dumpling - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Vegetarian Slow Cooker Lentil Sloppy Joes with Spaghetti Squash

Japanese Vegetable Curry

Chocolate Pomegranate Granola Bites

Beetroot rice recipe | beetroot pulao | how to make beetroot rice










dumpling vegetarian recipes

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook!

September 18 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! It’s been around three years since we started working on this cookbook, so finally telling you about it today feels monumental, exhilarating, and terrifying all at the same time. Our new cookbook is called Simply Vibrant: All-Day Vegetarian Recipes for Colorful Plant-Based Cooking, and it’s available for pre-order now! It’s written by me, Anya, and photographed by Masha – the same mother/­­daughter team that’s behind this blog. Today, we are sharing some key details about the book, accompanied by a book trailer (above), sneak peak photos and ways to pre-order. We’ll also be talking about the pre-order bonus recipe bundle, which is a free gift that we created for anyone who pre-orders the book. SO excited to share all of this with you :) About the Book -- Simply Vibrant will be released on February 6th, 2018, but it’s available for pre-order now. Anyone who pre-orders the book will have access to a free bonus recipe bundle, consisting of 10 brand new, plant-based recipes, which won’t be published anywhere else. Just save your receipt! This is our way of thanking you for your support :) More on the bonus below. -- There are 129 recipes in the book, all of which are vegetarian, 124 of them are vegan, and 109 of them are gluten-free or gluten-free adaptable. My goal was to create healthful, everyday recipes that require accessible, whole food ingredients – mainly vegetables, fruit, herbs, spices, grains, and legumes. The recipes are very much influenced by the seasons, too. Our hope is that you’ll be able to find whatever good-looking produce you picked up at your market or store in the index of the book, and get some ideas on preparing it. -- I used comfort food classics from around the world as inspiration for the recipes in the book, which also influenced the book’s organization. The chapters are as follows: Morning Porridges and Pancakes – this chapter contains breakfast recipes for every season, both savory and sweet. Salads and Bowls – this one has a grain bowl recipe for every season, as well as plenty of vibrant salads for every occasion. Wraps and Rolls – this chapter celebrates the wrapping techniques seen in cuisines all around the world. There are recipes for summer rolls, enchiladas, burritos, maki (sushi), collard green wraps, and more. Soups and Stews – the recipes in this chapter range from hearty winter stews to refreshing and light summer soups. Risotto, Paella and Pilaf – for this chapter, I took the format of well-loved rice dishes from around the world, and reinvented them with the use of different vegetables and grains (there are even a couple of completely grain-free risottos!). Noodles, Pasta and Pizza – this one is all about the coziest foods out there, reimagined to be more vegetable-forward – there are recipes for homemade pasta and dumplings, but also for noodles and pizza crusts made with vegetables. Fritters and Veggie Burgers – this chapter has a veggie burger recipe for every season, as well as plenty of lacy, plant-packed fritters. Just Veggies – this chapter is here to prove that seasonal vegetables only need a simple nudge to taste amazing – there are techniques for marinating, pickling, braising, stewing, and glazing that will take your produce to the next level. Sweets for Every Season – the title of this chapter speaks for itself – there are brownies, galettes, pies, cakes, and pots de creme, made with unrefined sweeteners, fruit, and even some vegetables. Basics and Sauces – a foundational chapter, which will supply you with ammunition for creating vibrant meals quickly – from mind-blowing sauces to broth that will cost you $0 in extra groceries. -- I’ve been thinking a lot about the amount of waste we produce as humans, and I’ve been working on developing techniques for using up all parts of the produce I buy. I present some of these ideas in this book, from the aforementioned veggie scrap broth, to a watermelon rind marmalade, broccoli stem risotto, and more. -- The introduction has a story about my shoemaker grandfather, which has basically become folklore in our family. I was very excited to immortalize it in a book. -- If you have our first cookbook, The Vibrant Table, this book is a follow-up to that. While The Vibrant Table focused on creativity in plant-based cooking, Simply Vibrant is much more focused on the everyday. It’s all about putting breakfast, lunch and dinner on the table. -- The book is 328 pages long, hardcover, and 7.5″ x 10″ in size. Every recipe is accompanied by a beautiful photograph, with the exception of a few sauces. Praise Here are some kind words we’ve heard about the book from people and publications we greatly admire. “Simply Vibrant captures the kind of accidentally-vegetarian food we want to eat right now.” --Bon Appetit Simply Vibrant is intuitively organized and brilliantly executed. It illustrates how many of us are striving to eat these days: crave-able, template-style recipes with seasonal touches, simple techniques, and an underlying nourishing essence that reads as encouraging, rather than prescriptive. Anyas approach starts with a deep-rooted reverence for what nature provides in all of its seasons--and in all of its sometimes neglected or wasted forms. The thoughtful uses for carrot tops, chickpea soaking liquid, and barley cooking water--like the rest of the books delicious plant-based recipes--speak to both virtue and pure enjoyment. This book inspires me to cook (and live!) with a deeper sense of care and appreciation. --Laura Wright, author of The First Mess Cookbook Anyas approach to food and the seasons always stands out as creative, inventive, and colorful. Simply Vibrant contains an abundance of inspiring recipes and clever tricks to add more nourishment and adventure to your everyday meals. --Amy Chaplin, James Beard award-winning author of At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen Anya has the incredible ability to inspire her readers to cook, but more importantly, she helps them tap into their own intuition to create delicious meals in a more relaxed way. I love her emphasis on seasonality, and her creative approach to leaf-to-root cooking, using every ingredient to its fullest potential without wasting a single seed! This recipe collection is bursting with global flavors, unique ingredient combinations, and of course, vibrancy on the highest level. --Sarah Britton, holistic nutritionist and author of My New Roots and Naturally Nourished   We are longtime fans of Golubka Kitchen and Anyas creative and beautiful plant-based recipes. Her new book is jam-packed with healthy, flavorful, and simple recipes and lots of interesting suggestions on how to cook with the odds and ends of produce that usually are discarded--like making marmalade from watermelon rinds and risotto using broccoli stems. So clever! --David Frenkiel and Luise Vindahl, creators of the blog Green Kitchen Stories “Exciting, vegetable led food.” -- Anna Jones, author of A Modern Way to Cook, A Modern Way to Eat and columnist for The Guardian “What made me want to cook from Simply Vibrant is its more relaxed approach to plant-based cooking” --Toronto Star Pre-Order Here’s where you can pre-order Simply Vibrant. Many of these outlets are selling the book at a discounted price while it’s still in the pre-order stages. Amazon Barnes & Noble Roost Powell’s IndieBound Book Depository (ships worldwide for free) Amazon Canada Indigo Pre-Order Bonus Recipe Bundle To show our immense gratitude to anyone who pre-orders the book, we made a little thank you gift in the form of a free Bonus Recipe Bundle PDF. It’s sort of like a mini e-cookbook, complete with 10 brand-new, plant-based recipes that won’t be published anywhere else. The style of the recipes is very similar to that of the recipes in the actual book – everyday meals to make your home cooking more delicious and vibrant. Click here for instructions on how to claim your pre-order bonus and see a preview of the recipes within. Thank You This book only exists because of this blog, and this blog exists because of you – your support, kindness, and curiosity in visiting this space, cooking from our recipes, and reading our stories. Seriously, none of this would be here without YOU. So thank you! Truly, from the bottom of our hearts. – Anya and Masha The post Simply Vibrant, Our New Cookbook! appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products!

January 8 2018 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products!Meatless Monday supports Goyas Can Do program, which donates food to Feed America every time someone purchases Goya products in stores. Since so many of Goyas products are vegetarian and packed with protein, food bloggers accepted the challenge to come up with meat-free recipes for Meatless Monday using Goyas featured Can Do products. Here are some of our favorite contributions from last year! Mango & Tomato: Vegan Laska with Zucchini, Peppers and Mushrooms Robin Asbell: Jamaican Rice and Gullah Peas C It Nutritionally: 5-Ingredient Curried Butternut Squash Soup Healing Tomato: Vegan Dumplings Soup with Pigeon Peas MomStart: Coconut Milk Veggie Curry Analidas Ethnic Spoon: Indonesian Coconut Turmeric Rice with Cashews Confessions of a Mother Runner: Spicy Thai Noodle Soup Life Currents: White Bean and Sweet Potato Taco Filling Show Me the Yummy: Roasted Carrot Soup Two Classy Chics: Creamy Cauliflower and Potato Soup Freckled Italian: Coconut Rice and Beans Dini Delivers: Coco Dalal Week99er: Double Chocolate Coconut Cupcakes with Coconut Creme Frosting Jersey Family Fun: Coconut Rice Bowls Food in Jars: Coconut and Cracked Brown Rice Pudding Cooking with Julie: Slow Cooker Red Lentil Coconut Curry Soup Make sure to follow Meatless Monday on social media to find out the next Goya Can Do featured product and to watch our live cooking demos with Goya! The post Meatless Monday Bloggers Show What They “Can Do” with Goya Products! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford

December 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Trinity Mouzon Wofford is the founder of GOLDE Turmeric, a line of high-quality turmeric blends for golden milk, lattes, and more. We are in love with everything GOLDE, and were so excited to get a peek at its radiant founder’s wellness routine. In this interview, Trinity tells us about her rule-free approach to self-care, her path to self-acceptance, and the importance of giving the body exactly what it’s craving, as well as a Geisha-approved moisturizer that works wonders for her skin, her number one cold remedy that’s likely in your kitchen right now, exercise, beauty, stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think having some form of a routine is crucial to your mental health when you run a business from home. It’s been sort of tricky as of late because we’re in transition from our home in Upstate New York to moving back down to Brooklyn. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. On an ideal day, I’m up around 6:30am and checking my phone for email and GOLDE‘s social media. Following that, I’ll do a bit of stretching to loosen up, and then hop in the shower. After I’ve gotten ready, I’ll sit down to work and make a to-do list for the day -- this is crucial for me. I forget things and get really anxious about what I’m forgetting if I don’t bother to organize my thoughts and tasks in advance. I’ll usually dig into whatever those tasks are for an hour or so before pausing for breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My partner, Issey, and I always make sure to have a cut-off time for work, barring emergencies. Once that point rolls around (it varies day-by-day), I’m usually catching up on the news or my favorite blogs while Issey preps dinner. We’ll eat together and then usually end off binging some TV show. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Issey’s miso soup with tons of mushrooms and seaweed. He makes it completely from scratch using his mom’s recipe. Lunch – Lunch is usually whatever is leftover from dinner that week  -- lately its a lot of hearty stews. Snack – We’ll do a little crudite plate with raw veg from the farmer’s market: carrots, turnips, radishes, persian cucumbers. Always with some cheese and seed crackers. Sometimes also with wine. Dinner – Tibetan food from our favorite spot in Jackson Heights, Queens. It’s a lot of dumplings (momos), noodles, and warming soups. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I can’t, really. I love the taste of coffee, but it turns me into a shaking, anxious mess. I always start the day with a turmeric tonic made with one of our blends -- usually cacao or original because the matcha also makes me a bit hyper. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Yes, yes, yes. I try not to “keep it in check” so much as listen to it with a variety of foods. Sometimes it’s fruit or homemade popcorn with coconut sugar. Sometimes it’s half a box of Dots eaten while laying on the couch. Refined sugar is trash for your system, but so is getting too regimented with your foods. I keep it light (emotionally) and eat what I’m craving. When junk food isn’t off limits, you’re not going to crave it every day. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Well, turmeric, of course. It makes such a difference in my skin and immunity. Issey loves it for instant allergy relief. There are apparently over 10,000 medical studies on its effects on the body --it’s really incredible. We’re also huge proponents of ashwaghanda in our household. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Upstate New York is not exactly the land of boutique fitness, so it can be more challenging to get in a sweat on the regular. I focus mostly on stretching and going on walks/­­hikes on the weekend. I think I’ve probably gained a bit of weight since I’ve been up here because I’m not moving as much as I did in NYC, but I don’t really mind. It’s okay for your body to fluctuate with your circumstances, as long as you’re treating it with respect. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? It varies. I really like working out as a method to clear my head, so often I do look forward to it. But that said, I don’t really try to push myself too much. If you want to be a world-class athlete, then by all means, train 2+ hours a day. I’m just looking to keep my body and psyche in good health, so if I don’t feel like making it to my workout, I don’t feel the need to punish myself later. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I grew up black in a very white town, so I’ve had a lot of really emotional moments coming to terms with what beauty means for me. At the moment, I like to keep things really natural with my curls out and minimal makeup. It took a while to accept my looks for exactly what they are, so now I’m really openly embracing it. I feel more beautiful now than I did 5 years ago, mostly due to opening myself up to the concept that I’m perfectly fine just as I am. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I try to keep my routine relatively simple. I’ll wash my face with raw African black soap or something gentle like Cerave. I love Drunk Elephant products, and I apply their C-Firma and B-Hydra serums every day. They help a lot with keeping my skin clear and getting rid of dark marks. After that I’ll moisturize with raw shea butter, or a cream that has that. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Turmeric, again. Because it’s anti-inflammatory, I’ve found it to be really helpful in clearing up redness or breakouts. Besides that, I try not to get too bogged down with a ton of supplements. I focus mostly on eating a variety of plants every day. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Shea butter is amazing for my skin. My partner’s Japanese mother recently put me on to this cream called Secret de Maiko. It contains shea butter and a few other natural, organic ingredients. Apparently this is what young Geisha girls would use as a moisturizer/­­makeup base. This cream is better than pure shea butter because it won’t leave you greasy at all. I use it twice daily. It’s great for keeping your skin clear and calm. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Well, cannabis helps. I use a vaporizer pen so there’s no smoke-related health detriments/­­lingering smell. I really want to try the Hmbldt pen because I’m a sucker for sharp design. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? There’s going to stress sometimes. I try to deal in healthy ways like going for a walk to clear my head, or talking to a close friend about whatever I’m dealing with. But life isn’t perfect, so sometimes you just end up being a bit tense for a few days. I think that’s normal and natural -- I try not to fight it too much. You have to let yourself feel it so that you can process it and move past it. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic!! At my old job, everyone in the office knew about this because I would practically through bulbs of raw garlic at anyone who complained of illness. Nothing works better for immediately beating a bad cold. If I feel something coming on, I take 2-3 whole cloves (swallowed like horse pills) with a ton of water. That can save you in just a couple hours -- it’s crazy. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I really like to work, so what I consider to be a healthy work/­­life balance might not be the right approach for someone else. I genuinely enjoy spending my free time dreaming up new campaigns, product ideas, or designs for GOLDE. I guess that’s the benefit to doing your own thing -- it doesn’t always feel like work. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I’ve gotten a lot better with this with age. I try not to have any food or exercise rules. Being militant about your body is not self-care, and it can really easily spiral into disordered behavior that veers on the edge of “orthorexia.” I mostly just listen to my body and allow itself what it wants, whether that has to do with food, movement/­­exercise, socializing vs. indulging my natural introvert, etc. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I really think doing away with rules (re: food, etc.) has been the most important change I’ve made. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with avoiding gluten or dairy because it upsets your stomach or causes breakouts, but don’t complicate your life with structure that does not serve you. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Usually moments like these mean I need to re-focus myself. I’ll start by making to-do lists, and go from there. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting GOLDE? I was pre-med at NYU, with plans to practice holistic medicine. By my senior year of college, I wasn’t so sure about spending more time and money on schooling, and sort of fell into a marketing role at a tech startup. I really loved the creative aspects of marketing, and found that GOLDE was a way of combining my interests in sharp branding with making holistic health more accessible. The interest in turmeric actually came from my mom, who has Rheumatoid Arthritis. She noticed a huge difference in her overall levels of inflammation when she started incorporating it into her daily routine -- that’s when I started paying attention. -- How do you approach the sourcing of your ingredients for GOLDE? We actually just started sourcing all of our turmeric with a company called Diaspora Co. They focus 100% on supporting ethical and high-quality spice trade that empowers rather than disenfranchises the people of color who have been growing and ingesting medicinal plants like turmeric for generations. The turmeric that we’re going to be using is an heirloom variety with almost twice the typical amount of curcumin. It’s grown on a fourth-generation, family-owned farm in India, and farmers are paid 6X the standard commodity prices to ensure truly fair wages. We’re really excited to be featuring a product that’s not only incredibly high-quality, but also works to re-build lingering inequality left in the wake of colonialism. -- What’s your favorite way to use your wellness blend? I love to have it just with hot water and raw honey in the morning. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Heading to the Union Square Greenmarket is one of my favorite activities. When I’m in the city, I like to go every Monday morning when it’s not too crowded. It’s mostly just you and the chefs (or their assistants?) shopping for what they’ll be preparing that day. I also love infra red sauna. I go to Higher Dose in the East Village. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie Song/­­Album – Songs in the Key of Life – Stevie Wonder -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I am nowhere near as regimented as our dear Joan. Usually my suitcase is packed haphazardly with whatever clothing is clean and well-suited for the weather. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? More people of color, please! A few of my favorites: Diane Chang Yaminah Mayo Dr. Tiffany Lester Latonya Yvette Nikisha Brunson Alex Elle Lauren Ash Sana Javeri Kadri Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Issey Kobori and Nico Behnzukeh. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Gatte Ki Sabji (Rajasthani Cuisine)

August 1 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Gatte Ki Sabji Gatte Ki Sabji is a traditional dish from Rajasthan. These steamed gram-flour dumplings are cooked in a spicy gravy. This mouth-watering dish will complement any meal. Enjoy Gatte Ki sabji with roti or plain rice. The recipe is also vegan and gluten free. For Gatte - 2 cups besan (gram flour) - 4 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1 tsp salt - 1 tsp red chili powder (adjust to taste) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing, asafetida is gluten free spice, but asafetida powder contains some wheat flour, gluten free asafetida, is available on amazon.) For Gravy - 3 Tbsp oil - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1 tsp fennel seeds (saunf) - 2 bay leaves (tejpat) - 2 dry red chilies -  1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1 tablespoon coriander powder (dhania) - 1 tsp salt - 1 Tbsp Kasuri Methi - 1 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 1/­­2 tsp garam masala - Mix all the ingredients for gatte together and make a stiff dough, using water as needed. You will need about 1/­­3 cup of water. Knead the dough well, let it rest for 10 minutes. Divide the dough into 8 parts and roll them in calendar about half inch thick. - Bring about 4 cups of water to boil in a pan on medium high heat. Gently drop the Gatte logs in boiling water. After it comes to boil, cover the pan and reduce the heat to medium low, and cook them cover for about 12-15 minutes gate should be floating on the top and will have bubbles all around. - Take them out from water and save the water, this will be used for making gravy. let them cool for few minutes and cut them in about half inch-thick slices. - Heat the oil in heavy bottom pan over medium heat, add fennel seeds, asafetida, red chilies stir and add Gattes, stir-fry for about 4-5 minutes until they are light golden brown. - Add bay leaves, chili powder, turmeric, coriander powder, and salt, stir-fry for about 2 minutes. - Add the water we saved, and Kasuri Methi boil for about 10 minutes over low medium heat, covered. This is the time add more water to adjust the thickness of the gravy. As Gatte Ki Sabji will cool off it gravy will become thick. - Turn off the heat and add mango powder, and garam masala, Gatte Ki Sabji is ready to serve. The post Gatte Ki Sabji (Rajasthani Cuisine) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

July 7 2017 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

INDIA vegan cookbook on KickstarterMy newest cookbook, The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA just launched on Kickstarter! watch the video: PRE-ORDER the the INDIA cookbook: http:/­­/­­kck.st/­­2uGbsog My new INDIA cookbook has been years in the making - with recipes, stories, artwork & photographs inspired by 8 trips to my most favourite country. It’s a culinary love story of my favorite cuisine - based on a total of nearly two years in India and 25 years of devotion to Indian cooking. My first trip to India was in 2001: mostly North India and Nepal. I spent 4 months on that journey, then another 6 weeks in South India in 2006. I visited twice more, in 2009 & 2010, followed by living and working for a year (as an art teacher) in Central India, returning to Berlin in 2011. In Autumn 2016 & Spring 2017, I went back to India to taste and explore the last regions (and cuisines) of India still waiting for me. I traveled across Kashmir & Ladakh, trekking through mountain villages and exploring towns and cities, staying mostly with families and cooking together in their kitchens. Then I went deep into the Northeast: West Bengal, Assam, Sikkim, and Nagaland. I even met with world famous chefs at their restaurants - and homes - for incredible eats and great times in the kitchen. Now I’m back in Berlin, recreating the culinary wonders of the Indian subcontinent in my own kitchen. As with my previous 4 cookbooks, I have written, illustrated, cooked, photographed, and designed this book myself. It’s a labor of love and the ultimate combination of my passions: art, travel, vegan cooking, and photography. I’m back on Kickstarter for my 5th international cookbook project. You can join the crowdfunding which makes everything possible. It’s an adventure in itself, complete with backer-only updates, behind the scenes sneak peaks, exclusive travel videos & stories, recipe testing groups, and more. Pre-order a signed copy of The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA (including worldwide shipping, stickers & e-book for EUR25!) My INDIA Cookbook at a glance: - My 5th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide - 192 pages with 90+ recipes and over 70 full-page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 8 trips /­­ 21+ months of travel around India and over 25 years vegan cooking experience - Total variety of regional cuisines: Rajasthani, Gujarati, Punjabi, Kashmiri, Sindhi, Maharashtrian, Tamil, Kerelan, Karnatakan, Goan, Hyderbadi, Bengali, Assamese, Sikkimese, Ladakhi, Tibetan, Nepali - Indian classics & family favorites, timeless treats, new culinary wonders, mind-blowing mega-metropolitan snacks, fabulous village feasts, scrumptious street food, and insanely delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything, anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Shahi Bengan – Roasted Stuffed Eggplant Gobi Pakoras – Batter-fried Cauliflower Saag Paneer – Spinach & Fried Tofu Cubes Pani Puri – Street Food Favorite Aloo Paratha – Grilled Potato-Stuffed Flatbreads Shahi Paneer – fried tofu cubes in creamy tomato sauce Seitan Vindaloo – Goan Tangy Curry Samosas! Fried Potato-Stuffed Pastries Gajur Halava – Bengali Carrot Pudding Gulab Jamuns – Doughballs in Rose Syrup Berry Halava – Fruity Semolina Dessert Recipes in The Lotus and the Artichoke – INDIA: - Garam Masala, Sambar Masala, Chaat Masala & Panch Puran - Tamarind Ginger, Pineapple, Tomato, Coconut, Chili & Bhang Chutneys - Aam Achar – Mango Pickle - Amitar Khar – Assamese papaya starter - Handvo – Gujurati zucchini cake - Uttapam – South Indian rice & lentil pancakes with tomatoes - Idly Paper Dosa – Karnatakan crispy rice & lentil crepes - Rava Dosa – Tamil semolina crepes - Dahi Vada Chaat – lentil cakes with yogurt & chutney - Hariali Paneer Tikka – Punjabi tofu skewers with spices & herbs - Gobi Pakora – batter-fried cauliflower - Mirchi Vada – Rajasthani batter-fried chillies - Aloo Tikka – spicy, fried potato cakes - Samosa – vegetable-stuffed fried pastry - Pani Puri – potato-stuffed fried pastry with tamarind spice water - Pav Bhaji - spicy vegetable mash with fresh baked buns - Momos – Tibetan vegetable dumplings - Shapaley – Tibetan vegetable pies - Kolkota Kathi Roll – spicy soymeat & shredded cabbage wrap - Sambar Bandhgobi Rolls – stuffed cabbage leaves - Aloo Dum – Kashmiri tomato potato curry - Shahi Tamatar – roasted stuffed tomatoes - Shahi Bengan – roasted stuffed eggplant - Shahi Mirch – roasted stuffed peppers - Shahi Paneer – tofu cubes in creamy, tomato curry - Paneer Jalfrezi – spicy tofu cubes - Saag Paneer – spinach & tofu cubes - Mutter Paneer - peas & tofu cubes - Xaak – Assamese greens, potatoes & cherry tomatoes - Bengan Bhartha – Kashmiri roasted aubergine - Malai Kofta – potato dumplings in creamy tomato curry - Bindi Aloo Tawa Masala – spicy stir-fried okra & potatoes - Khumb Kaju Makhani – Rajasthani cashew mushroom curry - Shukto – Bengali eggplant, potato & plantains - Pumpkin Posto – Bengali squash in creamy poppy seed curry - Seitan Vindaloo – Goan tangy curry - Black Sesame Seitan – Assamese spicy curry - Tamatar Pitika – Assamese tomatoes with herbs & spices - Aloo Pitika – Assamese potatoes with herbs & spices - Bol Tenga – Assames lentil dumplings in tangy curry - Mas Tenga – Assamese tangy jackfruit curry - Chupke – Tibetan dumpling soup - Tarka Dal – Punjabi lentil curry - Chana Masala – spicy chickpeas - Rajma - Kashmiri red kidney bean curry - Lobia Palak – black-eyed peas with lemon & spinach - Golden Rice - with turmeric & spices - Chana Pulao – rice with chickpeas - Pulihora – Tamil tamarind rice with peanuts & spices - Classic Biryani – Kashmiri rice dish with vegetables, nuts & spices - Jackfruit Biryani – Tamil coconut rice dish with spicy jackfruit - Tupula Bhaat – Assamese sticky rice steamed in banana leaves - Aloo Paratha – grilled flatbread stuffed with potatoes - Tibetan Bread – fried breakfast snack - Makki Roti – grilled cornbread - Roti – wholewheat grilled flatbread - Garlic Naan – traditional baked flatbread - Poori – deep-fried flatbreads - Date Ladoo – date & nut sweets - Besan Ladoo – chickpea sweet - Gajur Halava – spiced carrot pudding - Berry Halava – strawberry & blueberry semolina sweet - Mysore Pak – traditional sweet squares - Gulab Jamun – deep-fried dough balls in rose syrup - Rasmalai – cheese balls in saffron mango milk - Jalebi – fried, syrupy sweet - Peda – lemon cashew creamy sweet - Kheer – Kashmiri rice pudding with cardamom, nuts & raisins - Mishti Doi - Bengali sweet curd - Shrikand - Maharashtran yogurt dessert - Pista Kulfi – pistachio ice cream - Pitha – Bengali sesame & date pastry - Narikol Ladoo – Assamese shredded coconut balls - Kadala Parippu – Keralan sweet chana dal dessert - Ginger Chai – spiced black tea - Kahwa – Kashmiri green tea with almond & saffron - Badam Dudh – almond milk with cardamom & cinnamon - Anjoor Kaju Dudh – cashew shake with fig & date - Strawberry Mint Lassi – yogurt smoothie The post INDIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

Lucky Meatless Recipes to Start the Chinese New Year

January 23 2017 Meatless Monday 

Lucky Meatless Recipes to Start the Chinese New YearThe Chinese New Year begins this Saturday to usher in the Year of the Rooster. This annual tradition originates from a timeless legend about a deadly beast who could only be frightened away by loud noises, bright lights and the color red. The vibrant festivities take place not only in Mainland China, but also in areas with significant Chinese populations, such as Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Philippines. The Chinese year is based on the lunar calendar and the animal for each year is assigned by Chinese astrology. In fact, if youre interested, check out these additional Chinese New Year tidbits. This two-week celebration is full of family, fun, and, of course, great food. Special dishes are prepared that are said to bring prosperity and good fortune in the New Year. The classic Chinese dumplings, which can be made with just vegetables, are always a favorite. And Spring Rolls have a pale yellow color that resembles gold bars. Theres also good fortune fruit, such as oranges and tangerines, that are always very popular. We invite you to enjoy some of these wonderful meatless recipes below and wish you good fortune and great prosperity in the coming Chinese New Year!   Longevity Noodles, Driftwood Gardens    Tea Eggs for Chinese New Year,  She’s Cookin’ Soy Nuggets in Chinese Garlic Brown Sauce, Simply Vegetarian 777 Vegetarian Chinese Dumplings in Soup, An Exercise in Trivial Pursuits Honey, Soy, and Ginger Stir-Fry, 40 Plus and All is Well Stir Fry Spicy Green Beans, Easy Cooking with Molly Vegetable Spring Roll, Bok Choi and Broccoli For more recipes to help you celebrate a meatless Chinese New Year, visit our Pinterest board or the Meatless Monday recipe archive! The post Lucky Meatless Recipes to Start the Chinese New Year appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Beetroot Almond Soup with roasted chickpeas

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

Beetroot Almond Soup with roasted chickpeas As a child beetroot was awful to me. Earthy and red, that had to keep off my plate. Since I'm a vegan my taste definitely changed. I'm using beetroot all the time and I love it. If grated in a salad, in a cream sauce, roasted with finger-shaped potato dumpling, in a risotto or in a dessert. The colour just makes me smile. In the winter I love earthy vegetables like pumpkin and potatos. The beetroot just fits perfectly into a colorful menu. Before you know it the nodule has turned into a soup. I ate it all even though I wanted to keep something for my boyfriend...oh well, next time :-) Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 2 beetroot (700 g) 1 onion 3 tbsp. olive oil 1 small piece ginger 2 tsp. vegetable broth, powder 100 ml orange juice 5 cloves 1/­­2 tsp. cilantro seeds, grounded 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon 1 can (400 g) coconut milk 0,8-1 l water 1 tbsp. almond butter salt, pepper 4 tbsp. non-dairy cream 1 tsp. thyme, dried orange zest Peel the beetroot and the onion and cut them into cubes. Stew in olive oil until the onion start roasting. Cut ginger into small pieces and add it to the vegetable broth. Deglaze it with orange juice. Add cloves, cilantro, cinnamon, coconut milk and half of the water. Let it cook with closed lid for 10 minutes than add almond butter. Mash everything and taste it. For the roasted chickpeas: 1 can chickpeas 1 tbsp. olive oil 1/­­2 garlic paste 3/­­4 tsp. sweet paprika powder 3/­­4 tsp. curcuma powder seasalt, pepper Pour off the chickpeas and mix them with olive oil, garlic, paprika powder and curcuma powder. Flavour it with salt and pepper. Bake at 200°C (392°F) upper-/­­lower heat for 20 minutes. Turn them around once a while so they don't get burned. Serve the soup with dab of cream, some thyme, orange zest and put the chickpeas on top. Enjoy the recipe!

Curry-Stuffed Mini Pumpkins

October 31 2016 Meatless Monday 

Who says Halloween has to be all about candy? These savory stuffed pumpkins are the perfect autumn treat. Filled with millet, jalapeno, nuts, coconut and curry, they’re perfect for guests or a quiet evening in. This recipe comes to us from Robin Asbell. Serves 6 - 3 small sweet dumpling squash or mini pumpkins (about 13 oz/­­370 g each) - 1 tsp canola oil - 1/­­2 cup/­­60 g chopped onion - 1 tbsp minced peeled fresh ginger - 1 tsp black mustard seeds - 1 medium jalape?o, chopped - 1 tsp whole cumin seeds - 1 tsp ground coriander - 1/­­4 tsp ground turmeric - 1/­­4 tsp ground cinnamon - 1/­­4 cup/­­50 g millet - 1/­­2 cup/­­120 ml coconut milk - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 cup/­­55 g raw cashews - 1/­­2 cup/­­55 g whole almonds, toasted - 2 tbsp shredded unsweetened coconut Preheat the oven to 400° F/­­200° C/­­gas 6. Cut the squashes in half from the stem to the tip, or if you are using pumpkins that sit flat, cut off the tops as shown in the photo above. Scoop out the seeds and place them cut-side down on oiled baking sheets/­­trays. Bake for 10 minutes (they will not be completely cooked). Take the pans out and flip the squash halves over. When they have cooled, use a spoon to cut into the flesh, loosening it in spots but leaving it in the shell. Reduce the oven temperature to 375° F/­­190° C/­­gas 5. In a 2-qt/­­2-L saucepan, heat the oil and add the onion, ginger, and mustard seeds. Sauté over medium-high heat until the onions are golden, about 5 minutes. Add the jalape?o, cumin, coriander, turmeric, and cinnamon and stir until they are fragrant. Add the millet and stir to coat, then add the 1/­­4 cup/­­60 ml water, the coconut milk, and salt and bring them to a boil. When it boils, cover the pan and turn the heat to low. Cook until the liquid is absorbed, about 20 minutes. Take the pan off the heat and stir in the nuts, then stuff the mixture into the squashes. Sprinkle each with 1 tsp of coconut. Bake the squashes until the filling is set and bubbling and the squashes are easily pierced with a knife, about 20 minutes. Let them cool slightly before serving. The post Curry-Stuffed Mini Pumpkins appeared first on Meatless Monday.

MALAYSIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter

August 19 2016 The Lotus and the Artichoke 

MALAYSIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter On August 16th, 2016 I launched the Kickstarter Crowdfunding project for The Lotus and the Artichoke MALAYSIA vegan cookbook! This is my 4th Kickstarter project, and like the first three, it’s off to a terrific start. Cruise on over and check out the campaign. It’s a great way to support my creative endeavors and culinary adventures, and it’s a great way to pre-order the new cookbook which will be coming out in October. The Kickstarter will end on Sept 15th... make sure to get in before the fun is over. For the next few weeks, I’ll be posting cool updates and Behind the Scenes stories and photos of the design and production of the new cookbook. The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA After 3 successful Kickstarter projects and 3 internationally celebrated cookbooks, The Lotus and the Artichoke is back with a new cookbook... and back on Kickstarter! Earlier this year, I returned home to Berlin, Germany after 5 intense weeks exploring Malaysia, Singapore & Borneo: checking out the cities, cruising the coasts and countryside, island life during the wild Chinese New Year celebrations, staying in a rainforest treehouse, eating and cooking with the locals everywhere, and riding buses, trains, taxis, and boats all over the place. Since then, I’ve been recreating the insanely delicious eats, writing up new recipes inspired from the trip, spending hours at my art desk and computer with the illustrations and design, and photographing all the dishes for my next cookbook: The Lotus and the Artichoke – MALAYSIA: A Culinary Adventure with over 70 Vegan Recipes. My 4th cookbook of vegan recipes inspired by my travels, stays with families, and cooking in the kitchens of restaurants worldwide: - 160 pages - with over 60 full page color photos - Personal stories, art, and recipes inspired by 5 weeks of travel in Malaysia, Singapore & Borneo - Explore amazing Malay, Chinese, and Indian cuisine from the fantastic foodie metropolises Kuala Lumpur & Singapore, culinary heritage highlights of Penang, rising star Ipoh, Sarawak’s quaint Kuching, the tribal highlands of Borneo and beyond - Everyday classics, mind-blowing mains, fabulous feasts, street food superstars, awesome salads & fresh treats, great snacks, and crazy delicious desserts - Discover new flavors, tasty spices, and easy, awesome cooking skills - Great for cooks of all levels, from beginner to advanced: Recipes use easy-to-find ingredients (Cook everything anywhere!) - Delicious, easy-to-follow recipes designed to satisfy and impress eaters of all ages, tastes, and minds - Available in ENGLISH... und auch auf DEUTSCH! Pre-Order my MALAYSIA cookbook on Kickstarter Some of the recipes: - Kelabit Mango Salad - Shredded Beet & Coconut Salad - Cucumber Zucchini Salad - Acar - pickled vegetables - Urap - traditional veg side - Penang Laksa Soup - Curry Mee - Nonya Noodle Soup - Spicy Mushroom Noodle Soup - Wonton Soup - Popiah Rolls - Otak-Otak - steamed quiche pockets - Satay Skewers w/­­ peanut sauce - Serunding Kelapa - roasted coconut & spices - Sauce Kachang - satay sauce - Sambal Belachan - red chili sauce - Pineapple Pepper Chutney - homemade red curry rempah paste - vegan faux-fish sauce - super 5-spice powder - Nasi Lemak - coconut creamy rice & ginger lemongrass tofu - Nasi Kandar - Malay street food feast - Nasi Kerabu - herbs, spices & olive mushroom rice - Nasi Goreng - fried rice classic - Mee Goreng - fried noodles with vegetables & crumbled tofu - KLFC - Kuala Lumpur Fried “Chicken” - Mushroom Murtabak - stuffed, grilled Indian flatbread - Sayur Campur - mixed vegetables w/­­ dark soy sauce - Sayur Lodeh - mixed vegetables w/­­ coconut gravy - Kang-Kong Goreng - stir-fried spinach - Bao - steamed buns w/­­ spicy seitan - Assam Tofu Faux-Fish - Asian casserole - Crispy Curry Tempeh Cubes - Soya Rendang - Black Pepper Seitan - Eggplant & Okra Tomato Curry - Szechuan (Kung Pow) Seitan - Char Kuey Teow - stir-fried rice noodles - Hong Shao Rou - roasted jackfruit - Mushroom Manchurian - Roti Canai - red curry & flatbread w/­­ chutney - Banana Leaf - Indian curry meal - Gobi 65 - Indochinese batter-fried cauliflower - Punjabi Sizzler - Apam Balik - crunchy peanut pancakes - Cendol - shaved ice, green noodles & syrup - Kueh Dadar - green pandan crepes - Kueh Lapis - multi-color cake - Ondeh-Ondeh - sweet, chewy dumplings - Kuih Kodok - fried banana fritters - Chocolate Mint Cake - Lychee Banana Sorbet - Coconut Ice Cream - Iced Ginger Lime Soda - Purple Dream - ... and more! Pre-Order my MALAYSIA cookbook on Kickstarter The post MALAYSIA vegan cookbook on Kickstarter appeared first on The Lotus and the Artichoke.

25 Vegan Chinese Recipes

February 8 2016 Vegan Richa 

25 Vegan Chinese Recipes Chinese dishes make great one pot meals and are generally easy to put together once you have some sauces around. The recipes also work well with different vegan proteins as tofu, tempeh, fake meats, beans, chickpeas and lentils and of course loads of veggies. Here are a few amazing Vegan Chinese or rather Chinese inspired recipes to get you started!  Happy Chinese New Year to all who are celebrating.  Continue reading: 25 Vegan Chinese RecipesThe post 25 Vegan Chinese Recipes appeared first on Vegan Richa.

How to Cook: Plant-Based Holiday Meals

December 21 2015 Vegetarian Times 

How to Cook: Plant-Based Holiday Meals The holidays may a time for indulging, but it is possible to create a memorable holiday meal that is entirely plant-based and highly nutritious. Tis the season for root vegetables, dark leafy greens, and hardy herbs! Vegetables Center Stage When putting together your menu, feature vegetables prepared in a variety of styles, like roasted, pan seared, smoked, confit-ed and grilled. Consider stuffing: Make a wild rice and cranberry stuffing with squash, apples, or sweet potatoes. (Try: Wild Rice-and Sage Stuffing with Crunchy Croutons) Recreate traditions: Get creative! Make spanakopita with a creamy tofu-spinach filling, a sweet potato Shepards pie, or dumplings with caramelized mushrooms and rosemary. (Try: Wild Mushroom and Caramelized Onion Shepherd’s Pies) Hearty salads: Try tossing grains with a warm vinaigrette, roasting or poaching pears, candying nuts, and roasting Brussel sprouts for a more festive spin on an ordinary, green salad. (Try: Warm Farro Pilaf with Dried Cranberries)   A Good Sauce - Or A Few Its great to have several sauce options for your guests to choose from. Try relishes, gravies or savory marmalades that will complement your dishes. Pesto: Briefly blanch herbs in salted water and plunge into an ice bath. This will help preserve the bright green color. (Try: Dark Leafy Pesto) Toppings bar: When making a classic like latkes, prepare creative garnish options like cashew cream, chive oil, fennel-pear marmalade, cranberry balsamic reduction, or homemade apple sauce.   Umami is Everything Meat, dairy or seafood-centered meals have the umami (Japanese term meaning pleasant savory taste) base inherently covered. Creating umami in plant-based dishes requires a bit more finesse. Try the below techniques. Seasonings: Think smoked paprika, garlic powder, nutritional yeast, truffle oil or salt, cumin, aged balsamic, or caramelized onions. Smoked component: Whether you want to invest in an indoor smoker, smoking gun, or purchase a good quality liquid smoke in a bottle, try smoking one component of your meal for that extra punch of flavor. Mushrooms, olives, chestnuts, popcorn or nuts are great places to start. (Try: Mesquite-Smoked Almonds) Homemade stock: Try using roasted root vegetables like carrots, or a local squash for extra sweetness. (See: How to Make Vegetarian Stock) Consider Appearance Your guests will eat with their eyes first.  Use colorful ingredients and garnishes to make your dishes pop. Make Your Table Beautiful: Utilize interesting platters, mini gratin dishes, or flower centerpieces. Fallen leaves, rosemary springs, citrus fruits, apples or pears also make great decorations. Dont Forget the Hors dOeuvres Try mini Caesar salads in endive spears, blini with cashew cream, or butternut squash soup shooters. (Try: Caesar Salad and Butternut Squash-Bartlett Pear Soup) Chef Olivia Roszkowski is a graduate of NGIs Chefs Training Program and a full-time instructor. Olivia holds a Bachelors degree in Neuroscience and Behavior from Columbia University and has worked at various well-known NYC restaurants, including The Mercer Kitchen and Momofuku Ssam Bar. Olivia is a master at root-to-frond cooking. 

Vegetable Pot Stickers (Dumplings)

November 18 2015 Happy Cow veggie blog 

Healthy homemade vegetable pot stickers (dumplings) that are satisfyingly delicious! They are boiled and pan fried to golden perfection. Freezer-friendly and made completely from scratch! I usually make batches of […] The post Vegetable Pot Stickers (Dumplings) appeared first on The Veggie Blog.

Spinach Kofta Curry

September 30 2015 Manjula's kitchen 

Spinach Kofta Curry Spinach kofta curry is an exotic gravy-based dish. These spinach and potato koftas (also known as pakoras or dumplings) are simmered in rich creamy tomato gravy making this a very delicious dish. Spinach kofta can be served with any Indian flat bread like Roti, Naan, Paratha, or with plain white rice. This will be enjoyed by everyone. This recipe will serve 4. Ingredients: For Kofta - 2 cups spinach finely chopped - 1-1/­­2 cups potatoes boiled, peeled and mash - 1/­­2 teaspoon cumin seed (jeera) - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt For Batter - 1/­­4 cup besan (gram flour) - About 1/­­4 cup water Also needed Oil to fry Gravy - 2 tablespoons oil - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­8 teaspoon asafetida (hing) - 2 teaspoon coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 teaspoon turmeric (haldi) - 3 tablespoons cashew powder - About 2 cups tomatoes cut into small pieces - 1 tablespoon chopped ginger - 1 green chili chopped - 1 teaspoons salt - 1 teaspoon sugar - 1/­­4 cup cream - 1/­­4 teaspoon garam masala - About 1-1/­­2 cups of water Method Koftas (dumpling): - Mix all the ingredients for kofta spinach, potatoes, cumin seeds, and salt, this mix should consistency of dough. Notes: spinach should be pat dry and potatoes should be firm not overcook. Otherwise mix will be very soft and will not hold the shape after adding to the gravy. - With oiled hands, divide the mixture into 24 to 30 equal parts. Make them in round balls. - Make the batter add the water slowly as needed in the besan, batter should be very smooth no lumps. It should be pouring consistency. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium high heat. Frying pan should have about 1 inch of oil. Oil should be moderately hot. To check if the oil is ready, put small piece of mix in the oil, oil should sizzle. - Dip the spinach balls in the batter one at a time and slowly drop into the frying pan. Fry koftas until golden-brown all around. Turn them occasionally. This should take about 3-4 minutes. Making Gravy: - Blend the tomatoes, green chilies and ginger to make a puree. If you prefer a milder version, take the seeds out of the green chili before blending. - Heat the oil in a saucepan on medium-high. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil; if it cracks right away oil is ready. - Add the asafetida, cumin seeds stir for a minute. Lower the heat to low, add the other spices except garam masala, coriander powder, turmeric, salt sugar, turmeric, and cashew powder. Stir-fry for a minutes. - Add the tomato puree, increase the heat to medium cook until the tomato mixture starts leaving the oil and reduces to about half in quantity. Add cream save about 1 tablespoon for garnishing and cook for another minute. - Add about 1-1/­­2 cups of water, as it comes to boil reduce the heat to low and let the gravy cook for few minutes. - Note: adjust the thickness of the gravy to your taste by adjusting the water. - Add the prepared koftas and let it simmer for 1-2 minutes. - Turn of the heat and add the garam masala and cover the pot.   The post Spinach Kofta Curry appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

How to Celebrate Chinese New Year on Meatless Monday

February 23 2015 Meatless Monday 

How to Celebrate Chinese New Year on Meatless MondayThe festival marking the start of the Chinese new year began on Thursday, February 19th with families reuniting, fireworks exploding, and decorations everywhere. Special dishes are eaten on New Years Eve and throughout the sixteen day festival, with certain foods believed to bring good luck for the coming year. Not only do the dishes themselves matter, but the way you prepare and serve them matters as well. Dumplings, a classic Chinese dish dating back more than 1,800 years, are traditionally eaten on New Years Eve. They generally consist of minced meat and finely-chopped vegetables but can be made with just vegetables and can be boiled, steamed, fried, or baked. Legend has it the more dumplings you eat during the New Year celebrations the more prosperous you will be in the New Year. Arrange your dumplings in lines instead of circles - circles of dumplings can mean your life will go round in circles, never getting anywhere. Spring rolls actually get their name from being eaten during the Spring Festival celebrating the New Year. Filled with vegetables, meat, or something sweet, theyre fried so that they have a golden-yellow color, which makes them resemble gold bars and become a wish for prosperity. Niáng?o, glutinous rice cakes, are another popular New Years dish. Made with sticky rice, sugar, chestnuts, Chinese dates, and lotus leaves, the name relates to getting higher year after year. So whether youre a child wanting to grow taller, a student wanting better grades, or an office worker wanting a promotion, you definitely want to try niangao. Then there are longevity noodles - not hard to figure out the symbolism there. Longer than normal noodles and uncut, they can be fried, or boiled and served in a bowl with broth. And finally theres good fortune fruit such as oranges and tangerines. As you can see there are many ways to enjoy a Meatless Monday during the Chinese New Year while encouraging luck and prosperity. Predictions are also part of the Chinese New Year season, and heres one many culinary experts are making: Asian cuisine will rise in popularity in 2015 . Its easy to see why Asian cuisines are getting all the attention, wrote Karen Caplan, President and CEO of Friedas Specialty Produce . They are mostly vegetable-centric with bold flavors, and that resonates with consumers who want authenticity, as well as healthy food choices. She thinks shoppers desire for increased protein will motivate them to try more vegetables like Brussel Sprouts, cauliflowers, and artichokes. Meatless Monday also plays a part in this surge in popularity of plant-based protein, she noted. Meatless Monday is gaining enough popularity that some restaurants add special items for Mondays and some schools incorporate it into their lunch menus. Dare we predict continuing popularity for Meatless Monday in this new year of the sheep?   Many will certainly approve of that trend, including sheep. The post How to Celebrate Chinese New Year on Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

momos soup recipe | momo jhol achar | paneer momo dumpling soup

July 21 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

momos soup recipe | momo jhol achar | paneer momo dumpling soupmomos soup recipe | momo jhol achar | paneer momo dumpling soup with step by step photo and video recipe. basically an extended version of traditional momos recipe which is served spicy achar or sesame or tomato based soup. it is mainly served as appetiser just before the meal, but can also be served as a starter. in this recipe, paneer based vegetable stuffing is used, but can easily mix and matched with any meat based momos too. Continue reading momos soup recipe | momo jhol achar | paneer momo dumpling soup at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Instant Pot Asian Steamed Dumplings

March 22 2017 VegKitchen 

Instant Pot Asian Steamed Dumplings Dim sum can be hard to find once you go vegan, but not if you make your own. With store-bought wrappers these vegan Asian Steamed Dumplings are amazingly easy and cheap to make in an Instant Pot. Be aware that some brands contain egg, but you can always find vegan ones at Asian markets.The post Instant Pot Asian Steamed Dumplings appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Beetroot Soup with Roasted Chickpeas

December 23 2016 Veganpassion 

Beetroot Soup with Roasted Chickpeas As a child beetroot was awful to me. Earthy and red, that had to keep off my plate. Since I'm a vegan my taste definitely changed. I'm using beetroot all the time and I love it. If grated in a salad, in a cream sauce, roasted with finger-shaped potato dumpling, in a risotto or in a dessert. The colour just makes me smile. In the winter I love earthy vegetables like pumpkin and potatos. The beetroot just fits perfectly into a colorful menu. Before you know it the nodule has turned into a soup. I ate it all even though I wanted to keep something for my boyfriend...oh well, next time :-) Makes 4 portions. Ingredients: 2 beetroot (700 g) 1 onion 3 tbsp. olive oil 1 small piece ginger 2 tsp. vegetable broth, powder 100 ml orange juice 5 cloves 1/­­2 tsp. cilantro seeds, grounded 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon 1 can (400 g) coconut milk 0,8-1 l water 1 tbsp. almond butter salt, pepper 4 tbsp. non-dairy cream 1 tsp. thyme, dried orange zest Peel the beetroot and the onion and cut them into cubes. Stew in olive oil until the onion start roasting. Cut ginger into small pieces and add it to the vegetable broth. Deglaze it with orange juice. Add cloves, cilantro, cinnamon, coconut milk and half of the water. Let it cook with closed lid for 10 minutes than add almond butter. Mash everything and taste it. For the roasted chickpeas: 1 can chickpeas 1 tbsp. olive oil 1/­­2 garlic paste 3/­­4 tsp. sweet paprika powder 3/­­4 tsp. curcuma powder seasalt, pepper Pour off the chickpeas and mix them with olive oil, garlic, paprika powder and curcuma powder. Flavour it with salt and pepper. Bake at 200°C (392°F) upper-/­­lower heat for 20 minutes. Turn them around once a while so they don't get burned. Serve the soup with dab of cream, some thyme, orange zest and put the chickpeas on top. Enjoy the recipe!

Lentil Rice Casserole with Chickpea Dumplings

November 22 2016 Vegan Richa 

Lentil Rice Casserole with Chickpea DumplingsLentil Rice Casserole with Indian spices baked with chickpea flour dumplings. Use veggies and lentils of choice. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe.  Casseroles work out well for when you want to put everything in a pot or pan and keep it ready to bake, bake an h our or so before the occassion and serve. This casserole is like a kitchari casserole with lentils, rice, spices and topped with a gluten-free dumpling made with chickpea flour.  Layer the lentils, spices, tomato slices and rice. Add water to cover. Store to bake later. or Bake for 50 minutes. Then top with dumpling batter and bake again. Cool for a minute and serve.Continue reading: Lentil Rice Casserole with Chickpea DumplingsThe post Lentil Rice Casserole with Chickpea Dumplings appeared first on Vegan Richa.

5 Unexpected Foods to Satisfy Meat Cravings

September 19 2016 Meatless Monday 

5 Unexpected Foods to Satisfy Meat CravingsThere is a reason why so many people crave meat. When our ancestors first started eating animal flesh on the African savannas 2.5-million years ago, their food options were extremely limited. For our hungry ancestors, meat had two things, in particular, that were a godsend: fat and protein. Today, our tongues are still attuned to detecting the calorie-loaded fat and the umami taste that signifies that a food is abundant in protein. The reason why we love the taste of meats, such as fried bacon or grilled burgers, is the Maillard reaction: the browning that occurs when we cook some foods in high temperatures. To the tongues of our ancestors, the flavors of the Maillard reaction signified that a food had been cooked and thus safer to eat. But even though we no longer need meat for its protein and fat, and indeed we have better ways of knowing that food is safe than relying on the the Maillard reaction, our taste buds obviously didnt get the memo. They keep pushing us towards pork and beef. To make Meatless Monday easier and more fun, here are a few tips on how we can satisfy our outdated taste buds without meat, from Marta Zaraska, science journalist and author of  Meathooked: The History and Science of Our 2.5-Million-Years Obsession With Meat who has also published in the Washington Post, Scientific American, and The Atlantic. Craving ribs? Try avocado. Ribs are fatty. In a single 3 oz serving, you may get about 0.7 oz/­­20 grams of fat (and a lot of that is in unhealthy, saturated form). If you feel like dining on ribs or pork sausages, chances are your taste buds would be happy with something else that is fatty, so go for plant foods that are loaded with fat, such as avocados (13 grams of fat in 1/­­2 avocado) or macadamia nuts (a whopping 21 grams of fat in a 1 oz serving--more than ribs). And the good news is that fats found in plants are largely of the healthy, unsaturated type. Swap chicken for PB sandwiches. If the amount of protein in the human diet falls below 15 percent (more or less), we start craving it. So, on Meatless Monday, if you suddenly feel like having a lean chicken breast, your body may well be telling you it wants protein. A perfect solution would be a whole-wheat peanut butter sandwich or rice with beans. Both these dishes have complete protein, just like you would get from meat. Instead of toasty bacon, go for toasts. What makes bacon so appetizing are the flavors created in the Maillard reaction. But you can get these aromas in different ways besides the grilling or frying of meat. Toasted bread, tempura, pan-fried vegetarian dumplings--all these foods could satisfy your cravings because they offer the Maillard reaction. Create umami bombs. Meats are full of umami--delicious in Japanese--the fifth basic taste. Mushrooms have plenty of umami, and so does aged cheese (Parmesan, in particular), tomatoes, and fermented foods such as soy sauce or kimchi. Whats more, combining several umami foods in one dish can make what chefs call a umami bomb--even more potent deliciousness. So, instead of cooking a steak for your Meatless Monday dinner, try a stir-fry with soy sauce, mushrooms, and tomatoes. Make a meaty plant-based meal. Since meats tempt us with the combination of fat, umami, and the aromas of the Maillard reaction, try combining all these flavors in one plant-based meal. An example? A perfectly toasted sandwich with avocado, tomatoes, and Parmesan. Enjoy! The post 5 Unexpected Foods to Satisfy Meat Cravings appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Video: Tofu & Ginger Dumplings

July 22 2016 Oh My Veggies 

These vegetarian dumplings are full of superfoods. Vegetarians and carnivores alike will devour these tasty dumplings.

7 Meatless Recipes for a Vegetarian Chinese New Year!

February 8 2016 Meatless Monday 

7 Meatless Recipes for a Vegetarian Chinese New Year!Happy Chinese New Year! Chinese New Year, also called the Spring Festival, is celebrated at the turn of the Lunar New Year - a way of measuring a year based on the lunar calendar. The celebrations begin on the new moon that falls between January 21 and February 20. And this year, the big day falls on February 8, a Meatless Monday! While rituals and ceremonies connected with Chinese New Year vary greatly from region to region (Not only is the day celebrated across Mainland China, but also in areas with significant Chinese populations including Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. With communities and families around the world celebrating the Chinese New Year in different ways, one tradition that many of them share is the annual reunion dinner. This meal is a time to share family history, tell stories of the past year, and exchange hopes for the future. This year, welcome in the Year of the Monkey with a Meatless Monday Chinese New Year feast and recipes from Meatless Monday bloggers!   Longevity Noodles, Driftwood Gardens    Tea Eggs for Chinese New Year,  She’s Cookin’ Soy Nuggets in Chinese Garlic Brown Sauce, Simply Vegetarian 777 Vegetarian Chinese Dumplings in Soup, An Exercise in Trivial Pursuits Honey, Soy, and Ginger Stir-Fry, 40 Plus and All is Well Stir Fry Spicy Green Beans, Easy Cooking with Molly Vegetable Spring Roll, Bok Choi and Broccoli For more recipes to help you celebrate a meatlessChinese New Year, visit our Pinterest board or the Meatless Monday recipe archive! The post 7 Meatless Recipes for a Vegetarian Chinese New Year! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

9 Meatless Soups & Stews to Warm Up Winter

November 30 2015 Meatless Monday 

Winter is here, and with it all the hearty and savory foods of the season! One-pot meals like soups or stews can be simple to assemble, easy to cook, and even easier to clean up (just one pot and your prep utensils). A simmering stockpot on the stove is a welcome sight for friends and family, whether youre having a quiet dinner at home or a celebrating a festive occasion. These cozy soups and stews are bound to keep you warm on Meatless Monday; theyre delicious and hearty enough to make a perfect winter meal for any day of the week! For a time-saving trick, try making a big pot of one of your favorite recipes on Sunday night, and pack it away as an easy lunch you can bring with you to work, school, or wherever youre off to during the day. A thermos full of something warm is a great way to take the chill out of a frosty day. These recipes come from Meatless Monday bloggers, and feature some meatless favorite foods of the season. Hearty squashes, earthy root vegetables, and flavorful cooking greens add color, texture and taste to winter meals. You can make soups with almost any vegetables you have on hand, and these recipes call for a variety of ingredients that is sure to inspire! Greek Lentil Soup Fakes, Veggies Dont Bite Pumpkin Goulash with Bread Dumplings, Elephantastic Vegan Asparagus Potato Leek Soup, Feed Me Phoebe Seitan, Kale & Butternut Squash Stew, Oh My Veggies Spicy Roasted Butternut Squash Soup, Eat Healthy Eat Happy Vegan Creamy Spinach Soup, Crackle and Temper Vegetarian Onion Soup, Lydias Flexitarian Kitchen Autumn Harvest Soup with Butternut Squash and Kale, Kalyns Kitchen Persian Eggplant Stew, In My Bowl   Hungry for more? Find more ideas on our Meatless Menu: Soup’s On! Pinterest board or visit the Meatless Monday recipe archive for hearty entrees and savory side dishes that will keep you warm all winter long. The post 9 Meatless Soups & Stews to Warm Up Winter appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Pumpkin Goulash with Bread Dumplings

October 26 2015 Meatless Monday 

Spook your guests this Halloween season with this vegan pumpkin ghoul-ash! This dish is the perfect way to use fall’s ever-popular pumpkin and is hearty to boot with the addition of homemade bread dumplings. This recipe comes to us from Bianca of Elephantastic Vegan. Serves 2 - 2 lb. /­­ 1 kg cubed pumpkin - 1 small onion, diced - 3 garlic cloves, minced - 1 1/­­2 teaspoon salt (or to taste) - 1 1/­­2 tablespoons olive oil - ground pepper - a splash of white wine (possible to sub with a little bit of apple cider vinegar) - 1 teaspoon paprika - 1/­­2 teaspoon cumin - 1 teaspoon of corn starch, optional - Homemade Bread Dumplings, recipe below Pre-heat oven to 420°F/­­220°C. Cube the pumpkin and place the cubes on a baking sheet. Drizzle 1 tablespoon of olive oil on top and add 1/­­2 teaspoon of salt. Mix. Bake it in the oven for about 40 minutes. In a large pot heat 1 teaspoon of olive oil, add the diced onion and chopped garlic when it’s hot. As soon as the onion and garlic are glazed, add the baked pumpkin cubes. Stir and add 1 teaspoon of salt, ground pepper, 1 teaspoon of paprika and 1/­­2 teaspoon of cumin. After about 1 minute add a splash of white wine. Add 2 cups /­­ 500 ml of water and leave it on high heat with no lid on top for about 30-45 minutes. Add additional salt, paprika or pepper to taste. If you think it’s not thick enough, in a cup mix  1 teaspoon of corn starch with half a cup of water and add it to the goulash. Let it cook for a few more minutes. Enjoy! - 3 cups /­­ 250g dried bread cubes or old white bread (cubed) - 1 cup /­­ 250ml rice milk, unsweetened - 1 yellow onion - 3 garlic cloves - 1 teaspoon cumin - 2 tablespoons parsley, chopped - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt (or to taste) - ground pepper - a pinch of nutmeg - 1/­­2 teaspoon canola oil Prepare your steamer, such as a big pot of water with a steamer on top. In a large mixing bowl add the dried bread cubes /­­ cubed white bread and pour over a cup of plant-based milk. Mix. Let it sit for about 5-10 minutes. The bread cubes should get softer. Peel the garlic and onion and chop it in a food process. Meanwhile heat 1/­­2 teaspoon of canola oil in a pan and add the chopped onion and garlic. Let it roast until it gets a nice golden color. Then transfer the onion-garlic-mixture to the bread cubes, add the salt, chopped parsley, pepper and nutmeg and mix well. Let it cool off for a couple of minutes. Form bread dumplings with your hands. (Add more rice milk or if it doesn’t stick together.) Place the dumplings into the steamer and let it steam for about 30-45 minutes. Take them out and enjoy them for example with a Homemade Pumpkin Goulash! The post Pumpkin Goulash with Bread Dumplings appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetarian in Paris: Top Spots to Eat and Shop

April 30 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Vegetarian in Paris: Top Spots to Eat and Shop Veggie, végan, vitalité--the trend for veg-friendly restaurants, shops, and cafés has taken hold in Paris, creating new options for travelers to the City of Light. With that in mind, we chatted with our favorite Parisian insider, Aurelia dAndrea, a regular VT contributor and the author of Vegetarian Paris: The Complete Insider’s Guide to the Best Veggie Food in Paris. What brought you to Paris? The lure of a dialed-down lifestyle centered more on lifes little pleasures and less on the stresses inherent in the American work-to-live culture. The promise of high-quality (and tasty) food and wine was definitely a part of the live-abroad dream too. How did the guide come about? In the five years since pulling up roots in California and laying them down in France, Ive averaged about a dozen houseguests per year. I joke that I see my San Francisco friends more now that I live in Paris than I did when I actually lived there, and honestly, thats not too far from the truth. Friends, friends of friends, and family have all asked for veg restaurant recommendations, and after custom-creating itineraries for visitors year after year, and growing that list month after month, I figured it would be worth pitching the idea of a guide to a book publisher. U.K. publishers Vegetarian Guides took the bait and published Vegetarian Paris in late 2014. A French-language version, with updates, is slated for late 2015. How has the veg scene evolved since you got here? The clichés about French cuisine--specifically about how inhospitable it is to people who dont eat meat--are definitely rooted in reality. While the food culture is traditional, in the last several years a healthy eating trend has exploded in the City of Light. This has opened the door not only for vegetarian restaurants and vegan boutiques to flourish, but for vegans around France to come out of the closet and find community. At a recent vegan village pop-up event, there were no fewer than 10 booths selling vegan baked goods, and I couldnt help but ask everyone I met, Where have you been hiding?! The response is that theyve been there all along, but we simply didnt have the conduits to bring us all together. Now, we do. Whats the veg community like in Paris?? The veg community is eclectic, interesting, and diverse--just like Paris itself. The local vegan Meetup group is extremely active and an important hub for herbivores in the French capital. Members organize dining-out events, film screenings, and cooking classes, among other things, and some events are so popular that they have waiting lists. Because Paris is a city of immigrants and a place where people sometimes land for just a year or two, the veg scene is continually being added to and subtracted from, and new ideas that often cling are introduced regularly. Right now, theres a big upsurge in advocacy-driven events, due in part, I think, to the addition of Paul Watson and the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society on the local scene. (Watson recently got married in Paris, and one of his SSCS ships has been docked in the Seine for months.) What are some vegan/­­veg innovations in Paris? While researching the guide, I was surprised to discover some really novel, new-to-me organizations that had vegetarianism built into their ethos or philosophy. Café Zoide in the working-class 19e is a kids activity center upstairs, vegetarian café downstairs with a daily special that costs 5 euro. Both the pricing and the decision to offer veg fare are by design; this is to make the food accessible to a broader spectrum of people. Weve also got a vegan spa, Le Centre Tout Naturellement, where you can take a sauna and get a facial, followed by a healthy, filling 10-euro lunch. The owners are super welcoming and will make you a fresh-pressed organic juice if you ask. And recently, Paris finally got a vegan shoes-and-accessories store, Vegissime, in the Latin Quarter. I like to pop in to to see if theyve added any new footwear lines, then I stop by Vegan Folies, Pariss first vegan bakery, to pick up a decadent slice of cheesecake. Must-sees and must-dos in Paris? There are so many fun itineraries for veg visitors to the French capital. I love to steer friends toward neighborhoods where they can eat, drink, and be merry without having to venture too far on foot or by public transport, such as Canal Saint Martin. I recommend Tien Hiang, a Vietnamese/­­Chinese veg spot thats always bopping, where you can get stuffed on meat-free pho and bun xeo, then walk a few blocks over to Carmen Ragosta, a fusion boutique offering vegetarian Italian food, vegan shoes, and locally designed clothing. The tiramisu is divine, but call in advance for the vegan version. Another fun neighborhood to explore is Japantown, between Opera and the Louvre. A couple of spots offer tea-time snacks like steamed dumplings and bubble tea, and cool café Nest has oodles of vegan offerings, including brownies and Vietnamese tapioca desserts, which you can take away and enjoy in the beautiful and historic gardens of the Palais-Royal before setting off to explore the neighborhoods many covered arcades. Look out for our June issue--on sale May 12--for more on the best places to eat, shop, stay, and explore in Paris (plus recipes from our favorite French restaurants!).

Lentil Bread Gluten free Vegan Sandwich Bread Recipe

February 18 2015 Vegan Richa 

Lentil Bread Gluten free Vegan Sandwich Bread Recipe The amazing thing about Urad dal (split and dehusked black gram) batter is that it aerates by itself really well. Hence, the dal is the mandatory ingredient in the southern Indian crepes(Dosa) and steamed cakes(idli). Urad dal is also used to make Vadas(fried dumplings) which have just one main ingredient- urad dal. Another feature of urad dal is that it keeps the final product moist and soft. All of these properties make it a great candidate to make today’s bread.  There really isnt a substitute for Urad Dal. You can buy the urad dal lentils online on amazon Urad Dal Matpe Beans, Split or from an Indian store (much cheaper). This bread also obviously has the strong taste of the dal. If you have tried South Indian food, then you might know and its taste. This bread might seem like it has a hard crust right after baking but it gets softer as it sits because the dal leaks moisture. The photos do not do justice to how soft and delicious this bread is. There is no gluten or gum or nuts or added yeast in this bread.  Welcome to my world of experimentation Continue reading: Lentil Bread Gluten free Vegan Sandwich Bread RecipeThe post Lentil Bread Gluten free Vegan Sandwich Bread Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.


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