east - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Anja Schwartz Rothe

Maple and Balsamic Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Vegan Butternut Squash Curry

Marzipanstollen










east vegetarian recipes

Anja Schwartz Rothe

yesterday 15:30 Golubka Kitchen 

Anja Schwartz Rothe Anja Schwartz Rothe is an herbalist, gardener, medicine maker, and writer, based in New Yorks Hudson Valley. Anja is the alchemist behind Fat of the Land, a small batch herbal apothecary with a focus on cultivating connection to self, environment, and the cycles by which we live. We interviewed Anja about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, her work and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? A nice balance of both! I need to exist inside a structured, but flexible container. A little bit of routine allows me to make the most of my time, while feeling free and inspired. -- Do your routines change with the seasons? Definitely, it is one of the biggest factors that informs the way I live – acknowledging the seasonal shifts within and without and using that information to alter how I show up to take care of myself. -- What do your mornings look like? I dont like alarms, so I usually wake up naturally, somewhere between 6:30 and 8, depending on the time of year. Then I drink a bunch of water, sometimes with lemon and sometimes not. I try to get out in nature almost immediately. I live right next to a bird sanctuary on the Hudson River, so I bring a hot bevvie and do a long walk there. I always leave my phone at the house so I have a chance to really check in with myself, do some breathing, and connect before the day starts. After that, its breakfast and usually emails. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I usually wash my face and do some facial gua sha. Its so relaxing and helps me unwind. Then, I have little ritual of turning down the house, where I close the curtains, turn off the lights, and say goodnight to everything. It sounds like a small detail, but its a gesture I really like, acknowledging the animacy of the home energies, thanking them, and setting it all to rest for the day. In my bedroom, I try to keep good sleep hygiene, which for me means low technology and minimal artificial lighting. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice? Honestly, I think my whole life is a mindfulness practice. Isnt that what mindfulness is all about, practicing showing up in the mundane of the day-to-day in the fullest capacity? Sustenance -- Describe your typical or favorite meal for each of these: Breakfast – Usually some combination of eggs and ferments. In the summer, hard-boiled with smoked salmon and sauerkraut. Right now, Im on a scallion and ginger congee kick – a simple Chinese rice porridge served with a soft boiled egg and miso. Its so good. Lunch – Sometimes an open-face sandwich or leftovers from the night before. Lately, Ive been working through lunch and having an early dinner. Snack – Fruit and chocolate. Its apples, pears, and citrus right now. Dinner – Currently: soup and sourdough bread with lots of ghee. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I make myself a matcha latte with oat milk and a couple droppers of our brain tincture almost every day. On weekends, I might have a cup of coffee and I sometimes do a mushroom tea/­­dandy blend/­­cacao mixture as an afternoon pick me up. I really try not to have too much caffeine though, it makes me a bit of a mess and dehydrates me way too much, always trying to find that balance. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your basket? Its pretty broken up between farmers markets, the local food shop, and the co-op in the next city over. In the summer, primarily farmers markets for that good good fruit and veg. Right now, my staples are eggs, potatoes, citrus, oatly, broccoli, and cauliflower. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? Definitely. I like to keep my kitchen stocked with what I call hippie treats and lots of fruit. I dont buy a lot of packaged food, which means if I want to have sweets in the house I have to prepare them myself. I love baking, and will usually make a treat at least once a week – recently, its been sticky apple ginger date cake and berry crisps from a stocked freezer of gleaned summer berries. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I do, but with much variability. In the past, I’ve been really into running, yoga, and rock climbing — and these things come back in waves. In the summer, I’m cycling a lot, and right now I’m getting back into my ephemeral winter gym flow. Sometimes, my exercise is just doing squats in the kitchen while waiting for the kettle to boil. Thats actually my favorite kind. Beauty -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I definitely subscribe to the less is more skincare model. I wash with just warm water, am very liberal with hydrosols, and then use a serum and/­­or balm. I make all my own hydrosols in my garden during the summer and offer some of them in the apothecary. Im currently really loving Dragon Balm by Apis Apotheca, a farm and skincare line run by my friend Aviva, who really knows her shit. Most days I also do a quick little gua sha facial massage afterwards – I always see instant results and it feels too good. -- Do you have any beauty tricks that you’ve found to be especially useful? Drinking lots of water and herbal infusions. My present go-to is nettle, raspberry leaf, goji berry, and fresh ginger root. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress? Big Calm tincture in every pocket, purse, and drawer. I lean heavily on nervines and deep breathing. Getting outside is also really important — and socializing! -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? To be honest, I havent gotten so much as a cold in more than ten years! I owe this mostly to a naturally strong constitution, but also a pretty large emphasis on tonic, preventative medicine and lifestyle. Cooking with medicines, like infused vinegars, dank broths, and elderberry syrup, are big, but getting enough rest is the biggest. Im constantly doing micro check-ins throughout the day to see how I can best give myself what I need to prevent burnout, fatigue, and illness. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? Theyre so fluid in my life. I enjoy the hell out of the work I do, and I’d probably be doing most of it even if it wasnt my job, but Im also pretty good at allowing myself to turn off when I’m tired and not place undue expectations on myself all the time. I find allowing myself to take frequent mini vacations is the most helpful — getting out of my environment is the only thing that really turns off my work brain, plus it brings in a fresh influx of new inspiration and perspective. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming an herbalist? My first job in high school was at the local health food store. There were a couple older women who worked there and would walk me through the vitamin and bulk aisles, teaching me all about the different herbs and supplements. This was a sort of epiphany for me, viewing plants in this way. I then studied anthropology in university, focusing mostly on traditional sustenance and healing practices. After finishing school, I knew I needed to immerse myself in plant medicine, so I enrolled in an herbal medicine program in Appalachia. -- How do you approach foraging the ingredients for your apothecary and seasonal wellness boxes? Do you have a plan in mind for each season or is it more about going with the flow? I definitely have a plan in mind, but I usually have to surrender it while remaining open to new inspiration. It can be a challenge to have expectations for a season, nature doesnt really work that way, and thats been both a constant source of inspiration for me, as well as a lesson in boundaries and respect. I could be inspired to make one thing, but if its not a particularly fecund year for a certain plant, I have to cede to that. Making things from intuition and by listening to the seasons and cycles is probably not the best business model, but its the only way I want to work with plant medicine. -- What are some offerings youre working on currently? Im getting ready to re-release a little book I wrote last year, Always Coming Home: a guide to seasonal wellness, with some edits and new content. Im also refining the 2020 Seasonal Wellness Box subscription that will soon be available. -- How were you able to grow a business with your interests and loves in mind? Its been a very slow chipping away for me to remain really clear on the things that matter and the things that dont in growing my business. It turns out, remaining true to creating medicine that is intimate, small batch, and well cared for is much more important than being able to mass produce things or being on every shelf in the country. I want my values to be foremost and my business to be second. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Going full hibernation this January. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Put my legs up the wall, get a massage, go hiking with a friend, sweat, travel, in the summer I go swimming multiple times of day in various bodies of running water, thats my favorite. -- We love the Catskills so much. What are some of your favorite places to visit in the area? Montgomery Place farm stand for all your fruit and veg needs, there are so many great trails in the mountains, Colgate Lake for a swim, Talbott and Arding picnic at the Saugerties lighthouse for lunch and Lil Debs Oasis for dinner. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Im reading The Overstory by Richard Powers right now, and it is SO GOOD. A vignette of short stories written about trees and so much more. Song/­­Album – Hildegard von Bingen forever. Movie – Fantastic Fungi! Just saw and highly recommend, mushrooms will save the world. Piece of Art – All things Andrew Wyeth. Photos by Jenn Morse, Gabrielle Greenberg and Anja herself. The post Anja Schwartz Rothe appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Fried Tofu Eggs

before yesterday Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Fried Tofu Eggs Makes 24 eggs photo by Kate Lewis Sometimes an egg just completes the look. But jeez are chicken eggs a cruel business (don’t worry, I’m not gonna’ describe it, but google if you’re curious). And please don’t with “not all eggs…” Ok, speech is finished, now let’s get down to business and honor some chickens by leaving them alone and making delicious eggs out of tofu! These have been out in the world for awhile via my Instagram and it looks like youse love them as much as I do! They do take a little finesse and practice, so if yours look more like a hashtag Pinterest fail than a golden centered morsel of deliciousness, dont worry, it will still taste yummy, just keep practicing kids! The recipe was inspired by two things that I love to cook: my tofu omelet recipe and bánh x?o, the Vietnamese rice flour pancake. I have made it with and without the agar powder and it works both ways but the agar gives it a little more of the slickness you might be looking for in an egg. The yolk isnt runny, it has more of a medium cooked yolkiness to it. But it definitely sets itself apart from the rest of the egg in a convincing way. I hope you love it and put it on everything from avocado toast to ramen to pasta to a brekkie sandwich! And I have a pasta recipe coming up this week that is calling out for this egg so watch for it. Oh, also, there’s a video buried in my Instagram of my friend Abou (ok employee, I have no friends) making eggs. See if it helps you get the idea! Recipes Notes ~Please make the recipe as stated or if you want to experiment go off and do that and let us know the results! I cant tell you what will happen if you replace the tofu with carrots or whatever so youre on your own there, dont ask me. ~I think they taste best if you make all the eggs, then let them rest for 10 minutes or so. Gently reheat in the pan on low for a minute or so. You can make these a day ahead, if you like! ~You may need to thin the batter once its sitting. Dont add a lot of water, just a tablespoon at a time if needed to make it pourable. The more water you add the more fragile it becomes. Ingredients For the egg white: 2 14 oz package extra firm silken tofu (vacuum packed Mori Nu brand) 2 tablespoons melted refined coconut oil 1 cup rice flour 2 tablespoon cornstarch 1 teaspoon kala namak 1 cup cold water 1/­­8 teaspoon agar powder For the yolk: 1 cup of the egg white mix 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast 1/­­2 teaspoon turmeric 1/­­4 teaspoon paprika 3/­­4 teaspoons kala namak 1 tablespoon melted refined coconut oil 2 teaspoons tomato paste Directions In a blender, combine all of the egg white ingredients and blend until smooth. Transfer to a mixing bowl using a rubber spatula to scrape the sides. Now on to the yolk. Take one cup of egg white mix and add it back to the blender. Add in nutritional yeast, turmeric, paprika, the additional kala namak, additional tablespoon of coconut oil and the tomato paste. Blend until smooth. Transfer mixture to a smaller mixing bowl. Preheat a well seasoned cast iron over medium heat. Spray with a little cooking spray (I like coconut). Do a tablespoon test of the egg white. It should cook in about 2 minutes and be matte on top, golden underneath. If it burns, lower the heat, if it takes too long, raise it a little. Ok now make the eggs. Spray the pan with cooking spray. Use a 1/­­4 cup measuring cup filled about 3/­­4 of the way and pour into the pan in a circle, leaving a hole in the middle. Fill the hole with about a tablespoon of yolk. Depending on the side of the pan you can do 3 to 5 eggs per round. Let it cook for 2 to 3 minutes, until matte on top. Spray with more cooking spray, use a thin metal spatula to flip and cook on the other side for 30 seconds to a minute. Transfer to parchment as you continue with the others.

Cheesy Mac Muffins

December 9 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Cheesy Mac Muffins ‘Tis the season for holiday parties and brunches and I have just the thing to serve at your next get-together.  These Cheesy Mac Muffins from my cookbook Vegan Mac & Cheese are a fun way to enjoy everyones favorite comfort food. Theyre great as is, but the addition of chopped cooked veggies makes them even better.  And of course, this time of year, those veggies should be red and green! Two of my favorite holiday combos to add to the mac and cheese mixture are: finely minced and sauteed red and green bell peppers OR chopped steamed broccoli and finely minced oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes. (Simply fold in your veggies of choice when you combine the cheese sauce and macaroni.) These muffins can be made in full-size muffin tins or in those tiny muffin tins for one-bite wonders. Note: If using the tiny muffin tins, you can reduce the baking time by about 5 to 7 minutes so they dont dry out. Enjoy! Cheesy Mac Muffins From Vegan Mac & Cheese: More than 50 Delicious Plant-Based Recipes for the Ultimate Comfort Food by Robin Robertson (C) 2019, Harvard Common Press. 2 tablespoons vegan butter, plus more for preparing the muffin tin 2 tablespoons dried bread crumbs 2 cups elbow macaroni 3 scallions, white and green parts, minced 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1/­­2 teaspoon salt 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1/­­3 cup nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 2 1/­­4 cups plain unsweetened nondairy milk 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice Preheat the oven to 375°F (190°C). Coat a nonstick muffin pan with butter. Divide the bread crumbs evenly among the bottoms of the cups. Shake and tilt the pan to coat the cups on the bottoms and sides. Discard any excess crumbs. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the pasta and cook according to the package directions until al dente. Drain well and return to the pot. Set aside. In a saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the scallions and cook for 1 minute. Whisk in the flour, salt, and pepper and cook, whisking, for 1 minute. Add the nutritional yeast and mustard and then whisk in the milk. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to maintain a simmer and cook, whisking constantly, for 2 minutes, or until smooth and thickened. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste and adjust the seasoning, as needed. Pour the cheese sauce over the pasta and stir to coat. Divide the pasta mixture evenly among the muffin cups and press it down into the cups. Bake for about 15 to 20 minutes. Remove the muffin pan and set aside for 10 minutes. Run a knife around the outer edge of each muffin and then pop them out of the cups. Makes 8 to 12 muffins   The post Cheesy Mac Muffins appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Lisa O’Connor

December 8 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Lisa O’Connor Lisa O’Connor is a Toronto-based Holistic Nutritionist, Healing Alchemist, and host of the Glow Deep Podcast. We interviewed Lisa about her daily routines and practices, approach to food, exercise, skincare, healing and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Both! Im a naturally disciplined soul, so I have no problems at all committing to something. I thrive off of routine, but Ive been learning to be way more in flow these past few years. Especially with creating my own schedule and building my business /­­ practice, and now with the arrival of our puppy. My schedule got shifted around quite a bit, as he needs A LOT of attention and training at this moment! Im learning to find my own rhythm between routine, and free flow. Which I believe is always a dance for us as we transition through different seasons, and times of our lives. -- What do your mornings look like? Now with a puppy things have shifted! -We are morning people – getting up anywhere between 5-6am -A liter of water first thing -A walk in nature with the pup -A little play time with him & then putting him in his crate for a nap, so I can have me time -Kundalini -Meditation -Matcha latte -Reading – I commit to 30-45 min daily reading in the morning -Smoothie or whatever else Im feeling -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? To be honest, I dont have a lot of bedtime rituals, as I dont really have a problem with sleep. Whats important for me is turning my phone on airplane mode a good 45min- 1 hour before sleep, having a shower to shift my energy, magnesium cream, and reading a book in bed with my husband, or sometimes we watch a little something on Netflix to just switch completely off! -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  -Meditation -Walking in nature and being present -Kundalini -Im not a massive journal writer, but when it calls I listen! Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Smoothie & homemade matcha latte (I have the matcha first, and probably wait an hour or so and then have the smoothie!) Lunch – Honestly on client days I often keep it light and just snack – green juice here, smoothie there, some veggies, coconut water! And some days I just have liquids (juices, smoothies, water until dinner) on other days it could be a light salad, or a lunch out with a friend at a local healthy restaurant Snack – Im not too much of a snack person! But I would say nuts /­­ seeds, green juice, maybe a piece of fruit in the summer Dinner - Green salad, roasted veggies, curries, soups, brown rice -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I do :) I drink matcha during the week, and on the weekend when I can savour a beautiful organic Americano when Im at a cafe with my husband, its just that much more special. -- What is your grocery shopping routine like? Are there things that always make it in your cart? We do our big haul on Saturdays at a place here called Organic Garage. Everything is organic, and is so reasonable in price. In the summer I also add in local markets, and farmers markets. That being said, I feel like Im always grocery shopping on the daily, as Im always picking up fresh greens, or picking up supplemental things for dinner that we didnt get during our big shop on Saturday morning. Things that we always include: -Variety of leafy greens -Olives -Bananas -Apples -Mushrooms -Celery -Lemons -Frozen berries -Avocados -Brown Rice -Fresh herbs -Variety of proteins -Cucumbers -ACV -Pumpkin seed butter -Zucchinis -White & Sweet potatoes -Garlic -Ginger -Dates -Variety nuts & seeds -Seasonal vegetables -Hemp seeds +++ More but those are always staples!  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? I know people wont like this answer, but I actually dont! I can eat 95-100% chocolate, and feel super satisfied. If Im sweetening anything I use dates, bananas, and/­­or a touch of raw honey. -- Are there any particular foods that you find to be helpful with your energy levels and general wellness? Greens!!! I am a greens monster, and feel so deeply connected to them. I love to consume their liquid sunshine properties. Potatoes are also a huge staple for me, as they are easily digested, high in fiber, and the natural sugars are burned as energy for me. Berries – I love wild blueberries and raspberries Spices /­­ herbs – Ginger, garlic, cayenne, nettle, turmeric Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  I dont have anything particular right now! My favourite form of exercise is walking! Its highly underrated in my opinion. I live in a big city, without a car, so my mode of transport is Me. I find it meditative, calming, and great exercise. I also practice Kundalini yoga, and will sometimes do some resistance work (P.Volve). -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I find it to be an extension of me, and I dont ever have to force it. I trust my body and flow with what it wants and feels in the season of life that Im in. At the moment Ive been the least active Ive ever been, but its what feels best for me, and my body is welcoming it, and responding beautifully to it. In other seasons of my life Ive done intense and hard workouts at least 4 -5 x per week, and other times Ive done daily exercise. If there is anything Ive learnt along the way, is that nothing good comes from force. When we practice, and learn to tune- in, we will always be guided to what our body needs. In 2020 I want to get back into doing Ballet Beautiful though, as I did it for over two years and felt so graceful, feminine, yet toned. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty, both internal and external? My idea of beauty will always be that is stems from within. And not just the foods that we eat, or supplements we take, but the thoughts we think, our mood, mental state, stress levels, how kind we are...etc. I struggled with really bad acne for years, and addressing all of the above, with nutrition + curated herbs /­­ supplements, actually brought my skin back better than before! Beauty in my eyes is always a projection, and energetic force with regards to whats going on inside. When things are aligned within, I feel beauty just radiates regardless of how we *think* we look. This beautiful energetic force truly knows no bounds. I do still enjoy to take care of my external skin, and body, but I would say its only about 10% of my regime. Everything else stems from internal work! -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? MINIMAL. People are so surprised how little I do, as I really do practice what I preach. When we focus on the internal, the external will always reflect that. I use all natural products – Face wash, rose spray, and oil (I rotate a few of my favourite brands – including Living Libations, F. Miller & Marie Veronique) In the summer I mask more (May Lindstrom or just the Aztec Clay mask) I find them too harsh for the winter, so I love a good Manuka honey mask during the winter. -- Do you have any beauty tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Less is more. When I was healing my skin I tried EVERYTHING. I used too many products, stripped my skin, and it all just made it worse. I find my skin is the best the less that I do. Sweating is key, so are hot /­­ cold (contrast showers), kundalini (breathwork) and again coming back to nurturing and feeding (Physical & Mental) your Internal Self, which then shows up Externally. The key is to get things moving & flowing. Digestion, lymph, liver, as this ultimately shows up on the skin. No flow, no glow. Stress, Etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines for managing stress?  -Meditation (nothing fancy, or prescriptive, just sitting with myself) -Dog walks in nature -Kundalini Yoga -Reading -Nutrition -Seeing loved ones -Spending time with my husband, and puppy -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? -REST /­­ SLEEP – seriously the simplest thing one can do, I just believe we feel as a society that we cant just Be, or cant just take a break -Green juicing -Hot /­­ cold showers to stimulate lymph flow and detoxification -Ginger tea -Broths /­­ soups Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Im quite simple, easy-going, yet Ive always been disciplined, and my husband might say stubborn (my Ukrainian genes :) ). I dont find it that difficult to honour my body, mind, and soul. Ive also been on a deep healing journey since 2006 (got diagnosed with Lyme Disease in 2012), so truly these arent even actions or steps I take, they are just Me. I dont force anything, and allow for flow, ease, while still knowing, and honouring when I need to heal something deeper, take a new direction, and take care of my inner child. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Hmmmm I dont think there is just one thing, as I see things very holistically, and connected. I would say mind work. Focusing on mental strength, vitality, and honouring my subconscious mind, as this is where all of our habits, programs, and deep belief systems live. Our mind is everything, as the body is the unconscious mind.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Take a break! It could be an afternoon, a day or even a few. I have a tendency to force things, and when I do nothing flows. Ive learned this the hard way many times over, so I create space to go within. On the other hand, I can get inspired easily via images, nature, people, environments, so its always there for me. Its cheesy, but inspiration can hit at any moment, so I stay open. But when Im stuck, I take a step back or I schedule a brainstorming session with my husband. Just so I can talk things through, get a different perspective ( hes very smart, yet practical). In my business its just me, myself, and I, so it can get pretty insular. Although my goal for 2020 is to hire my first employee!  -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. To be honest, nothing outside of myself influenced this or my view. It was losing my health, and healing on a deep level that has brought me to where I am with self-care. Its never been anything to do, if anything its how I practice Being. Ive come to see, and know deeply that our relationship to Self – On a body, mind, and soul level is everything. If we dont show up for ourselves, than we cant for others. But if I were to pick anything in terms of external energy, I would say the book Magdalen Manuscript, its a channeled script of Mary Magdalen. It speaks about Ka energy (life force), and the power of energy that courses through all of Us. The only way to channel this energy, is to nourish ourselves from the inside out. Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a holistic nutritionist? When I started to become ill in 2006, it set me on my path. At first it started with my own experiments, lifestyle changes, and reading /­­ self-knowledge for close to six years. Then from there, I took it further to get certified, and study formally. While Im a HN, Ive expanded my view of my work, as I go *much* deeper than just food. My story is WILD, so I wont go into all the details, but when you experience something so deep, intense, and beautiful on your own, you want to help others heal via your journey, knowledge, and gifts (which I believe we all have! Its just up to us to cultivate them). I dont believe I chose this profession, as Ive never felt more called to something. Knowing how crazy, and wild it is to lose one’s health, its my mission to help others tap themselves into their own innate healer. -- What is your healing philosophy? How do you approach working with clients? Ive come to see healing as alchemy. As a society weve been taught that we should just focus on one body part, one thing, one pill, and weve become so singular in our view point and scope of healing /­­ practice. I.E. if we are having back pain, focus on the back. Where as I see everything, and I mean everything holistically. I see the alchemy, and connection between it all – Body, Mind, and Spirit. While we might be having physical pain some place (i.e. back), yes we must look and take care of the cellular body (which I do), but we also have to look at our emotions, trauma, history, and deeper work into the soul, and subconscious. While this isnt the easy work, to me its the only way I know! So when taking on a client, this is where we go. I look at each soul as a unique and individual being. No one is alike, so there isnt a pill or protocol that fits just because someone has been diagnosed with X, and so has their friend. Those two people are so different, have been raised uniquely, have most likely experienced trauma in their own way, and are navigating different life pathways, and stressors. We navigate the deeper parts, so we can heal holistically, sustainably, and in connection with our whole Self. We arent just a body, we are so much more. When we focus on just the body, I dont believe we do ourselves any favours. This is whats often missing in chronic care of  humans and why so many people are just living and coping with pain and dis-ease. We are seeking greater depth, purpose, and fulfilment, yet were left confused, hopeless, and overwhelmed. If I can just bring someone to see that they DO have the power to heal, than man oh man, it just means everything to me! Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? Our new puppy Rumi! Hes a Rhodesian Ridgeback, so he will grow to be a big boy, but we are soaking up all the puppy cuddles right now. Also ending off a decade, ushering in a new one , and entering into the year 2020. There is a lot of potent energy coming forth, and Im feeling really charged, clear, and ready for it all. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Nothing really special, I love just the simple things in life. A hot shower, getting into my robe or a grey sweat suit, eating a nourishing dinner, and cuddling with my husband & puppy! Sometimes I will treat myself to a facial, and when I can infrared sauna sessions.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Anatomy of the Spirit and Course in Miracles Song/­­Album –   Anything by Bon Iver or Ben Howard or White Sun Movie –   Dirty Dancing (forever & always my favourite) Piece of Art –  I adore a lot of art  /­­ creative work, but some of my favourites include: Renaissance art, Matisse, Unconditional Magazine, Picasso, Christiane Spangsberg. This post contains Amazon Affiliate Links Our New Ebook: Golubka Kitchen Sweets! Filled with our favorite, vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes in the world. The post Lisa O’Connor appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

All-You-Can-Eat Vegan Buffets Around the World

November 26 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

– 7 restaurants in 6 countries where you can fill your plate with vegan dishes. As vegans, it’s a celebration to find entirely vegan restaurants. But entirely vegan buffets? That’s a tricky one!  The truth is: it just takes a little searching - and occasionally traveling – to find one. From east to west around the world, here are some of our favourite vegan buffets. The Poya Day Vegan Buffet - Mount Lavinia, Sri Lanka If you were to plan your Sri Lanka trip around this buffet, you wouldn’t be the first! Located near the pool and beach,  it features both a salad and dessert bar all its own. Considering it’s open only once a month (on Poya Day, a public holiday correlating with the full moon), you’ll definitely want to add this to your must-visit list. SuTao Cafe - Malvern, PA, U.S.A. The Chinese buffet at SuTao Cafe is available for lunch, dinner, and a buffet-to-go. Cold and hot items, soups, and desserts are offered - including home-made vegan sushi. All of their veggie meat and seafood dishes are made with soy protein, seitan, or konjac. With plenty of these faux meats, you’re sure to keep your omnivorous friends […] The post All-You-Can-Eat Vegan Buffets Around the World appeared first on HappyCow.

55 Vegan Gluten free Thanksgiving Recipes

November 25 2019 Vegan Richa 

55 Vegan Gluten free Thanksgiving Recipes55 Vegan & Gluten free Thanksgiving Recipes. Main Dishes, Sides, Desserts and other options for a vegan gluten-free Thanksgiving menu. Veggie Loafs, Stuffing, Casseroles, Pies and more. Planning a feast this holiday season? Here are some vegan and gluten-free options to add to the menu! Most of these recipes are by default Gluten-free or have easy gluten-free options mentioned on the post. Have a wonderful festive season! Soy-free (SF) options and Nut-free NF Options and Oil-free OF options are marked as well.Continue reading: 55 Vegan Gluten free Thanksgiving RecipesThe post 55 Vegan Gluten free Thanksgiving Recipes appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Whipped Mashed Potatoes With White Bean Gravy

November 22 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Whipped Mashed Potatoes With White Bean Gravy photo by Joshua Foo, styling by me Feeds about 10 Let’s face it. The most important thing at the holiday table is going to be mashed potatoes. Hot on its heels is going to be gravy. So why mess around with anything less than the creamiest, fluffiest, lushest most dreamy taters? The secret here is twofold: Fold 1) Ingredients. Lots of cashew cream and buttery coconut oil. And fold 2) Method: whipping it all to high heaven with a hand mixer. You incorporate air, plus remove all the clumps without overmixing. No one will be able to resist these! The gravy I’ve used here is akin to a white pepper gravy. Thick and creamy with a lil’ kick. It starts with a roux (that’s toasted flour and oil to you, bub) for a deep sultry flavor and velvety thickness. It’s a really nice customizable recipe in that if you want to make it a mushroom gravy you can certainly add sautéed mushrooms before or after blending. If you want to make it a sausage gravy chop up some sausages and add them at the end. And so on! These recipes are from Superfun Times. Ingredients For the potatoes: 5 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 1/­­2 inch chunks 3/­­4 cup cashews, soaked in water for at least 2 hours (if you have a high speed blender soaking is not necessary) 3/­­4 cups vegetable broth, at room temp 1/­­3 cup refined coconut oil, at room temp 1/­­3 cup olive oil 1 1/­­4 teaspoons salt Fresh black pepper Thinly sliced chives for garnish, if desired For the gravy: 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 medium yellow, roughly chopped 4 garlic cloves, chopped 2 teaspoons dried thyme 2 teaspoons dry rubbed sage Several dashes fresh black pepper 3 cups vegetable broth, plus additional for thinning 2/­­3 cup all purpose flour 3 cups cooked navy beans (2 15-oz can, rinsed and drained) 1/­­3 cup tamari or soy sauce Salt to taste For the gravy: Directions Place potatoes in a pot and submerge in cold water by about an inch. Sprinkle about a teaspoon of salt into the water. Cover and bring to a boil. In the meantime, drain cashews and place in a blender with vegetable broth and blend until completely smooth, scraping the sides with a spatula occasionally to make sure you get everything. If you have a high speed blender this will take about a minute. In a regular blender it will take around 5 so give your blender a break every now and again. Back to the potatoes, once boiling, lower heat to a simmer, uncover and cook for about 12 minutes, until fork tender. Drain potatoes, then place back in the pot. Do a preliminary mash with a potato masher, just to get them broken up. Add half of cashew mixture, coconut and olive oil, salt and pepper and mash with a potato masher until relatively smooth and no big chunks are left. Now comes the creamiest part. Add the remaining cashew mixture, mix it it, then use a hand blender on high speed to whip the ever loving life out of them. They should become very smooth, fluffy and creamy. Taste for salt and pepper along the way, transfer to a serving bowl, garnish with chives and serve! Preheat a saucepan over medium-high heat. Sauté the onion and garlic in the oil for about 5 minutes. Add the thyme, sage and black pepper (I like a lot of black pepper in this) and cook for about 3 minutes more. While that is cooking, stir the flour into the broth until dissolved. If you have an immersion blender, then add the beans, broth mixture, and tamari to the saucepan. Blend immediately and lower the heat to medium. Stir the gravy often for about 10 minutes while it thickens. Use broth to thin as necessary.  If you are using a regular blender, add the beans, broth mixture, and tamari to the blender and blend until smooth. Transfer the onion and the other stuff from the pan to the blender. Puree again until no big chunks of onion are left. Add back to the pot and stir often over medium heat to thicken. Once the gravy thickens, reduce the heat to low. Now you can decide exactly how thick you want it by whisking in extra broth, anywhere from 1/­­2 cup to 3/­­4 cup. Cook for about 10 more minutes to let the flavors deepen, stirring occasionally, adding broth as necessary. Taste for salt. Keep gravy covered and warm until ready to serve.

Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup

November 17 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe comes to us from The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook by Jenn Sebestyen. Jenn says, “This thick and creamy soup reminds me a bit of potpie filling, but in soup form. The small ditalini pasta rings are the same size as the diced vegetables, making it easy for kids to scoop up a bit of everything in one bite. Made with no cream, not even homemade cashew cream, you wont believe how creamy it is. Youll be heading back for seconds in no time.” Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - 2 tablespoons (28 ml) olive oil - 1 yellow onion, diced - 3 carrots, peeled and diced - 2 ribs celery, diced - 1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced - 1 tablespoon (1 g) dried parsley - 1 teaspoon dried basil - 1 teaspoon dried thyme -  1/­­2 teaspoon dried dill - 1 1/­­4 teaspoons salt, or to taste -  1/­­4 cup (32 g) all-purpose flour - 2 cups (475 ml) unsweetened almond milk or milk of choice, divided - 4 cups (946 ml) low-sodium vegetable broth - 2 tablespoons (8 g) nutritional yeast (optional) - 1 cup (110 g) dry ditalini pasta or similar small pasta shape (gluten-free, if desired)   Heat the olive oil in a soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion and sauté for 5 to 6 minutes until soft and translucent. Add the carrots, celery, and bell pepper and sauté 4 to 5 minutes until starting to soften.   Add the parsley, basil, thyme, dill, salt, and flour and stir to combine, scraping up any bits of flour on the bottom of the pot. Slowly pour in 1/­­2 cup (120 ml) of milk while whisking continuously, again scraping up any bits of flour on the bottom; a flat whisk is convenient here, but a balloon whisk will work as well. Whisk until the flour is completely incorporated.   Add the remainder of the milk, vegetable broth, and nutritional yeast, if using. Whisk to combine. Increase the heat to high and bring to a boil. Once boiling, add the pasta, and then reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer for 10 to 15 minutes until the pasta is cooked through, stirring often to prevent the pasta from sticking.   Taste and adjust the seasoning, if necessary.   Swap it! For a gluten-free option, use brown rice flour instead of all-purpose flour. The post Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Palak Pakora (Crispy Spinach Fritters)

November 13 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Palak Pakora (Crispy Spinach Fritters) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Print Palak Pakora (Crispy Spinach Fritters) Palak Pakoras are a crispy and flavorful snack, and quite possibly the tastiest compliment for your afternoon tea. Warning: These pakoras are highly addicting! Eat at your own risk! This recipe will serve 4. Course Appetizer, Snack Cuisine Indian Keyword Appetizers, Gluten Free, Homemade, Jain Food, No Garlic, No Onion, Sattvik Food, Snack, Spinach Fritters, Tasty, Teatime, vegan Prep Time 10 minutes Cook Time 10 minutes Servings 4 people Ingredients2 cup packed spinach roughly chopped 1 cup besan gram flour 2 Tbsp corn starch 2 tsp chili flakes adjust to taste 2 tsp coriander crushed dhania 1/­­2 tsp mango powder amchoor 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds jeera 1/­­2 tsp salt 1/­­8 tsp asafetida hing 1 tsp oil InstructionsCombine all the dry ingredients, with spinach, besan, corn starch, coriander, cumin seeds, chili flakes, salt, mango powder, and asafetida in a bowl. Mix it well. Add water as needed to make sticky dough. Heat at least one inch of oil in a frying pan over medium high heat. To test, put one drop of batter in the oil. The batter should come up slowly. Oil your palm lightly, take about 2 tablespoons of dough and roll them in patties, but not very thin. Make all the patties and put them over greased plate. Drop the patties slowly in oil, do not overlap the pakoras. Fry the pakoras this will take three to four minutes per batch. Fry the pakoras, turning occasionally, until both sides are golden brown. Repeat this process for the remaining batches. NotesThey taste best when they are served hot. Palak Pakoras taste delicious specially when they are served with sweet and sour tamarind chutney, and hot cup of chai. You can also serve them as a chaat drizzling whipped yogurt, tamarind chutney and cilantro chutney.  If you have prepared them before, the best way to heat the pakoras fry them again or heat them in oven at 350 for about 10 minutes. Enjoy! And thank you The post Palak Pakora (Crispy Spinach Fritters) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Your Diet and Diabetes: What You Need to Know

November 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Your Diet and Diabetes: What You Need to KnowChances are you know someone affected by diabetes, a condition that impacts the lives of about 30 million Americans. Approximately one in three American adults has prediabetes -- a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes -- and of that population, 90% dont know they have it. Think you or a loved one may be at risk? Take (or share) the 60-second American Diabetes Association (ADA) type 2 diabetes risk assessment quiz and find out. The good news is that most cases of type 2 diabetes are preventable through simple lifestyles changes. The three most important things to do: lose weight, if needed; eat healthy, and be active. Reducing meat and increasing plant-based foods in your diet is one important step in lowering your risk of type 2 diabetes. This November is Diabetes Awareness Month, so to help make the connection between diet and diabetes, weve introduced a new hashtag -- #DontLetDietBeatUs - along with social media graphics to to increase awareness of how eating more plant-based foods and less meat can help lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. All throughout the month, we will be posting recipes, cooking hacks, and shopping tips with the hashtag #DontLetDietBeatUs to help manage and prevent a prediabetes or diabetes diagnosis. You can also download our new set of creative materials , so you can help spread the word on how a meatless diet can reduce your risk of diabetes. Weve also collaborated with our experts at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future to compile a list of eating tips that can help you or a loved one reduce your risk of diabetes. Incorporate More Plant-Based Food Choices into Your Diet Substitute red meat with nuts, whole grains, beans, peas, lentils, legumes and other meat alternatives like tofu, and tempeh. Whole grains are especially important, as they are packed with nutrients like selenium, potassium, and magnesium, low in fat, and fiber rich.  Additionally, research shows an inverse relationship between whole grains intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes.  Dont forget according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, at least half of your grains for the day should be from whole grains. Make Half Your Plate Fruits and Vegetables Here are two ideas on how to make it easy: 1) eat seasonally, when produce is fresher and lower cost, and 2) if you cant find it fresh, frozen fruits and vegetables are picked at peak ripeness and are quickly frozen, preserving their nutrient content and flavor. Buy them when they are on sale and keep a few bags handy for stir fries, soups, quiches, or casseroles, and smoothies. Choose Heart-Healthy Fats Use healthy oils for cooking, like canola and olive oil.  Nuts, seeds and avocado are good for an afternoon snack and best of all, theyll keep you full when those mid-afternoon munchies strike. Limit Fried Foods and other Foods High in Saturated and Trans-Fat These foods are associated with a high risk of cardiovascular diseases. Saturated fats are found mostly in meats and high fat dairy. Trans-fats are common in processed foods, such as cookies and crackers. Reduce Intake of Added Sugars Avoid sugar-sweetened beverages such as juice, soda and energy drinks and sweets such as baked goods, candy, ice cream. For more information on the relationship between diet and diabetes, click here If youve already been diagnosed, a couple of extra tips to manage your diabetes: o Be active all days of the week o Work with a health professional to manage your diabetes. Remember knowing your ABC (A1C, Blood pressure, and Cholesterol levels) of diabetes is important in helping you manage the disease successfully.  To help you understand the A1C test better, click this link on the ADA website . The post Your Diet and Diabetes: What You Need to Know appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust

November 3 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust Way back in the day when I was first getting interested in vegetarian cooking, I came across Mollie Katzen’s recipe for a Cauliflower Cheese Pie, which completely blew my mind. Maybe you know the one I’m talking about? It’s such a classic. I even developed a little tribute recipe to that pie for our first cookbook. This vegan cauliflower and leek version is not as directly inspired by Katzen’s pie, but I still fondly kept it in mind while working on this recipe. Cooked cauliflower itself already tastes kind of cheesy to me, and when baked in a ‘cheesy’ but also totally plant-based sauce like in this recipe, it’s complete heaven. This pie also features caramelized leeks and an addictive, gluten-free onion-pecan crust that’s packed with flavor. It’s definitely a special enough savory pie for a holiday table, and we can’t wait to make it again for ours. Hope you’ll consider it as well! If you’ve been cooking plant-based for a while, you’ve probably heard that boiled potatoes and carrots make for a surprisingly cheesy sauce, when blended smooth with a bunch of aromatic pantry staples like nutritional yeast, garlic powder, and miso. In this recipe, we also add sun-dried tomatoes and smoked paprika to that kind of sauce, for an extra hint of umami and smokiness. We cut a whole head of cauliflower into florets and brown it, then cook it until soft on the stovetop, where we also caramelize some leeks. The cauliflower, leeks and the sauce then get cozied up into the quickly pre-baked onion pie crust and baked all together. The crust is just 5 ingredients, which is a true achievement for gluten-free baking :) This pie is delicious the day of baking, but the leftovers are also amazing (if not better), so you could definitely make it a day ahead and reheat. We will be making the whole thing on our instagram stories this afternoon, if you’d like to see the whole step-by-step process. Happy November! Wishing you all the warmth and coziness. Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust   Print Serves: one 9-10 pie Ingredients for the crust neutral oil for oiling the pie dish 1¼ cup ground pecans (grinding directions in the recipe) ½ cup tapioca starch pinch sea salt 1 medium onion - roughly chopped 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds for the cheese sauce 1 large or 2 small white potatoes 1 medium carrot 2-3 sun dried tomato halves (soaked in hot water if not oil-packed/­­if very dry) or 1 tablespoon tomato paste ¼ cup non-dairy milk 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1 tablespoon miso 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon smoked paprika pinch of sea salt for the cauliflower and leeks avocado oil or olive oil 2 large leeks, white and light green parts only - thinly sliced sea salt red pepper flakes - to taste 1 large head of cauliflower - cut into florets Instructions to make the crust Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare a 9-10 pie dish by oiling it well. Place a generous 1 cup of pecans in a food processor and grind into a flour, taking care not to over-grind. Measure out 1¼ cups of the ground pecans and transfer that amount to a large mixing bowl. Save the rest of the ground pecans for a future recipe, or see note. Add the tapioca starch and salt to the bowl, mix to combine. Add the onion to the food processor and puree it. Its okay to have some small onion chunks, but the puree should be pretty uniform. Transfer the onions to a medium bowl, add the ground flax and mix to combine. Let the mixture sit for 10 minutes, letting the flax bloom. Add the mixture to the bowl with the pecan flour and mix well to combine. Transfer the crust dough into the prepared pie dish and form an even pie crust, using a spoon and your hands. Place the crust in a freezer for 15 minutes to set. Cover the crust with parchment paper and baking beans, and blind bake for 15 minutes. Remove the cover and bake for an additional 5 minutes, until the base of the crust is dry to the touch. to make the cheese sauce Combine all the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Take care not to over-blend, so that the starch in the potatoes doesnt give the sauce a gluey texture. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. to prepare the vegetables and bake the pie Preheat the oven to 350° F (175° C). Heat about 1 tablespoon of oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the leeks, a pinch of salt and red pepper flakes and cook the leeks for 8-10 minutes, until they begin to soften. Turn the heat down to low, cover the pan and cook the leeks for another 10 minutes. Remove the lid, turn the heat back up to medium and cook for another 5 minutes, until the leeks are very soft and somewhat caramelized. Transfer the leeks to a bowl and set aside. Wipe the pan clean and heat another tablespoon of oil over medium heat. Add the cauliflower florets along with a pinch of salt and mix to coat. Distribute the cauliflower in a single layer and let sear, undisturbed, for about 3 minutes, or until the undersides are nicely browned. Mix and keep cooking the cauliflower until soft throughout, for about 15 minutes. If your cauliflower is not softening, cover the pan with a lid and turn the heat down to medium-low, letting it steam until soft. Add the caramelized leeks and half of the cheese sauce to the pan and mix to combine. Transfer the cauliflower mixture to the pre-baked crust, carefully evening it out with a spoon. Add the rest of the sauce on top, evening it out. Cover the pie with parchment paper, foil, or a lid and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover and bake for another 5-10 minutes, until slightly browned on top. Let cool well before slicing. Notes If you have any leftover ground pecans, you can make a quick cheesy sprinkle by mixing them with nutritional yeast, sea salt, and black pepper to taste. Sprinkle over this pie, pasta dishes, avocado toast, etc. 3.5.3226 The post Vegan Cauliflower and Leek Pie with Onion Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Sauteed Lentils & Dandelion Greens

November 2 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Sauteed Lentils & Dandelion Greens Serves 4 If there arent delicious aromatics wafting through the air, have you even cooked? Shallot, onion, olive oil.. now thats dinner! This method is what I use time and time again with whatever I picked up at the anarchist co-op (ok fine Whole Foods) and whatever beans I have burning a hole in my cupboard. So try it with spinach, arugula or chard. Or just go ahead and try it with dandelion greens like the goddam recipe says. It takes only 15 minutes or so (if your lentils are cooked ahead of time or from a can) and it tastes like it took 20. At least. This recipe is from I Can Cook Vegan. Notes There’s a hidden gem to be learned in this simple recipe. If you cook the nutritional yeast for a minute with the shallot and stuff it gets a deep toasty flavor like a roux! It makes it taste extra special and thickens the sauce, too. So much winning. Ingredients 1/­­2 cup walnuts 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup thinly sliced shallot 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/­­2 teaspoon dried tarragon Fresh black pepper 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1/­­4 cup dry white wine 1/­­2 cup vegetable broth 1 large bunch dandelion greens 1 1/­­2 cups cooked brown or green lentils 2 cups thinly sliced radicchio Directions 1 – Preheat oven to 350 F. Spread walnuts onto a small baking tray and toast for about 10 minutes. Remove from oven, let cool, and roughly chop. In the meantime, proceed with the rest of the recipe.  2 – Preheat a large pan over medium heat. Saute shallots in olive oil with a pinch of salt until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add garlic, tarragon and black pepper and saute another minute. 3 – Add nutritional yeast and stir with a wooden spatula to toast for about 1 minute. Add white wine and to deglaze the pan. Let cook for about 3 minutes. 4 – Add vegetable broth and bring to a boil. Add the greens and cook down for about 5 minutes. Add the lentils and toss to heat through. Serve topped with walnuts!

14 Restaurant Chains Offering Meatless Monday Options

October 21 2019 Meatless Monday 

14 Restaurant Chains Offering Meatless Monday OptionsFast-food and quick-service restaurants all across the country have recognized that customers want to incorporate more plant-based foods into their diet. And were thrilled! Today, it is easier than ever to join the Meatless Monday movement. Last week, McDonalds announced their plan to test their own version of a meatless burger in collaboration with Beyond Meat. They join a growing list of chains offering some sort of plant-based alternative to their menu. And while plant-based burgers are getting all of the media attention, many national chain restaurants are serving a variety of meatless veg-forward options that deliver that same fast-food flavor using grains, legumes and fresh vegetables. For all of you looking to go meatless on Monday , weve compiled a list of the most popular national chain restaurants that are offering plant-based options on their menus.   Bareburger    View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Bareburger (@bareburger) on Oct 3, 2019 at 3:10pm PDT Bareburger  has your favorite, whether its the Beyond Burger, the Impossible Burger or a veggie packed black bean or sweet potato burger, they serve them all. The restaurant chain also serves plant-based eggs, tempeh bacon and the Beyond Bratwurst. Its pretty much plant-based heaven here.   Burger King   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Burger King (@burgerking) on Aug 22, 2019 at 7:34am PDT When the news first dropped that Burger King  launched its very own Impossible-Burger-Based Whopper , it became the largest chain to embrace plant-based meat - over 7,000 locations nationwide. And, at least according to this video taste test , self-proclaimed carnivores are just as wild about the plant-based option. The Impossible Whopper is served with tomatoes, lettuce, mayo, ketchup, pickles, and onions on a sesame seed bun.   Cheesecake Factory   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by The Cheesecake Factory (@cheesecakefactory) on Jun 18, 2019 at 12:00pm PDT Who would have thought that the Cheesecake Factory would be a pioneer in meatless dining ? Well, the chain has quite the selection of non-meat alternatives -- vegan Cobb salad, avocado toast, roasted artichokes, falafel salad, super antioxidant salad, and their version of the Impossible Burger (note: this one is not vegan because of the cheese and brioche bun, the latter is typically made with egg and butter).   Chopt Creative Salad Co.   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Chopt Creative Salad Co. (@choptsalad) on Mar 3, 2019 at 9:08am PST Although the chain is more-or-less confined to the East Coast, Chopt has wooed diners looking for a more diverse array of meatless options . They offer a long list of preconceived salad concepts, but they also give you the ability to customize your own. Choose from one of their classic salad and grain bowl combinations, or just let your inner chef guide lead the way.   Del Taco   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Del Taco (@deltaco) on Sep 2, 2019 at 11:03am PDT An early adopter of Beyond Meats plant-based crumbles , Del Taco offers a comprehensive list of meatless options that includes burritos, tacos, bowls and even a crunchy tostada. Looking for something a little more traditional? Try a bean burrito or black bean bowl.   Dunkin   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Dunkin (@dunkin) on Jul 24, 2019 at 11:21am PDT Besides their newly launched Beyond Meat breakfast sandwich , Dunkin’ offers a number of vegetarian options including a veggie egg white wrap and an egg and cheese sandwich on an English muffin.   Just Salad   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Just Salad (@justsalad) on Sep 12, 2019 at 8:00am PDT In September, Just Salad announced a partnership with Beyond Meat that brings Beyond Beef Meatballs to the menus of all 40 of their locations. But Just Salad is taking their meatless commitment one step further by removing all forms of beef from their menu . For Meatless Monday, try their Keto Zoodle Bowl, which contains Beyond Beef Meatballs, zucchini noodles, grape tomatoes, and roasted balsamic mushrooms.   Mellow Mushroom   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Mellow Mushroom (@mellowmushroom) on Dec 10, 2018 at 9:20am PST It’s plant-based pie paradise at Mellow Mushroom . Their meatless pizza options include dairy-free cheese, Follow Your Heart brand, and plant-based proteins, such as tofu and tempeh… plus every veggie topping you could possibly imagine. DIY your pie or opt for one of their curated specialty pizzas.   McDonalds   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by McDonalds Canada (@mcdonaldscanada) on Sep 26, 2019 at 3:29am PDT We bet you never thought youd see McDonalds on this list, but the Golden Arches have finally decided to try their hand at plant-based meat. McDonalds recently announced that they would be testing a P.L.T (plant, lettuce and tomato) in 28 locations in and around London, Ontario starting this week and lasting through the end of the year. Beyond Meat will be supplying the burger, but the sesame seed bun, tomato, lettuce, pickles, onions, mayo-style sauce, ketchup, mustard, and a slice of processed cheddar cheese will be classic McDonalds. As the worlds largest chain and one of the largest buyers of beef globally, the P.L.T. addition has enormous potential to positively impact the environment.   Panera Bread   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Panera Bread (@panerabread) on Oct 26, 2018 at 7:14am PDT Panera Bread has always been ahead of the pack when it comes to vegan and plant-based options, but theyve upped their game in recent years as the call for meatless options has gotten louder. Panera Bread has gone as far as launching an entire plant-based menu that lists a Greek Salad, a Modern Caprese Sandwich, a Mediterranean Veggie Sandwich, a Ten Vegetable Soup, and a variety of smoothies.   QDOBA   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by QDOBA (@qdoba) on May 28, 2019 at 9:07am PDT Following in the footsteps of other major quick-service chains, QDOBA has launched new vegan and fajita bowls in conjunction with Impossible Foods . But even without the plant-based beef, its easy to go meatless at Qdoba; try one of their tacos, burritos, or bowls with black or pinto beans, brown or cilantro-lime rice, and grilled veggies. And you can always add guac or salsa on the side.   Red Robin   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Red Robin Gourmet Burgers (@redrobinburgers) on Oct 7, 2019 at 10:34am PDT Red Robin has two options for meatless burger seekers. Their veggie burger is a mixtape of culinary inspiration -- cool avocado, Swiss cheese, roasted garlic aioli, and tomato bruschetta sit atop an ancient-grain veggie patty. If youre looking for a more traditional burger experience, you can swap in the Impossible patty on to any traditional Red Robin burger.   Subway   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Beyond Meat (@beyondmeat) on Sep 5, 2019 at 2:26pm PDT Until recently, Subways plant-based options were limited to a simple veggie sandwich and salad. But theyve seriously upped their veg game with the addition of the Beyond Meat Meatless-Meatball Marinara - which boasts 24g of protein for a 6 sub. Leave off the cheese and pack it with veggies for an even more substantial plant-based lunch or dinner.   TGI Fridays   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by TGI Fridays (@tgifridays) on Oct 1, 2018 at 10:00am PDT At participating TGI Fridays , the Beyond Burger comes grilled and topped with white cheddar, lettuce, tomato, red onion, pickles and Fridays sauce. Of course, you can also order it in place of other burgers. Check out Meatless Mondays visit to TGI Fridays  as they launched their Beyond Burger.   Are you looking for more meatless dining options? Check out our list of best plant-based burgers .   Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , 

West African-Style Peanut and Okra Stew

October 14 2019 VegKitchen 

West African-Style Peanut and Okra Stew This peanut and okra stew is a westernized version of a typical African dish, made in various ways around the continent. I first made this stew as part of an African feast at my kids’ school some years ago in conjunction with a class project. Privately, I doubted that any of the kids, then third and fourth graders, would eat this. The post West African-Style Peanut and Okra Stew appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Miso Kale Scalloped Potatoes

November 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Miso Kale Scalloped Potatoes Before we get into these delicious potatoes, we want to thank you for your support on our new desserts ebook! It truly means the world to see you guys enjoying it. And in case you missed it, we just released an ebook, filled with our favorite vegan and gluten-free dessert recipes that are great for the holidays and beyond. You can learn more about it and buy yours here. And these potatoes! There’s no such thing as too many ideas for carby vegetable sides in our book, and this one is so tasty. We layer thinly mandolined potatoes with silky kale and bake them in a miso-pine nut sauce, until golden and crispy on top and soft and creamy inside. The result is pure coziness. Wishing all our American friends a great holiday and a great rest of the week to everyone else

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast

November 25 2019 Meatless Monday 

Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving FeastThanksgiving is a time for family, giving, and gratitude. But its also the time for stuffing...and starches, and birds, briskets, casseroles, cranberry sauce, gravy, dressings, and desserts! But as we know from Thanksgivings past, the entire family doesnt always agree, especially when it comes to the food on the dining room table.  So, whether your guests prefer dark meat, white meat, or no meat, its important that your Thanksgiving spread accommodates everyone. Fortunately, the classic Thanksgiving fixings can be made completely plant-based without compromising tradition or taste. Weve compiled a collection of simple plant-based Thanksgiving swaps that allow everyone -- from the newly vegan to the traditional omnivore -- to enjoy the holiday feast, together. Mushroom Gravy from Trader Joes Sometimes your secret recipe is store bought. We wont tell. Trader Joes has an impressive Organic Savory Vegan Gravy made with onion, garlic, coconut milk, tamari, mushrooms, and a whole bunch of seasonings and zero work for you. Oh, its also gluten free. Roasted-Garlic Smashed Potatoes from Minimalist Baker The secret to incredibly light and fluffy dairy-free mashed potatoes isnt much of a secret. After boiling and mashing your potatoes (you can use a potato masher or hand mixer; if you use the latter, be careful not to overmix), fold in non-dairy butter and a whole head of roasted garlic to pump up the decadence.  Super Savory Vegan Stuffing from The Cheeky Chickpea A Thanksgiving spread is judged not on its turkey, but rather the quality of its stuffing. We scoured the internet to find the most satisfying stuffing recipe available. Chopped mushrooms, wild rice, bell peppers, vegetable bouillon, plant-based sausage, cubed up bread, and Thanksgiving seasonings -- fennel, garlic, parsley, fresh rosemary -- make this stuffing simply irresistible. Cinnamon Sugar Sweet Potato Casserole from Eat With Clarity Oh, sweet potato casserole; you sit innocently on the Thanksgiving table masquerading as a member of the main meal, but we all know youre our pre-dessert dessert...with your delightful topping of crushed pecans, coconut sugar, oats, and marshmallows. But the sweet and creamy nature of this indulgent side dish is a necessary counterbalance to all the punchy herbs and spices. This recipe adds another dimension to the traditional sweet potato casserole by using non-dairy milk, ground flax seeds, and melted coconut oil. Roasted Root Vegetables with a White Balsamic Glaze from Healthy World Cuisine No bacon necessary for these magical root vegetables. The recipe suggests fennel, carrots, and Cipollini onions, but you can add any of your favorite seasonal vegetables. Curried Green Bean Casserole from Omnivore’s Cookbook A spin on the classic, this curried green bean casserole adds a new dimension to the Thanksgiving table. Traditional green bean casseroles typically rely on a can of condensed cream of mushroom soup and a topping of bread crumbs and fried onion straws. This recipe is just as easy to make, but offers your taste buds so much more! No-Meat Loaf from Nora Cooks Turkey doesnt always have to be the star of the Thanksgiving spread. Meatloaf traditionally plays a supporting role, but this holiday season let it take center stage with this smoky, savory plant-based chickpea loaf. After its covered with a tangy ketchup glaze and baked in the oven, its look and texture become indistinguishable from its meaty counterpart. Cranberry Jam from Delish Theres something extraterrestrial-looking about the maroon cylinder of congealed cranberry sauce that you always find sitting menacingly next to the gravy boat. Its Thanksgiving, you deserve better. Treat your family (and yourself) with this simple-to-make four-ingredient cranberry jam. All you need is fresh cranberries, sugar, water, orange zest, and about twenty minutes. Your dinner rolls, stuffing, and other Thanksgiving starches will thank you. Chipotle Whole-Roasted Cauliflower with Caper Vinaigrette from Goya Need an alternative centerpiece for your Thanksgiving meal? Look no further than this elegant whole roasted cauliflower with a smoky chipotle finish. Top your cauliflower steaks with a tart and briny caper vinaigrette for a perfect alternative to the big bird. Chocolate Fudge Brownie Pie from Sweet Vegan Sara Some people eat to live, others eat to get to dessert. Your patience has paid off. This plant-based chocolate fudge brownie pie looks sinful, but it really isnt. The crust uses a combination of almond flour, rolled oats, date sugar, and flax eggs (coagulated flax seeds), while the filling is as healthy as hummus, using chickpeas, nondairy milk, date paste, cocoa powder, rolled oats, and vegan chocolate chips. Creamy Coconut Pumpkin Pie from Loving It Vegan What makes this pumpkin pie filling so much more luxurious than the rest? A rhinestone-studded crust? Nope, this pie gets its extra decadent flare from a can of full-fat coconut milk. Fold in some brown sugar, maple syrup, pumpkin pie spice, and a little bit of cornstarch, and youve got yourself the ultimate Thanksgiving dessert.   Invite your friends and family to try (and share) these plant-based Thanksgiving swaps. If youre looking for more meatless recipe inspiration, check out our recipe gallery. The post Mushroom Gravy, Savory Stuffing, Fudge Brownie Pie, and 8 Other Plant-Based Swaps for Your Thanksgiving Feast appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Aquafaba Pumpkin Pie

November 23 2019 Isa Chandra Moskowitz 

Aquafaba Pumpkin Pie photo by Kate Lewis Makes a 9-inch Pie Pumpkin Pie just got lighter, airier and way, way easier! Aquafaba (that’s cooked chickpea liquid) fluffs up as you puree literally every single ingredient together in the blender. So while it works, you can lean against the kitchen counter scrolling through Instagram and giggling at all the sillyheads that are still using eggs. Come on, it’s 2020, get with the program. But anyway, this pie is full of ginger and spice and everything nice; simply put it tastes the exact way you want pumpkin pie to taste. It also sets beautifully as you can see from those luscious fork marks. Long story short: cancel any other pies and get this on your table. Notes ~You will need 1/­­2 a cup of aquafaba. I highly recommend aquafaba from an organic can of chickpeas. That is what we tested it with and it worked beautifully! Homemade aquafaba will give you varying results in flavor and texture so experiment some time but if you’re new to this just buy the can. I am sure you will figure out some way to use those chickpeas. ~More about that can! I would suggest a 28 oz can because then you won’t need to scrape the bottom of a small can to make sure you get that full 1/­­2 cup. ~For crusts, you can use one off this site, or a storebought one, or a gluten-free crumb crust or whatever you want. No need to parbake. ~If you are using a high-speed blender (like Vitamix) then put it on a low setting. 2 sounds good. If it’s a regular old blender, do a 5 or 6. Ingredients 3 cups pumpkin purée 1/­­2 cup pure maple syrup 1/­­2 cup aquafaba (see notes) 2 tablespoons coconut oil at room temp 2 tablespoons organic cornstarch 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground ginger 1/­­4 teaspoon ground nutmeg Pinch of ground cloves 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt 1 (9-inch) pie crust, unbaked and chilled Directions - Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Add the pumpkin, maple syrup, aquafaba, coconut oil, cornstarch, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves and salt to a blender. Blend for about 3 minutes (less if using a high-speed blender), until light and fluffy. It should increase by 20 percent to 25 percent in volume. - Pour into prepared pie crust. Bake for about an hour, until the top is crackly, the filling is a little jiggly in the center and pulling away from the sides slightly. - Let cool for about 30 minutes at room temperature, then refrigerate for at least 3 hours. Slice and serve with whipped cream!

New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their Veggies

November 18 2019 Meatless Monday 

New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their VeggiesLooking for some culinary inspiration for your next round of Meatless Monday meals? Well, we have some EXCITING news: The first Meatless Monday cookbook is finally here, and with over 100 delicious, better-for-you plant-based recipes youll be able to whip up a meat-free meal for any type of eater -- from experimental flexitarians to new vegans to the staunchest of carnivores. The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook , by Jenn Sebestyen, emphasizes the limitless potential of plant-based cooking. The recipes are nutritious, easy-to-prepare, and mimic the look, taste, and texture of comfort-food favorites (youve got to check out the lentil Bolognese, butternut-squash mac and cheese, and meaty mushroom stew). The book, whose foreword is written by Sid Lerner, founder of the global Meatless Monday initiative and The Monday Campaigns, is based on the Meatless Monday philosophy of cutting out meat one day a week for your health and the health of the planet. And as its title suggest, The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook is designed for the whole family, because when kids are involved in the prepping and cooking process, they develop a greater appreciation, understanding, and respect for the food in front of them. The cookbook officially goes on sale November 19, but weve included a few recipe highlights to share with you. And with Thanksgiving right around the corner, these plant-based recipes might just be what you need to round out the holiday dinner table.     Garlicky White Bean Avocado Toast with BBQ Drizzle This recipe marries the best traits of avocado toast with the enticing aroma and flavor of cannellini beans slowly sautéed with fresh garlic and olive oil. The mixture is spooned on to the avocado-smeared toast and drizzled with a sweet and tangy homemade barbecue sauce. Pumpkin Maple-Glazed Penne with Roasted Fall Vegetables With butternut squash, carrots, parsnips, and Brussels sprouts, youre getting all the best that autumn has to offer. The subtle maple glaze adds a surprisingly subtle sweetness that pairs nicely with the fall vegetables. Meaty Mushroom Stew over Garlic Mashed Potatoes Theres nothing cozier than a hearty stew and some mashed potatoes. This recipe, which uses cremini and shitake mushrooms and a healthy dose of tamari, is an homage to umami. Ladle it over a scoop of mashed potatoes for some pure plant-based bliss. Creamy Vegetable Noodle Soup Its like a chicken potpie -- minus the chicken and the pie. No animal products are necessary for this smooth and sultry creamy vegetable noodle soup. Vegetable broth, almond milk, nutritional yeast, and a whole lot of seasonings and aromatics make this soup satisfying and delicious. Very Berry Quinoa Salad with Cinnamon Toasted Pecans This salad is light and fresh yet has plenty of protein from the quinoa and pecans. Fresh summer berries are little powerhouses of vitamins and are super kid-friendly. The toasted pecans take this dish to the next level. Rice and Bean Pan Grilled Burritos A burrito is engineered to include an entire meals worth of goodies wrapped in one, warm, fluffy package. Chocked full of smoky pinto beans, cilantro rice, lettuce, and an avocado green chile sauce, be prepared for requests for seconds. BBQ Chickpea Veggie Bowls Channeling the hot smoke of the barbecue pit, this BBQ chickpea veggie bowl is charred, sweet, and tangy with a satisfying crunch. The recipe calls for roasted broccoli, red peppers, onions, and chickpeas, but you can top your brown rice bowl with any variety of vegetables. Just dont forget to drizzle over some homemade sweet-and-spicy barbecue sauce. Sweet-and-Spicy BBQ Sauce The proper blend of sweet and heat, this BBQ sauce uses smoky chipotles, tart apple-cider vinegar, maple syrup, and a blend of spices. Squeeze a little bit any meatless Monday meal to take it to the next level. About the author: Jenn Sebestyen is the creator of VeggieInspired.com. She was inspired to write The Meatless Monday Family Cookbook to help moms and dads get both picky kids and die-hard carnivores to eat more veggies. She offers tips and tricks that have worked for getting her kids on board with a veggie-heavy Meatless Monday plan.   Interested in learning more about Meatless Monday? Click here for more recipes, cooking tips, and ways that you can spread the Meatless Monday message to your community. For a chance to be featured in our next recipe roundup, make sure to tag @MeatlessMonday or use the hashtag #meatlessmonday the next time you post a meatless or plant-based recipe. The post New Plant-Based Meatless Monday Cookbook Will Get the Whole Family to Eat Their Veggies appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cranberry-Carrot Cake with Vegan Maple-Cream Cheese Frosting

November 13 2019 VegKitchen 

Cranberry-Carrot Cake with Vegan Maple-Cream Cheese Frosting This cranberry-carrot cake is festive and luscious, but with a minimum of fat and a plethora of fresh fruit (and a vegetable!) in the batter, not the least bit guilt-inducing. It’s a nice alternative to pumpkin pie for Thanksgiving dinner, for those few who don’t care for it, and wonderful for Christmas as well. The post Cranberry-Carrot Cake with Vegan Maple-Cream Cheese Frosting appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Thanksgiving Recipes

November 12 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Thanksgiving Recipes  It’s that time of year again when we decide what to make for Thanksgiving dinner.  Most of the dishes I make have been part of our vegan holiday traditions for more than 30 years.  So at the risk of repeating myself or trying to reinvent the wheel, I’m sharing some of my favorite Thanksgiving Recipe Round-up posts from over the years to give you lots of choices. You can find some great recipes in my Vegan Holiday Hotline Or check out some holiday favorites is the Thanksgiving Dinner Menu I developed for Vegan.com (has it been 10 years ago already?)   If you’re still looking for more ideas, how about this Tricked-Out Tofurky There’s always my Butternut Mac and Cheese which is great as a main dish or a side:   And for dessert, lots of variations on my all-time favorite Thanksgiving dessert in this Pumpkin Cheesecake Round-Up I hope you all have a wonderful and compassionate Thanksgiving! The post Vegan Thanksgiving Recipes appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Vegan Scalloped Potatoes

November 9 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Scalloped PotatoesYou have to try My Creamy Vegan Scalloped Potatoes Recipe! No Dairy, No Nuts, No nutritional Yeast! in this Potato Gratin. Can be gluten-free and Soy-free. Oil-free option Jump to Recipe Lets make these Classic Scalloped Potatoes to add to the Thanksgiving menu! These Scalloped potatoes are Easy, use just a few ingredients, don’t need nutritional yeast for the cheesyness, have no nuts and are creamy, cheesy and all things delicious. Use herbs of choice for variation. Use a combination of veggies such as cauliflower with the potato. Top with a breadcrumb topping. Many options!Continue reading: Vegan Scalloped PotatoesThe post Vegan Scalloped Potatoes appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Poppy Seed Streusel Taler

November 3 2019 seitan is my motor 

Poppy Seed Streusel TalerThe smell of poppy seeds and vanilla fresh from the oven is the best thing ever. Combine that with buttery streusel and a fresh yeast bake and you are basically in heaven. The post Poppy Seed Streusel Taler appeared first on seitan is my motor.

The Best Vegan Tacos In Austin, TX

October 26 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Source Austin may be famous for its barbeque, but this cosmopolitan Texas capital has a huge variety of menus and cuisines. There’s no shortage of restaurants, cafes, and food trucks that cater to vegan and vegetarian tastes. Being deep in the heart of Texas, Mexican and Tex-Mex food is a must. If you get the urge for a vegan taco - youre in luck in Austin! The challenge is choosing the best vegan tacos in Austin. Let’s start with the places that have vegan or vegetarian-only menus: Arlos Food Truck, 900 Red River St., 1700 E. 6th St., or 2908 Fruth St. Specializing in comfort food, Arlos is one of the most well known vegan spots in Austin and so it is often first on everyones checklist. Try their street or Chikn tacos have house-made or seitan crumbles with grilled pico de gallo, lettuce and chipotle sauce. The trucks are located near popular bars and gathering spots in Austin, perfect for a case of the munchies! Source Counter Culture, 2337 East Cesar Chavez St. Counter Culture offers a full menu of anything a vegan could want, from breakfast food to pizzas and sandwiches and a chocolate brownie to die for. […] The post The Best Vegan Tacos In Austin, TX appeared first on HappyCow.

garlic naan recipe | homemade garlic naan recipe without yeast

October 17 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

garlic naan recipe | homemade garlic naan recipe without yeastgarlic naan recipe | garlic naan bread | homemade garlic naan without yeast with step by step photo and video recipe. indian flat bread recipe are an essential part of the indian day to day meal. it is generally made with wheat flour, but can also be made with plain flour or maida which is known as naan bread. one such simple and easy variation is the homemade garlic naan recipe made with tawa or pan in cooking stove. The post garlic naan recipe | homemade garlic naan recipe without yeast appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Peanut Butter & Pumpkin Caramel Bars

October 13 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Peanut Butter & Pumpkin Caramel Bars You’d think we were trying to check off as many October-inspired ingredients as possible with today’s recipe: pumpkin, pumpkin pie spices, the combination of chocolate and peanut butter, etc. etc. And we kind of were! But we’ve been wanting to elaborate on the nut butter-based caramel trick that we’ve had up our sleeves ever since these colorful Twix bars. This was the perfect opportunity. The layers in these bars go as follows: a gluten-free and no-bake, chocolate ‘shortbread’ crust, the aforementioned pumpkin peanut butter caramel that’s studded with peanuts, and a neat blanket of chocolate to bring the whole thing together. We are in love. The combination of flavors is both familiar and surprising in these bars. They taste a little bit like Snickers, both the bar and the ice cream, and are of course similar to Reese’s (or Justin’s!). The pumpkin puree brings that little element of surprise to the table. It contributes both its creamy texture and undeniably autumnal flavor, and really makes this treat stand on its own. We hope you’ll give it a try. Wishing you a great Sunday! Peanut Butter & Pumpkin Caramel Bars   Print Serves: 16 square bars Ingredients for the crust 1/­­2 cup coconut butter/­­manna (not oil) 3/­­4 cup pumpkin puree (about half a can) 1/­­4 cup maple syrup pinch of sea salt 1/­­2 cup coconut flour 1/­­4 cup cacao powder for the pumpkin peanut butter caramel 3/­­4 cup smooth peanut butter 3/­­4 cup pumpkin puree (about half a can) 1/­­4 cup melted coconut oil 1/­­4 cup maple syrup 1 teaspoon cinnamon ⅛ teaspoon nutmeg generous pinch of sea salt 1 1/­­2 tablespoons miso paste (optional) 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil (optional) 1/­­4 cup toasted peanuts for the chocolate layer 3/­­4 cup dark dairy-free chocolate chips 3 tablespoons peanut butter 1 tablespoon coconut oil pinch of sea salt Instructions to make the crust Line a rimmed 8 x 8 dish (or a dish of a similar size) with parchment paper, extending the edges out of the dish for easier removal later. In a medium saucepan, melt the coconut butter, whisking it until smooth. Turn off the heat, add the pumpkin puree and maple syrup, mix to combine. Add the salt, coconut flour, and cacao, mix until smooth. Press the mixture into the parchment-lined dish, using the flat bottom of a measuring cup and/­­or your fingers, to form an even crust layer. to make the pumpkin peanut butter caramel In a food processor, combine the peanut butter, pumpkin puree, coconut oil, maple syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, miso and sesame oil, if using. Process until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Transfer the caramel to the dish with the crust and spread it into an even layer. Sprinkle the peanuts over the caramel and lightly press them in with the back of a spoon. Place the dish in the freezer for 30-40 minutes, letting the caramel set. to make the chocolate layer and assemble Melt the chocolate chips in a heat-proof bowl/­­saucepan on a double boiler or over very low heat, mixing constantly. Add the peanut butter, coconut oil and salt, mix until smooth. Spread the chocolate over the caramel layer. The chocolate might harden right away when you pour it over the chilled caramel, so work quickly, spreading it in an even layer. Place the dish in the freezer for at least an hour, letting all the layers set completely. Lift the bar out of the baking dish onto a cutting board, using the extended edges of the parchment. Cut it in half lengthwise and widthwise, then in half again, until you end up with 16 square bars. Keep the bars refrigerated and enjoy straight out of the refrigerator (they will melt at room temperature). The bars also freeze well in an air-tight container. 3.5.3226 The post Peanut Butter & Pumpkin Caramel Bars appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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