east - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegan Portobello Mushroom Burger

Tomato Tofu Scramble

Orzo Greek Salad

Spring Vegetable and Quinoa Pot Pie










east vegetarian recipes

Pea Alfredo Pasta

May 15 2019 VegKitchen 

Pea Alfredo Pasta Discover this fully vegan recipe for fettuccine with alfredo sauce and peas without delay. You will be surprised to discover that the cheese is replaced here by nutritional yeast. As for the creamy alfredo sauce, it is made with vegetable broth and plant based milk. The post Pea Alfredo Pasta appeared first on VegKitchen.

Roasted Vegetarian Puttanesca Sauce

May 3 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I’m not a lazy cook, but I’m also not opposed to a few shortcuts now and then. One shortcut that I use a lot is jarred pasta sauce. Because it’s easy! And if you buy the right brand, it tastes good too. Or, at least, good enough. (Sometimes good enough is good enough, you know? Especially after a long work day.) Making my own pasta sauce seemed like such a chore, I never bothered attempting it. Well, I’m now fully aboard the homemade pasta sauce train. Homemade pasta sauce! What took me so long?! And the best part is, it’s really not as time-consuming as I thought it would be. Because I’m a big fan of roasting veggies, I decided to use roasted tomatoes as the base for vegetarian puttanesca sauce rather than making it on the stove. Not only does this make the sauce more flavorful, it also reduces the hands-on time for the recipe. Sure, opening a jar of sauce and heating it up in a saucepan is still quicker, but this sauce is worth the (short) wait. You can use the roasted tomatoes as a base for just about any kind of pasta sauce–roast the tomatoes with […]

Fudgy Sweet Potato Brownies

May 1 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Fudgy Sweet Potato Brownies I consider these to be snacking brownies, rather than full-on dessert brownies. They’re vegan, gluten-free, flourless, and pretty lightly sweetened. They depend on steamed sweet potato for much of their fudgyness and even some of their sweetness. In other words, they’re pretty virtuous as far as brownies go. But not too annoyingly so, since they’re still plenty delicious. They’d make for a great lunchbox snack for kids or a midnight bite for students. They freeze well, too, so it’s good to keep a batch in the freezer to satisfy any kind of sweet tooth emergency. We are huge fans of using sweet potatoes as an ingredient for good vegan desserts – see these truffles, this pudding, and this nougat. They do so many things: they bind, contribute moistness, add a bit of sweetness, but also largely act as a blank flavor slate. We are currently obsessed with steamed sweet potatoes and found that that method of cooking works beautifully for these brownies. Sweet potatoes come out incredibly silky when steamed, and the process also hydrates them quite a bit, which is crucial for that fudgyness in the brownies. Steaming generally cooks sweet potatoes faster than roasting them, so that’s another little bonus. Just a note that we used a Japanese, white-fleshed sweet potato for this photoshoot because that’s all they had at the store somehow. You can definitely use a regular, orange sweet potato. Hope you’ll give these a try! Have a great rest of your week :) Fudgy Sweet Potato Brownies   Print inspired by Minimalist Bakers black bean brownies Serves: 12 brownies Ingredients 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds 1 medium sweet potato - steamed until fork-tender and peeled 3 tablespoons olive oil or soft coconut oil, plus more for oiling the tin ½ teaspoon vanilla extract ¾ cup cocoa powder ¼ cup + 3 tablespoons coconut sugar 1½ teaspoons baking powder generous pinch of sea salt dairy-free dark chocolate chips - for topping optional: nuts, and/­­or coconut flakes - for topping (we also used rose petals, which should be added after baking) Instructions Preheat oven to 350°F (175° C). Prepare a 12 hole muffin tin by oiling each hole with olive oil or soft coconut oil. In a small bowl, combine the ground flax with 6 tablespoons of water. Whisk together and let sit while you prepare the rest of the ingredients. In a large bowl, mash the sweet potato until smooth. You should have about 1¾ - 2 cups of sweet potato flesh. Add the oil, vanilla, cocoa, sugar, baking powder, and salt to the bowl. Mix everything together until smooth. Fold in the flax mixture, which should be thickened to a raw egg-like consistency at this point. You can also do all this mashing and mixing in a food processor if you prefer. Distribute the brownie mixture in the oiled muffin tin, patting it down into the muffin holes somewhat evenly. I like to use slightly dampened hands for this, but you can also use a wetted spoon. Top each brownie with some chocolate chips and any other topping of choice, if using. Place in the oven and bake for 28-30 minutes, until the brownies are dry to the touch on the outside but still quite fudgy inside. Let cool for at least 20 minutes before removing the brownies from the pan. Keep refrigerated or frozen in an air-tight container. Notes These brownies are very mildly sweetened. If you prefer a sweeter brownie, I would recommend adjusting the amount of sugar to a full ½ cup. Since this is vegan batter, you can also safely taste it for sweetness before baking and adjust as needed. 3.5.3226 The post Fudgy Sweet Potato Brownies appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Hamantaschen

April 29 2019 VegKitchen 

Vegan Hamantaschen Making these traditional Purim cookies in a vegan rendition is not much of a stretch--Earth Balance comes to the rescue. I like to make them with at least two, or even three types of jam for variety and color. Makes about 2 dozen 2 1/­­2 cups whole wheat pastry or spelt flour, plus more as needed 3/­­4 cup sugar 1 1/­­2 teaspoons baking powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 3/­­4 cup nonhydrogenated vegan margarine or shortening (such as Earth Balance, in both cases) 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/­­4 cup orange juice (from about 1 large orange) Fillings (use any, or a combination): The post Vegan Hamantaschen appeared first on VegKitchen.

Legendary Layer Bean Dip - Vegan, Grain-free

April 26 2019 My New Roots 

Legendary Layer Bean Dip - Vegan, Grain-free     Dips are my favourite food group. Yes, food group. If I ever got a tattoo, it would probably say something like: pass the hummus. I was recently hosting a party-for-no-reason, and like most of my get togethers they involve a lot of food. But I didnt feel like making a fallback dip, like tzatziki, or baba ganoush. No. I felt like leveling up and creating something I hadnt tried to before. Something with BIG DIP ENERGY – a chunky, spicy, creamy, and above all impressive layer dip. Id cooked pinto beans the night before, had a little tin of chipotle chilies kicking around the pantry, and I knew that if I cut a couple corners, this thing would come together so Id still have time to tizz myself up before the guests arrived. My childhood memories of layer dip involve many cans and jars of processed food being dumped into a large bowl, but the current-reality-holistic-nutritionist version definitely involves making every single one of those things from scratch. Mama dont have time for that! So I simplified things by cutting out the guacamole (dont yell at me like that - add it if you want to!), and using jarred salsa. Everything else was homemade, but came together quickly and easily.       First, I sautéed the pre-cooked pinto beans with onions, garlic, spices, and the chipotle peppers. While that was on the stove, I whipped up the hemp seed queso (no soaking required!). And the salsa got an upgrade with some fresh, chopped cherry tomatoes. This is such an easy hack btw, since it makes the salsa taste more alive and juicy, while giving it a lot more texture, which I personally dig. All it takes after that is mushing the beans up a bit in the pan, which you can do with a bean masher, or an immersion blender, if you dont want to haul out yet another large piece of equipment. Then layer away! All in all, this took me about 20 minutes, start to finish, and the party people hung around this bowl like it was the last dip on planet earth. The delicious, creamy cheese sauce is a riff off my cashew queso, but in the interest of keeping this allergen-free, I used hemp seeds instead. I love this change-up, since its less expensive, and contains way more omega-3 fats and protein. You can dial up the heat here if you like, but because both the salsa and the bean layer have quite a kick to them, I kept the queso pretty mild. Did I mention that this is delicious on its own next to a platter of veggie sticks?! Or chips. Lets be honest.          Pinto Bean Dreams Just look at those beautiful beans! Dont they look gorgeous in all of their tone-on-tone mottled-ness? Pinto actually means painted in Spanish, and when you take a close look at pinto beans you can clearly see how theyve earned their moniker. Their speckles fade when cooking, and turn a lovely pale pink colour. They also gain a super creamy interior that is perfect in soups and stews, but also dips. Pintos, like all beans, are a mixture of protein and complex carbohydrates, making them incredibly filling, but wont spike blood sugar levels. Pinto beans are low in calories and fat, but contain the highest amount of fiber out of all the legumes (wow!). Key nutrients in pinto beans include potassium to maintain normal blood pressure, calcium for supporting muscle and nerve function, iron to enhance oxygen transport, and zinc for skin health.  Like all beans, pintos can cause an increase in intestinal gas (burps! farts! abdominal discomfort!), due to the oligosaccharides in the beans fermenting in the lower intestine. Because these starchy molecules live in the skin of the beans, a simple soak in water overnight usually does the trick. The soaking process will help leach out many of these fermenting properties, which is why it is so important to discard the soaking water and then boil them in fresh water. Adding a strip of kombu seaweed to the pot will further help to reduce the gas-producing potential of pinto beans (and all legumes), acting like a sponge to absorb those raffinose sugar toot culprits. Try these two tricks to reduce your toilet tunes, and stay social!          I used a clear glass bowl to serve the dip in so that they layers are visible, and it was not until after pouring in two layers did I have the idea to put cilantro stems up on the sides of it. Doh! But knowing it would be #worthit, I painstakingly scooped out the beans and salsa trying to keep everything separate, cleaned the bowl, and started over. I lightly brushed the tiniest amount of olive oil on the leaves to act as glue, then pressed them to the walls of bowl. This is completely unnecessary, but it makes the dip look less monotone and more enticing in my opinion – green always does it! This step takes an extra two minutes and adds a decorative touch, but its your call. Maybe you need those two minutes to tizz yourself up?  If you want to change up the recipe, try using black beans or kidney beans in place of the pintos. If you want to add another layer to this already boss situation, go on and add the guac! I was just trying to keep things a little easier for yall.  And if youd like to make your own salsa, I have a stellar raw recipe right here. Lastly, I want to add that my bowl for this was roughly 1 1/­­2 quarts /­­ litres capacity, and everything it fit perfectly. I would only suggest sizing up if you don’t have this exact container size.         Print recipe     Legendary Layer Bean Dip Serves 8-10 Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (or ghee) 1 medium yellow onion, diced 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1 clove garlic, minced 2 tsp. ground cumin 1 tsp. dried Mexican oregano (substitute with regular oregano) 1/­­2 tsp. ground sweet paprika 3 cups /­­ 500g cooked pinto beans (about 2 cans) 1/­­2 can chipotle peppers in adobo sauce (use more or less to suit your taste) water as needed 1 small bunch cilantro, washed and dried 1 pint /­­ 280g cherry tomatoes, divided 1 green onion, sliced (white and green part) 1 small jar (15.5 oz. /­­ 415ml) store bought salsa, mild medium or hot, depending on your tastes 1 cup /­­ 145g hulled hemp seeds 1 medium red bell pepper, seeds removed and roughly chopped 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 3 Tbsp. nutritional yeast 2-3 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste 1/­­2 clove garlic 1 small piece fresh turmeric, chopped (substitute with 1/­­2 tsp. dried) ground cayenne, to taste 3 Tbsp. water, if needed Directions: 1. Melt oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onions, salt, and stir to combine. Cook until lightly caramelized (about 10 minutes), then add the garlic and cook for a couple minutes until fragrant. Stir in cumin, oregano and paprika, cook for 2 minutes, then add the beans and chipotles in adobo (use as much or as little as you like). Cover and cook on low heat while you make the queso. If the pot becomes dry, add a little water and stir. 2. To make the queso, put all ingredients, except water, in a high-speed blender or food processor and blend until smooth and creamy. If needed, add water one tablespoon at a time until the desired consistency is reached. If you want a thick cream, use less water, for a thinner sauce, use more. (You will not achieve a perfectly smooth sauce with a food processor, but it is still delicious!). 3. Slice the cherry tomatoes into quarters. Add half of them to the salsa and stir to combine. Save the other half for later. 4. Smash the beans with a bean masher, potato masher, immersion blender, or put them into your high-speed blender (remove the queso first, but dont worry about cleaning it). The goal is to get the beans creamy, but not perfectly smooth. Add water if necessary, and season to taste.  5. Pick out a few stems of the most attractive cilantro, brush them with a little olive oil and stick them to the inside wall of the bowl (this step is optional). Chop the remaining cilantro and set aside. 6. Combine the remaining cherry tomatoes and combine them with the sliced spring onion. Sprinkle with a little salt, and fold to combine.  7. To assemble the dip, Spread the bean layer in the bottom first, followed by the salsa and finally the hemp queso. Top with the chopped cilantro, and finally the fresh tomato mix. Serve with whatever you like to dip! Party on!      Hope you’re all doing well out there. If you are experiencing any semblance of Spring weather where you are, please send some my way. K thanks. Happy dipping! xo, Sarah B The post Legendary Layer Bean Dip – Vegan, Grain-free appeared first on My New Roots.

Bakery Highlight: Celebrated In Providence, Rhode Island

April 22 2019 Happy Cow veggie blog 

  Each time we bite into a soft, fresh-from-the oven chocolate chip cookie, it should be a celebration of life. At least, this is what Becky Morris, the owner of Celebrated, believes. Celebrated is an award-wining vegan private dessert studio in Providence, Rhode Island that serves happy eaters throughout Rhode Island and Eastern Massachusetts. Celebrated creates plant-based, allergen-free desserts that are hand-crafted by a small team of workers. Decadent dessert tables, creatively-crafted wedding cakes, and impressive mini desserts are among the list of products available for custom order.   Celebrated has catered to a wide range of corporate events, banquets, and weddings. In Celebrateds portfolio of past events, customers can drool over a spread with cookie dough cupcakes and soft blue tinted macarons for a whale-themed Baby Shower; pumpkin spice and chocolate orange-flavored macarons to pair with an icing spiderweb-laced grandiose wedding cake for a Halloween-themed wedding; salted caramel and smores macarons to compliment a grand white wedding cake for a rustic fall wedding; and intricate frosting multi-flowered cakes for a succulent bridal shower.   Beckys creatively-flavored macarons appear at nearly every event that she caters. These signature macarons are the only vegan French macarons available in New England, and […] The post Bakery Highlight: Celebrated In Providence, Rhode Island appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

pal payasam recipe | rice kheer recipe | paal payasam | rice payasam

April 19 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

pal payasam recipe | rice kheer recipe | paal payasam | rice payasampal payasam recipe | rice kheer recipe | paal payasam | rice payasam with step by step photo and video recipe. kheer recipe is very common dessert recipe not just india but most of the south east asian countries. each region has slight variations specific to native place and is prepared and served accordingly. one such kheer variation is pal payasam or rice kheer hailing from the south indian cuisine. The post pal payasam recipe | rice kheer recipe | paal payasam | rice payasam appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Silky Sweet Potatoes with Cucumber Tahini Ranch, Green Veg and Chickpeas

April 13 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Silky Sweet Potatoes with Cucumber Tahini Ranch, Green Veg and Chickpeas Do you ever use your steamer? My $10 bamboo steamer is one of my favorite kitchen tools. I love how quick the steaming process is – generally much faster than roasting or even sautéing in some cases. I also really like how steaming imparts moisture onto ingredients, so they come out hydrated and silky smooth. Some people think steamed veg is boring because there’s no oil or seasoning, but you can liberally oil and salt your steamed goods after they are done. This little meal mostly comes together in the steamer. You steam the sweet potatoes until they are soft and custardy, throw in the broccoli and kale in the last few minutes of cooking the potatoes, and serve everything with a liberal slather of our cucumber tahini ranch and crispy chickpeas. We have a tahini tzatziki recipe in our cookbook, and this ranch is sort of reminiscent of that. It’s an addictive sauce that’s amazing on pretty much everything. We made this whole meal on our Instagram Stories if you’d like to see the process (look for it later today). Below you’ll find some links for things we’ve been into lately. Wishing you a great weekend :) Mama Eats Plants E-Cookbook – We love everything that Amanda does, and have been so excited for her ebook to come out. It’s everything we ever wanted and more: delicious, cozy plant-based recipes, low waste organization tips, beautiful writing and photos. Highly recommended if you’re in need of some inspiration in the kitchen and beyond. Green Kitchen Stories New Website – Everyone’s favorite vegetarian bloggers just launched their new website and it’s so beautiful. We love watching their stunning cooking videos over and over :) Bon Appetit Youtube Channel – Speaking of cooking videos, we love watching Bon Appetit’s test kitchen videos. The editing is perfect, the hosts are full of charm, and the videos are always packed with little tricks and tips that will most definitely improve your cooking. This one of Brad Leone and Samin Nosrat making focaccia is solid gold. How I Built This – We’ve been binge-listening to this entrepreneur-centred NPR podcast. It’s fun to hear how some now giant companies got started out of thin air. Some favorite episodes include: Alice Waters, Yvon Chouinard. Our Planet on Netflix – As heart-breaking as it is awe-inspiring, this is a nature documentary that really stops you in your tracks and gets you to reconsider your impact, beyond your day to day life. I definitely cried through the whole first episode. Asparagus Fries on YumUnviverse – Plant-based cooking goddess Heather made the asparagus fries from our cookbook and shot the most beautiful video of the process. Can’t wait to make these with the first of the asparagus soon. Silky Sweet Potatoes with Cucumber Tahini Ranch, Green Veg and Chickpeas   Print Serves: 2 as a main or 4 as a side Ingredients for the cucumber tahini ranch ¼ cup tahini zest from 1 large lemon, divided juice from 1 large lemon 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon maple syrup 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1-inch piece of cucumber - shredded 3-4 sprigs of dill - chopped 2 scallions - sliced sea salt and freshly ground black pepper - to taste apple cider vinegar and water - for thinning for the vegetables and chickpeas 2 medium sweet potatoes - halved olive oil 1 15 oz can chickpeas or 1½ cups cooked chickpeas sea salt 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 2 stalks of broccoli - cut into florets 4-5 leaves Lacinato kale - stemmed and torn lemon zest (reserved from the ranch) red pepper flakes Instructions to make the cucumber tahini ranch In a medium bowl, combine the tahini, half of the lemon zest (reserve the rest for later), lemon juice, olive oil, maple syrup, mustard, nutritional yeast, and garlic powder, and mix until you have a smooth paste. Add the cucumber, dill, scallions, salt and black pepper to taste, mixing everything in. Your ranch will be pretty thick at this point, so thin it out with splashes of apple cider vinegar and water, until you have a glossy, creamy sauce. Taste for acidity, salt, and pepper, and adjust if needed. This ranch will last refrigerated in an air-tight container for 3-4 days. to make the vegetables and chickpeas Set a tiered bamboo steamer or steaming basked over a pot with boiling water. Place the sweet potatoes into the steamer, cover, and steam for 35-40 minutes, or until the potatoes are fork-tender and custardy. While the sweet potatoes are cooking, prepare the crispy chickpeas. Drain and dry off your chickpeas really well with a kitchen towel, lightly rubbing them to get as many as you can out of their skins. This will prevent the chickpeas from popping in the pan. Warm a generous pour of olive oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add the chickpeas and fry, stirring occasionally, for about 15 minutes, until golden and crispy. Transfer the chickpeas to a bowl and mix in some salt to taste, as well as the nutritional yeast and smoked paprika. Do not wash the pan, but wipe it off if theres any burnt bits. In the last 5 minutes of the sweet potato steaming time, add the broccoli and kale to the same steaming basket or add another tier to your bamboo steamer and add the green vegetables to that. Cover and steam for 5 minutes, until the broccoli is bright green and the kale is slightly softened. While the broccoli and kale are steaming, warm a bit more olive oil in the same pan you used for the chickpeas, over medium low heat. Add the reserved lemon zest (from the ranch recipe) and a pinch of red pepper flakes and let the oil infuse until the vegetables are done. Once the vegetables are done steaming, add the broccoli and kale to the pan with the infused oil, add a pinch of salt, and toss to coat. Serve the steamed sweet potatoes with a pinch of salt, a good slather of the ranch, topped with the green vegetables and chickpeas, and liberally drenched in more ranch. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 This post contains Amazon Affiliate links. The post Silky Sweet Potatoes with Cucumber Tahini Ranch, Green Veg and Chickpeas appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Recipe | Chocolate Caramel Pretzel Gelato

April 8 2019 Oh My Veggies 

This is the recipe that finally made me realize that our freezer does not get as cold as it should. All last summer, I was on a Zoku kick and I made popsicles at least once a week, if not more. It was our first summer in North Carolina and it was hot. I had never been much of a popsicle person, but in that hot weather, suddenly they were all I wanted to eat. In my popsicle making frenzy, I noticed that the Zoku was taking much, much longer than it should have to freeze my popsicles. So naturally, I blamed the Zoku. In December, I got my ice cream maker. I’ve used it a few times and each time, the ice cream turned out a little bit soupy. I blamed the ice cream maker. So when I made this Chocolate Caramel Pretzel Gelato, it was the same story–it just barely set in the ice cream maker, so I decided to Google it and see what was going on. There were virtually no bad reviews for it and the few bad reviews there were had comments saying, “Your freezer probably isn’t cold enough!” Oh. So that’s why the Zoku […]

Spinach Salad with Baked Tofu and Carrot Ginger Dressing

April 1 2019 Meatless Monday 

This light, refreshing salad is a perfect side that can also stand on its own thanks to the protein-rich spinach and tofu. To save time, you can press the tofu and make the peanut sauce and dressing the night before for a quicker and easier prep time! This recipe comes to us from Triad to Wellness . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 2 Spinach Salad 6  ounce  bag of spinach 3/­­4  cup  carrots 3/­­4  cup  edamame 3  tbsp  hemp seeds,  seeds 14  ounces  firm tofu,  drained, pressed and cut into 1″ cubes   Peanut Sauce 1/­­4  tsp  coconut oil,  olive oil can be substituted 2  garlic cloves,  minced 2  tbsp  low sodium tamari,  soy sauce or coconut aminos can be substituted 3/­­4  cup  water 1  cup  coconut milk,  canned 3/­­4  cup  coconut water 2  tbsp  red curry paste 3/­­4  cup  peanut butter,  smooth 1  tbsp  sorghum syrup,  honey can be substituted red pepper flakes,  optional   - Carrot Ginger Dressing 1/­­4  cup  olive oil 1  tsp  sesame oil 1/­­4  cup  white vinegar 2  tbsp  white miso,  white chickpea miso can be substituted 1  tbsp  tahini 2  medium carrots,  peeled and chopped 1  inch long  piece fresh ginger,  peeled and cut into circles 1  tsp  sorghum syrup,  honey can be substituted 1/­­4  tsp  salt 1/­­4  tsp  white pepper   Preheat oven to 400? F. To drain and press tofu, roll tofu in a clean dish towel and place on a clean plate. Cover tofu with the flat side of another plate. Stack three heavy books on top of plate and set aside to allow liquid to drain from the tofu for at least 15 minutes. (This step can be prepped the night before.) To make peanut sauce, heat coconut oil over medium heat in a medium saucepan. Add garlic, sauté until lightly browned. Whisk in tamari, water, coconut milk, and coconut water. Add curry paste and stir for 1 minute. Whisk in peanut butter and sorghum syrup, bring to a simmer. Cook for 5 minutes. Add red pepper flakes if desired. Remove from heat. Cut tofu into 1 inch cubes. Place tofu cubes in a single layer on a lined baking sheet pan with parchment paper. Bake until firm, approximately 20 minutes. Remove tofu from oven, baste tofu with 1/­­4 cup peanut sauce, set aside. In a high-speed blender add all of the ingredients for the carrot-ginger dressing, blend until smooth. Refrigerate the dressing for at least 15 minutes so the flavors meld. In a medium salad bowl, toss together spinach, carrots, edamame, 2 tablespoons hemp seeds, remaining peanut sauce, basted tofu, and 6 tablespoons of carrot ginger dressing in a large bowl. Sprinkle the top of salad with 1 tablespoons hemp seeds. The post Spinach Salad with Baked Tofu and Carrot Ginger Dressing appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder

March 23 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder We’re very ready for spring and all of its tender, green produce, but unfortunately it’s still very much soup weather around here. I think that soups are such lifesavers for busy people. They’re simple to make, hard to mess up, and can be customized millions of ways. You can make a giant soup for the week and have warming, wholesome meals right at your fingertips when you don’t have the energy to cook. They’re easy to bring to go in a mason jar or thermos. It’s also great to freeze some soup, which will always be appreciated later, in the midst hangry emergencies. We had two goals for this chowder – we wanted it to be creamy, filling, and comforting, but also light and a bit different from the squash and root vegetable soups that are always around in the winter. Just a little nod to spring :) The creaminess in this chowder comes from blended roasted cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas. There’s no cashews or any nut-based products, since we wanted to go for a lighter soup. I think that cauliflower works so well in creating both a chowder-like consistency and flavor here, while the roasted mushrooms bring an extra depth of flavor. There are also green peas for more springy vibes, along with a base of mirepoix (onion, carrot, celery), and smoked paprika. When it comes to creamy soups, we still love having some chunky texture present, so we leave some of the cauliflower, mushrooms, and chickpeas whole here. The chowder just tastes more like a meal this way, but it could definitely also serve as a side in smaller portions. We’ll be showing the step-by-step process for preparing this chowder on our Instagram Stories later today, and we’ll also save it in our Highlights. Hope you try this one and have a great weekend :) Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients olive oil toasted sesame oil (optional) 1 yellow onion - chopped 1 medium carrot - cubed 1 stick of celery - sliced sea salt 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 1 teaspoon nutritional yeast (optional) ¾ cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight or up to 24 hours 8 cups purified water 2 bay leaves 1 large head of cauliflower - cut into bite-sized florets 10 oz crimini mushrooms - cut into quarters or eighths for bigger mushrooms freshly ground black pepper 1 cup frozen peas juice from 1 lemon fresh herbs - for garnish Instructions Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Warm a soup pot over medium heat. Add a generous drizzle of olive oil and sesame oil, if using. Add the onion, carrot, and celery to the pot, along with a pinch of salt. Cook the vegetables for about 10 minutes, until soft. Add the garlic, smoked paprika, and nutritional yeast, if using, and stir around for about 30 seconds to 1 minute, until fragrant. Drain and thoroughly rinse the chickpeas and add them to the pot, stirring to coat. Add the water and bay leaves, bring the liquid up to a simmer and cook, with the pot lid askew, for 30 minutes. Taste a few chickpeas after the 30 minutes, they should be cooked and creamy inside. If the chickpeas are not yet done, cook them longer. This process can take up to an hour or even longer with some older chickpeas. Generously salt the chickpea broth towards the end of the chickpea cooking time. While the chickpeas are cooking, prepare two rimmed, parchment paper-covered baking trays. Place the cauliflower on one of the trays and the mushrooms - on the other one. Drizzle both the cauliflower and mushrooms with olive oil (or other roasting oil of choice), sprinkle with salt and pepper, and stir. Place both trays in the preheated oven and roast for 30-40 minutes, stirring halfway, until the cauliflower is soft and caramelized. The mushrooms will release water while roasting, so thats why using a rimmed baking tray helps. Once the chickpeas are cooked and the vegetables are roasted, add the cauliflower and mushrooms to the pot with the chickpeas, stirring to combine. Add about half of the soup to an upright blender, making sure to catch plenty of chickpeas, cauliflower, and mushrooms for creaminess. Blend until smooth and return the blended liquid to the soup pot, mixing everything together. Bring the soup back up to a boil and simmer for 5 more minutes for the flavors to merge. Turn off the heat and stir in the peas, which will thaw immediately in the hot soup. Stir in the lemon juice. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the chowder, garnished with fresh herbs, a drizzle of sesame oil or olive oil, and with a side of toasted sourdough bread or croutons. Enjoy! Notes You can also make this soup with canned chickpeas! Just use one to two 15 ounce cans of chickpeas and less water (start with about 5-6 cups). Since the chickpeas are cooked, you dont have to simmer them for 30 minutes. Otherwise, proceed as written out in the recipe. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Berry Creamsicles with White Chocolate Drizzle - Ice Cream Sunday Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango + Giveaway Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites Babamesco Dip .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Roasted Cauliflower and Mushroom Chowder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes

March 14 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes These potatoes are extra in every way. They take extra ingredients, extra work, and come out extra flavorful as a result. Simple roasted potatoes are already really good and don’t need changing, but I like to look at these lemon-miso ones as a category of their own. They’re for that time when you’re craving something indulgent, when you’re up for a fun kitchen project, and when you want to try out something new. They’re next level! The key to the flavor here is the marinade. The potatoes get par-boiled and marinated in a garlicky lemon-miso sauce. They are then slowly roasted in the marinade until they’re soft and creamy on the inside and golden and crispy on the outside. Pretty sure it’s impossible not to finish the whole batch in one sitting! Hope you give them a try, and if you’re interested in the step-by-step prep, check out our Instagram Stories later today (and highlights if you’re not reading this the day of). Sending you lots of love .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Next Level Lemon Miso Potatoes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired

March 7 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired We’re continuing with our series of Abruzzo-inspired, plant-based meals today (all our previous recipes are linked below). We love this style of cooking, because it’s focused on an elegant kind of simplicity that really lets every single ingredient shine. Italians tend to take the integrity of their ingredients really seriously, which we experienced first-hand everywhere we ate and cooked in Abruzzo. That obsession with quality ingredients really comes through in the amazing flavor of seemingly very basic dishes. This golden, warming stew was inspired by a seriously unforgettable cabbage and potato stew we tried in Abruzzo. We added our own spin to it – white beans and mushrooms – but the core stayed the same. It’s got just the type of soul-warming energy that we want in our kitchens and on our stoves during a decidedly un-spring like, snowy March. There are still spots open for our retreat in Abruzzo this coming October! You can read all about our past retreat here, complete with photos and testimonials. This time around, we will be focusing on re-centering and relaxation, together with exploring beautiful Abruzzo. We are super excited to have an on-site yoga/­­meditation instructor and an on-site acupuncture physician, both offering daily services. We’ll be hosting a bunch of fun workshops like medicinal jams, vegan cheese, meal planning, and homemade skincare (wink wink Magic Moisturizer). Also: visits to an olive grove, winery, and a family truffle plantation. You can see our whole sample itinerary here, and book here! Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! This stew is all about the combination of the fragrant, golden broth and the rustic, chunky pieces of variously textured veg. There’s tender, silky cabbage, carby goodness from the potatoes, and meatiness from the mushrooms and white beans. Onion, carrots and garlic establish a solid flavor base, and the addition of nutritional yeast, mustard, red pepper flakes, and lemon brings even more depth and a kick of zing and spice. We are crazy about this recipe. You can also watch us making this stew step-by-step later today on our Instagram Stories (it will be saved to our highlights as well). Hope you give it a try! For more of our Abruzzo-inspired recipes, check these out: Pasta e Ceci, The Simplest Lentil Soup, Ciabotta, Rhubarb Jam Cookies. And all scenery photos in this post are from our past retreat in Abruzzo this fall. Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience! - Rachel, Alabama I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special! - Claudia, Massachusetts It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group...I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with. - Helen, Michigan Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting. - Maudia, Michigan Ive been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that Id never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family homes basement... Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you! - Katya, Sochi Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients olive oil 1 medium onion - diced 2 large carrots - finely cubed sea salt 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast generous pinch of red pepper flakes 3 cloves of garlic - minced 4 oz shiitake mushrooms - stems removed, sliced 1 lb any starchy potatoes of choice - cut into 1 chunks freshly ground black pepper 1½ tablespoons Dijon or grainy mustard 2 bay leaves 7 cups water or veggie broth/­­broth from cooking the white beans 1 small Nappa or white cabbage - cored and cut into 1 chunks 2½-3 cups cooked white beans juice from 1 lemon handful of parsley - chopped, for serving Instructions Heat up a soup pot over medium heat and add some olive oil for sautéing. Add the onion and carrots, along with some salt and pepper, and sauté for about 8-10 minutes, until the onion and carrots are soft. Add the nutritional yeast, red pepper flakes, garlic, shiitake, and another pinch of salt. Stir and cook for another 8 minutes, or until the mushrooms are cooked through and any liquid that they release is evaporated. Add the potatoes, black pepper, mustard, and another pinch of salt, and give everything a stir. Add the bay leaves and water/­­broth and bring up to a simmer. Be mindful to use less salt if you are using a salted broth or more salt if using water. Using a wooden spoon or spatula, deglaze any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Simmer, partially covered, for 20-25 minutes, until the potatoes are tender. Add the cabbage and white beans, and bring the stew back up to a simmer. Simmer, partially covered, for another 15 minutes, until the cabbage is silky and tender. Turn off the heat. Add the lemon juice and stir it in. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the stew, garnished with parsley and a drizzle of olive oil. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Vegan Caesar Salad with Tempeh Croutons, Roasted Peaches and Corn Black Sesame and Ginger Ice Cream Roasted Pepper Lasagna Simple Mango Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!)

March 3 2019 Vegan Thyme 

Vegan Pasta e Fagioli Soup (and my gardener's lament: winter poison ivy!) Dear Soup, Thank you for always reminding me there are better days ahead. Soups are mainstays around here, especially with snow on the ground and temps hovering in low twenties to single digits tonight, plus more cold on the horizon this week. And poison ivy. (Yup.) I've probably made six batches of this already this winter. It involves a food processor and a soup pot. That's it. Comes together in approximately five minutes and is satisfying, warm and delicious. Here's my take on this soup, which was originally inspired by this. Here's how I made my Vegan Pasta e Fagioli: 4 carrots 1 leek 6 cloves garlic 1 celery stalk 1/­­2 onion sliced thin 2 bay leaves 1/­­2 head of cabbage 1 can of cannellini beans (drained, rinsed) 1 can diced tomatoes 1/­­3 cup ditalini pasta (cooked in separate pot, then added to soup just before serving) 2 T. nutritional yeast 1 qt. veggie stock olive oil thyme oregano red pepper flakes salt & pepper to taste Add chopped veggies--carrots, leeks, garlic to food processor, pulse about ten times. Prep the soup pot with the olive oil over medium heat, add chopped veg. Cook till just tender. Add remaining ingredients and broth and seasonings, salt and pepper. Cover and let simmer two hours over low heat. Serve with a side of your best homemade bread. (Mine is Jim Lahey's --I made the ciabatta version). After a visit with the folks at Urgent Care yesterday for a infernal outbreak of poison ivy, I am now awaiting an agonizing three weeks for this painful mess to clear up. Or longer. Why does Mother Earth require such an evil, toxic plant? What purpose does it serve? I've been struck by this havoc on only a handful of times in my life because I am so gawdawful afraid. Sounds impossible. But trust me when I tell you: only to me, the Master Gardener, and in winter no less. And above is the culprit.  Our home is undergoing a transformation of sorts in a few weeks which will finally rid us of these old railroad timbers and be replaced with a more substantial wall of stone. (That will hopefully outlive us and beyond.)  So I found myself outside on a warm-ish day earlier last week in a bit of a snit over the demise of some cherished plants I couldn't bear to loose. I've spent fifteen years tending and planting, so obviously there are plants I want to keep. Out with the shovel and buckets and pots. Everything's dormant, ground was soft, sun was out: perfect. Until later that night when I woke with what I imagined to be some sort of bug bite. Then to the next afternoon when my arm reached up to scratch my wrist (pulling the long sleeve back and discovering to my horror what really had happened). OMG. WTH? Could this be? . . . is this? Noooooo!  And then began the seven stages of grief: shock, denial, guilt, anger and bargaining, depression and loneliness to reconstruction (the UC visit) and finally acceptance. Yes, I accept that I have the rash of the spring and summertime, of gardeners, campers, hikers and landscapers, the poisonous fury of: Leaves of Three Let it Be! Ah, but what about the roots?  I had come in contact with said dormant plant--through the roots. I had oh-so carefully lifted plants and divided, setting each clump aside. Gloves and long sleeves. I have replayed this moment back through my mind a hundred times: as I reached under one of my plants, I must have accidentally, on an exposed part of my wrist, come in contact with the worst plant root on the planet, unbeknownst to me.  I am more allergic than most and so, this lovely little visitor and its prescribed remedy dosed out (the horrid steroid treatment) is, well. It's hell. The rash has traveled from my left wrist, up my right arm, to my abdomen, and leg. There's a perfect dot-to-dot landscape you can follow if you wanted. I can see the entry at every point. It's like an incredibly cruel irony and one I will face with tears, determination, agitation and regret. As for the remainder of the plants. They'll be destined for demolition. 

Vegan Quiche

April 29 2019 Meatless Monday 

This quiche is vegan and soy-free, with a cheesy filling complementing a whole grain crust and crunchy asparagus or seasonal veggies of your choice. It’s also easy to prepare, taking 40 minutes to make from start to finish. This recipe comes to us from Happy Kitchen.Rocks . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 6 - For the crust: - 260 grams or 2 cups whole wheat flour - 1 tsp. sea salt - 1/­­3 c. olive oil - 0.4 cup (100ml) cold water   - For the filling: - 1 cup raw cashews soaked in water over night (if time is limited, one hour of soaking is sufficient) - 2/­­3 cup water - 1 tsp Marmite or nutritional yeast - 2 cloves garlic - 1 tbsp lemon juice - 1/­­2 tsp nutmeg - a pinch cayenne - 2 tbsp freshly chopped herbs (consider oregano and thyme) - salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste - 7 spears asparagus (or veggie of your choice)   Prepare the crust: 1. Preheat the oven to 350 °F. 2. Combine whole wheat flour, salt, olive oil and water in a medium mixing bowl. 3. Knead until the dough forms a ball. Roll it and transfer to a rectangular quiche or tart pan. (You can use 10 x8 in., 14 x 6 in, 12 x 12 in. or even round-shaped ones.) 4. Bake for 15 minutes. Make the filling: 5. Place soaked cashews, garlic, water, lemon juice, nutmeg and a pinch of cayenne in the bowl of your food processor or blender. 6. Pulse until smooth and silky to achieve consistency of a thin hummus. Add more water if needed. 7. Add chopped herbs, salt and black pepper to taste. Prepare your veggies: 8. Trim ends of asparagus and blanche in salted boiling water for 5 minutes. (This way you will pre-cook the thickest parts of your stems while the tops will be nice and crunchy.) 9. If using other vegetables (except for dried tomatoes), pre-cook by stir-frying or steaming. Assemble the quiche: 10. Spread the filling over the crust. Arrange asparagus on top and gently press it, so that it’s half drown in the filling. 11. Bake for 20 minutes or until he top is golden. The middle should be a little unset. If a firmer texture is desired, increase baking time to 30 minutes. 12. Let it cool and enjoy! The post Vegan Quiche appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Gluten free Naan Vegan Grainfree

April 24 2019 Vegan Richa 

Gluten free Naan Vegan GrainfreeVegan Gluten free Naan Flatbread. Grain-free Naan Recipe. No Yeast. 6 Main Ingredients,  1 Bowl, and 20 Minutes. Serve with curries or slice and serve with dips or add to bowls. Soyfree Nutfree options.  Jump to Recipe We always need a good, fluffy, soft Naan flatbread to serve with curries, soups, stews or dips. My favorite Naan is obviously the one with gluten. But this one today is totally gluten-free! This Gluten free Naan has no grain, no yeast, no egg, no nuts, no need to sit and rise, no need to roll out. They are super quick and simple! They need 1 Bowl, 6 Main ingredients and are ready within 30 mins. Just whisk the batter, spread on parchment lined sheet, add toppings and bake! These flatbreads are soft and pliable when warm and will tend to dry out or get more cakey as they sit. Cover and store. I prefer the baked version, but you can make them on a cast iron skillet as well. See notes. To reheat, slice and grill or warm on a skillet or in a microwave. They also are great to serve with dips. Top with different seeds of choice and serve with creamy bean dips for a protein filled snack. These Naans are a slightly modified version of the chickpea Naans from my Indian Kitchen cookbook. That book is a treasure of amazing recipes! Continue reading: Gluten free Naan Vegan GrainfreeThe post Gluten free Naan Vegan Grainfree appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri)

April 21 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri) Achari Mathries, is a traditional staple snack in North India. They are usually served with spicy pickles, but in this recipe I have added mango pickle spices in the dough instead to add a tangy flavor to the mathri itself. With my family, mathries are a must have while travelling, and now with Achari Mathri, we no longer need the pickle, so it becomes one less thing to carry.  - 2 cup all purpose flour (planin flour, maida) - 1/­­2 cup fine sooji (samolina) - 1-1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­4 tsp dry ginger powder (saunth) - 1/­­4 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1/­­2 tsp fennel seeds crushed (saunf) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1 tsp yellow mustard seeds powder - 1/­­2 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 2 tsp red chili flake (adjust to taste) - 4 Tbsp oil - 3/­­4 cup lukewarm water (use as needed) -  Mix all the ingredients except the water. Add the water little at a time, kneading into a firm dough.  Cover the dough and set aside for 15 minutes or more. Prick them with a fork all over the rolled dough, so the Mathries do not puff when frying, and Mathries stay crisp. -  Divide the dough into 3 equal parts. Take each part of the dough and make a flat ball shape. Roll them into about 12-inch circles and thickness of salted crackers. -  Take a cookie cutter and cut them in rounds. I am using 2-1/­­2 inch cookie cutter. Use the size and shape to your choice. -  Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium heat. The frying pan should have at least 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put a small piece of dough in the oil. The dough should make the oil sizzle and come up slowly. -  Make sure to place just enough mathris in the oil it should be easy to turn them. Fry the mathris until both sides are light golden-brown. This should take about 7-8 minutes. Tip - Achari Mathries can be stored for a couple of months in airtight containers.  - If the mathries are cooked on high heat, they will be soft. - You will also enjoy Gulab Jamuns, Besan Ki Burfi, Plain Mathri The post Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Eggplant Pesto “Meatballs”

April 15 2019 Meatless Monday 

Who said meatballs must be made with meat? Hearty eggplant is one of the best vegetable substitutes for making meat-less meatballs because of its meaty texture and high fiber content. These plant-based Eggplant Pesto Meatballs have a similar texture to your traditional Italian recipe, but the eggplant in our recipe gives these balls a more tender and silky consistency and a flavor that makes it easy to forget that you are not eating beef. This recipe comes to us from Triad to Wellness . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Makes 40 meatballs (5 servings) - Eggplant mixture 1 1/­­2  tbsp  olive oil 1  medium  onion  chopped 2  garlic cloves  minced 1 1/­­4  pounds  eggplant  unpeeled and cut into 1″ cubes 3/­­4  cup  water 1/­­4  tsp  salt 1/­­2  tsp  pepper 1  cup  panko bread crumbs red pepper flakes  optional - Cashew Pesto 2  garlic cloves,  minced 1 cup  raw cashews,  soaked overnight or boiled for 20 minutes until soft 2  tbsp  pine nuts 2  tbsp  water 2  tbsp  lemon juice 1/­­4  cup  nutritional yeast 1/­­4  tsp  sea salt   Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Place 1/­­2 tablespoon olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium high heat. Add onion and saute until translucent about 3 minutes. Add garlic until lightly browned, remaining olive oil, and eggplant, and brown on both sides. Add water, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally until eggplant is soft. Remove from heat, transfer to a heat proof bowl, and set aside. In a food processor, add garlic, cashews, pine nuts, nutritional yeast, sea salt, and water. Process until smooth. Add basil, lemon juice, and olive oil while processing. Mix until smooth and set aside. In the bowl, mash eggplant into small pieces with the back of a wooden spoon or potato masher. Add the cashew pesto and mix well. Lastly, add the breadcrumbs and red pepper flakes and stir until well combined. Roll eggplant meatless balls in about 2-inch diameter approximately 1 1/­­2 tablespoon of mixture. Transfer to parchment lined baking sheet and bake until browned (about 25 minutes) turning once so the eggplant pesto “meatballs are browned on both sides. Serve over zucchini noodles or your choice of pasta with tomato sauce. The post Eggplant Pesto “Meatballs” appeared first on Meatless Monday.

veg kabab recipe | veg kebab recipe | vegetable kabab recipe

April 12 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

veg kabab recipe | veg kebab recipe | vegetable kabab recipeveg kabab recipe | veg kebab recipe | vegetable kabab recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. kebab recipe is a popular meat-based snack made for celebrations feast or served as a party starter. but it does cater to all the dietary requirements as it may contain red meat and also other meats. veg kabab recipe is the answer for the non-meat eaters or vegan which is purely made with vegetables and spices. The post veg kabab recipe | veg kebab recipe | vegetable kabab recipe appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese

April 3 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese This might be our favorite recipe so far this year! We were craving bolognese, but were also mindful of the fact that it’s spring, which generally has people cooking lighter, greener fare. So we compromised and came up with a vegetable-packed bolognese that doesn’t depend on canned tomatoes. Instead, we start with fresh cherry tomatoes, bell pepper, zucchini, and tons of basil. Tempeh and mushrooms bring savoriness and meatiness, while some pantry staples help build the deep flavors that you’d generally expect from bolognese. The result is super flavorful and amazing on pasta, but it also feels lighter and more spring-appropriate than your traditional bolognese. We’ll be showing how to make this recipe step-by-step on our Instagram Stories later today, so check that out if you’re interested in trying it :) If you’re doubtful about including zucchini in bolognese, give it a chance! When roasted, it has a nice, meaty texture that goes perfectly with the mushrooms and tempeh. In addition to that, some of the zucchini gets blended into the sauce, which makes the whole thing super creamy. This recipe is also great for tempeh skeptics. The tempeh just takes on the flavors of the sauce and aromatics here and contributes a meaty bite, without any other foreign flavors. We’re having a bit of a tempeh obsession right now and it’s so good in this dish. That’s pretty much it! Hope you try this one and thanks so much for all your comments on last week’s giveaway. Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients 8 oz tempeh 2 tablespoons tamari 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar ⅓ cup cashews ⅓ cup sun dried tomatoes (dry, not oil-packed) 10 oz cherry tomatoes - halved 2 zucchini - cut in half lengthwise 1 red bell pepper - cored and quartered 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered sea salt freshly ground black pepper avocado oil or other roasting oil of choice 1 yellow onion - chopped 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste splash of red wine (optional) ¼ cup nutritional yeast 12 oz pasta or more - for serving 1 bunch of basil - chopped, plus more for garnish Instructions In a bowl, crumble the tempeh and drizzle with the tamari and balsamic, toss to coat. Soak the cashews and sun dried tomatoes in hot water. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Arrange the tomatoes, zucchini, bell pepper, and mushrooms on the trays. Sprinkle everything with salt and pepper, drizzle with oil, and mix to coat. Place the trays in the oven and roast for 35-45 minutes, until all the vegetables are soft and all the liquid thats been released by the mushrooms cooks off. Meanwhile, heat oil to a large pan set over medium heat (if you dont have a large pan, consider using a soup pot here). Add the onion and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the marinated tempeh, stir once, and then let sit without stirring for a good 3-4 minutes, so that it thoroughly browns. Stir and sauté for another 3-4 minutes, until completely browned. Stir in the garlic at the end. Add the tomato paste and a splash of wine, if using, and stir to coat. Once the vegetables are done roasting, in an upright blender, combine 1 roasted zucchini half, all of the bell pepper, all the tomatoes, about ⅓ of the amount of the mushrooms, the drained cashews and sun dried tomatoes, nutritional yeast, and about 3 cups of water or broth. Blend until smooth, taste for salt and adjust if needed. Cube the remaining roasted zucchini. Add the sauce to the pan with the tempeh, along with the cubed zucchini and remaining mushrooms and bring up to a simmer. Let the sauce reduce for 10-15 minutes. Meanwhile, cook the pasta. Once the sauce is done cooking, stir in the basil. Serve the bolognese over pasta, garnished with more basil. Notes This bolognese keeps really well, so we suggest cooking as much pasta as youre planning on eating that day and serving it with the sauce bit by bit. That way, you can enjoy properly cooked, al dente pasta every time. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Salsa-Style Nectarine Panzanella from Cook Share Eat Vegan Mediterranean Dolma Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Simple Mango Gazpacho .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Chunky Monkey Overnight Oats

April 1 2019 Meatless Monday 

Delightfully vegan, perfectly dense, and pleasurably sweet, this protein-packed breakfast is filled with heart-healthy whole grains that will keep you full all morning. Simply add all of the ingredients to a Mason jar, refrigerate overnight, and wake up the next day to an incredibly healthy breakfast! Overnight oats are a perfect alternative to many traditional sugary breakfast options and can be enjoyed by the entire family. This recipe comes to us from Triad to Wellness . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 1 1/­­4  cup  mashed bananas ( 1/­­2 medium banana) 2  tablespoons  salted nut butter,  your choice 1/­­4  cup  unsweetened plain almond milk 1/­­3  cup  gluten-free rolled oats 2  teaspoons  hemp hearts 1/­­2  teaspoon  vanilla extract 1/­­2  teaspoon  cinnamon 1  teaspoon  vegan chocolate chips (for topping) 1 1/­­2  teaspoons  coconut (for topping)   Place banana, nut butter, and almond milk in a glass jar (or container with a lid) and stir with a spoon to combine. Add oats, hemp hearts, vanilla, and cinnamon and stir, then press down with a spoon to ensure all oats are coated in almond milk. Cover securely with a lid or plastic wrap and set in the refrigerator overnight (or at least 5 hours). The next day, open and enjoy as is, or garnish with desired toppings. The post Vegan Chunky Monkey Overnight Oats appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Gur Para (Punjabi Sweet Snack)

March 17 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Gur Para (Punjabi Sweet Snack) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Gur Para, Punjabi Sweet Snack Gur Para is a traditional Punjabi treat. This is made in preparation for festivals such as Holi, Makarshakrantri, and Diwali. Gur Para makes for a great homemade gift because of its long shelf life. It can be stored for up to 2 months in an airtight container. This is a super simple recipe that only requires a few ingredients.   For Dough - 1 cup all-purpose flour (plain flour, maida) - 2 Tbsp sooji fine (samolina) - 2 Tbsp oil - 1/­­3 cup water, use as needed For Syrup - 3/­­4 cup gur (jaggery) - 1 tsp oil - 1/­­4 cup water Making Para -  Mix flour, sooji, and oil, and mix it well to get consistency of breadcrumb.  Add water as needed to make firm but smooth dough. Cover with damp cloth and set aside at least for ten minutes. - Knead the dough for another minute and divide in two equal parts. - Take each part of the dough and make a flat ball shape. Roll them into 8-inch circles and thickness of salted crackers. - Cut each of the rolled dough into about half inch wide and 2 inch long pieces. Note: you can cut them in your desire shape. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium heat. The frying pan should have about 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put little piece of dough in the oil. The dough should make the oil sizzle and come up slowly. - Fry the paras until both sides are light golden-brown. Let them cool off to room temperature before coating them. Making Sugar Syrup -  Put the water and gur in a frying-pan and bring to a boil on medium heat. Keep stirring till gur is dissolve, syrup should be about 1 thread, to check the right consistency of syrup drop the syrup in cold water and you should be able to roll into ball. Close the heat. - Put all the paras to the syrup and mix it well, making sure all the paras are coated with syrup. Keep stirring every few minutes and keep separating them. After they are just warm, take them out on a greased plate, making sure that paras are not clumped together. - Allow them to cool. Gur paras can be stored for several weeks in airtight container. Notes: If Syrup consistency is not right paras will be sticky, if paras are little sticky let them dry for longer. You will also like to see these recipes they are good for gifting and easy to make Moong dal Ladoo, Apple Coconut Burfi, Besan Save   The post Gur Para (Punjabi Sweet Snack) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Curried Red Lentil & Quinoa Bowls with Cilantro-Mint Chutney

March 8 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I think red lentils might just be the least appetizing food you can cook. Well, visually, at least. When you cook split lentils, they fall apart--kind of like split peas in split pea soup. I spent a lot of time trying to think of ways to make curried red lentils look attractive, but sometimes you just have to let curried red lentils be curried red lentils. You do you, lentils! You do you. So they’re not pretty, but I assure you, these Curried Red Lentil & Quinoa Bowls are delicious. I had the curried red lentil recipe in my pocket for a while and I just wasn’t quite sure what to do with it. I tried serving it over cauliflower steaks, but that was kind of weird. Serving it over quinoa is much better! It also makes this recipe a great source of protein--the quinoa has 6 grams per serving and the lentils have 10. Because I used Madras curry powder in this recipe instead of sweet, the lentils are a little bit spicy. You can add a dollop of Greek yogurt to your bowl to cool it down a bit, or make a batch of Cilantro-Mint Chutney. I love […]

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo

March 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo Every year, people around the world celebrate Mardi Gras and Carnival, a festival of parades, music and eating decadent foods leading up to Lent. Millions of people observe Lent by fasting or foregoing treats and meats for 40 days. Fun fact, the term carnival is from carnelevare, or to remove meat. So thats what were doing, removing the meat, but keeping the delicious flavor of the popular Mardi Gras dish gumbo. This Creole stew from Southern Louisiana usually features strong-flavored stock, meat, or shellfish, but, with a few simple swaps, it’s a perfect vegetarian dish. Green Gumbo is a popular plant-based version that includes a variety of greens and herbs that give it an amazing color and rich flavors. Richard McCarthy, Member of the Executive Committee for Slow Food International and a Meatless Monday ambassador , shares his green gumbo recipe and great tips for making this plant-based dish taste authentic. Richards essentials for cooking green gumbo: Cook with what you have. Use collard greens, kale, mustard greens, turnip greens, spinach, and herbs like parsley, dill, etc. Green gumbo appears throughout the Lenten culinary calendar as meatless and on Holy Thursday in famous restaurants (like Dooky Chase) with meat stock. Begin by making a roux. Heat the pan with vegetable or olive oil, add flour, and mix with a wooden spoon until dark brown. The color of the gumbo will be determined by how dark you make the roux. The roux gives butter beans and lima beans a great base of flavor. Or, consider any medley of vegetables. Add Shiitake Bacon to get the traditional umami flavor. Umami is the savory flavor that many eaters say is missing in vegetarian recipes. One way to add umami to green gumbo is to make shiitake bacon, which provides the missing depth of flavor. Dont forget the rice. Rice is a traditional accompaniment to gumbo. While a saucepan is perfectly good for preparing rice, rice cookers are also an easy way to prepare perfect rice every time. Any grain or variety of rice can work, but long-grain rice is best since it provides the gumbo with more surface areas to cover with flavor.  McCarthy recommends a simplified version of the recipe crafted by Richard Stewart, the former chef of Gumbo Shop. Green Gumbo Serves 4 Ingredients: Gumbo: 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1/­­4 cup of flour 1 large onion, minced 4 stalks of celery, minced 1 bell pepper, minced 2 bunches of available greens (collard, mustard, kale, turnip, and/­­or spinach), chopped 1/­­4 cup of chopped parsley 2-4 cups of water (or enough to make a soup) 2 bay leaves Salt and pepper, to taste Cayenne pepper or hot sauce, to taste 1 cup of dried field peas (or Sea Island red peas, on the Slow Food Ark of Taste ) Vegetable stock, to taste (optional) Mushroom Bacon: 1 dozen fresh shiitake or button mushrooms 1 TBS of liquid smoke, smoked salt and/­­or smoked paprika 1/­­4 cup of vegetable or olive oil 1 TBS of salt or soy sauce (to taste) Rice: 1 cup of long-grained rice 2 cups of water Preparation: Field peas: Rinse, then boil field peas in salt water until soft. Drain peas of excess water and either store or immerse immediately into the gumbo. This step can be done in advance in order to cut down on preparation time on the day of serving. You can even prepare and freeze the peas days before, drop them into the hot soupy pot mid-way through the process. Make the gumbo: Heat a soup pot at a medium setting and make a roux (the soup base). Roux: add oil to the pot, once sizzling, add flour and mix with a wooden spoon. When the flour starts to smell delicious, it will then begin to turn a brownish color. Stir fairly vigorously to avoid burning. Once its a dark brown (5-10 minutes), add minced onions, celery and bell pepper. Stir the ingredients well to blend the flavors. Add salt, pepper, and more oil and/­­or water (or wine) to deglaze the pan. The roux will become bubbly and smell almost sweet. At this point, start adding water and turn down the heat a little. Add bay leaves, other seasonings, and the chopped greens and herbs. They will soon turn from bright green to dark green. Add field peas and any additional vegetables, like chopped carrots or turnips, whatever you have in the kitchen. Let simmer for at least 60 minutes. Once the gumbo is hot, tasty and ingredients cooked down into dark greens, and soft field peas, it is ready to serve. Tasting it at the end is important: Is it salty or spicy enough? If not, add more cayenne or hot sauce, black pepper, salt, etc. Mushroom bacon: Slice fresh mushrooms vertically in thirds, depending upon the size of the mushrooms. (Button mushrooms are fine and usually easily available, feel free to select shiitake or other exceptionally tasty varieties.) In a mixing bowl, add 1/­­4 cup of oil, 1 TBS of liquid smoke, salt or soy sauce. Mix the ingredients, and then add the fresh mushrooms and mix until they are coated. Spread sliced mushrooms across a baking sheet and bake for 20-30 minutes at 375 degrees F. Check after 15 minutes and turn over ones that are browned and crisp. Once crispy, turn off the oven and let cool slowly in oven. Rice: If you have a rice cooker, prepare as usual. If not, wash 1 cup of rice under running cold water to remove any excess dust, etc. Boil in 2 cups of water until soft (usually 25-30 min). Final Preparations: Place 1/­­4 cup of rice in the middle of a shallow soup bowl. Pour gumbo around the rice, making sure that there are equal amounts of greens and liquid. Take the dried, crispy mushroom bacon from the cooled oven and add a handful on top of the rice, and serve. Invite your friends and family to celebrate a plant-based Mardi Gras with this Green Gumbo recipe. If youre looking for other meatless recipe inspiration throughout the Lenten season, check out our recipe gallery . Happy Mardi Gras! Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Make it a Meatless Monday Mardi Gras Celebration with Green Gumbo appeared first on Meatless Monday.

How to Save The Chutney

February 28 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

How to Save The Chutney Chutney are a big part of the condiments that I serve and I always like to keep them handy since they have long shelf life. These chutneys are used as an extra source of flavor with many appetizers, snacks, and chaat (whether it be sweet, sour,spicy, etc.). They are great to have readily available, because it makes life so easy when preparing a large menu, especially when you are in mood to have something spicy or when you make a sudden plan to entertain family or friend for afternoon tea. You can easily take any kind of dry snacks that you have on hand, even boiled potatoes, chickpeas, or crackers and turn them into a mouth-watering treat. These two chutneys, in my opinion, are a staple to every household preparing Indian food. I have their recipes on my website. Tamarind Chutney This chutney can be refrigerated for months. I like to make it thick in texture so that I can adjust the thickness of the chutney depending on what I am using it for. This exotic, sweet and sour chutney and can be called the ketchup of the east! This is delicious as a dipping sauce for French fries, as a spread over crackers, or even as a zesty addition to a rice dish. You really can never go wrong with it. Cilantro Chutney I prefer to prepare this in a large quantity in advance and freeze it in ice cube trays. You can store the frozen cubes in a zip-lock plastic bag. When you ready to serve, defrost as many cubes of chutney as needed. And after so many years, I have finally learned how to keep the vibrant green color of chutney. When blending the chutney, use crushed ice to blend instead of room temperature water; I was amazed by the difference it makes. Keep looking out for my blogs because I will continue sharing the tips I have learned over the years. It might just solve the one problem you could not figure out. The post How to Save The Chutney appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.


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