east - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Adai recipe | adai dosa recipe | how to make adai dosai

Butternut Squash and Spinach Alfredo

Easy Vegan Mashed Potatoes – Instant Pot or Saucepan

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette










east vegetarian recipes

Vegan Cheesy Crackers

before yesterday Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Vegan Cheesy CrackersIts easy to find crackers without animal ingredients, unless of course, your favorite crackers happen to be the cheesy ones. Now you can make vegan Cheesy Crackers at home, complete with the delicious crunch and flavor you love but without the animal ingredients and additives.   Cheesy Crackers Now you can make vegan Cheesy Crackers at home, complete with the delicious crunch and flavor you love but without the animal ingredients and additives. - 1 cup all-purpose flour - 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast -  1/­­2 teaspoon baking powder -  1/­­2 teaspoon salt -  1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder -  1/­­4 teaspoon smoked paprika - ? teaspoon turmeric - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 tablespoon vegan butter - 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice - 5 to 6 tablespoons cold water, or more as needed - Preheat the oven to 350°F. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, nutritional yeast, baking powder, salt, garlic powder, smoked paprika, and turmeric. Mix well. Add the olive oil, butter, and lemon juice, mixing with a fork until the dough is fine and crumbly. Add the water a tablespoon at a time until the dough becomes cohesive. - Transfer the dough to a piece of parchment paper large enough to fit a large rimmed baking pan. (You can use a Silpat instead, if you have one.) Top the dough with another sheet of parchment paper and roll out the dough until thin, measuring about 11 x 13 inches. Transfer the parchment paper and rolled-out dough to a large rimmed baking sheet. Remove the top sheet of parchment paper and cut the rolled dough into 2-inch squares. If desired, remove any uneven pieces of dough from around the edges and press together into a small disk and roll it out to get more crackers that are a uniform size. (Otherwise, youll have a few partial crackers from around the end to nibble on!) - Bake for 15 to 17 minutes, or until the crackers are baked but not browned. The color should be golden. Cool completely on the baking sheet. These crackers keep well for a week in a sealed container at room temperature. Text excerpted from VEGANIZE IT! (C) 2017 by Robin Robertson. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Photo by William and Susan Brinson. Save Save The post Vegan Cheesy Crackers appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan

November 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan Chi San Wan is a creative consultant, mama, entrepreneur and author based in London. We love Chi’s beautiful cookbook, her aesthetic, and down-to-earth approach to wellness, and we were very excited to get a peak at her everyday routine. In this interview, Chi tells us about her morning and bedtime routines, her ways of dealing with stress, the simple beauty tricks she’s learned from her mother, making space for the occasional cake and wine, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I enjoy routine, especially in the mornings. Before Marloe came along, routine was the only thing keeping me grounded. I have all sorts floating around in my head, and working for myself means one day can be very different to the next, so I need my mornings to be predictable in order to get me in the right mind-set for the rest of the day. However, now that those routines are governed by Marloe, our one year old, things are somewhat less predictable, and I have learnt to let go of the importance of routine a little. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. They vary slightly from day to day, depending on whats on the agenda, but in an ideal and average world my morning would be waking up around 6am, do some stretching, then 20 mins of meditation. Around 6:30am Marloe wakes up and we like to cuddle in bed together as a family (shes really into giving kisses at the moment). We get out of bed around 7am and take turns to shower whilst the other one plays with Marloe, makes lemon hot water and preps breakfast. We sit down together for breakfast between 7:30am-8am and have our mornings chats – most of the time theres food throwing involved. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? I like to stop any computer work by 9pm, make myself a small hot drink and climb into bed to do some reading – usually self-help or study. I try to sleep by 10pm latest, but sometimes me and my boyfriend just end up chatting about the day until 11pm or midnight… Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Typically… Breakfast – multi-grain porridge with almond milk, topped with whatever seasonal fruits are around and some nut butter Lunch – quinoa, roast veg, salad, some kraut, some seaweed – usually leftovers Snack – sourdough and avocado, or an apple with cheese /­­ nut butter, whatever I find on my travels Dinner – salmon and veg, or daal /­­ curry with rice, yoghurt and lots of freshly chopped herbs -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? If I have the time, I will make myself a matcha latte in the mornings or for a snack. If we have eggs, maybe I will have an Earl Grey tea or some fresh juice. I only ever drink coffee when I fancy a croissant! Then it would have to be a flat white with fresh almond milk or oat milk.  -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I never used to! But somehow, during pregnancy and since Marloe was born, I have developed a sweet tooth! Maybe its to keep energy up? As the weather is colder now in London, I have been obsessed with searching for the best hot chocolate (always disappointing and not chocolatey enough!). When I get the urge for something sweet, its usually something very specific, not any old sweet thing will suffice, and I will have to go on a hunt for it. Though usually after dinner, I am happy with a piece of raw chocolate from the fridge.  -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I try and have a wide and varied diet to keep things in check, and food is the first thing I look to when trying to manage my general wellness. I try and listen to my body, even if sometimes its asking for wine or cake! Usually, it needs just that and feels much better for it. In terms of taking anything else, since pregnancy and the birth of Marloe I have taken a high DHA Omega 3 supplement and probiotics daily (just in case I dont get the chance to eat it in food form). Once a week I will make some water steeped in goji berries, longan (when my mum visits, she will always leave me some) and any dried herbs I have on hand and sip on that. I have some adaptogenics on hand too – chaga, cordyceps, reishi, ashwaghanda, schisandra – but I dont make a habit of taking them everyday, only when I need to. -- What is your approach to feeding your daughter? Do you try to guard her from all unhealthy/­­processed foods, or are you more relaxed about it all? Do you have any advice for parents who want to raise their kids to be comfortable with real, whole foods? For her first year I was a little precious about what I gave her to eat – everything was made at home and organic produce only. I went with baby led weaning which is so messy, anyone who knows me knows I cannot handle mess so this was, and still is, a learning curve for me. But it gives me great pleasure watching Marloe enjoy her food, and try anything I give her. She has days where she is super picky, but generally she is a happy eater. I am more relaxed and realistic about what she consumes now, because I cant always control where we are – she has predominately home made food, but when we are out she will have bits of whatever we are eating, and its fun to watch her try new things! I really recommend baby led weaning. If you read up on it, it makes a lot of sense to get kids to eat real, whole foods this way – who wants to eat mush? It could be anything! Real food looks and tastes much more exciting and it makes them more adventurous with food, and less fussy. Eating together at the table is important to me as well, and for Marloe to have what we are eating – she knows if we have given her a different meal and will shout until we feed her some of ours.  Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I love to fit yoga in when I can and I walk a lot (at a very fast pace), but other than that, its chasing the baby around. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I dont do any form of exercise that I find torturous, such as spin or anything high adrenaline; it doesnt work for me. I enjoy yoga – dynamic or kundalini, and walking in nature a lot.  Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I think if youre comfortable in your own skin, that is beautiful. But for everyone, that could be down to many different factors and it will chop and change with time. Someone who is confident but grounded with integrity – their beauty will shine through. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Its pretty simple and not that exciting! I try and dry-brush when I can, I use Dr. Bronners Baby soap for the body, and then after a shower, whilst the body is wet, I will rub a concoction of almond oil, sesame oil and essential oils that I fancy, all over. For my face, I take the day off with coconut oil and rose water (I make my own with 3/­­4 organic rose water and 1/­­4 colloidal silver). For my morning shower, I will use a thin flannel to scrub the face and spray with rose water, followed by a tiny bit of Nucifera, The Balm – a recent find in LA. Its been amazing for the change in weather in the UK.  -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Water, water, water. Not eating so much dairy, wheat and sugar, but consuming more good fats like avocado, coconut and ghee. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. My mum looks so good and youthful, but she has never drank much, never smoked, never wore make-up...thats her trick! I have never smoked, I drink less now naturally, as I am breastfeeding and I’m too busy to do any make-up, so usually a go at the eyelash curlers will do for the day! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I think fitting in meditation everyday greatly reduces stress for me and puts things into perspective. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Acupuncture. Talking it out with my boyfriend and friends. Knowing that ‘this too shall pass’. Treating myself to whatever food and drink I desire (within budget of course).  -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? I take Wellness tablets. I make sure to be hydrated and wrap up warm at all times, especially the throat and chest. I make congee or daal, something warming and easy to digest so the body can rest.  -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? At the moment, I am very much governed by my daughters day to day antics, and I try and fit everything else around her. This does stress me out at times, but then I try and remember to enjoy these first years with her. I am lucky to have this time together with her, because I am freelance. I just try and plan my time carefully (shared iCal helps!), but not everything always goes to plan – which I am learning to let go of.  Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Things generally fall better into place when I take time to be kind to myself, so I just keep reminding myself that self-care is important, especially for a working mum. Setting routines like bed times for myself etc helps with this and saying no to some friends, projects, events etc when you just need the time to sort stuff out, so that everything else can run more smoothly. Obviously there is room for spontaneity, thats what keeps me feeling alive!  -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Meditation. Making the time for it. It keeps me feeling focused, rested and puts things into perspective. Its a form of self-care and love for myself, and is incredibly nurturing. I dont always do it every day twice a day, but when I do, it helps immensely. I learnt from Jacqui at The Broad Place in the summer and, hands down, they’re the best teachings of meditation I have come across, because its real and it works.  -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Its easier said than done, but I try not to stress about it, and just trust the process rather than sit and wallow. Ill meet up with friends and my peers and we chat it out – usually its something that is felt by a few people, and I find that it usually reverberates between similar minds, like theres something going on with the energy around us. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. I cant pinpoint one thing, its a zeitgeist thing, its in the air...maybe because we are entering a revolution, the age of Aquarius. I am constantly  inspired and influenced by the people I surround myself with, the internet, social media, so books /­­ movies /­­ classes suggested through those mediums are naturally the ones I gravitate to.  Knowledge -- You co-authored A Simple Table, a beautiful cookbook that focuses on fresh and simple meals. What was the key message that you aimed to communicate with the recipes and lifestyle tips in the book? Thank you. The key message was that everyday nourishment neednt be difficult or a chore. It could be simple acts of kindness to yourself, or simple recipes that dont require crazy expensive ingredients. Its to encourage the reader to explore what makes them feel good inside and out, as everyone is different and there is no one formula. Most of all, it was to enjoy the simple pleasures.  -- Tell us a bit about the fresh almond milk company that you co-founded, The Pressery. What inspired you to start it and what did you learn from having that business? I felt a change in me, and the start of a movement back in 2013 when I became a little disillusioned working in fashion, and more excited about food and drink and the effects it has on us. I have always been a food fanatic, so it was natural for me to explore this familiar and yet unknown territory. My business partner had been feeling the same for a while, so it felt like the right time to launch a small business in something we were both passionate about. I was already making almond milk at home, and after some research we settled on focusing on making the one product the best we could. There is a lot to learn through starting a business from nothing (I was a freelance fashion stylist before that), and building a brand from scratch – we started selling at a market and then got into Selfridges, and I grew the social media following from 0 to 22k organically in 2 years. Ive met many people through the business, with whom I am still good friends now and work with today, as a creative consultant. It was a natural progression for me and I wouldnt be where I am now if it wasnt for The Pressery.  Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I like to have a glass of red wine, make dinner with my boyfriend and possibly have a candle lit bath with Epsom salts and essential oils.  -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – salt. by Nayyirah Waheed, there is always a piece that speaks to me at any point in my life Song/­­Album – I will never tire of Your Hand In Mine by Explosions In The Sky Movie – In The Mood For Love has been a long favourite – the soundtrack, the colours, the feelings… Piece of Art – anything by Agnes Martin really does feed and soothe my soul, when the exhibition was at the Tate Modern, I went about 5 times! -- What are your favorite places to eat in London? Leilas  for breakfast, Esters  for brunch, Towpath  for lunch, Granger & Co Kings Cross  for work meetings, Violet  for cake and tea, P. Franco  for wine and small dishes and for dinner – Primeur , Campania and Jones , Uchi , Westerns Laundry , Legs , Luca ...too many!  -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list . What are some essential objects that would be in yours? – comfy t-shirt and shorts for sleep – current book  – Nucifera The Balm – rose water spray – essential oils to mix – Weleda lip balm – Dr. Bronners Baby soap (which doubles up as shaving foam) – x2 pairs of jeans (one boyfriend, one flares) – x1 sunglasses – x1 rucksack, x1 fancy bag, x1 tote bag – x1 black trousers (usually wide culottes) – x3 different style tees – x1 cashmere sweater – x2 white shirts  – x1 jumpsuit /­­ playsuit  – x1 dress for day or evening – x2 sandals (one Birkenstocks, one Isabel Marant) – x1 trainers – x1 smart shoes (for me, its Doc Martens) – x1 jacket or coat (depending on the destinations temperature) – x1 light cashmere scarf -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Id love to hear from Julie from Rudy Jude, Rosa from Cereal Magazine, Serena Mitnik-Miller from General Store and Holly from The Acey. Photos taken by Jessica MacCormick, Emma Lee and Chi San Wan. 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Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette

November 15 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. I’ve been wanting to come up with a worthwhile roasted vegetable salad ever since the weather turned chilly. I can’t be the only one who loses appetite for cold, super-green, lettuce-y salads once it’s cold outside. I’ll still say yes to something like a hearty kale salad, but most other ones make me shiver, if not accompanied by something warm. This salad is anything but shiver-inducing. Fingerling potatoes, carrots, and red onion all get roasted together in the oven, then mixed with green split peas, parsley, and a very special miso vinaigrette. The result is a substantial and hearty fall salad that makes for a great side dish or even lunch. Lets talk about split peas for a second. Did you know they are not only good for soups? When I was growing up in the Soviet Union, split pea soup or split pea puree was on the menu of every kindergarten/­­school lunch, and neither item was my favorite. Since then Ive learned that I like my split peas left intact, with a little bit of bite even. They are protein-rich, instantly making any dish more nourishing, and they are great at drinking up any dressing that theyre mixed with, which makes them perfect for salads. They take this salad from being just a plate of vegetables to a complete, well-rounded dish, thats acceptable to eat on its own. Do you have any favorite split pea recipes? Whether you use split peas, beans, lentils or chickpeas, making a habit of incorporating at least 1/­­2 cup of cooked pulses in your cooking a few days a week will lead to some sustainable, nourishing and affordable meals. For more recipes using pulses, check out our White Bean Tuna Sandwich, Smoky Chickpea Croutons, Fennel-Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans, Perfect Pressure Cooker Beans, Red Lentil Gazpacho, or any recipes on the Half Cup Habit website. Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the miso vinaigrette 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons brown rice vinegar 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime or lemon juice 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil 1 teaspoon tamari 1 garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil for the salad 1 cup green or yellow split peas - soaked in purified water w/­­ a splash of acv overnight sea salt 2 lb fingerling potatoes - halved or quartered 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil - melted freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped rosemary (optional) 3 medium carrots - diced diagonally 1 medium red onion - cut into small wedges 1 small bunch parsley - finely chopped handful of dill - finely chopped (optional) Instructions to make the vinaigrette Place the the miso paste into a small bowl. Add 1 tablespoon of the brown rice vinegar and mix until smooth. Add the rest of the brown rice vinegar, lime/­­lemon juice, sesame oil, tamari and garlic, stir to combine. Continue stirring and slowly pour in the olive oil to emulsify. to make the salad Drain and rinse the split peas and combine them with plenty of purified water and sea salt in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, partially covered, for about 30 minutes, until soft, but not mushy. Drain over a colander and set aside. In the meantime, preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare two parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the potatoes on one of the trays, drizzle with half of the oil, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and half of the rosemary, if using, and mix. Put the carrots and onion on the second tray, do not mix them together. Drizzle both with oil, salt, pepper and the rest of the rosemary, if using, and toss to coat. Place both trays in the oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, until all vegetables are golden and cooked throughout. The onion might cook quicker than the potatoes and carrots. Remove it from the baking sheet earlier, if thats the case. Let the roasted vegetables cool slightly and combine them with the cooked split peas in a large bowl, add the herbs and the vinaigrette, and toss to coat. This salad gets even better with time, as everything marinates in the vinaigrette. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Metabolism Boosting Everything Salad Watermelon Panzanella Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Baked Veggie Spring Rolls .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Potato and Split Pea Salad with Miso Vinaigrette appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Easy as Chocolate Pie

November 14 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Easy as Chocolate PieThis decadent vegan chocolate pie assembles in minutes. After some time in the fridge, its ready to serve. What can be easier than that? Easy as Chocolate Pie This decadent chocolate pie assembles in minutes. - 12 ounces vegan semisweet chocolate chips - 1/­­4 cup almond milk or other nondairy milk - 1 tablespoon coconut oil - 1/­­2 cup chopped nuts, optional - 1/­­2 cup sweetened dried cranberries, cherries, or blueberries (optional) - 1 vegan chocolate cookie crust ((Keeblers brand is vegan-friendly)) - Chocolate curls or chopped nuts, for garnish - In a saucepan, combine the chocolate chips, almond milk, and coconut oil over medium heat. Cook, stirring until the chocolate and coconut oil are melted. Stir in the nuts and dried fruit, if using, until well combined. - Transfer the chocolate mixture to the crust and spread evenly. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours to firm up before serving. Garnish the top with chocolate curls. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. Save Save The post Easy as Chocolate Pie appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Caramel Apple Butter (Vegan)

November 6 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

If you’ve got some delicious fall apples sitting in your kitchen, apple butter is a GREAT thing to make with them! Feasting On Fruit has a yummy vegan caramel apple butter recipe that is healthy and easy to make. Fillings, toppings, or a dip — no matter how you use your apple butter, you’re guaranteed to get a cozy fall feeling while snacking on it. Here’s how to whip up your very own batch of delicious apple butter: Read the full recipe here. The post Caramel Apple Butter (Vegan) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

palappam recipe | appam recipe without yeast | kerala appam recipe

November 6 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

palappam recipe | appam recipe without yeast | kerala appam recipepalappam recipe | appam recipe without yeast | kerala appam recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. basically palappam is an extended version of plain appam or vella appam recipe to which grated coconut is added while grounding. later the fermented batter is poured to bowl shaped pan to yield a bowl shaped pancakes. Continue reading palappam recipe | appam recipe without yeast | kerala appam recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Vegan Pumpkin Cornbread 1 Bowl

November 2 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Pumpkin Cornbread 1 Bowl1 Bowl Vegan Pumpkin Cornbread with a few ingredients. Spiced, lightly sweet and great with soups, chilis or on its own with vegan butter and maple syrup or make sandwiches with it. Vegan Soy-free Recipe.  It is the season to plan winter meals and try out some holiday options to plan a menu! Lets start with this soft and delicious cornbread This Pumpkin Cornbread comes together very quickly. The pumpkin and the spices add a wonderful flavor and moistness to it. Just a touch of maple to keep it lightly sweet. It is perfect to snack on as is, and also great made more sweeter or savory. For a sweeter version, add some sugar and add more pumpkin pie spice. Add dried fruit or other additions. For a savory cornbread, reduce the maple, add some garlic powder, nutritional yeast, herbs!  Serve it with chili, soups, or slice thin to make sandwiches. What’s your favorite way to eat cornbread? Continue reading: Vegan Pumpkin Cornbread 1 BowlThe post Vegan Pumpkin Cornbread 1 Bowl appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites

October 25 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites This post was created in Partnership with Nuts.com Coming to you with my favorite, easy treat as of late. Though the desserts section of our recipe index has plenty of bar recipes of all kinds (check out our lemon bars, ‘twix’ bars, matcha lime bars, etc.), I can’t stop coming back to them as one of my favorite dessert formats. These cookie dough ones are a little different though – they are shaped into perfectly indulgent, bite-sized treats. They are: made with pantry ingredients, low-maintenance in preparation, gluten-free and vegan, and they really do taste like cookie dough! Since the concept of eating raw cookie dough is non-existent where I come from, I was very skeptical when I first found out about it some years ago. My mind was quickly changed when I tried one of the crazy Ben & Jerry’s flavors involving chunks of cookie dough, dispersed throughout their ice cream. I get it now. I really do. Our cookie dough is a bit less indulgent and more nourishing than the average, but still tastes rich and perfectly decadent. It’s made with flours that are okay to eat in their raw form – almond (made of just almonds) and coconut (made of coconut pulp), and the buttery element comes from tahini or cashew butter. Once mixed with a bit of coconut oil, maple syrup and cacao nibs, it’s remarkable how much the stuff actually tastes like chocolate chip cookie dough. Add a coating of tahini chocolate to that, and you’re in business. I haven’t yet met anyone who wasn’t immediately impressed by these bites. All the ingredients for this recipe come straight from my favorite online bulk foods shop, Nuts.com. Though we often talk about them on this blog, I never tire of marveling at their amazing selection. It’s true bulk food heaven. They also take real pride in the quality of their ingredients, and it really shows. I haven’t been able to find juicier dried fruit anywhere else. AND they roast their nuts the same day they are shipped! I love seeing that type of care put into businesses, and I’m always grateful to have Nuts.com as a sponsor. Hope you’ll give these bites a try! Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites   Print Ingredients for the chocolate chip cookie dough ½ cup almond flour ½ cup coconut flour generous pinch of sea salt 1 tablespoon maca powder (optional) ½ cup tahini, cashew butter, or a mixture of both 2 tablespoons coconut oil 2-3 tablespoons maple syrup ¼ cup cacao nibs for the chocolate layer ½ cup dark chocolate chips 1-2 tablespoons tahini or cashew butter 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 tablespoon maca powder (optional) Instructions to make the chocolate chip cookie dough Prepare an 8 x 8 square dish and line it with parchment paper, extending the edges up the sides for easy removal later on. Combine the almond and coconut flours with the salt, maca powder, if using, tahini/­­cashew butter, coconut oil, and maple syrup in a food processor. Mix until well-combined. Transfer the mixture to a bowl and fold in the cacao nibs. You can also mix all the ingredients by hand in a bowl. Press the cookie dough mixture into the bottom of the lined dish to create an even layer. to make the chocolate layer and assemble Melt the chocolate chips on a double boiler. With the heat still on, add in the tahini/­­cashew butter, coconut oil, and maca, if using. Stir everything together until smooth and turn off the heat. Pour the chocolate mixture over the cookie dough layer in the baking dish. Spread into an even layer with a spoon. Place the dish into the refrigerator for at least 20 minutes, or until the chocolate layer is hardened. Lift the cookie out of the dish, using the extended sides of the parchment paper, and place it onto a cutting board. Start by cutting the cookie in half lengthwise and crosswise with a sharp knife. Then continue cutting each piece in half until you have 1 cookie dough bites. Alternatively, make them any shape or size you want. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Asian Flavoured Veggie Burgers with Asparagus Fries Rooibos Poached Pear Tart Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices Roasted Yellow Plum and Rosemary Popsicles .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Kale & Mushroom Tortilla

October 15 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Kale & Mushroom Tortilla I tried to write this post late last night after all kids had been tucked to bed. I was sitting down in our couch with my laptop on my knee and a bar of dark chocolate, a jar of salted almonds and a glass of water within reach. I was ready to do this. The next thing I remember is Isac’s hand pulling my hair three hours later. A dream had woken him up and he wanted me to come sleep next to him. I took a quick look at my computer and realized I had written zero words. So, new try today. This time I’m sitting at an outside cafe in broad daylight so I’ll hopefully not fall asleep here. Today’s recipe is an autumnal approach on tortilla. You know that potato and egg cake that is sold on the counter in literally every corner shop, cafe and tapas bar in Spain. It’s a great snack and super popular with our kids whenever we are in Barcelona so we have started making it at home as well. It’s easy to get lost in the Spanish tortilla vs Italian frittata discussion. When I previewed the first version of this recipe on Instagram, I already received some comments that “this isn’t a Spanish tortilla”. Well of course not. It’s a Swedish tortilla. Seriously though, I realize that we have bent this recipe quite far - adding kale and mushrooms to it and changing the cooking method a bit - but it is still tastes like a tortilla to me. It’s more potato based than a frittata and slightly firmer so that it can be cut out into triangles, eaten with your hands either warm or cold. We finish it off in the oven rather than flipping it (which apparently is the Italian way of doing it rather than the Spanish) but it’s just because we are lazy and it works so well. And semantics aside, the most important part is that it tastes really good. It also has a rather short ingredient list and has become another one of our last minute dinner solutions. First time we made this autumn version was a few weeks ago after I had scored a huge bag of funnel chanterelles at the market. After having made this stew on the first night and a version of this sandwich for lunch the day after, the bag was still half full. So we added them to a dinner tortilla. Just adding a few more vegetables to a simple tortilla turns it into dinner rather than just a snack. Especially if served with a side salad. These mushrooms are cheaper than chanterelles and usually easier to find in the forest. But if you can’t find them, just use regular chanterelles or any another mushroom. Here are a few tips and tricks that we use when making tortilla. o Don’t bother peeling the potatoes. If you use fresh and scrubbed potatoes, keeping the peal on. Not only does it save time, but also makes your tortilla more rustic. Dicing the potatoes instead of slicing it also helps making it more rustic. o Traditionally in a tortilla, the onion is first sautéed for 20 minutes and then the potatoes are fried in LOTS of olive oil for another 20-30 minutes but we prefer precooking the diced potatoes in water instead (while the onion is sautéing). It saves time and we can reduce the amount of oil. If you have precooked potatoes leftover in the fridge, they are perfect for this dish. o We make this with butter instead of olive oil because it’s more heat resistant and it brings out the best flavor in mushrooms. But you can of course use any oil of preference. o Fry the mushrooms on a low/­­medium heat. Don’t crowd the pan and always listen for the sizzle. If you cant hear them sizzling, the temperature is too low. o Luise has developed an intolerance against garlic (especially raw) so we have kept it out of this recipe, but I bet it could be good along with the mushrooms and kale. o If you don’t like kale, try it with spinach. Or use the same method with another range of vegetables. o Feta cheese is also really good in this combination. Just crumble it into the egg mixture. or before placing it in the oven. o We finish the tortilla in the oven because it’s easier, but you can flip it by sliding the half-cooked frittata onto a plate. It will still be some liquid in the middle so you need to be careful doing this. Than you place the saucepan over the frittata (and plate) and simply flip it upside down while holding the plate as a lid so it falls down into the sauce pan. And then fry it for a few more minutes on that side. Kale & Mushroom Tortilla Makes approx 8 serving 1 onion  350 g /­­ 2 1/­­2 cups firm potatoes, diced 5 tbsp butter or oil 2 cups /­­ 100 g Funnel chanterelles (or any other mushroom) 2 leaves /­­ 30 g kale, stems removed 1 large handful fresh parsley  6-8 eggs (depending on the size) salt and pepper Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Add water to a medium size saucepan and bring to a boil. Peel and chop the onions. Scrub and dice the potatoes into 1-2 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch cubes. Heat 1 tbsp butter in an ovenproof frying pan. Sauté the onions on low heat for about 10-15 minutes until soft, translucent and smells sweet, stir occasionally. Meanwhile add the potatoes to the boiling salted water and cook for about 13-15 minutes on medium heat, they should be almost done. Drain the cooking water and add the potatoes to the saucepan with onions, along with one more tablespoon butter. Sauté for a few minutes more to give the potatoes some flavor and color. Pour the onion and potatoes into a separate bowl and put the saucepan back on the heat. Clean the mushrooms, slice them into desired size and add to the pan along with a knob of butter. Fry the mushrooms on low/­­medium heat (you should here them sizzling without burning) for 5-6 minutes or until they have released some moisture and started caramelizing. Rinse the kale, chop finely and add it to the pan along with fresh parsley. Let wilt down for a few minutes. Salt generously and then pour into the bowl with potatoes. Wipe the saucepan clean and put it back on the heat along with a knob of butter. Beat the eggs with salt and pepper. Pour the vegetables into the egg mixture and then tip it into the warm saucepan (it’s essential that the pan is warm and buttered. Let it fry for about two minutes (preferably with a lid or a plate on top) and then place the pan in the oven (without lid) and switch on the broiler. After about 10 minutes it should be firm, golden and ready. Wait a few minutes for it to cool down and then run a spatula around the edges to make sure it comes off easily. Cut into triangles and serve with a side salad. It can also be stored in the fridge for a couple of days. PS! Look at these two photos of Luise and Noah, taken exactly one year apart.

Vegan In Bangladesh

October 10 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Unfortunately, there is no magic word in Bangladesh to easily describe your dietary preferences. It is very difficult for a Bangladeshi person to understand that you do not want any meat. At least, this was my experience while trying to eat vegan food in Bangladesh. In Bangladesh, everything vegetarian will most likely be vegan too. They never use Ghee, since vegetable oil is way cheaper. This is especially true for street food–places will use mustard or corn oil. The kitchen of Bangladesh is very Indian-inspired. But where India is the master of vegetarian food, Bangladesh has a whole other (meat) culture. One important thing to keep in mind is that there will always be traces of meat in your food. Meat will typically be fried in the same oil as veggie dishes, or your vegan food will be served with the same spoon used for meat dishes. Because of this, I had a bone or two mixed into my vegan dishes. Yuk. The few times this happened, I gave away my food to a person on the street in need. Singharas and samosas are mostly vegan, but dont trust the ones filled with onions! Sometimes I would repeat 15 times: NO MEAT! […] The post Vegan In Bangladesh appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Baked Farro with Tomatoes & Herbs

September 30 2017 VegKitchen 

Baked Farro with Tomatoes & Herbs Rich and cheesy tasting without a lick of cheese (and with plenty of nutritional yeast), this comforting and easy tomato and herb-drenched baked farro casserole may bump your favorite pasta bake down a notch or two. Farro is a rustic, chewy variety of whole-kernel wheat rich in protein and fiber, and usually stocked in nice […] The post Baked Farro with Tomatoes & Herbs appeared first on VegKitchen.

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway

September 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + GiveawayThis post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes, fermenting crock giveaway below. I grew up with home-pickling and fermenting as the norm. Food in the Soviet Union was not only scarce, but also highly seasonal, so if you didn’t take care to preserve some tomatoes or cucumbers for the winter, you wouldn’t be able to taste any until the next summer. My mom made sure to stock our cool basement with jars of pickles, tomatoes, and fruit preserves every summer, as did pretty much every woman around. Other common fermentation projects included kombucha (or the ‘tea mushroom’ as we call it) way before it was cool, kefir, and of course sauerkraut. I can’t say that I’ve continued all these traditions. I do make my own kombucha, but I can’t motivate myself to do a big batch of pickles, and you can buy such good ones in the store anyways. Same goes for tomatoes, especially since California grown ones are available all year round, and will do if a big craving hits. Sauerkraut is a different story though, because it takes very little work, and the return is so good. I’ve fermented sauerkraut in jars and in big pots, inventing weighted contraptions out of any appropriately-sized object I could find, but what I’ve always dreamed about is a nice, clay fermenting crock with custom weights that fit inside perfectly. The two things that have stopped me from getting a proper fermenting crock were the hefty price tag and the considerable size that they usually come in, which is not very countertop-friendly. I was incredibly excited when Raw Rutes reached out about their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock, because it addressed those two points perfectly. It’s petite and sits on my countertops very compactly, yet it can still fit two small-medium heads of shredded cabbage. It’s also quite a bit more affordable than traditional crocks. I love that it’s a clean white too, because they are often brown – not my favorite color, at least for my kitchen. If you’re not familiar with fermenting crocks, the main thing to know is that they make the whole fermenting process really easy and safe. All you have to do is shred whatever vegetables/­­fruits you want to ferment, salt them with either salt or salty brine until they are covered with water, weigh them down, and leave them be for a few weeks while they magically transform. The natural clay that the Yaozu crock is made with makes the environment clean and safe, and the water channel up top takes away the need for an airlock. The crock comes with clay weights, which fit inside perfectly, and ensure that all your veggies are submerged in the brine, which prevents any mold from developing. It’s truly a magical pot. For my first fermenting project, I wanted to do a sauerkraut that was a bit more colorful and exciting than the traditional kind. I used purple cabbage together with blueberries and apple, with a bit of coriander seeds for extra interest in flavor. It took about a week and a half, and came out really delicious. The predominant flavor is of sauerkraut, but there are juicy, sweet and salty bursts from the blueberries, as well as a bit of crunch and sourness from the apple. I can’t wait to experiment more. I even know my next project – the fruit kimchi from Sandor Ellix Katz’ book, The Art of Fermentation. Making your own kraut/­­any fermented vegetables is a really addicting activity. Once you try your first batch, you won’t be able to stop, which is great, since fermented foods are so nourishing. Probiotics are on the tip of everyone’s tongue nowadays – we’ve all heard that having a balanced microbiome is key for good health. Completing little fermenting projects at home and enjoying the results daily is the perfect, incredibly affordable way to contribute to that gut health of yours :) Giveaway: Raw Rutes, the charming online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, is giving away their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock to one Golubka Kitchen reader. To enter to win, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite fermented food until October 11th, 2017 (USA only). Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut   Print Serves: about 2 large jars Ingredients 2 small-medium heads of red cabbage 2-3 tablespoons sea salt 2 green apples - peeled and sliced into 1-inch sticks 12 oz blueberries 2 teaspoons coriander seeds (optional) Instructions Rinse your cabbages and remove the outer leaves. Save a few of the leaves and set them aside. Cut the cabbages in half and cut out the core. Cut each cabbage half into quarters and shred on a mandolin slicer or with a sharp knife. Put the shredded cabbage in a large bowl and mix in the salt, then massage it well until the cabbage starts to release juices. Let the cabbage sit in the bowl for about 30 minutes to release more juices. Mix in the apple slices, blueberries, and coriander with your hands. Pack everything tightly into your fermenting crock using your fist. Cover the surface with the reserved cabbage leaves - this will make sure that nothing will float to the top. Place the ceramic weights on top. At this time, all the contents of the crock, including the ceramic weights, should be completely submerged in juices. If thats not happening, let everything sit for a few more hours and see if the cabbage releases more juices to submerge. If there is still not enough liquid after a few hours, make brine with 1 cup filtered water and 1 teaspoon sea salt. Pour the brine into the crock, until the weights are just covered with the liquid. Its important to have everything submerged in liquid at all times to prevent any mold from forming. Pour brine or filtered water into the water channel and cover the crock with its lid. Let everything ferment for 1-2 weeks, tasting periodically, until the flavor is sour to your liking. Refill the water in the water channel as it evaporates. After a few days of fermenting, the brine should be nice and bubbly. If you have a cool basement, you can also start out the fermentation in a warmer room for the first week, and then move the crock to the basement to finish off the process (the basement should not be too cold!). Once your sauerkraut is done, pack it into clean glass jars, covered with brine, and keep it refrigerated. Save some of leftover brine to use as a starter in your next fermentation project, which will kick-start the process much quicker. You can also take little shots of the brine for a nice probiotic, booster. Have fun! 3.5.3226 You might also like... No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Babamesco Dip Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cabbage Pakora (Bhajia)

September 21 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Cabbage Pakoras Cabbage Pakoras or Crispy Cabbage Fritters are a great any time snack. They especially taste delicious when they are served with Chutney and hot cup of tea. They are also easy and quick to make. Surprise your guests and treat them with these mouthwatering crispy cabbage pakoras. - 3 cup thinly sliced cabbage (patta gobhee) - 1 cup besan (gram flour) - 1/­­4 cup rice flour - 1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder (lal mirch) - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro (hara dhania) - 1 Tbsp thinly sliced green chilie (adjust to taste) - Also need oil to fry - Combine all the dry ingredients, to cabbage besan, rice flour, cumin seeds, coriander, red pepper, salt, asafetida, cilantro, and green chili in a bowl. Mix it well. Add water as needed, mixture consistency should be of sticky soft dough. - Heat at least one inch of oil in a frying pan over medium high heat. To test, put one drop of batter in the oil. The batter should float and not change color instantly. - Place about one tablespoon of mix holding with your fingers into the oil. Do not overlap the pakoras. - Fry the pakoras in small batches; after you turn the pakoras one time press the pakoras lightly. - This will take five to six minutes per batch. Fry the pakoras, turning occasionally, until both sides are golden brown. - Repeat this process for the remaining batches. - The crispy, delicious Cabbage Pakoras are now ready to serve. Tips If the oil is too hot the pakoras will not be crisp; if the oil is not hot enough, the pakoras will be greasy. The post Cabbage Pakora (Bhajia) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

10 Easy Jícama Recipes You’ll Love

September 18 2017 VegKitchen 

10 Easy Jícama Recipes You’ll Love Jícama is a root vegetable that’s native to the American Southwest. Pronounced HICK-a-mah, until the last decade or so it wasnt easy to find outside that region. Now it’s more widely available well-stocked supermarkets and produce markets from west to east, primarily in the fall. Subltly sweet, crunchy, and a bit more watery than other roots (its actually […] The post 10 Easy Jícama Recipes You’ll Love appeared first on VegKitchen.

Middle Eastern Lentils & Rice

November 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

In this Middle Eastern classic also known as Mujaddara, onions are caramelized until sweet and brown to season the green lentils and hearty brown rice. Cinnamon and cumin complement the caramelized onion to spice this traditional dish which wont break the bank. This recipe comes to us from Anne of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 1 cup brown rice - 2 cups green lentils, rinsed and sorted - 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided - 3 large onions, sliced - 1 teaspoon cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 teaspoon salt - freshly ground black pepper, to taste - 1 cup flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped - a sprinkle extra virgin olive oil, for serving Place the rice in a saucepan over medium high heat with 2 cups of water and a dash of salt. Bring the rice to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, cover and cook for 45-50 minutes, or until the rice is cooked through. Drain. While the rice is cooking, cover the lentils with 2 inches of water in another pot over medium high heat. Bring the lentils to a boil and continue boiling for about 20-25 minutes, or until the lentils are cooked through, but not yet mushy. Drain. While the lentils and rice are cooking, place the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, stirring to make sure the slices have separated and are coated in oil. Reduce heat to low and cook for about 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions have caramelized. When the rice, lentils and onions have completed cooking and caramelizing, toss them together in a large bowl. Season the rice, lentils and onions with the cumin, cinnamon, salt and black pepper to taste. Divide the lentils and rice into 6 equal servings. Sprinkle each serving with the parsley and drizzle with the extra virgin olive oil and enjoy! The post Middle Eastern Lentils & Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat)

November 6 2017 Meatless Monday 

Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat)Mark Bittmans original How to Cook Everything Vegetarian was such a hit the first time around that the award-winning food writer decided it was time for an update. On November 7, Bittman will release a new edition which includes new recipes and information about the benefits of reducing meat consumption. We spoke with Bittman about whats different in How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition and the many reasons why he felt it was time for a do-over. 1. What do you think has changed about plant-based eating since the first edition of your book was published? What compelled you to do a new edition? Everyone wants to eat healthier than they did 10 years ago, and most people know that that means eating less meat. (When I ask audiences whos eating less meat than they were 10 years ago, almost everyone raises their hand.) And there are so many resources available to vegetarians - and more importantly, semi-vegetarians or flexitarians - that it seemed worth an update. Plus, frankly, I was a little disappointed with aspects of my approach in the original, so I got to fix that. 2. Do you think that more people understand the benefits of eating less (or no) meat now? If so, what has contributed to that change? If not, why do you think people are resistant to that change? Most, but not everyone. That goes without saying. (And see above.) Why? Overwhelming evidence that overproduction of meat is harmful to the environment and overconsumption is harmful to individuals. Not to mention producing animals as if they were widgets. http:/­­/­­www.meatlessmonday.com/­­images/­­photos/­­2017/­­11/­­59d5122651a0c_­Smart_­Bites-_­How_­Meatless_­Monday_­Improves_­YOUR_­Health_­and_­the_­Health_­of-the_­Planet.mp4 Courtesy of HealthGuru.com 3. Do you believe its easier to cook vegetarian? Anyone who only cooks animal products is missing out on a universe of flavors and textures that cant be found elsewhere. Foods from the plant kingdom are generally easy to cook, but theyre also healthy, theyre inexpensive, they can be cooked in bulk, and they last for a long time. Thats not about cooking vegetarian - its about cooking. Period. 4. It says on your site that your mission is to make food understandable. What are people not understanding about food and how do you like to explain it to them? The sheer amount of information out there--much of which is misinformation--is overwhelming, to say the least. Im constantly reminding people that food can be delicious without being complicated; you can make something great with three ingredients. Once theyre on board with that mindset, its a good idea to get comfortable with substitutions and winging it. The goal of the recipe variations in the How to Cook Everything books is to get people to understand that they dont have to follow a recipe word for word. In fact, its better if they dont because whatever variation they use, whether its one of mine or something they come up with, will be tailored to their particular tastes. 5. Some people arent quite ready to change their entire diet or give up meat completely. What are some recipes that work for quick, weeknight Meatless Monday dinner? Heres the first line of HTCEV: Im not a vegetarian, nor am I invested in you becoming one. Many foods are naturally meat-free, and the point is that we need to be eating more of those than we do now. That doesnt mean not eating animal products - it means changing the focus. There are no sacrifices here. Consider recipes like Cream of Spinach Soup, Cauliflower Salad with Olives and Bread Crumbs, the infinite ways to make Beans and Greens (black beans with kale, cannellini with escarole, lentils with fennel, etc.), and the zillions of non-meat pasta dishes, like Pasta with Walnut Sauce and Pasta with Caramelized Onions. How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Completely Revised Tenth Anniversary Edition is available on Amazon beginning November 7. The post Mark Bittman Wants to Help You Cook Everything (Without Meat) appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Chilli Paneer (Indo-Chinese Dish)

November 3 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Chilli Paneer Chilli Paneer is a popular Indo-Chinese dish. Chilli Paneer makes a spicy flavorful starter especially for many of my friends who enjoy the spicy food. Chilli Paneer can also be served as a side dish. This is absolutely delicious and easy to make. - 6 oz paneer (cut into bite sized pieces) - 1 cup bell pepper (sliced, capsicum, Shimla mirch, I am using yellow and green bell pepper for color) For Batter - 2 Tbsp all-purpose flour (plain flour, maida) - 2 Tbsp corn starch or arrow root powder - 1/­­2 tsp salt For Sauce - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1 Tbsp ginger (shredded, adrak) - 1 Tbsp green chili (chopped) - 1 tsp chili flakes - 2 Tbsp soy sauce - 1 Tbsp vinegar - 1 Tbsp tomato paste - 1-1/­­2 tsp corn starch or arrow root powder - 1/­­2 cup water -  I am using store bought paneer, texture is not very soft to give the paneer softer texture soak the paneer for at least 10 minutes in hot water with few drops of lemon juice. -  To make batter mix flour, corn starch, and salt in a bowl. Add the water slowly to make a smooth batter (batter should be consistency of pancake batter or dosa batter). -  Heat at least 1/­­2 inch of oil in a frying pan over medium high heat. Oil should be moderately hot. -  Dip the paneer into the batter, making sure it is completely covered by the batter. Then drop the paneer pieces slowly into oil in the frying pan. (do not overlap them) -  Fry the paneer in small batches. Fry them turning occasionally, until they are very light golden brown. Take them out over paper towel. -  Do same with bell pepper. -  For sauce heat the oil in sauce pan over medium heat; add ginger, and green chili stir for about one minutes. Add all the ingredients for sauce except corn starch, (soy sauce, vinegar, chili flakes, and tomato paste), Stir for 1 minutes. mix water and corn starch and add to the sauce. Cook for another two minutes, sauce should be thick consistency. Sauce gets thicker as it sits. -  Add paneer, and bell pepper into sauce and serve hot. The post Chilli Paneer (Indo-Chinese Dish) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Pumpkin Spice Truffle

October 27 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

For a healthier Halloween treat, Feasting On Fruit‘s Pumpkin Spice Truffle checks all the boxes! This yummy vegan recipe contains dates, which helps sweeten the truffles naturally. And of course it’s got pumpkin, to satisfy all your fall pumpkin treat cravings! Here’s how to make these fun little truffles yourself: Read the full recipe here. The post Pumpkin Spice Truffle appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla

October 15 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla I tried to write this post late last night after all kids had been tucked to bed. I was sitting in our couch with my laptop on my knee and a bar of dark chocolate, a jar of salted almonds and a glass of water within reach. I was ready to do this. The next thing I remember is Isac’s hand pulling my hair three hours later. A dream had woken him up and he wanted me to come sleep next to him. I took a quick look at my computer and realized I had written zero words. So, new try today. This time I’m sitting at an outside cafe in broad daylight so I’ll hopefully not fall asleep here. Today’s recipe is an autumnal approach on tortilla. You know that potato and egg cake that is sold on the counter of literally every corner shop, cafe and tapas bar in Spain. It’s a great snack and super popular with our kids whenever we are in Barcelona so we have started making it at home as well. It’s easy to get lost in the Spanish tortilla vs Italian frittata discussion. When I previewed the first version of this recipe on Instagram, I already received some comments that “this isn’t a Spanish tortilla”. Well of course not. It’s a Swedish tortilla. Seriously though, I realize that we have bent this recipe quite far - adding kale and mushrooms to it and changing the cooking method a bit - but it is still tastes like a tortilla to me. It’s more potato based than a frittata and slightly firmer so that it can be cut out into triangles and eaten with your hands either warm or cold. We finish it in the oven rather than flipping it (which apparently is more common for a frittata) but it’s just because we are lazy and it’s the easiest method. And semantics aside, the most important part is that it tastes really good, has a short ingredient list and has quickly become one of our favorite last minute dinner solutions. First time we made this autumn version was a few weeks ago after I had scored a huge bag of funnel chanterelles at the market. After having made this stew on the first night and a version of this sandwich for lunch the day after, their were still mushrooms left in the bag. So we added them to a dinner tortilla. It’s amazing how you can turn a simple tortilla into a dinner just by adding some more vegetables to it. Especially if you also serve it with a side salad. These particular mushrooms are cheaper than chanterelles and usually easier to find in large quantities in the forest. But if you can’t find them, just use regular chanterelles or any another mushroom. Here are a few tips and tricks that we use when making tortilla. o Don’t bother peeling the potatoes. If you use fresh and scrubbed potatoes, keeping the peal on not only saves time, but also makes your tortilla more rustic looking. Dicing the potatoes instead of slicing it also improves the rustic look. o Traditionally in a tortilla, the onion is first sautéed for 15 minutes and then the potatoes are fried in LOTS of olive oil for another 20-30 minutes but we prefer precooking the diced potatoes in water instead (while the onion is sautéing). It saves time and calls for less oil. If you have precooked potatoes leftover in the fridge, they are perfect for this dish. o We actually prefer making this with butter instead of olive oil because it’s more heat resistant and it brings out the best flavor in mushrooms. But you can of course use any oil of preference. o Fry the mushrooms on a low/­­medium heat. Don’t crowd the pan and always listen for the sizzle. If you cant hear them sizzling, the temperature is too low. o Luise has developed an intolerance against garlic (especially raw) so we have kept it out of this recipe, but I bet it could be good along with the mushrooms and kale. o If you don’t like kale, try it with spinach. Or use the same method with other vegetables. o Feta cheese is also really good in this combination. Just crumble it into the egg mixture. o We finish the tortilla in the oven because it’s easier, but you can flip it by sliding the half-cooked frittata onto a plate. It will still be some liquid in the middle so you need to be careful doing this. Than you place the saucepan over the frittata (and plate) and simply flip it upside down while holding the plate as a lid so it falls down into the sauce pan. And then fry it for a few more minutes on that side. Kale, Mushroom & Potato Tortilla Makes approx 8 slices 1 onion  350 g /­­ 2 1/­­2 cups firm potatoes, diced 5 tbsp butter or oil 2 cups /­­ 100 g Funnel chanterelles (or any other mushroom) 2 leaves /­­ 30 g kale, stems removed 1 large handful fresh parsley  6-8 eggs (depending on the size) salt and pepper Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Add water to a medium size saucepan along with salt and bring to a boil. Peel and chop the onions. Scrub and dice the potatoes into 1-2 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch cubes. Heat 1 tbsp butter in an ovenproof frying pan. Sauté the onions on low heat for about 10-15 minutes until soft and translucent, stir occasionally. Meanwhile add the potatoes to the boiling water and cook for about 13-15 minutes on medium heat, they should be just done. Drain the cooking water and add the potatoes to the saucepan with onions, along with one more tablespoon butter and a little salt. Sauté for a few minutes more to give the potatoes some flavor and color. Pour the onion and potatoes into a separate bowl and put the saucepan back on the heat. Clean the mushrooms, slice them into desired size and add to the pan along with a knob of butter. Fry the mushrooms on low/­­medium heat for 5-6 minutes or until they have released some moisture and started caramelizing. Rinse the kale, chop finely and add it to the pan along with fresh parsley. Let wilt down for a few minutes. Add salt and then pour into the bowl with potatoes. Wipe the saucepan clean and put it back on the heat along with a knob of butter. Crack the eggs in a bowl, add salt and pepper and whisk. Pour the vegetables into the egg mixture and then tip it into the warm saucepan (it’s essential that the pan is warm and buttered for the tortilla not to stick to it). Let it fry for about two minutes (preferably with a lid or a plate on top) and then place the pan in the oven (without lid) and switch on the broiler. After about 10 minutes it should be firm, golden and ready. Wait a few minutes for it to cool down and then run a spatula around the edges to make sure it comes off easily. Cut into triangles and serve with a side salad. It can also be stored in the fridge for a couple of days. PS! Look at these two photos of Luise and Noah, taken exactly one year apart.

Stuffed Pumpkins And Creamy Mushroom Sauce

October 13 2017 Happy Cow veggie blog 

How do you make a fall-inspired dish even more festive? Serve it inside a pumpkin! Brownble‘s stuffed pumpkin recipe is the ultimate autumn feast that is sure to get you in the spirit of all things fall. A delicious mixture of flavors from fragrant sage, cranberries, and crunchy pecans, your kitchen will smell amazing while cooking this up. The filling can be served in individual small pumpkins, or put in a large pumpkin for the middle of your table. What a great centerpiece that would make, right?? And don’t forget to top it off with some amazing creamy mushroom sauce! Here’s how to make everything: View the printable recipe here. The post Stuffed Pumpkins And Creamy Mushroom Sauce appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Mixed Mushroom Soup

October 9 2017 Meatless Monday 

This mixed mushroom soup, or “zuppa di funghi misti,” as the Italians would say, is perfect for the fall season. The aromas and flavors provided by shallots, garlic, red wine and thyme excellently compliment the mushrooms’ earthiness. We love that this gourmet recipe is also perfect for home cooks! This recipe comes to us from Alicia Walter of Eataly’s La Scuola. - 4 cups mixed mushrooms, cut into 1/­­4-inch pieces, stems and scraps reserved - 5 cups water - 2 tablespoons butter or olive oil - 1 ounce dried porcini mushrooms - 1/­­4 cup shallots, cut into small dice - 3 cloves garlic, minced - 2 sprigs thyme, leaves picked from stem and chopped - Pinch red chili flakes - 1 bunch kale, stems removed and chopped into 1-inch pieces - 2 tablespoons tomato paste - 1 cup red wine - Extra virgin olive oil - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 1 loaf rustic bread, sliced and grilled Prepare a mushroom stock by adding the reserved mushroom scraps and dried porcini mushrooms to a large stockpot filled with 5 cups of water. Simmer over low heat for at least 30 minutes and then strain. You should have 4 cups of stock. In a small stockpot, heat the olive oil until almost smoking. Add the mushrooms in one layer, working in batches if necessary. Once the mushrooms have been browned on one side, sprinkle with salt, add in a small spoonful of butter or oil and continue to cook until the mushrooms are browned on all sides. Remove the mushrooms from the pan with a slotted spoon and reserve. Reduce the heat and add the shallots, garlic, thyme, red chili flakes and a pinch of salt. Add more olive oil if necessary. Cook until the shallots are soft. Add the tomato paste and cook until the color changes from bright red to brick red. Add in the red wine and boil until the alcohol has cooked off. Finally, add the kale and an additional pinch of salt. Sauté until soft. Slowly pour in the strained mushroom stock and simmer for ten minutes. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Place a quarter of the reserved mushrooms into a shallow bowl. Ladle the broth over the mushrooms. Top with a piece of grilled bread drizzled with olive oil and rubbed with garlic if desired. Enjoy immediately. The post Mixed Mushroom Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

dry gulab jamun recipe | dry jamun with milk powder | dry kala jamun

September 29 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

dry gulab jamun recipe | dry jamun with milk powder | dry kala jamundry gulab jamun recipe | dry gulab jamun with milk powder with step by step photo and video recipe. perhaps one of the recent innvovative and appreciated indian sweet recipe served dry with sugar crystals. most commonly dry gulab jamun recipe is found in the feast of religious or special occasions as it is easy to serve and consume. further it is also common practice to serve warm dry jamun with cold vanilla ice cream. Continue reading dry gulab jamun recipe | dry jamun with milk powder | dry kala jamun at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese

September 26 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Giardiniera Mac and Cheese Italian pickled mixed vegetables, called giardiniera, can be quite tart, so its best to drain and rinse before using. You can make this mac and cheese without the gardiniera or with the addition of cooked vegetables, frozen, thawed green peas, or marinated artichoke hearts. You can also make this ahead and then cover and pop it in the oven to reheat.   Giardiniera Mac and Cheese - 8 to 12 ounces fiore pasta or other bite-sized pasta shape - 2 1/­­2 cups giardiniera vegetables, drained and coarsely chopped - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1/­­3 cup panko crumbs - 1 1/­­2 cups unsweetened almond milk - 1/­­3 cup raw cashew pieces, soaked and drained - 2 tablespoons cornstarch or tapioca flour - 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast flakes - 1 tablespoon mellow white miso - 1 heaped tablespoon tomato paste - 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar or lemon juice - 3/­­4 teaspoon mustard powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon smoked paprika - 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder - 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder - 1 small clove minced garlic - 1/­­4 teaspoon ground turmeric - 1 teaspoon salt, or to taste - Cook the pasta in a pot of boiling salted water until it is al dente. About 3 minutes before the pasta is done cooking, stir in the giardiniera. Drain and leave in the strainer. - Heat the oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat. Add the panko crumbs, stirring to coat with the oil. Cook, stirring for a few minutes until the crumbs are toasted. Remove from the heat and set aside. - In a blender, combine all of the remaining ingredients and blend until smooth and creamy. Pour the sauce into the pot in which the pasta was cooked and cook stirring, over medium-high heat, until the sauce is hot, bubbly, and thickened, about 4 minutes. Add the pasta and vegetables to the sauce, stirring gently to combine and heat through. Transfer to a casserole dish and sprinkle with the reserved panko. Serve hot. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. The post Giardiniera Mac and Cheese appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Slow Food and Meatless Monday: Cooking Up a Better Future

September 18 2017 Meatless Monday 

Slow Food and Meatless Monday: Cooking Up a Better Future Get ready for a countrywide Meatless Monday! Next week, on September 25, Meatless Monday and Slow Food USA are teaming up for the Cook Up a Better Future campaign. Restaurants and chefs across the nation will create and serve delicious, plant-based meals putting three unsung ingredients in the spotlight. In the combined efforts of promoting biodiversity in food, reducing meat consumption, and fighting climate change, Cook Up a Better Future seeks to bring diners to the table for a great movement for food and the environment. The three ingredients featured – Sea Island Red Peas, Carolina Gold Rice, and Sea Island Benne Seeds, all from Anson Mills are from Slow Foods Ark of Taste, a global catalog of foods facing extinction. Participating Chef Jay Lippin of Crabtrees Kittle House Restaurant & Inn in Chappaqua, New York explains the mission behind Cook Up a Better Future:     Remember to visit one of these restaurants next Monday, September 25 to celebrate global biodiversity and great food! Here are the restaurants and chefs Cooking Up a Better Future: Arizona Orme School, Patti Marrs, Mayer, Arizona California Arcade Cafe, Richard Lewis, Gilroy, California Assaggiare Mendocino, Julia Conway, Fort Bragg, California Deckmans en el Mogor, Drew Deckman, San Ysidro, California GEO Academy at Grant High School, Brenda Ruiz, Sacramento, California Jackson Nunes Consulting, Lesa Jackson Nunes, Menlo Park, California Joni Sare Chef Services, Joni Sare, Cupertino, California Magpie, Edward Roehr, Sacramento, California Savory Cafe, Juan Barajas, Woodland, California Colorado The Living Farm Cafe, Mike Gillespie, Paonia, Colorado Mountain Harvest Festival – Disco Soup, Jim Brett, Hotchkiss, Colorado Florida Nutwood, Steven Rojas, Winter Haven, Florida Table & Tap, David Rashty, Punta Gorda, Florida Georgia Miller Union, Steven Satterfield, Atlanta, Georgia Your Resident Gourmet, Jennifer Hill Booker, Lilburn, Georgia Hawaii Mud Hen Water, Ed Kenney, Honolulu, Hawaii Indiana Late Harvest Kitchen, Meredith Iacocca, Indianapolis, Indiana Illinois Elsa M. Jacobson, farmers market manager/­­recipe taster, Chicago, Illinois JCR, James Rorhbacher, Chicago, Illinois White Oak Gourmet, Thomas Leavitt, Long Grove, Illinois Michigan City Food, Phillip Jones, Detroit, Michigan Granor Farm, Abra Berens, Three Oaks, Michigan Missouri Feast in the Forest Teaching Kitchen, Penelope Beache, St. James, Missouri Good Fortune, Ryan McDonald, St. Louis, Missouri Square1 Project, Logan Ely, St. Louis, Missouri New Jersey Atlantic City Rescue Mission, Dara Heston, Sweetwater, New Jersey New York Crabtrees Kittle House Restaurant & Inn, Jay Lippin, Chappaqua, New York North Carolina Catch, Keith Rhodes, Wilmington, North Carolina South Carolina Wild Olive Cucina Italiana, Carmine Peluso, John’s Island, South Carolina The post Slow Food and Meatless Monday: Cooking Up a Better Future appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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