see what a Road Trip is really like from the eyes of four young men who navigate the Midwest highways and landscape, but at the same time navigate surviving each other.     Sometimes I look at Frankie and am so damn happy with her, I want to cry.  These are Eastern Phoebes who decided to make a nest in our breezeway.  This bird is part of the flycatcher family of birds. So they seek out areas high and protected, for raising their brood. The birds feed on bugs and insects brought to them by mama bird, who is catching them mid-flight at times and returning to the nest with bugs sometimes as big as her head, it's wonder she can even fly. This behavior is called "hawking" according to the Bird Book. She's a protective mama bird. Though I will say, she's all business with these kids she's raising. One morning we lost one. It broke my heart. But they are very close to flying the coop now. Any day. It's also said that they may "return" the following year to the same nest.  Our fingers are crossed. Knitting up a Reverse Psychology shawl, with Vice hombre yarn I got at my LYS.  The color makes me happy. So did the trip to the yarn store. Got a much needed break yesterday as I ran on a trail nearby. I heard the whistle and thought I'd make the crossing. But then approached the tracks only to see the train had arrived. I thought it'd make for a nice screen capture of a happy woman who had to make a hard stop on a three-miler during the morning's ninety-degree temps. I finished the run. But barely.


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