durum - vegetarian recipes

durum vegetarian recipes

Feed a Family with These 13 Big-Batch Plant-Based Recipes

April 20 2020 Meatless Monday 

Feed a Family with These 13 Big-Batch Plant-Based RecipesCooking is a joy, but making every meal from scratch can get tedious, not to mention time consuming. And thats where big-batch cooking comes in. Weve created a list of plant-based recipes that are well suited for families (and leftovers). To do this, we looked through our Meatless Monday recipe database to find dishes that dont require a lot of preparation, are easy to scale up, and are hearty, nutritious, and filling. Although not all the recipes listed below are main dishes, they can still be prepared in large quantities and can be used to accompany other meals as side dishes or mid-day snacks. From Moroccan split pea soup and roasted chimichurri vegetables to Thai pumpkin curry and green tea pesto pasta the options for bulk cooking are only limited by your imagination -- and maybe the size of your stock pot. This Monday, do yourself a favor and cook a batch thats big enough for leftovers.  Black Bean Sesame Veggie Hash This recipe is an opportunity to get creative. Add whatever vegetables you have on hand and cook them up in your biggest skillet with some soy sauce, scallions, garlic, and chile oil. For the Black Bean Sesame Veggie Hash recipe, click here .   Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables Pungent and flavorful, these roasted vegetables can be prepared in bulk. The aromatic parsley-based chimichurri sauce is easy to scale up as well. For the Chimichurri Roasted Vegetables recipe, click here .         Freekeh Pilaf Swapping out rice for freekeh -- an ancient grain made from roasted green durum wheat -- makes for a healthier and more textured version of this classic dish. As with any pilaf, the flavor is only as good as the broth you use to cook it in, so make sure to use a nice, flavorful vegetable stock when cooking. For the Freekeh Pilaf recipe, click here . Ginger Orzo Brussels Sprouts Salad Chunks of butternut squash and Brussels sprouts makes this fragrant and flavorful ginger orzo more of a main meal than a side dish. The recipe serves eight, so expect leftovers, which is a plus because the flavors become more pronounced after they spend a night in the refrigerator. For the Ginger Orzo Brussels Sprouts Salad, click here . Green Tea Pesto Pasta An exceptionally unique recipe, this green tea pesto pasta is perfect to make in big batches. You can also make extra sauce and keep it in a plastic container for when pasta cravings hit. Add any variety of vegetables -- cherry tomatoes, zucchini, broccoli -- to add some oomph to the meal. For the Green Tea Pesto Pasta recipe, click here . Lemon Ginger Peas Frozen peas are humble ingredients, but they can be wonderfully delicious. This dish is simple to prepare and can be made in large batches, depending on how many bags of frozen peas youre willing to store in your freezer. Experiment with different seasoning combinations to keep your taste buds guessing. For the Lemon Ginger Peas recipe, click here . Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya This meat-free jambalaya is packed with smoke, heat, and creole flavor. The recipe feeds six and doesnt require much in terms of prep -- just sauté the aromatics, pour in the stock, beans and rice, bring to a boil, and simmer away until the rice is fluffy and tender. For the Meatless Brown Rice Jambalaya recipe, click here .     Moroccan Split Pea Soup No matter the season, a hearty cauldron of split pea soup can feed an army. Besides being incredibly affordable, split peas are easy to prepare and packed with protein and fiber. Moroccan-inspired seasonings add a refreshing punch of flavor to each spoonful. For the Moroccan Split Pea Soup recipe, click here . Quick and Easy Hummus Making your own hummus is so much more affordable than buying it prepackaged at the store. Double or triple this recipe (depending on the size of your food processor), and have delicious, creamy hummus available all week. For the Quick and Easy Hummus recipe, click here . Roasted Parsnip and Spinach Shepherds Pie Hello leftovers. Making a platter of this shepherds pie will feed a large family. Prep the platter the day before cooking and store in the refrigerator if you want an easy weeknight meal. For the Roasted Parsnip and Spinach Shepherds Pie recipe, click here . Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry This recipe can easily be doubled if you want an extra few servings the following day. Although it calls for pumpkin, feel free to incorporate eggplant, extra tofu, or a bag of frozen spinach to add more heft to the dish. For the Thai Tofu Pumpkin Curry recipe, click here . Vegetarian Gumbo Gumbo gets its color and flavor from its roux -- a paste-like mixture of flour and fat. This recipe is rich, decadent, packed with vegetables, and easy to scale up. For the Vegetarian Gumbo recipe, click here . Zucchini Scallion Cakes As simple as making pancakes, you can whip up a few dozen of these lemony zucchini cakes in no time. For the Zucchini Scallion Cakes recipe, click here . Click here  for more Meatless Monday recipes. When posting pictures of recipes to your social media network, tag @MeatlessMonday use #MeatlessMonday to show the plant-based community your creation. The post Feed a Family with These 13 Big-Batch Plant-Based Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad

March 30 2020 Meatless Monday 

Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go BadEvery food item will eventually go bad, but there are many food staples that offer a terrific value, can be prepared in big batches, and have an incredibly long shelf-life. Some of these ingredients can serve as the centerpiece of a meal, like potatoes, beans, and pasta, while others act as supporting actors, providing quick bursts of flavor to ordinary dishes. Best of all, many of these foods are completely plant-based and rich in many of the essential vitamins and minerals necessary for a healthy body. Our list of plant-based ingredients all have a shelf life of over two months (when stored properly) and are relatively inexpensive. But most importantly, these pantry staples give you the opportunity to get in the kitchen and experiment with flavors and ingredients that you may have overlooked in the past. And Meatless Mondays are always a great opportunity to start a new healthy ritual. Beans Often sold for less than a dollar a can, beans are the ultimate plant-based protein. With so many different types to choose from -- kidney, black, pinto, cannellini, pigeon peas, butter beans -- the recipe possibilities are endless. Make a stew, vegetable chili , bean salad, or these black bean meatless balls with zucchini noodles . Diced Tomatoes (canned) Take a simple stew, stir-fry, or sauce to the next level with a can of diced tomatoes. At only a buck a can, diced tomatoes will become your new secret weapon in the kitchen. Try adding them to this boldly-seasoned spicy chickpea ragout. Frozen Fruits and Vegetables Toss them into a blender, soup pot or sauté pan to add some nutrients and heft to your mid-week meals. When stored properly, frozen fruits and vegetables will last years (but please dont make them wait that long). Some frozen vegetables -- spinach, collards, broccoli rabe -- should be thawed and drained before cooking, while others like broccoli, peas, and peppers can be thrown into a hot pan as-is and easily transformed into a garlic-ginger fried rice. Granola A bag of granola wont run you much more than $4.00, depending on the brand, but it will impart an invaluable crunch to yogurt and oatmeal. Many manufacturers sell granola with a shelf life of up to six months, but it should be good to eat it even past that point (although it might not retain its full crunch). Lentils (dry) At $1.50 per pound, a bag of dried lentils is one of the best bargains in the grocery store. Besides an almost indefinite shelf life, the lentil contains a laundry-list of essential minerals like iron, folate, and manganese, is packed with protein, and is a great source of fiber. If youve never before cooked with dried lentils, start with a simple stew or this easy French lentil salad with cherry tomatoes. Onions When stored in the refrigerator, onions can last for up to two months (sometimes longer). Theyre pretty cheap, too, costing only around $1.00 – $1.50 per pound. Sear on the stove top for a smoky, charred flavor or cook them low-and-slow to unlock their natural, caramel-like sweetness and sprinkle them over this sweet potato caramelized onion stew. Oatmeal Think of oatmeal as a blank canvas. Costing less than a quarter per serving, let your imagination run wild when it comes to cooking breakfast. Mix in everything from peanut butter, jam, nuts, seeds, or even savory spices. Dried oatmeal can last longer than a year when properly stored. Use oatmeal in this vanilla almond milk oatmeal or try using it to make dessert, like this apple cranberry oatmeal bread. Pasta Costing only $1.00 per box, your pantry should be loaded with pasta, but we recommend going beyond the standard semolina/­­durum wheat flour varieties and experiment with pastas made from whole grains, vegetables, lentils, and chickpeas. Try some unique flavor combinations to keep things interesting, like this recipe for green tea pesto pasta . Peanut Butter Whether you like it creamy or crunchy, peanut is the ideal pantry staple . A serving of peanut butter is packed with protein and healthy fats, both of which will keep you feeling nice and satiated. Peanut butter has a shelf life of more than a year (unopened), and many brands of sell for less than $2.00 a jar. Polenta (corn meal) Polenta is made by mixing cornmeal (dried, ground corn) with either water or milk. Inexpensive and versatile, polenta can serve as the foundation of any number of meals, pairing especially well with tomato sauce, like in this recipe for Italian white beans with kale and polenta.  Potatoes These starchy staples dont last forever, but when stored in a cool dark space they can last for between 2 - 3 months. At around .50 cents per pound, the potato is an excellent source of fiber, nutrients, and calories; they can add creaminess to soups or serve as a vessel for a delicious stuffed potatoes primavera . Rice Whether its white, brown, or wild, rice costs less than a quarter per serving. Rice can serve as an accompanying carbohydrate or act as the main meal. For a new take on everyones favorite grain, try this vegetarian biryani or meatless brown rice jambalaya . Salsa Jarred salsa is an excellent (and convenient) alternative to fresh varieties. Add a tablespoon to anything bean burritos and taco bowls to spicy puttanesca pasta and gallo pinto ; mash some together with a ripe avocado and youve got a quick-and-easy guacamole. Soy Sauce Drizzle soy sauce into your stir fry, salad, sautéed vegetable, or tomato sauce for a boost of salty umami flavor. You can also use it liberally in this yummy Asian noodle bowl with spicy almond sauce . Soy sauce can cost as little as $2.00 a bottle and can last nearly two years after opening when stored in the refrigerator. Sweet Potatoes The sweet potato is natures candy; slice it down the middle and heat in the microwave for five minutes and out comes tasting reminiscent of a sugary soufflé. If you want to try making a dish that requires a little more technique, cook up this spicy and aromatic sweet potato chana or a coconut milk sweet potato white bean soup . Vegetable Broth/­­ Bouillon A box of vegetable broth is a staple of any kitchen, but you can expand your soup selection by adding some chickn bouillon cubes to your pantry. Add some beans, frozen vegetables, and seasonings and you have a clean and simple dinner for around $1.00 per serving, or add some flour, nut-milk, and noodles for a creamy vegetable noodle soup . Curious about what other plant-based ingredients you should be storing in your pantry? Check out our list of 20 Essential Meatless Monday Ingredients . The post Inexpensive Plant-Based Ingredients That Won’t Go Bad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Freekeh Pilaf

April 17 2017 Meatless Monday 

Freekeh is an ancient grain that is newly becoming more popular. It’s made from roasted green durum wheat and is often compared to quinoa due to its high protein content. This pilaf recipe highlights freekeh’s unique flavor and versatility. This recipe comes to us from Tawnie of Kroll’s Korner. - 1/­­2 white onion, finely chopped - 2 cloves garlic, jarred or fresh - 3 tsp. olive oil - 1 cup Freekeh - 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon - 1/­­4 tsp. ground allspice - 1/­­4 tsp. ground coriander - salt and pepper to taste - 2 cups vegetable broth or water - 2 tablespoons pine nuts - 1 handful of fresh mint, parsley and cilantro, chopped. - 3/­­4 cup Greek yogurt, plain nonfat - 1 1/­­2 tsp. lemon juice Place oil, onion, and 1 clove garlic into saucepan. Sauté on medium heat for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add Freekeh to pot, and then add the cinnamon, allspice, coriander, salt and pepper. Add vegetable broth or water and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low. Let simmer for 20 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let sit for 5 minutes, covered. Then, remove lid and fluff with fork. Stir in herbs, mix well, and top with pine nuts! Wonderful alternative for rice pilaf! Optional: Mix together 3/­­4 cup Greek yogurt, garlic, and lemon juice and top on pilaf. Very tasty!! The post Freekeh Pilaf appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Gluten-Free and Low-Gluten Pasta Varieties

January 10 2017 VegKitchen 

Gluten-Free and Low-Gluten Pasta Varieties Whether you have celiac disease, gluten intolerance, or just want to start cutting down, theres no denying it -- wheat is hard to avoid. But if you take the time to look, theres a whole delicious world of pasta beyond the boxed durum wheat varieties. If you avoid gluten and are stuck in a pasta rut, try one of these gluten-free or low-gluten options.The post Gluten-Free and Low-Gluten Pasta Varieties appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Banza Co-Founders on Creating a Chickpea-Powered Pasta

May 16 2016 Meatless Monday 

Banza Co-Founders on Creating a Chickpea-Powered PastaWe here at Meatless Monday love chickpeas. And whats not to love?  A great source of protein and high in fiber, magnesium and folate, these naturally gluten-free legumes are loved across the globe for their nut-like taste and buttery texture. In its newest rendition, the versatile chickpea is used to make pasta, and we sat down with the founders of Banza to see how they came up with “pasta that loves you back”. MM: What was your initial inspiration to eat more nutritiously? Health, sustainability? Did you grow up with healthy cooking/­­eating as a family or did you become interested in it later on? Brian: Growing up, I was a picky eater – I didnt venture far away from chicken nuggets and bagels. After college I started paying closer attention to the way I ate, and noticed a real difference in how I felt. I began to focus my attention on food and nutrition. Now Im the guy who stays up late reading food science books and thinking about our next innovation. MM: How did you get the idea to use chickpeas as your starter food? Why pasta? Brian: Im a huge fan of chickpeas. Theyre delicious and a staple of the mediterranean diet. Meanwhile, I love pasta. If I could, I would eat it every day. But durum wheat doesn’t have a ton of nutritional value. So I bought a hand crank and started making chickpea pasta in my own kitchen! I figured I wasnt alone – other people also must be craving a better pasta. So I recruited my big brother Scott, who was working in private equity at the time, to co-found the business with me. And weve been chickpea dreamin ever since! MM: Tell us about some of your creative failures creating the pasta and your final ah-hah moment? Scott: Early on, we realized why chickpea pasta didnt already exist. Its really hard to make! We worked with pasta experts, and still werent satisfied. We finally found the right plant, invested hundreds of thousands of dollars into production, and landed our first big order. But our initial attempt fell short of our expectations. We lost a fair amount of time and money, but the challenge motivated us to spend every waking hour researching, testing and perfecting. Well never stop obsessing over making our product better. MM: Whats the feedback you hear from people about your product? Scott: When were sampling our pasta in stores or at events, we get to meet our customers, which is incredibly rewarding. We love watching people take a bite, and be shocked to discover Banza is made from chickpeas. Since day one, weve made a commitment to building a brand thats personal – one that people can meet and get to know. MM: Whats your favorite chickpea pasta recipe of all the time and can you share the recipe with us? Thats like making a parent choose a favorite child! Mac & cheese is a team favorite. We also love this avocado cream with herbs! Get the recipe for Banza’s Spring Pea Pesto Penne! MM: Do you have plans for other products with chickpeas or other ingredients? Brian: Right now were focusing on pasta – well be launching a high protein mac & cheese soon! But yes, our mission is to take the foods that people love and make them better, by using more nutritious ingredients. Im continually experimenting in my kitchen – making better versions of the foods we dont want to give up - from cereal to tortillas. Stay tuned. MM: What advice can you give our readers about how to live a healthier and more sustainable life - besides eating Banza chickpea pastas?! Everyones different, but everything in moderation. You dont need to give up all the foods you love to eat well. There are a lot of options out there that are healthy, simple substitutions for everyday foods, and healthy is much more sustainable over time if its done without sacrifice.   The post Banza Co-Founders on Creating a Chickpea-Powered Pasta appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Gluten-Free and Low-Gluten Pastas Varieties

January 10 2017 VegKitchen 

Gluten-Free and Low-Gluten Pastas Varieties Whether you have celiac disease, gluten intolerance, or just want to start cutting down, theres no denying it -- wheat is hard to avoid. But if you take the time to look, theres a whole delicious world of pasta beyond the boxed durum wheat varieties. If you avoid gluten and are stuck in a pasta rut, try one of these gluten-free or low-gluten options.The post Gluten-Free and Low-Gluten Pastas Varieties appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.


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