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10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet










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10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet

November 19 2020 Vegetarian Times 

With the new year just weeks away, the media is honing in on the top nutrition trends we can expect to see in 2021, and to no surprise increasing plant-protein remains at the top. Whether youre eating more plant-based for sustainability, health, or just because, rest assured there are a variety of whole food options you can choose from to meet your protein needs. But, before you head straight into the freezer department at your local grocer to pick up the latest faux meat product, lets take a look at 10 whole food sources of plant-based protein you may just want to toss into your cart instead! Reader beware, you may end up saving a few bucks once you realize how convenient and affordable many of these options are. Lentils Just one cup of cooked lentils provides nearly 18 grams of plant-protein and 16 grams of fiber for just 225 calories. Lentils also contain many important nutrients, like iron, potassium, zinc and choline (a nutrient that 90% of Americans arent getting enough of!) Plus, theyre budget-friendly with a 16-ounce bag of dried lentils coming in at just $2.99.  Registered Dietitian Kim Rose of www.kimrosedietitian.com recommends making a pot of seasoned lentils on the weekends. Divide them into individual 1 cup servings, and then add them to different meals throughout the week!  Youll find me turning lentils into meatballs, or for a really quick fix, adding a little bar-b-que sauce to them to make tasty, vegan sloppy joes. Hummus This plant-based spread can be made from a variety of beans and legumes, not just the traditional garbanzo bean you may think! Depending on the bean used, the protein content will vary slightly, but a standard 1/­­4 cup serving (or about 70 grams by weight) has roughly 6 grams of protein for just 180 calories. Plus, it often packs heart-healthy unsaturated fatty acids that help keep you fuller for longer too! Brynn McDowell, Registered Dietitian and cookbook author of The Mediterranean Diet Made Easy recommends using hummus in place of mayo on sandwiches or spreading it on bagels or toast! She suggests thinning it out and using it as a creamy salad dressing to add more plant-based protein to meals. Pistachios Pistachios are a good source of plant-based protein with a 1-ounce serving of the nut (shelled) providing 6 grams of it! Plus, they pack dietary fiber, potassium, and antioxidants that help keep your body in tip-top shape. While the shelled variety tends to be a tad pricier, you can still pick up a 10-ounce in-shell bag for about $5.49 at most markets. Lauren Manaker, Registered Dietitian, and author of Fueling Male Fertility, recommends to use shelled pistachios as a salad topped in place of grilled chicken or shrimp. The plant-based protein boost that also gives you fiber and healthy fats for staying power. You can also toss pistachios in trail mixes and in oatmeal as a topping for added nutrition and crunch! Related: Healthy Late-Night Snacks Chickpeas One of the most common forms of plant-based protein on the market is the good ole chickpea (aka, the garbanzo bean!) With nearly 7.5 grams of protein, 6.5 grams of fiber, and 3.7 mg of iron in just 1/­­2 cup serving of cooked chickpeas, its a great way to increase the total nutrient density of your diet. The best part: a pound of chickpeas (dried) often comes in at less than $3.00! NYC-based Registered Dietitian, Natalie Rizzo, MS, RD, is a big fan of adding chickpeas to both meals and snacks! From grain bowls to veggie burgers, or roasted as a protein-filled snack, chickpeas offer a convenient and affordable plant-based protein to nearly every diet. Edamame (Soybeans) Edamame is the immature form of the soybean that is often eaten from the shell (or shelled) alongside traditional Asian dishes. Regardless of the form of soybean you eat, they can easily be incorporated into a balanced diet with two servings being a reasonable goal for adults. A half-cup of shelled edamame packs nearly 9.5 grams of plant-based protein and 4 grams of fiber, as well as iron, potassium, folate, and choline! Sarah Koszyk, Sports Nutritionist and author of 25 Anti-Aging Smoothies for Revitalizing, Glowing Skin, recommends pureeing edamame in a hummus, dip, or pesto. Spread the edamame purees on a sandwich or wrap, add it to a burrito, or toss it with a salad, pasta, or rice dish. If youre looking to venture into the other forms of soybeans (like tofu), Registered Dietitian Sylvia Klinger of Hispanic Food Communications suggests blending silken tofu with oil, spices and herbs makes for a delicious high protein dressing, or adding a soy-based curd to pancakes to boost the protein there as well! Tempeh Tempeh is a fermented product made from soybeans in addition to some whole grains, seasonings and other flavorings. A 4-ounce serving of this soy-based protein packs nearly 20 grams of protein, in addition to a host of nutrition benefits. For starters, tempeh is filled with nutrients like manganese, magnesium, phosphorus and B vitamins in addition to its role as a probiotic. Jenna Braddock, Florida based at MakeHealthyEasy.com recommends spending a little bit of time prepping it to make the perfect dish! Braddock suggests crumbling the tempeh, then marinating it and finishing with a sear in a hot pan to add instant protein to salads, wraps, bowls and tacos. Pill Nuts Pronounced peel-y, this nut is native to the pili tree often found in Northern Australia and the Philippines. While lower in protein comparatively speaking per serving size (a 1/­­4 cup serving provides 3 grams in comparison to some of the other nuts), it packs a nutritional punch in that it contains essential amino acids the human body needs. This nut is harder to find at local markets, and you will need to likely shop online and be willing to spend about $16.99 for a one-pound bag. Maya Feller, nationally recognized nutrition expert and author of The Southern Comfort Food Diabetes Cookbook, recommends enjoying this mildly flavored nut in yogurt form (yes, brands are now popping up incorporating this nut into their yogurts!) smothered over a stack of pancakes or in their raw form as a crunchy snack. Hemp Seeds Three tablespoons of hulled hemp seeds provide nearly 10 grams of plant-based protein to your meal for just 170 calories. Plus, theyre full of iron and unsaturated fats while offering a great nut-free alternative for crunch. While a bit more pricey than other seeds (a 12-ounce bag is roughly $12.99), theyre an easy addition to boost plant-protein on simple foods. Plant-based sports dietitian, Kelly Jones of kellyjonesnutrition.com recommends adding them to oatmeal, sprinkling them onto pancakes, using as a topper for soups and salads, and incorporating into homemade energy bites! Lupini Beans Lupini beans are a staple of the Mediterranean diet and making a name for themselves in the US due to their high protein content. In just a 1/­­2 cup cooked serving of the bean it packs nearly 13 grams of plant-based protein. But, where it packs in protein it lacks in fiber, with that same 1/­­2 cup serving providing only 2 grams. Found traditionally in the jarred food section of the market, there are a few ways you can cook with them! Amy Gorin, a plant-based registered dietitian and owner of Plant-Based Eats recommends draining and rinsing the beans as you would do with any other canned beans. Then, use them in your favorite dishes, like her delicious plant-based lupini salad! Quinoa One of the only whole grains that is a complete source of protein (containing all 9 essential amino acids), this is an excellent (and affordable) gluten-free, plant-based protein addition to nearly any diet! One cup of cooked quinoa contains nearly 8 grams of protein for just 220 calories (plus nearly 5 grams of fiber.) Quinoa also contains many important B vitamins as well as potassium and antioxidants. Registered Dietitian Tamara Hoffman of Unbeetable Nutrition and Wellness recommends adding quinoa to your taco Tuesday menus with a spicy Mexican seasoning or sauteing it into your stir-fry dishes with a soy sauce. The post 10 Dietitians Share Their Tips to Add More Plant-Protein to Your Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

7 Tips for Shaking Sugar

November 7 2020 Vegetarian Times 

1. Rethink breakfast and afternoon treats Many people who decide to eat less sugar face two immediate challenges: what to eat for breakfast and finding a non-sweet afternoon treat, says Amy Chaplin, author of Whole Food Cooking Every Day (2020, Artisan/­­Workman Publishing Co., Inc.) which includes many sugar-free recipes. For breakfast, Chaplin suggests making your own muesli or granola using yakon syrup, a natural sweetener that is low on the glycemic index (GI) scale (meaning it doesnt bombard your body with sugar because it is digested slowly). Other options: tofu scrambles and steel-cut oatmeal. For snacks, go for apple slices with peanut butter, plain yogurt with blueberries or carrots and hummus. Instead of soda or fruit juices, drink chilled sparkling water with a slice of lemon or herbal teas. 2. Know what you are eating There are at least 200 other names for sugar on food labels, says Uma Naidoo, MD, director of Nutritional and Lifestyle Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital and author of This Is Your Brain on Food (2020 Little Brown Spark/­­Hachette). Fructose, dextrose and maltose are just a few. And look for added sugars Dr. Naidoo advises. Foods like ketchup, pasta sauces and salad dressings often have more added sugars than sweet foods where you expect sugar. 3. Mind your carbs Choose to eat complex carbs that are low on the GI scale such as apples, oranges, bran cereals and black beans, which are slowly digested, and skip simple carbs such as potatoes, French fries, white rice, white pasta and refined breakfast cereals which are high on the scale. 4. Try new ingredients When cooking, use naturally sweet ingredients in place of sugar. I like using freshly squeezed orange juice, berries and berry powders, beet juice powder, vanilla, coconut butter or dried coconut flakes, says Chaplin. Medjool dates are another good choice, and spices such as cinnamon add extra flavor. Related: 8 Way to Improve Your Gut Health & Mood 5. Be fruit-wise Because fruit contains fiber and nutrients, it is digested slowly and its sugar is absorbed slowly too. Still, its wise to limit fruit. I prefer lower glycemic fruit such as blueberries, blackberries, strawberries and Bing cherries. These options contain less fructose, the natural sugar in fruit, says Dr. Naidoo. Two to three servings of fruit eaten throughout the day should be OK for most people, she adds, unless you are diabetic or have fructose intolerance in which case you should consult with your doctor. 6. Remember why its important Sweet cravings are hard to resist. Sugar-laden foods increase serotonin in the brain and make you feel good, explains Dr. Naidoo. The calming effect of serotonin may often be felt shortly after eating a candy bar, cake, or other foods high in simple carbs--this is a reason why these foods can be so addictive. Remind yourself that consuming too much sugar can raise the risk of life-threatening illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease when overwhelmed with a craving for a sugary sweet, 7. Enjoy dessert! Dont deprive yourself of luscious desserts. Start to replace those sugary treats with healthier options that still taste good, says Dr. Naidoo. Another option is to switch to baking with erythritol--sold as Swerve--in recipes, says Dr. Naidoo. Even when using artificial sweeteners, however, moderation is key. She also suggests making your own fruit-based ice cream. Amy Chaplins new cookbook features fruit-based desserts such as Berry Chia Pudding--A crowd pleaser for sure! Chaplin says. Click here for the recipe. The post 7 Tips for Shaking Sugar appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Label Lingo: Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan Diet

November 6 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Plant-based products have never been hotter. From grocery store aisles to restaurant menus, the term plant-based is everywhere these days. Meanwhile, vegan has become so mainstream that it seems like every day, you hear about another celebrity or athlete going vegan. So does plant-based mean vegan and vice versa? Its hard enough reading labels on food products let alone figuring out the difference between these terms, especially when you throw whole food in front of plant-based. While they do have things in common, there are differences between these labels. Experts untangle them below. Related: 5 Plant-Based Subscription Meal Kits Guaranteed to Make Your Taste Buds Happy Plant-Based Versus Vegan As the name implies, plant-based dieters are focused on increasing the amount of plant-based food sources in their meals. This means more fruits, vegetables, legumes, tubers, nuts, seeds, legumes and grains. Although a person on a plant-based diet may still consume foods with animal products and/­­or byproducts, the ratio of plant-based sources increases while foods from animal and seafood sources are minimized, says Dan Nguyen, R.D.N., registered dietitian and nutritionist at HelloFresh. Of course, the based part of plant-based can be confusing, namely because it has wide-ranging meanings. For some, it could indicate that theyre eating 51 percent of their diet from plants while others might be closer to 90 or 95 percent. They can both be called plant-based eaters, but only if youre eating 100 percent plants can you say that youre a whole-food, plant-based eater, says Susan Levin, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D., director of nutrition education for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine. Vegan, on the other hand, means that this person eats zero animal products. That translates into no meat, poultry, dairy, seafood, or any animal byproducts. Yet vegan extends beyond the diet, as it also affects what people wear and what purchases they make. According to the Vegan Society, vegan is defined as a philosophy and way of living which seeks to exclude--as far as is possible and practicable--all forms of exploitation of, and cruelty to, animals for food, clothing or any other purpose; and by extension, promotes the development and use of animal-free alternatives for the benefit of animals, humans and the environment. In dietary terms, it denotes the practice of dispensing with all products derived wholly or partly from animals. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages Why Plant-Based and Vegan Labels Arent a Health Halo Eating more plants is the key to better health and even longer life, according to numerous studies. Plants are a powerhouse of fiber, vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and phytonutrients, Nguyen says. By eating more plants and fewer animals, youll get more of these valuable nutrients. As a result, you might experience lower blood sugar, LDL (or bad) cholesterol, and blood pressure, to name a few beneficial side effects. Plus, eating fewer animal foods and seafood will help decrease your carbon footprint, which is a win for the planet. Yet dont get duped into thinking that foods labeled plant-based or vegan are automatically healthy. The surprise? Many of these foods are still highly processed. Foods marketed as plant-based may not necessarily be healthy or contain many whole plant foods, Nguyen says. These foods can be high in fat, sugar and/­­or sodium and could still make you sick, putting you at greater risk for chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes. Thats true even if youre a junk food vegan who primarily eats processed vegan food. Just taking animal products out of your diet doesnt guarantee that youll be healthier, as you may not be getting the fiber and nutrients you need, Levin says. Related: Less Meat, Less Problems How to eat healthy, no matter whether youre plant-based or vegan While going plant-based, more so vegan because youre eliminating all animal products, is an admirable first step, it shouldnt be your end step if youre prioritizing health, Levin says. Instead, think about moving as close as you can to a 100 percent whole-food diet. To get there, Levin suggests reading food labels and keying in on fiber. Fiber is often a good indicator of how processed the product is, she says. If you dont see much fiber in a food, chances are its on the low end of the healthy food scale. Then check the added sugar and the ingredient list in general. If you see ingredients you dont know how to pronounce, you should probably avoid putting that food in your cart, Levin says. The post Label Lingo: Plant-Based Diet vs. Vegan Diet appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Got Anxiety? Create a Soothing Sleep Routine

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

If youre like a lot of people right now, anxiety may be causing you to toss and turn throughout the night. But sleep is essential to our health--without it were at increased risk of infections, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity. And getting a good nights rest can improve mood and emotional balance according to Matthew Walker, PhD, director of the Center for Human Sleep Science and author of Why We Sleep (Scribner, 2017). Maybe we cant make every night worry-free, but with the following suggestions for creating a soothing going-to-bed routine, we can improve our chances of getting those much-needed hours of sleep. Keep your bedroom cool, dark, and comfortable Screens--your iPad, laptop, television, phone--all emit light that has been shown to disrupt sleep. Make your bedroom a no-gadget zone and block out street light with shades. Even a hint of dim light...has been shown to delay the release of nighttime melatonin in humans, writes Walker, referring to the hormone that alerts our bodies to darkness, signaling that its time to sleep. For optimal rest, your mattress and pillow should be comfortable, and your bedroom temperature should be cool, according to Your Guide to Healthy Sleep published by the National Institutes of Health. Create a transition time I dont work or do anything on the computer past 8 p.m., says Kim Acosta, a working mother of two who, in spite of a complex schedule of family and work responsibilities has found ways to ensure a full nights rest. She has an evening routine of sitting with her 13-year-old son while they each read their own books before going to sleep--a relaxing time for both of them. Instead of working or cleaning the house right up to the minute you hit the pillow, give yourself time to unwind and relax at the end of the day. Create a transition to sleep with activities such as taking a warm bath, playing music, writing in a journal, or doing yoga stretches. Related: 11 Ways to Reduce Stress and Anxiety Dont let exercise or dinner ruin sleep Getting exercise earlier in the day promotes good sleep, but if you work out just before going to bed, your body may be too revved up for restful sleep, according to Your Guide to Healthy Sleep. The same goes for eating--if you eat a big meal right before bed, indigestion might keep you up. Time these activities for early in the evening or at least two to three hours before bedtime. Put off your worries When I start to worry about the next day, I dont try to problem-solve in the moment, says Acosta. I tell myself youre equal to the task which seems to calm me. I think its my way of giving myself permission to not worry about whatever is bothering me at the moment and remember that it will all be fine tomorrow when I will deal with it. Follow her lead and try putting your worries on a mental shelf until tomorrow. Meditate The science is loud and clear: meditation and sleep make splendid bedfellows, writes Ariana Huffington in her bestselling book, The Sleep Revolution-Transforming Your Life, One Night at a Time (Harmony Books, 2017). Huffington, who suffered from sleep deprivation for years, learned that making a mental gratitude list helped calm her mind at night, and that meditating eased stress. Need guidance? Check out apps such as Headspace, Cal, Noisli or Slumber, which offer guided meditations, soothing music, storytelling and nature sounds that can help you drift into peaceful, health-giving sleep. We independently source all of the products that we feature on vegetariantimes.com. If you buy from the links on our site, we may receive an affiliate commission, which in turn supports our work. The post Got Anxiety? Create a Soothing Sleep Routine appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

High-Vibe Condiment Classics

May 23 2020 My New Roots 

High-Vibe Condiment Classics Summer is fast-approaching (at last!) and I dont know about you, but to me this means grilling, eating outside, and enjoying all of the classic, warm-weather treats. But wait! Did you know that there are all kinds of funky ingredients hiding in the most innocuous places, like your ketchup, mustard and relish?! We shouldnt have to forgo these truly classic condiments just because were walking on the whole foods path. No way! So I decided to do a high-vibe makeover all of the condiments that youd find at a barbecue, picnic, or baseball game: ketchup, mustard, honey mustard, Dijon, relish, mayo and secret sauce, without any refined ingredients, colours, or preservatives. They are entirely vegan (except for the honey mustard), and taste absolutely incredible.  Making your own condiments from scratch is empowering, and you too will see that by whisking up your very own mustard, or blending your very own ketchup that you are incredibly capable in the kitchen! Its a serious delight to realize that youre not only qualified to make things you thought you needed to buy, but that youre also doing yourself a giant favour in cutting questionable ingredients out of your life. When I was a kid, I loved hotdogs with mustard and relish (not ketchup, that was for burgers). The vinegary tang of the yellow mustard with the sweetness of pickle relish perfectly offset the salty squishiness of a microwaved wiener. This was a typical Saturday lunch, with doughnuts for dessert, all washed down with a giant glass of milk. I wanted to recreate that nostalgia, minus pretty much everything else. The flavours bring me back to simple times and simple food. But simple food is not always so simple. Have you read the ingredients on a squeeze bottle of relish lately? Its a complicated collection of chemicals that I certainly wouldnt want in my body. High-fructose corn syrup, natural flavour, and food colouring are just a few of the ingredients that plague most tasty toppings. Food additives are everywhere, especially in shelf-stable products. If youre not going to refrigerate something or preserve it properly, it has to have things in it to prevent it from spoiling. It also has to look appealing and taste good, even after months (or years!) on a grocery store shelf. That is why it is so important to read labels and be discerning about what you choose to buy. This is not to say that these additives are inherently harmful, but they are far from natural, and Im a believer in eating as close to the earth as possible! Luckily my condiments are not only based on whole foods, but they taste amazing and are actually good for you.    Here is a small list of the food additives to watch out for and avoid, if possible. Remember to check the packages of your other summer favourites, like chips, salad dressings, sparkling beverages, soda and juice, ice cream, popsicles, and frozen yogurt.  High Fructose Corn Syrup Sometimes labeled HFCS, this highly-refined artificial sweetener has become the number one source of calories in North America. It is found in almost all processed foods, since it is cheap to make, shelf-stable, super sweet, and highly addictive. Excessive consumption has been linked to obesity, and type 2 diabetes. Watch out for it in condiments, salad dressing, bread, candy, soda, yogurt, breakfast cereals, even canned vegetables and fruit.  Natural Flavours This is a sneaky term meant to throw you off. When you see these words on an ingredient list, they refer to a naturally-derived flavouring agent that has to be extracted from plant or animal sources, designed to enhance the taste of food. Conversely, artificial flavours are synthetically created, with their original sources being manmade chemicals. Natural flavours however, are still made in laboratories by food chemists who can add any numbers of chemicals, including preservatives, solvents and other substances, which are defined as incidental additives, to what they are creating. Food manufacturers are not required to disclose whether these additives come from natural or synthetic sources, and as long as the original flavouring comes from plant or animal material, they can be classified as natural. The point is, natural flavours dont appear to be any healthier than artificial flavours, and they can still contain ingredients that may cause reactions in sensitive individuals, especially children. To avoid them, cut back on packaged products and stick to the real-deal whole foods!  Food Dyes /­­ Colours To make food look bright, fresh, and especially appealing to children, food manufacturers add dyes to obvious things like candy, sports drinks and baked goods, but also not-so-obvious things like condiments (!), pickles, cereals, salad dressing, yogurt, and chocolate milk. Some of these dyes are approved for use in certain countries, while others have banned them, making it challenging for consumers to navigate. The safety of food dyes is controversial, especially in regards to children. Studies have linked them to hyperactivity in sensitive kids, and they may cause allergic reactions in some people. Because most food dyes are found in unhealthy processed foods, its easy to avoid them if youre sticking to a more natural diet.  Hydrogenated /­­ Partially Hydrogenated Oils You know when the World Health Organization plans on eliminating these fats from the global food supply, they must be pretty problematic. Created by forcing hydrogen gas into vegetable fats under extremely high pressure to turn liquid into solid, hydrogenation creates trans fats, which increases the amount of LDL cholesterol, lowers HDL cholesterol, therefore significantly increasing the risk of coronary heart disease. Whats more is that these fats are pro-inflammatory. Although their use has been banned in several countries, trans fats still lurk in many processed foods.  As long as there is less than .5% per serving, it isnt required in to be listed in the ingredients or nutritional information. The best way to avoid them is by cutting out processed foods, especially margarine, coffee creamer, chips and crackers, frozen pizza, fast foods, baked goods, and microwave popcorn.   Health Claims – these are put on the front of the box to lure you in, and can include buzz words like natural, whole grain, low-fat, no added sugar, organic, light, low calorie, gluten-free, and enriched. Terms like these should be a red flag for you, so read the entire label, including the ingredient list, the serving size, the amount and types of sweetener and fat used. Think critically and be selective – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  The bottom line?! Stick to whole, or minimally-processed foods and ingredients as often as possible. Its better for you, and your family to make your own from scratch whenever possible. Not to mention, its fun to brag to everyone that youre a condiment master, a yogurt wizard, or a salad dressing whisperer.  I had so much FUN with these recipes! It was a blast to brainstorm which condiments I would attempt to health-ify, experiment with, and eventually master to make them all easy-to-make and delicious. My condiments wont last years in the fridge, but all of them passed the two-week mark with flying colours (all of them natural, of course). As long as youre using clean utensils to scoop out your servings, you shouldnt have a problem keeping these toppings around for a few weeks – ya know, if you can ration them for that long!  Yellow Mustard This was in fact my first attempt at making yellow mustard and it proved to be ridiculously easy! I think Id built it up in my head to be some complicated project, but wow was I mistaken. Just a few simple ingredients, and a little stovetop whisking will get you the brightest, tangiest, most beautiful ballpark mustard of your dreams! I must warn you, from one condiment-master to another, that the bubbling mixture gets darn hot and tends to splatter when its cooking. To avoid scalding yourself, use the pot lid as s shield (insert laughing emoji here).      Print recipe     Yellow Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients:  1 cup /­­ 250ml cold water 3/­­4 cup dry mustard powder 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. garlic powder 1/­­8 tsp. ground paprika 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar Directions: 1. In a small saucepan, whisk together water, dry mustard, salt, turmeric, garlic, and paprika until smooth. Cook the mixture over medium-low to low heat, stirring often, until it bubbles down to a thick paste, 30 to 45 minutes. 2. Whisk the apple cider vinegar into the mustard mixture and continue to cook until its thickened to the desired consistency – this can take between 5 and 15 minutes depending on how thick you like it.  3. Let the mustard cool to room temperature. Transfer the mustard to an airtight glass jar or container, and refrigerate for up to 3 months.  Honey Mustard Depending on how sweet you like your honey mustard, its just the above yellow mustard recipe with as much honey stirred in as you like! I added two tablespoons and it was perfect for me, but if you want even more, got for it. I recommend avoiding very runny honey, since this will loosen the mustard. Instead, opt for something on the thicker side to maintain the consistency. If youre vegan, brown rice or date syrup would be the best choices, since they are more viscous than maple syrup, for example. I love this on sandwiches with lots of fresh veggies and sprouts!     Print recipe     Honey Mustard Makes 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 1 1/­­4 cups /­­ 300ml yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 Tbsp. raw honey Directions: 1. Combine the mustard and the honey. Taste and add more honey if desired. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 months.  Grainy Dijon Mustard This style of Dijon is a whole-seed one, which is my favourite because of the great texture and colour variations. Its spicy and complex, and will only get better with time. Keep in mind that this recipe is in two stages, the first one requiring you to soak your mustard seeds the night before you plan on blending.      Print recipe     Grainy Dijon Mustard Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml  Ingredients: 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g yellow mustard seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g black mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground mustard 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml white wine vinegar 1/­­3 cup /­­ 75ml apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt Directions: 1. Combine all ingredients and refrigerate overnight (for 12-24 hours) to allow the mustard seeds to soften and absorb the flavours. 2. Place mixture in blender and mix on high for a minute or two, until the seeds have broken and the mustard thickens. 3. Transfer contents to a clean jar and enjoy! Dijon will keep for about one month in the refrigerator. Sweet Pickle Relish This was the most anticipated condiment to try and make myself, since its one of my favourites, but also one of the worst offenders for additives. I successfully recreated that gorgeous tang, and succulent texture of commercial relish that I loved so much as a kid. The taste of this one is off the charts! My recipe uses coconut sugar instead of refined sugar and syrups, so the colour is a little darker and browner than the conventional types, but I dont think youll notice – and you certainly wont miss the food colouring!     Print recipe     Sweet Pickle Relish Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 340g finely diced cucumber 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g finely diced yellow onion 1 tsp. salt, divided  1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml apple cider vinegar  1/­­4 cup /­­ 40g coconut sugar 1/­­4 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. yellow mustard seeds 1 tsp. dried dill 1/­­4 tsp. turmeric 1/­­4 red bell pepper, finely diced 1 tsp. arrowroot, dissolved in 2 tsp. water Directions: 1. Toss the cucumber and onion with 3/­­4 teaspoon of salt in a sieve set over a bowl, and let drain for about 3 hours. Next, press the ingredients against side of sieve to release as much liquid as possible, then discard liquid from bowl.  2. Bring the vinegar, coconut sugar, and remaining 1/­­4 teaspoon of salt to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring until sugar has dissolved, then simmer until reduced to about a 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml (just eyeball it), about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic, mustard, dill, and turmeric, stir until fragrant, about 1-2 minutes. 3. Add the drained cucumber and onion mixture, plus diced red bell pepper, and simmer, stirring for about 2 minutes. Make the arrowroot slurry, then whisk it into the relish. Simmer, stirring, 2-3 minutes until noticeably thickened. Turn off the heat and transfer relish to a glass jar or storage container and leave uncovered until it cools to room temperature, then put in the fridge. The relish will keep for up to a month in the fridge.  Tomato Ketchup This ketchup was an old blog post that I revisited and revised. I used to make this recipe in the oven, but my new method eliminates the need to crank up the heat when its probably the last thing you want to do. Instead, the whole thing is made on the stove, then blitzed up in the blender. Its deeply spiced and complex, so much more interesting than store-bought ketchup. The first time I made the new version, I used a good portion of it for a soup base, then added more to a dip – both were delicious, so if you have leftovers, put it to use in an unexpected place. Its tasty with everything!      Print recipe     Tomato Ketchup Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil (expeller-pressed, flavour neutral)  3 star whole anise (make sure they are whole to remove easily!) 3 bay leaves 1 tsp. ground coriander pinch of chili flakes  1 large onion, chopped  3/­­4 tsp. sea salt  1/­­4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 3 cloves garlic, minced 2.2 lbs. /­­ 1 kg tomatoes  2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar 1 Tbsp. maple syrup  Directions: 1. Melt the coconut oil in a medium stockpot, then add the star anise, bay leaves, coriander, and chili flakes. Cook until fragrant about 2 minutes, then add the onions, salt and pepper, and cook until slightly browned, about 10 mins. Next add the add garlic, cook for 1-2 minutes, then add balsamic vinegar, scraping any stuck bits off the bottom of the pot. Add tomatoes and their juices, then bring to a simmer.  2. Cook on low heat for about 60 mins or until reduced and starting to caramelize on the bottom of the pot.  3. Turn off heat and remove bay and anise, add maple syrup. Let cool slightly and transfer to a blender, blend until smooth. Taste, and adjust seasoning to suit your taste.  4. Let cool to room temperature, then transfer to an airtight glass container and store in the fridge. Keeps for about one month.   Aquafaba Mayonnaise This was the most exciting discovery to make: vegan mayo using aquafaba! Aqua faba translates to bean water and its the cooking liquid from chickpeas. Although any can of chickpeas will have this, I make my own, since there are no additives or chemicals that have leached from the can itself. If you cook your own chickpeas from dried, you have aquafaba. Although I wouldnt normally consume large amounts of aquafaba, in this case its used in such a small amount that I think its fine. Plus, did I mention it makes vegan mayo?! The results are so unbelievably shocking and delightful that Im a convert, even though I eat eggs! I highly suggest using the most neutral-tasting olive oil you can find for this recipe. Since it makes up the majority of the flavour of the mayonnaise, a strong-tasting olive oil will overpower the delicate nature of this condiment. I used the one from Pineapple Collaborative, which works perfectly. I also tried avocado oil, grapeseed, and sunflower, but didnt like the results as much as mild olive oil. Its up to you! You can really use whatever you have on hand, just keep in mind that it will really dictate the taste of the final result.      Print recipe     Aquafaba Mayonnaise Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3 Tbsp. aquafaba 1/­­4 tsp. Dijon mustard 1/­­4 tsp. fine salt 1 1/­­2 tsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml mild olive oil (or other light-tasting oil) Directions: 1. Place the aquafaba in the bottom of a wide-mouth jar. Add the mustard, salt, lemon juice, vinegar, and the olive oil. Allow a minute for the oil to separate into a distinct layer. 2. Insert an immersion blender all the way to the bottom of the jar. (Note: this will not work with an upright blender) Start the blending process on medium speed and do not lift the blender until the mixture has thickened and turned white at the bottom of the jar. Only then, slowly move the blender up, waiting for the oil to incorporate as you go, until you get the texture of mayonnaise. Use immediately; refrigerate leftovers in a tightly sealed jar for up to 1 month. The mayonnaise will thicken slightly once cooled in the fridge. Smoky Secret Sauce This is the creamy, tangy, and perfectly seasoned sauce that most famously adorns the Big Mac burger from McDonalds. Whats best about my version is that it has zero secrets...nothing weird to hide here! I had the most fun with this recipe, since it required a number of the condiments that Id already made as ingredients. I did deviate a tad from the original and added smoked paprika, since I love the added dimension of smoke flavour to anything thats going on grilled food, but Ive also found this to be a stellar salad dressing, especially for chop-style salads that have chunky, less delicate ingredients. I hope you find some fun things to slather it on this summer. Its lip-smakingly tasty!      Print recipe     Smoky Secret Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup /­­ 175ml aquafaba mayonnaise (recipe above) 1 tablespoon yellow mustard (recipe above) 2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish (recipe above) 1 tsp. maple syrup 1/­­2 teaspoon white wine vinegar 1/­­2 teaspoon paprika 1/­­4 tsp. smoked paprika (not traditional, but delicious!) 1/­­4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon onion powder Directions: 1. Fold all ingredients together in a small bowl or jar. Enjoy immediately, and store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for 2-3 weeks.    As a bonus, Ive included this stellar recipe for carrot hot dogs – since youll need a high-vibe wiener to put your condiments on! Hahaaa! I realize that carrot hot dogs are pretty 2018, but Id never tried them before and it was a very amusing undertaking. I looked at a number of recipes online and my version is a mash-up of the ones that sounded the most delicious. My method is also much easier and faster than other versions Ive seen, since its just a braise on the stove and a quick grill (no marinating, steaming, roasting, etc).  The important thing to keep in mind for this recipe, is that the amount of time you braise the carrots for,Im  will be dictated by the girth of the carrots. Mine were more sausage-sized (approx 1.5 or 3.5-3.75 cm) than a typical hot dog wiener, and a 20-minute simmer was the perfect amount. If your carrots are smaller, Id go down to 15 minutes. Insert a sharp knife to check on the doneness after 10 minutes or so, and take them out when they are tender, but way before they get mushy. Remember that youre also going to be grilling them for 10 minutes so they will cook even more, and you dont want them too soft. The final result should be tender all the way through, but shouldnt fall apart in your mouth.     Print recipe     Carrot Hot Dogs Serves 8 Ingredients: 8 large hot dog-sized carrots 8 hot dog buns 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml tamari 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml apple cider vinegar  1 cup /­­ 250ml vegetable broth or 1 tsp. vegetable bullion powder + 1 cup water 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (preferably expeller-pressed, flavour neutral) 1 Tbsp. liquid smoke 2 tsp. yellow mustard 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 tsp. paprika 1/­­2 tsp. onion powder 1/­­2 tsp. ground black pepperWash and peel carrots. Round the edges of the carrot to look more like wieners, if desired.  Direcitons: 1. Whisk all marinade ingredients together in a large stockpot with a lid. Add the peeled carrots and bring to a boil, reduce to a gentle simmer, and cook with the lid on for about 20 minutes (less if your carrots are on the thin side, see headnote). Remove from heat and turn on the grill.  2. Grill the carrots over medium-high, turning every couple of minutes, basting them with the remaining braising liquid if desired. Cook until slightly charred and fragrant, 10 minutes total. Grill or toast the buns. Place a carrot on each bun and enjoy with all of the condiments! I wish you all an incredible summer ahead! I recognize that this season is going to look very different from years past, but as long as were all healthy and the sun is shining, weve got it pretty good. Stay safe out there, and keep fuelling your body with the whole foods it needs to thrive and feel alive!  All love and happy condiment-making, Sarah B The post High-Vibe Condiment Classics appeared first on My New Roots.

Your Diet and Diabetes: What You Need to Know

November 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Your Diet and Diabetes: What You Need to KnowChances are you know someone affected by diabetes, a condition that impacts the lives of about 30 million Americans. Approximately one in three American adults has prediabetes -- a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes -- and of that population, 90% dont know they have it. Think you or a loved one may be at risk? Take (or share) the 60-second American Diabetes Association (ADA) type 2 diabetes risk assessment quiz and find out. The good news is that most cases of type 2 diabetes are preventable through simple lifestyles changes. The three most important things to do: lose weight, if needed; eat healthy, and be active. Reducing meat and increasing plant-based foods in your diet is one important step in lowering your risk of type 2 diabetes. This November is Diabetes Awareness Month, so to help make the connection between diet and diabetes, weve introduced a new hashtag -- #DontLetDietBeatUs - along with social media graphics to to increase awareness of how eating more plant-based foods and less meat can help lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. All throughout the month, we will be posting recipes, cooking hacks, and shopping tips with the hashtag #DontLetDietBeatUs to help manage and prevent a prediabetes or diabetes diagnosis. You can also download our new set of creative materials , so you can help spread the word on how a meatless diet can reduce your risk of diabetes. Weve also collaborated with our experts at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future to compile a list of eating tips that can help you or a loved one reduce your risk of diabetes. Incorporate More Plant-Based Food Choices into Your Diet Substitute red meat with nuts, whole grains, beans, peas, lentils, legumes and other meat alternatives like tofu, and tempeh. Whole grains are especially important, as they are packed with nutrients like selenium, potassium, and magnesium, low in fat, and fiber rich.  Additionally, research shows an inverse relationship between whole grains intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes.  Dont forget according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, at least half of your grains for the day should be from whole grains. Make Half Your Plate Fruits and Vegetables Here are two ideas on how to make it easy: 1) eat seasonally, when produce is fresher and lower cost, and 2) if you cant find it fresh, frozen fruits and vegetables are picked at peak ripeness and are quickly frozen, preserving their nutrient content and flavor. Buy them when they are on sale and keep a few bags handy for stir fries, soups, quiches, or casseroles, and smoothies. Choose Heart-Healthy Fats Use healthy oils for cooking, like canola and olive oil.  Nuts, seeds and avocado are good for an afternoon snack and best of all, theyll keep you full when those mid-afternoon munchies strike. Limit Fried Foods and other Foods High in Saturated and Trans-Fat These foods are associated with a high risk of cardiovascular diseases. Saturated fats are found mostly in meats and high fat dairy. Trans-fats are common in processed foods, such as cookies and crackers. Reduce Intake of Added Sugars Avoid sugar-sweetened beverages such as juice, soda and energy drinks and sweets such as baked goods, candy, ice cream. For more information on the relationship between diet and diabetes, click here If youve already been diagnosed, a couple of extra tips to manage your diabetes: o Be active all days of the week o Work with a health professional to manage your diabetes. Remember knowing your ABC (A1C, Blood pressure, and Cholesterol levels) of diabetes is important in helping you manage the disease successfully.  To help you understand the A1C test better, click this link on the ADA website . The post Your Diet and Diabetes: What You Need to Know appeared first on Meatless Monday.

ragi idiyappam recipe | ragi shavige | ragi nool puttu

June 25 2019 hebbar's kitchen 

ragi idiyappam recipe | ragi shavige | ragi nool putturagi idiyappam recipe | ragi shavige | ragi nool puttu with detailed with step by step photo and video recipe. south indian breakfast recipes are typically rice based dishes which is abundant source of carbohydrates. but this can be an issue for those who have issue with carbs or even for those with diabetes. well the answer for this problem is the millet based recipes and ragi idiyappam is one such easy alternatives. The post ragi idiyappam recipe | ragi shavige | ragi nool puttu appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can Use

January 28 2019 Meatless Monday 

Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can UseStart smart eating habits on Mondays for a happier and healthier you! February is just around the corner and its American Heart Month . Take a moment on Monday to focus on behaviors that may help you live a longer and healthier life. This is the third article in this months Healthier You Series. Weve discussed making good dietary choices for kidney health and type 2 diabetes . This week, we look at heart health. The American Heart Association recommends making simple changes to your diet to improve heart health, such as limiting red meat. Meatless Monday is an easy and enjoyable way to make smart food choices for your heart . Consuming less red and processed meat and more plant-based foods like whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes can benefit cardio-health. Bonnie Taub-Dix is a nutrition consultant, author, and Meatless Monday advocate. We asked her to share some heart-friendly advice. 1. Meatless Monday encourages people to cut out meat one day a week for their health and to try a great variety of plant-based foods. Are there specific plant-based foods that are most beneficial for heart health? Plant-based protein is a hot, trendy topic but these are foods that have been around for centuries, providing fiber and an array of nutrients. Plant proteins like beans, nuts, and seeds are just a few examples of how we can cut back on meat while boosting the value of our diets. Oatmeal is a steamy bowl of goodness for breakfast swirled with almond butter and bananas or as a savory side mixed with a variety of seasonings and spices. Oats and almonds are rich in fiber to help lower cholesterol levels. Beans, the most underrated superfoods, are also rich in soluble fiber to help keep you feeling fuller longer while controlling cholesterol levels. Theyre also a great source of plant-based protein.   2. Are there particular foods to avoid? What about processed foods? Many people say they try to avoid processed food, as if its a kind of poison. Its a well-intentioned goal, but even pre-chopped fruit or vegetables are processed foods! Certain processed foods make our lives more convenient, safer-and in many ways, even more nutritious. The good news is certain processed foods are healthier than some foods found in their natural state, such as: o Plain yogurt, with added cultures, retains the protein and calcium naturally found in dairy products, and it also includes added good bacteria to help boost our gut function and immune systems. o Canned tomatoes contain more lycopene--a powerful antioxidant that reduces inflammation--than fresh tomatoes do, especially when they are eaten simultaneously with a small amount of oil to enhance absorption. Dont judge a food by the front of the package. Flip that bag or box over to read whats really inside!   3. Should people with a family history of heart disease be much more careful than those who dont have a history? What can someone with a family history do to help prevent heart disease? If you knew you could have stopped that balsamic vinegar from splattering on your favorite white sweater, would you have done something to prevent it from happening? Unless youre clairvoyant, its not very easy to prevent something you cant predict. When it comes to your body--whether its potential damage from high blood sugar, blood pressure, or cholesterol levels--this is the time to take charge of your health. You can fight against your family histories by taking a closer look at what youre putting on your plate, moving more , and finding effective ways to manage stress .   4. Whats your go-to food for heart health on Meatless Monday? Id have to say my Spicy Dark Chocolate Chili Bowl ! What I love about this recipe is that you dont really have to follow it exactly -- you can swap out for your favorite ingredients. This recipe contains beans and avocado, as well as a variety of anti-inflammatory spices. Bonnie recently published Read It Before You Eat It – Taking You from Label to Table . You can find more about Bonnie at Better Than Dieting and on Instagram. For an extra bonus, check out heart-friendly Meatless Monday recipes, from pancakes to burgers, in our free comfort food e-cookbook . Use Mondays to make positive change in your life that will do you a world of good. Meatless Monday is a global movement followed by millions who choose not to eat meat one day a week for their health and the health of the planet. Help spread the word about the many benefits of Meatless Monday, such as how reducing meat consumption may improve your heart health. Download our shareable free graphics here . Follow  us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Healthier You Series: All-Star Nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix Sheds Light on Good Heart Health Practices You Can Use appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Healthier You Series: Go Meatless with Delicious Diabetes-Friendly Recipes from Chef Ronaldo Linares

January 20 2019 Meatless Monday 

Healthier You Series: Go Meatless with Delicious Diabetes-Friendly Recipes from Chef Ronaldo LinaresStart smart eating habits on Mondays for a happier and healthier you! Did you know increasing your consumption of plant-based foods and decreasing red meat could help you lower the risk of type 2 diabetes in the long term? Find out more! Photo credit: Kelly Campbell Photography This week we catch up with Chef Ronaldo Linares , a leading expert on healthy Latino cooking who is helping his community fight diabetes in a big way, with food. Known for creating modern recipes from ancient flavors, he recently published Chef Ronaldos Sabores De Cuba , where you can find close to 100 diabetes-friendly recipes using Latin flavors. The cookbook meets the dietary guidelines of the American Diabetes Association, plus its bilingual! Heres Chef Ronaldos advice for keeping it sabroso y sano (flavorful and healthy): 1) What are some of your most popular tips for making dishes diabetes-friendly? Mother Earth gives us a lot! We only have to educate ourselves about food to make delicious diabetic-friendly dishes. Here are my suggestions: o Simplicity is key. o Stick to three main ingredients. o Choose ingredients that are high in fiber, low in sugar, and contain healthy fats. o Mix up the spices to avoid using too much salt, i.e. consider adding fresh herbs to the mix! 2) Why is it important to reduce the amount of meat you eat in your diet? Thats a great question. By eating less red meat and more plant-based foods, you could lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Reducing your consumption of red meat can also reduce your intake of cholesterol, a change that can help heart health. This means if you are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes or heart disease, by eating more whole grains, vegetables and fruits, and less red meat, you could lower your risk of developing these diseases. 3) Whats your favorite Meatless Monday dish?  Quinoa Mango Jicama Salad! You get a great balance of protein, fat, and carbs in this tasty recipe. The crunch of the jicama, the nutty flavor from the quinoa, and the fresh herbs all add the perfect touch. This is also a great meal prep salad: Make the salad at home and bring it to work, put the dressing in a separate container, and when youre ready, mix everything up and enjoy! For me, its about keeping it simple and maximizing the flavors. 4) Whats your favorite plant-based protein and why? My top choice has to be quinoa! The possibilities are endless. From quick soups and bowls to stir-fries, its such a versatile, diabetic-friendly, and plant-based protein. One cup of cooked quinoa has 8 grams of protein and is rich in nutrients, iron, and fiber. You could make a big batch on Sunday and eat it throughout the week. 5) What is the number one piece of advice you give people who are starting a new healthy diet and lifestyle? Be patient. Eating plant-based foods comes with a whole bag of new benefits like weight loss, physical transformation, and maybe feeling better, too! Enjoy the journey, TOMA! Use Mondays to make positive change in your life that will do you a world of good. Meatless Monday is a global movement followed by millions who choose not to eat meat one day a week for their health and the health of the planet. Help spread the word about the many health benefits of Meatless Monday, such as reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Download our fun and shareable free graphic: Find us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Healthier You Series: Go Meatless with Delicious Diabetes-Friendly Recipes from Chef Ronaldo Linares appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Give the Gift of Meatless Monday with these 8 Inspiring Books

December 17 2018 Meatless Monday 

Give the Gift of Meatless Monday with these 8 Inspiring BooksHappy holidays from Meatless Monday! As the year closes, we have a lot to be thankful for and youre a big part of that. Meatless Monday is practiced in communities all around the world, from school children to nurses and doctors in hospitals, from Israel to India, in huge cities like Singapore and in small rural towns all over America. Youre a part of our big global network unified by one simple idea: refraining from meat one day a week for our health and the health of the planet. In this spirit of unity and giving, were sharing our year-end short list for our favorite books of 2018. Any of them will make a great gift for your friends and family to support healthy eating with original plant-based recipes. They all look so good - you may want to add them to your own wish list! Here is our list for 2018, in no particular order:     Plant-Powered for Life - Sharon Palmer, RD We love this because Sharon gives you a handbook approach to Meatless Monday. This is a cookbook-slash-handbook to help anybody make plant-powered eating a habit and enjoy lasting, vibrant health--the fun way! Sharon urges readers to set a personal goal and take one step closer to it every week.           Fit Men Cook - by Kevin Curry We love this book by Kevin Curry and its the perfect gift for the man in your life. Curry shares everything you need to live a healthy life--from grocery lists to common dieting pitfalls to his ten commandments of meal prep--as well as his personal story of overcoming depression and weight gain to start a successful business and fitness movement.         Read It Before You Eat It - by Bonnie Taub-Dix, RDN Give this informative and fun book to the grocery shopper in the house. A dietitian nutritionist, Taub-Dix shares what organic, grass-fed, all natural, cage-free, and more means for young and old eaters alike. She explains how to read, decipher, and learn what labels mean for you, your health, and the planet.             OMD: The Simple, Plant-Based Program to Save Your Health, Save Your Waistline, and Save the Planet - by Suzi Amis Cameron This is a great gift for parents who are thinking about ways to get their kids to not only enjoy Meatless Monday but also understand why Meatless Monday. This mom of five is the founder of the MUSE School in California, where they practice Meatless Monday. Here, she presents a way to improve your health and shrink your carbon footprint by eating a plant-based diet.           The Reducetarian Cookbook - by Brian Kateman Why do we love this book? Because the recipes are simple yet creative. Brian Kateman says that by eliminating at least 10% of the meat from our diets, we will reap wonderful personal health benefits and contribute to a healthier planet. That sounds awfully familiar!           Food is the Solution - by Matthew Prescott This book would be great for everyone, but especially for the person who already has everything! Prescott is a thought leader and Senior Food Policy Director for the Humane Society. With lavish photos and simple yet delicious recipes, Prescott goes deep into the medical, scientific, and environmental benefits of refraining from eating meat. Hes gotten some great reviews from folks like Paul McCartney, David Chang, and Moby.         Eat for the Planet - by Nil Zacharias & Gene Stone Share this book because it explains why Meatless Monday works. Sharing research, infographics and compelling arguments, this book is a clear affirmation of how anyone can have a positive impact on changing the world.           Sabores De Cuba - by Chef Ronaldo Linares Does your mom love Latin food? She can dance with this cookbook while she whips up a Cuban feast! Linares, an executive chef at the popular Martinos Cuban Restaurant in Somerville, New Jersey, knows Cuban cuisine backward and forward. His latest book features nearly 100 recipes, all of which will wow your taste buds and meet the strict nutrition guidelines of the American Diabetes Association. An added benefit, the book is bilingual.   Excellent taste in books always makes a good impression! Its the season for sharing and Meatless Monday is proud to share these ideas for your gift-giving, to keep it simple and focus on what truly matters. Find us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Give the Gift of Meatless Monday with these 8 Inspiring Books appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats

March 21 2018 My New Roots 

Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats So the big move-in happened, but we are far from moved in. I am writing this from my dirty dining room table, watching and listening to a collection of relative strangers drill, saw, spackle, sand, stain, and paint around me, like a tornado of humans in tool belts. Drywall dust dances in the shafts of light pouring into our new space, as I try to ignore the deafening screech from a floor sander behind a paper-thin plastic partition a few feet away from my head. Ahhh...home renovation. I could go on about the frustrations of living in a construction site, how my filth-tolerance has reached unthinkable heights, and how if I hear someone tell me that it should all be complete in two more weeks I may collapse, but I know that whenever it is done, it will all be worth it. Really and truly. I made these Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats a few days before we relocated from our rental to our home, knowing that I would need to have a stockpile of snacks that didnt require refrigeration, or even cutting, since we would be living without electricity, and I had no idea where to locate a knife in the unpacked boxes stacked high in the basement. Since then, Ive thanked myself every time Ive sunken my teeth into each chewy-crunchy-sticky bite, the cacao releasing its relaxation-inducing alkaloids and minerals into my frazzled bloodstream, the hemp seeds delivering their much-needed anti-inflammatory omega-3s, and the nut butter grounding my nerves with all its protein and healthy fat. In these uncertain times, Ive been certain that a delicious snack was ready to satisfy me at the drop of a hammer. My original inspiration for these bars came from my fellow Canadian health-food blogger and vegan recipe guru Angela Liddon, of Oh She Glows fame. Her Almond Butter Crisp Rice Treats were a fun Sunday afternoon snack project for my four-year old son and I, and since then Ive been making many variations of them. My goal was to add more protein, healthy fats and filling fiber to the bars, so I tossed in heaps of hemp and chia seeds until I found the right balance. Losing their chewy-crisp goodness would have been a real shame, since its the texture of these treats that is so very crave-able! So I tinkered a few times, and found the exact right amount that maintained the satisfying chew. I also wanted to add chocolate. Because chocolate. After nailing the additions, I knew that top needed some flair: not just visually, but something to cut the richness a tad. I had some freeze-dried raspberries kicking around my pantry that I had bought on a whim in the US some months back, and immediately knew that they would be the perfect supplement with their vibrant pink hue and bright acidity. Bingo! Freeze-dried fruit (and vegetables) have been popping up all over the place lately, since they taste incredible, have a long shelf life, and are a nutritiously convenient way of getting another serving of produce a day, especially for kids. However, if you cant find freeze-dried raspberries, or any substitute for that matter, you can easily replace them in this recipe with more traditional dried fruit like goji berries, roughly chopped figs, apricots, or even raisins. You could also top the bars with toasted nuts or seeds, coconut or cacao nibs. Think of these as a blank canvas for your favourite add-on flavours and textures, or keep it as simple as you like. The bars are also delicious as is, and if youre into a dark and rich flavour above all else, simply leave the toppings off. But do not under any circumstance skip the flaky salt – it is key.  Hemp hemp, hooray! Since being back in the homeland and trying to buy as much locally-produced food as possible, Ive been loving on hemp seeds lately - even more than usual! Because of their mild, nutty flavor, they blend so effortlessly with just about any food, sweet or savory. And what they lack in flavor, they make up for in protein and healthy fats, specifically those essential Omegas. Weve all heard about Omega-3s and how important they are for the health of our entire body, helping to prevent cancer asthma, depression, obesity, diabetes and so on. But! There is another star on the block, Omega-6, which seems to be less talked about due to the fact that many of us get enough (or in some cases, too much) of this essential fatty acid. Omega-3 and Omega-6 fasts are essential, meaning that our bodies dont produce them and we need to obtain them from the foods we eat. Sources of Omega-3 fats include flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, walnuts, chia, dark leafy greens, some sea vegetables and cold-water fish. Omega-6 sources include soybean, canola, corn, peanut, sunflower, and sesame oils. You can see from this list that most people in the Western world at least, are getting their fair share of Omega-6 fats, and lacking in Omega-3s. In fact, in North America it is estimated that the population consumes 10 to 20 times more Omega-6 than Omega-3, due to the popularity of processed foods. Although the correct ratio of these fats is still a matter of debate, researchers in this field agree that this ratio is far too high. We should be aiming for an Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio between 2:1 and 4:1. So why is the balance so important? Because the ratio of Omega-6s to Omega-3s helps determine the flexibility of our cell membranes, meaning that ALL communication throughout the body depends on at least in part on this balance being correct. Coronary heart disease, chronic inflammation, obesity, and healthy genetic processes have all been linked to the delicate equilibrium of essential fatty acids. How can we improve the situation then? Just making simple, small changes to our diets will greatly improve the balance of fats in our bodies. Instead of relying solely on foods high in Omega-6s like peanut butter and foods made with vegetable oils (like corn, sunflower and soybean oil) swap them with foods high in Omega-3s like walnut butter and flaxseed oil, and sprinkle chia seeds on your breakfast bowl or a salad. For omnivores replacing chicken, beef and pork with wild-caught, cold water fish will make a big difference too. But the most ideal food to choose when trying to achieve that perfect balance of these fats then, is hemp! Hemps Omega-6 to Omega-3 ratio is a healthy 3.75:1. You can find hemp in many forms these days: un-hulled and hulled seeds (also known as hemp hearts), hemp oil, hemp flour, hemp protein powder, hemp milk, and hemp seed butter. Remember that choosing hemp in its most natural form (the un-hulled or hulled hemp seeds) is your best bet to ensure a high-quality, whole food product. I like to sprinkle hemp seeds on just about everything, from my breakfast porridge to my salads and sandwiches. They add an amazing creaminess to smoothies, raw custards and cheesecakes. You can even make your own milk from hemp and you dont even need to soak the seeds first! Simply blend 1 part hulled hemp seeds to just under four parts water, with an optional sweetener like maple syrup, dates, or honey, and enjoy. Simple and delicious. You can get the full hemp milk recipe here. The last thing I want to mention is the crisp brown rice. There are a few types of it on the market, and one reason Im happy to be back in Canada, is because they have the right kind. By that I mean really crispy rice crisps. For whatever reason, the ones I found in Europe would always get soggy very quickly, whereas the ones here maintain their crunch even after combining them with wet ingredients like maple syrup and brown rice syrup. Ive also found high-vibe sprouted brown rice crisps over here from a company called One Degree (not sponsored). They work really well too, but cost a fortune. I alternate between those, and the ones Ive found at my local bulk food store that arent sprouted or even organic, but they get the job done when Im renovating a house and feeling strapped for cash. You may need to experiment with a couple kinds before finding the one. In the end, the bars should be relatively crunchy-crisp - not mushy at all (even though they will still be delicious). If you like Rice Crispy Treats, youre going to love these bars. Theyre the grown-up version of your favourite childhood treat, with a mega boost of nourishing superfoods. Its an indulgence you can feel good about feeding both you and your family...but I wont tell anyone if you hide them and eat them all yourself. Ive definitely never done that before. Nope. Never.     Print recipe     Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats Makes about 16 bars Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. virgin coconut oil, plus a little more for greasing 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml unsalted nut or seed butter of your choice 2/­­3 cup /­­ 160ml brown rice syrup 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 tsp. vanilla extract heaping 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­3 cup /­­ 40g raw cacao powder (or cocoa powder) 4 cups /­­ 200g puffed brown rice crisps 1 cup /­­ 150g hulled hemp seeds 3 Tbsp. chia seeds a few pinches flaky sea salt (Maldon works perfectly) 3-4 Tbsp. freeze-dried raspberries Directions: 1. Rub a little coconut oil in an 7″x11″ (20x30cm) baking pan. 2. Melt the coconut oil in a large saucepan over low heat. Add the nut butter, brown rice syrup, maple syrup, vanilla and fine salt, and stir to combine. Remove from heat. Stir in the cacao powder until thoroughly incorporated. 3. Add the puffed brown rice, hemp seeds, chia, and stir quickly to combine, then pour the mixture into your baking pan and press firmly (using the back of a large spoon or spatula rubbed with a little coconut oil really helps). Once smooth and even, generously sprinkle the top with the freeze-dried raspberries and flaky salt. Place in the fridge or freezer to firm up, then slice into bars or squares and enjoy. Store the bars in a tightly sealed container in the fridge or freezer. Show my your bars on Instagram: #cacaohempcrispytreats *   *   *   *   *   * Hey Toronto! I’ve just launched my first collaborative project since moving back to Canada, with my friends at ELXR Juice Lab: the Activated Power Bowl! This delicious breakfast (or snack!) is made lovingly with activated grains, superfood stir-ins, and tasty toppings. There are three mouthwatering varieties to choose from, or you can build your own bowl. I am so thrilled to offer my fellow Torontonians a vegan, gluten-free, whole food breakfast with activated grains – this is truly the first of its kind! The Activated Power Bowl is available at all four ELXR locations across the city, so if you’re in town go pick one up and enjoy. We had a very successful launch over the weekend – huge thanks to everyone who came out to taste and support! The post Cacao Hemp Crispy Treats appeared first on My New Roots.

New York City Mayor Announces Meatless Monday School Program to Tackle Climate Change and Obesity

October 30 2017 Meatless Monday 

This week, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that 15 public schools will offer Meatless Monday as part of a pilot program, with the potential to expand throughout the school system. Every Monday, students in the pilot will enjoy breakfast and lunch menus featuring meatless meals. De Blasio also added a personal commitment to start the practice at Gracie Mansion, his official residence ...we are now going to be instituting Meatless Mondays as well...Were starting a new habit and Im looking forward to it. New York joins a growing group of cities that are reducing meat consumption, with recent Meatless Monday proclamations issued in Pittsburgh, Sacramento, and Vancouver, B.C. Global leaders, including Argentinian President Mauricio Macri and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, have also committed to practicing Meatless Monday. Cutting back a little on meat will help make our city healthier and our planet stronger for generations to come, said de Blasio. He added that both the obesity and climate change crises can be meaningfully addressed by adopting a more plant-based diet. According to research from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, scientific adviser to the Meatless Monday campaign, livestock production is a major driver of climate change, contributing to nearly 15 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions. Based on predictions, if upward trends of meat and dairy consumption continue, global mean temperature rise will more than likely exceed 2 degrees Celsius, the level that scientists agree we must stay below to avoid the most catastrophic climate change scenarios. In addition to reducing climate impact, diets that favor plant-based instead of animal protein can lower the risk of chronic preventable diseases like cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity. Sid Lerner, founder of The Monday Campaigns and the Meatless Monday movement, said, Were thrilled that NYC schools will participate in Meatless Monday to introduce kids to delicious plant-based options that can create healthy eating habits for life. Congratulations to the mayor for his leadership in taking Meatless Monday into the future, for our health and the health of the planet. The Meatless Monday movement has been integrated into schools, restaurants, hospitals, college campuses, corporations, and communities. Free resources to start Meatless Monday are at www.meatlessmonday.com/­­start-a-campaign. Want to get involved? Contact us today! The post New York City Mayor Announces Meatless Monday School Program to Tackle Climate Change and Obesity appeared first on Meatless Monday.

A First Taste from Meatless Monday

June 26 2017 Meatless Monday 

A First Taste from Meatless MondayGet Ready for VegReady - Delicious New Plant-Based Meals Delivered to Your Door     Flavorful, Nutritious and Convenient Imagine being able to enjoy a delicious, ready-to-eat vegan meal whenever and wherever youd like. Thats the whole idea behind VegReady, a unique new food concept thats launching July 14 th on Kickstarter. VegReady is different for a number of reasons. First, the meals dont need refrigeration, defrosting or cooking. Theyre pasteurized and shelf-stable. So they can be eaten anytime and easily stored at room temperature. Next, theyll be sold online directly to you, rather than through retail stores. This is intended to develop a more personal relationship with each customer. Each meal will cost $7.50 and are ordered in quantities of 10 meals at a time. The meals arrive at your address in reusable pizza boxes. Initial VegReady Meals Sourced from Peru The first VegReady dishes will come from the mountains of Peru, where Quinoa is the traditional high protein dish. Quinoa was referred to as chisaya mama or mother grain by the ancient Incas. The meal will contain deliciously cooked Quinoa, sautéed greens and savory vegetables. Peru was selected because its the first country in the world to have a complete ban on GMOs. Following the initial launch, additional meals will be added with Middle Eastern, Southeast Asian, India and Pakistan cuisines. Meals Optimized for Your DNA VegReady plans to work with doctors to offer custom meals created to meet your specific health needs and taste preferences. Theyre also partnering with a DNA analysis firm called 23andme, so your meals can be matched to your individual DNA makeup. Better Health for You - and for the Planet At Meatless Monday, we always welcome new ideas that encourage more plant-based eating. Choosing not to eat meat just one day a week, like on a Monday, decreases your risk of cancer, obesity, diabetes and other preventable chronic diseases. Whats more, it reduces your carbon footprint and promotes more sustainable food practices. For you - and the planet - its a win-win. Click this LINK to get on their launch list and save 40% or more! The post A First Taste from Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Make Dad’s Day — Meatless Monday Style

June 12 2017 Meatless Monday 

Make Dad’s Day — Meatless Monday Style Fathers Day is next Sunday, less than a week away. For your family celebration, why not surprise Dad with some tasty meatless dishes that are sure to satisfy. After all, June is Mens Health Month. And by getting Dad to eat less meat - even skipping it just one day a week - he can significantly improve his health. Reducing meat consumption has been shown to help prevent heart disease, diabetes and cancer. And that works not just for Dad, but for your whole family. So enjoy a wonderful Fathers Day and help keep Dad healthy and happy. Here are a few recipes hes guaranteed to love more than a new tie or a pair of socks. And please send us your favorite Fathers Day meatless recipes. You never know, they may end up in our collection. Quinoa Chili Fries Pulled Jackfruit Sandwiches Slow Cooker Veggie Lasagna The post Make Dad’s Day — Meatless Monday Style appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse?

November 2 2020 Vegetarian Times 

Have you started swinging through the drive-thru more frequently since fast-food chains decided to hop on board with plant-based burger options? Sure, Burger Kings Impossible Whopper and Carls Jr.s meatless Beyond Meat burger may seem like enticing options after a long day -- heck, even Ikea is rumored to be working on a meatless version of its famous Swedish meatballs. And of course, its an encouraging sign that a plant-based lifestyle is becoming more mainstream, especially when its accepted in restaurants known for their beefy offerings. But could racking up too many fast-food visits mean youre sacrificing some of the positive health benefits associated with a plant-based diet for the sake of convenience? Meat alternatives are taking center stage because more and more people are recognizing that taking meat off our menus is an imperative if we are to preserve the planets life support systems for future generations, says Brenda Davis, R.D., a world-renowned expert in plant-based nutrition and coauthor of Nourish: The Definitive Plant-Based Nutrition Guide for Families. Aside from being better for the planet, her coauthor, Reshma Shah, M.D., a plant-based pediatrician, notes the many health attributes with this lifestyle. Plant-based diets have been associated with longevity, a decreased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, and a healthy gut, she explains. Studies suggest the people eating a plant-based diet have a lower risk of being overweight or obese. Additionally, plant-based diets have been shown to be an effective strategy for treating many of the chronic diseases that make up the leading causes of death in the United States and throughout the world. 5 Pros of Alternative Meats First, lets explore the benefits of adding alternative meats to your diet: - Easy protein source. Some people may benefit from these concentrated, and very bioavailable protein sources. For athletes who struggle meeting protein needs, these foods can rapidly boost protein intake, says Davis. Also, for seniors who have higher protein needs, and lower calorie intakes, it can be tough to meet recommended intakes. Meat alternatives can help boost protein intakes in a way that is simple and palatable for seniors. - A non-threatening way to transition to eating less meat. New to the world of plant-based eating? Or simply trying to replace a few meat-based dishes each week? Plant-based meat alternatives can offer convenience for busy families, provide an alternative in social situations, and make the transition to a plant-based diet more enjoyable and sustainable in the long run, says Dr. Shah. You may find that you rely on these foods more at the beginning of your plant-based journey. As many people become more comfortable cooking and enjoying a variety of whole, plant foods, they may end up eating these foods less often. - Cleaner fuel. Plant-based meats are lower in persistent organic pollutants that are most concentrated in products at the top of the food chain, such as meat, fish and dairy products, says Davis. Also, plant-based meats cannot form heterocyclic amines, which are carcinogenic compounds formed when meat, poultry or fish are cooked at high temperatures. - Lesser inflammatory response. Plant-based meats are much lower in endotoxins (also known as lipopolysaccharides) than ground meats, which Davis says are associated with chronic inflammation and several disease states. - Reduced risk of food poisoning. Plant-based meat alternatives don’t carry the risk of foodborne disease from bacterial contamination in the same way that animal-based foods do, says Dr. Shah. Related: Tofu: The Unsung Hero of Coronavirus-Related Meat Shortages 5 Cons of Alternative Meats There are some downsides to alternative meat consumption, too: - Processed food is still processed food. While it might be tempting to skip purchasing whole ingredients and making your meals from scratch, the tradeoffs may not be worth it. Most plant-based meat alternatives tend to be higher in calories, fat, sodium, and additives compared to whole plant foods -- like beans and rice, says Dr. Shah. While plant-based meat alternatives are higher in fiber -- animal foods contain no fiber-- and are devoid of cholesterol, they certainly would not be considered a health food when compared to a homemade burger made of black beans, quinoa, and veggies. - Budget-buster. Currently, meat alternatives are rather expensive, sometimes even more expensive than meat. As the demand increases, this may change. - Quality depends on the brand. Meat alternatives vary in their quality, but are generally fairly highly processed foods, says Davis. Some are made from extracted plant proteins, fats, seasonings and preservatives, while others are made from black beans and quinoa. Consumers who want minimally processed foods need to read the label. - Allergens abound. Are you sensitive to gluten, soy or nuts? Meat alternatives are often based on ingredients that are associated with common allergens, so be sure to read labels carefully to avoid a reaction. - Nutrient deficient options. Davis says that meat alternatives are not always fortified with vitamin B12 or zinc, both of which are relatively high in meat. Make sure youre getting enough of these nutrients via the rest of your diet or through supplements. Related: 8 Must-Try Alternative Milks How to Shop for Alternative Meats A simple ingredient list with recognizable foods is always a good place to start. Next, Dr. Shah says to consider the amount of fat (especially saturated fat), sodium, and other additives. One particular additive that has gained scrutiny is the addition of heme iron in certain plant-based meat alternatives, she says. Heme-iron is added to enhance the meaty flavor and appearance of these foods -- but its thought to be pro-inflammatory, cause increased body iron stores, and provide an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. How Often Should You Consumer Alternative Meats? As with most things in life, moderation is key. Eating plant-based meat alternatives from time to time can certainly be a part of a healthy diet, but relying on them on a regular basis -- especially if they are taking the place of whole, plant foods -- would not be considered health-promoting, concludes Dr. Shah. Its also important to note that the consumption frequency may depend on your overall state of health. What is safe and appropriate for one individual may be quite different for another, explains Davis. If you struggle with hypertension or cardiovascular disease, you will want to minimize intake of the high sodium, high-fat meat alternatives. The post Alternative Meats: A Convenience or a Curse? appeared first on Vegetarian Times.

Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19.

December 30 2019 Meatless Monday 

Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19.Youve probably heard of Meatless Monday. Maybe youve even considered giving it a try. Well, weve got your motivation right here -- the 19 reasons to go meatless on Monday in 2020. With the human population set to reach 10 billion by as early as 2050, the current approach to food production is no longer sustainable. Studies show that a reliance on animal products like dairy, beef, pork, and poultry is doing irreversible damage to the environment and is having a negative impact on personal health. Pretty heavy issues, but Meatless Monday can be part of a delicious solution to tackle these global problems. For 2020, we are encouraging everyone to ditch meat one day a week to help preserve the planet and live a healthier life. Improve Your Health Eating animal products has shown to increase instances of a myriad of metabolic and chronic health problems. Cut out meat one day a week to improve your wellbeing:   1. Reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. 2. Lessen the probability of developing type 2 diabetes. 3. Lower chances of having a stroke. 4. Preserve your kidneys. 5. Maintain a healthy weight. Save the Environment  Theres an inextricable link between livestock production and environmental degradation. For a number of reasons (many of which are listed below), a reduction in the consumption of animal products can help stall the destruction of our oceans, forests, and atmosphere. Enjoying plant-based meals instead of meat on Mondays can be help address climate issues including: 6. Forests are cleared for livestock production. 7. Animal feed production requires intensive use of water, fertilizer, pesticides, and fossil fuels. 8. Animal waste is a leading factor in the pollution of land and water resources. 9. Beef, pork, and poultry emit large amounts of carbon dioxide, methane, and other harmful greenhouse gases. 10. Livestock production uses 75% of the earths agricultural land. 11. Industrial livestock production displaces small, rural producers. 12. A quarter-pound of beef requires 425 gallons of water to produce (enough to fill 6,800 glasses of fresh drinking water). 13. Livestock manure can contain a variety of pathogens such as coli, growth hormones, and antibiotics. 14. Livestock waste streams contaminate drinking water and groundwater. Plant-based Goodness   Feel good about the food youre eating while saving money and exploring new ingredients. Thanks to the boom of flexitarian and plant-based eating, its never been easier, more convenient or delicious to go Meatless Monday. 15. Abundance of delicious plant-based meats to satisfy any of your cravings. There are so many high-protein meatless products now available at grocery stores, restaurants and fast food chains - making it easier than ever to enjoy your favorite foods - entirely plant-based. 16. Make Meatless Monday a reason to get the team together. Round up your friends and family to enjoy plant-based meals with on Mondays. 17. Almost all of your favorite restaurants offer a hearty plant-based option. So you can still frequent your favorite local, just explore new parts of the menu on Mondays. 18. Provides an opportunity to explore new ingredients. There are so many fruits, vegetables and grains to choose from, every Meatless Monday meal can be a new culinary adventure. 19. Youll likely save money on your grocery bill!   Interested in learning more about why you should give Meatless Monday a try? Weve got all the information (and plant-based recipes) that youll need to get started. The post Still Looking For a Reason to Go Meatless on Monday? Here are 19. appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Rosemary Roasted Carrots

November 4 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Recipes by me, photos by Rikki Snyder. Even though I have a food blog, I have to confess that I get overwhelmed when cooking a few things at once. Does that happen to you too, or am I just especially weak and easily confused? It seems like the more I have going on in the kitchen, the more likely things are to end up charred and inedible. So when developing recipes for a vegetarian Thanksgiving, I wanted a good mix of dishes that were a little more involved and dishes that required very little time, effort, or thought. These Rosemary Roasted Carrots are one of the latter. I also decided to add some simple roasted vegetable recipes to our Thanksgiving line-up because I wanted to have some lighter, healthier options in the midst of the stuffing and dessert and mashed potatoes. And that brings me to the other topic of this post: World Diabetes Day. When Carolyn from All Day I Dream About Food asked me to be involved in her World Diabetes Day event, I didn’t hesitate to say yes. But then I had a moment of doubt--do I even know how to make a recipe that’s diabetic-friendly? Carolyn […]

It’s National Kidney Month, Show Your Kidneys Some Love

March 10 2019 Meatless Monday 

It’s National Kidney Month, Show Your Kidneys Some LoveMarch is National Kidney Month and weve partnered with the National Kidney Foundation to urge all Americans to give their kidneys a second thought and a well-deserved checkup. World Kidney Day is on March 14 and the perfect time to give your hardworking kidneys some love. According to the National Kidney Foundation, in the United States, about 30 million adults have chronic kidney disease - and most arent aware of it. 1 in 3 American adults are at risk for chronic kidney disease. Risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and family history. Studies suggest that incorporating meatless options into an overall balanced diet can help promote kidney health. Meatless Monday provides an easy way to make this first step towards a healthier lifestyle by cutting out meat just one day a week, and diversifying diets through meatless choices. Spread the kidney health love and share these social graphics with your friends and family to encourage them to try #MeatlessMonday and get a kidney check-up. National Kidney Foundation (NKF) and National Kidney Month Activities: Free Health Checks: The NKF offers free health checks to those most at risk for kidney disease - anyone with diabetes, high blood pressure or a family history of kidney failure. Locations and information can be found on the calendar on their website .  Are You at Risk Kidney Quiz: Early detection can make a difference in preventing kidney disease so its important to know if youre at risk. Take the online kidney quiz ! Join the Conversation: Post photos or Meatless Monday kidney health infographics on social media platforms using #HeartYourKidneys or #NationalKidneyMonth to help raise awareness.   Invite your friends and family to celebrate National Kidney Month with a delicious Meatless Monday meal. Check out our recipe gallery for inspiration - breakfast, lunch, dinner and snack options available.   Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram!   The post It’s National Kidney Month, Show Your Kidneys Some Love appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Quinoa, Mango, Jicama Salad

January 20 2019 Meatless Monday 

This recipe comes to us from Chef Ronaldo Linares and is featured in his cookbook Chef Ronaldo’s Sabores de Cuba: Diabetes-Friendly Traditional and Nueva Cubano Cuisine . Chef Ronaldo says this about the recipe: “You get a great balance of protein, fat, and carbs in this tasty recipe. Being a mango lover this recipe allows me to enjoy it in a different way. The crunch of the jicama, the nutty flavor from the quinoa, and the fresh herbs add the perfect touch. This is also a great meal prep salad, bring to work in a mason jar, put the dressing in a separate container, and when ready mix everything up. For me it;s about keeping it simple and maximizing the flavors.” Serves 6 - For the quinoa - 1 cup quinoa - 1 1/­­2 cups water - 1/­­4 teaspoon avocado oil - 1/­­4 teaspoon kosher salt   - For the salad - 1 cup jicama, peeled and cut into 1/­­4- - inch cubes - 1/­­4 cup thinly sliced red onion - 3 ounces mango, peeled and cubed - 3 radishes, cut into thin rounds - 1 tablespoon finely chopped cilantro - 1/­­4 teaspoon cracked black pepper - 1 tablespoon lime juice - 1/­­4 teaspoon chili powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon avocado oil   Rinse quinoa with cold water in a colander. Add quinoa, water, oil, and salt to a rice cooker and cook. This should take about 20 minutes. Once the quinoa is done, fluff it with a fork and spread it onto a baking sheet to cool. Set aside. Once quinoa has cooled, transfer it to a large bowl. Add jicama, onion, mango,radishes, cilantro, and pepper. Toss gently to incorporate. Set aside. In a small bowl, add lime juice, chili powder, and avocado oil, and whisk together for about 30 seconds to create a light flavorful dressing. Add dressing to the bowl with all the ingredients and mix together gently so the dressing is fully incorporated with the salad ingredients. The post Quinoa, Mango, Jicama Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Healthier You Series: Go Meatless Monday for Kidney Health

January 14 2019 Meatless Monday 

Healthier You Series: Go Meatless Monday for Kidney HealthStart smart eating habits on Mondays for a happier and healthier you! We hear a lot about how not eating meat just one day a week is good for the planet, but what about how good it is for our health? It turns out, Meatless Monday is also an easy way to take steps towards a healthier lifestyle and better health. Cutting out meat just one day a week and choosing plant-based foods instead can help promote kidney health . In fact, eating less red and processed meat and more plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes, can help lead to: o Better kidney health o Better management of kidney disease o Lower blood pressure and cholesterol o Lower risk of diabetes o Healthy weight management Your hard-working and multi-tasking kidneys work round the clock to remove wastes from your body, balance your bodys fluids and minerals, make hormones that control blood pressure and form red blood cells, and much more. You cant live without your kidneys! Were very pleased to say that Meatless Monday has partnered with the National Kidney Foundation  to encourage people to make healthier changes to their diets in support of kidney health. Gail Torres, RN, MS, RD, Senior Clinical Communications Director at the National Kidney Foundation explains, “Studies show that eating less meat may play a key role in keeping your kidneys healthy and in improving your health overall. This doesnt mean you need to cut meat out completely from your diet, but rather, to replace some meat with plant-based foods, such as soy and nuts. She continues, This change in diet helps your body make less acid, which puts less stress on your kidneys. It also lowers your intake of saturated fat, which can harm blood vessels and lead to heart and kidney disease. Less meat in the diet is also linked to preventing and controlling diabetes and high blood pressure, the two main causes of kidney disease.” 1 in 3 American adults is at risk for kidney disease. According to the National Kidney Foundation , in the United States, about 30 million adults have chronic kidney disease - and most arent aware of it. Risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and family history. But heres the good news! You can kickstart your Mondays by swapping out meat for plant-based foods to help promote kidney health. See this weeks Meatless Monday recipe for Corn-Stuffed Zucchini, courtesy of National Kidney Foundation. Use Mondays to make positive change in your life that will do you a world of good. Meatless Monday is a global movement followed by millions who choose not to eat meat one day a week for their health and the health of the planet. To spread the word about Meatless Monday and kidney health, download our fun and shareable free graphics, here. Find us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Healthier You Series: Go Meatless Monday for Kidney Health appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Exciting New Partnership! Meatless Monday and the National Kidney Foundation

October 15 2018 Meatless Monday 

Exciting New Partnership! Meatless Monday and the National Kidney FoundationWere thrilled to announce Meatless Mondays new partnership with The National Kidney Foundation , the largest organization dedicated to the awareness, prevention, and treatment of kidney disease. The National Kidney Foundation and Meatless Monday are partnering to encourage people to make healthier changes to their diets. Studies suggest that incorporating meatless options into an overall balanced diet can help promote kidney health. Meatless Monday provides an easy way to make this first step towards a healthier lifestyle by cutting out meat just one day a week, and diversifying diets through meatless choices. Through the partnership, Meatless Monday hopes to support individuals who are at-risk or who are experiencing kidney disease in making an important dietary change. Meatless Monday also strives to help all people learn about the many benefits of reducing meat consumption. Reducing consumption of red and processed meat and eating more plant-based foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes, can help lead to: o Better kidney health o Better management of kidney disease o Lower blood pressure and cholesterol o Lower risk of diabetes o Healthy weight management Kidney disease is more common than you might think! According to the National Kidney Foundation , in the United States, about 30 million adults have chronic kidney disease - and most arent aware of it.  1 in 3 American adults are at risk for chronic kidney disease. Risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, and family history. See Meatless Mondays kidney-friendly graphics and materials Theyre free for use by all – individuals, organizations, hospitals, city leaders, universities, and more,for use across social media, online, and print. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram for Meatless Monday recipes and news each week. The post Exciting New Partnership! Meatless Monday and the National Kidney Foundation appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meatless Monday Attends the Food as Medicine Summit in NYC

December 11 2017 Meatless Monday 

Meatless Monday Attends the Food as Medicine Summit in NYCOn Thursday, November 30, Meatless Monday participated in the Food as Medicine Summit held at the Hunter College New York City Food Policy Center. The summit featured expert speakers who discussed how problematic food habits have caused the number and prevalence of chronic diseases to rise. Therefore, food must also be the solution, according to the summits mission. Meatless Monday founder Sid Lerner (second from left) with (from left) Stephen Ritz, Dr. Robert Graham, and Michel Nischan. Photo by Charles Platkin. The summit kicked off with a welcome from Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, who has been outspoken in his support for Meatless Monday and healthy eating habits in NYC schools. The former police officer was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2016 but was able to put the disease into remission by switching to a healthier lifestyle that included more plant-based foods. He has been a strong proponent of bringing Meatless Monday to several schools in Brooklyn. The opening keynote address was delivered by Dr. Robert Graham, a co-founder of FRESH Med NYC who promotes the idea of food as medicine, saying there should not be just a pill for every ill. Graham discussed how the top 10 causes of death are related to food and diet. His mission stands by food as a remedy and uses dietary changes as the first approach in managing illness at FRESH Med NYC. Other speakers included Michel Nischan, chef and CEO of Wholesome Wave, and Stephen Ritz, CEO of Green Bronx Machine. Their panel discussed the impact of healthy food on children and its availability in schools. Nischans son was diagnosed with diabetes at age five; Ritz pointed out the difficulty in getting good produce in his South Bronx neighborhood. An emphasis was placed on not only getting kids interested in healthy eating at a young age but also making it fun for them to learn about it. Meatless Monday President Peggy Neu spoke to the significance of meeting education with action and putting good ideas into practice. The healthcare industry is the front line in the battle to better inform and direct people towards more healthy lifestyles and diets. Rather than using band-aid remedies for chronic illnesses, Neu said, these diseases can and should be prevented with better eating habits. Neus takeaway on the discussion of food as medicine: we need new heroes and better food choices need to be made culturally relevant. The bottom line of the Food as Medicine Summit was keeping people interested, keeping food exciting, and - most importantly - keeping people educated. The post Meatless Monday Attends the Food as Medicine Summit in NYC appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Sechelt Brings More Meatless Monday to the Sunshine Coast!

July 17 2017 Meatless Monday 

Sechelt Brings More Meatless Monday to the Sunshine Coast!   We are excited to announce that one more community has joined the Meatless Monday bandwagon! Last month, the District of Sechelt issued a proclamation to announce its commitment to the Meatless Monday campaign in recognition of the positive impact on the environment and our health. With the help of Sunshine Coasters for Meatless Mondays, a local volunteer group, Sechelt will now offer up their vegetarian best! With Mayor Bruce Milnes announcement, Sechelt joins Vancouver, North Vancouver, Port Moody and New Westminster in the growing Canadian Meatless Monday community. Citing the three most important reasons to go meatless - improved health, environmental concerns, and the humane treatment of animals - the proclamation is a call to action for local offices, restaurants, and schools to offer meatless meals on Mondays. It states: [R]educing our consumption of animal products and increasing our intake of fruits, vegetables, and legumes have been linked to a host of health benefits and may reduce the risk of chronic preventable conditions like cardiovascular disease, diabetes and some cancers. Sunshine Coasters for Meatless Mondays were instrumental in getting Sechelt to adopt the campaign. On their Facebook page, they celebrated the first Monday by listing restaurants participating in Meatless Monday, offering 25 percent discounts on vegetarian and vegan specials. In additional to inviting restaurants, delis, and other local businesses to participate, offices and schools have also been challenged to join the campaign. In order to help Sun Coast citizens go meatless at home, Sunshine Coasters posts recipes and updates on their Facebook page to keep the momentum going. Welcome to Meatless Monday, Sechelt! We cant wait for vegetarian poutine! The post Sechelt Brings More Meatless Monday to the Sunshine Coast! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Get Fired Up! 10 Sizzling Meatless Burger Recipes from Meatless Monday

June 19 2017 Meatless Monday 

Get Fired Up! 10 Sizzling Meatless Burger Recipes from Meatless Monday Summer is just around the corner, so break out the grill and round up your friends for a great cook-out get-together. But dont bother with the beef, weve got you covered. Weve put together the most amazing collection of burger recipes youve ever tasted. Best of all, none of them use meat.   Top 10 Meatless Burger Recipes - Free Download your free copy of the Monday Burger Cookbook now. Inside youll find 10 scrumptious ways to make burgers using healthy, plant-based ingredients. Enjoy the rich, satisfying flavor of our Sweet Potato Black Bean Burger. Or settle back with our yummy Mini Portobello Mushroom Burger Sliders. And for those who crave the zesty taste from South of the border, check out our Mexican Lentil Burger. All in all, there are 10 mouth-watering meatless burger recipes for you to explore. So get your buns in gear!   The Monday Burger - Skip the Meat, One Day a Week Americans consume nearly 50 billion burgers per year, thats three burgers per person each week. By choosing not to eat meat just one day a week, you can improve your health by reducing your risk of heart disease, diabetes, obesity and even cancer. In addition, youll help preserve our planets resources. To get a better idea of the environmental implications, read this article from Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future.   Fresh Fruits and Veggies, Hot Off the Grill As long as youve got the grill out, dont forget all the other fresh seasonal produce thats perfect for outdoor cooking. In fact, weve got a special article on this very subject coming up soon. So look for it and let us know which meatless burger recipe in our Monday Burger Cookbook you like best on Facebook. Well announce the recipe that gets the most votes! The post Get Fired Up! 10 Sizzling Meatless Burger Recipes from Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Step Up for Men’s Health Month this Meatless Monday

June 5 2017 Meatless Monday 

Step Up for Men’s Health Month this Meatless MondayWelcome to June: longer days, fresh garden veggies and Mens Health Month. If youre a man, this month is your yearly reminder to make sure youre healthy and fit. And if youre someone who cares about men, then this is your month to apply some friendly persuasion to make sure the guys in your life schedule a doctors appointment pronto - and maybe suggest a few changes to their eating habits. Lets dig in! Foods that Help Keep Men Healthy Show most men a juicy, fresh-grilled steak and watch their eyes light up. In fact, show some men a fast food drive-thru window and their mouths start watering. And its alright to treat yourself every now and again, but be warned. Overconsumption of meat (red and processed) as well as other unhealthy choices (fried foods, dairy and excessive alcohol drinking), can lead to serious health issues. These include heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer. Now its no secret that fresh veggies, fruits, whole grains and nuts are a healthier way to go.  And you can always start with a few simple changes. For instance, begin with the classic fare thats always tasty and satisfying, but switch out the meat ingredient - like a hearty bean burrito or a rich meatless chili. Next, fire up that grill and serve some sizzling portabella mushrooms, roasted bell peppers and hot, juicy corn on the cob. And dont forget some zesty side dishes. How about a flavorful three bean salad drizzled with a tangy-sweet vinegar olive oil dressing? Before you know it, men will be eating healthier - and not missing the meat!   Wear Blue, Support Mens Health Mark your calendar. June 16th, the Friday before Fathers Day, is Wear BLUE Day. Break out your favorite blue jeans, blue shirt or stylish blue attire to show your support. Urge the men in your life to make healthy choices in diet, weight and exercise. And be sure they get checked out by a doctor for a clean bill of health. Lets make it a guys thing. And since were using blue to support Mens Health, heres one of our favorite blueberry recipes. Blueberry Oatmeal Muffins   The post Step Up for Men’s Health Month this Meatless Monday appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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