desiccated coconut - vegetarian recipes

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desiccated coconut vegetarian recipes

Black Bean Brownie Bites

December 8 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Black Bean Brownie Bites The moment I placed these brownies in the oven, I started whining like a disgruntled teenager because Luise had persuaded me to only sweeten them with dates and mix a whole can of black beans into the batter. “They are going to taste like sh*t” might have been the carefully formulated phrase I used. Baking brownies was my idea to start with and I usually don’t complain about healthy desserts, but I was tired that day and my mind was set on the caramel-tasting brownies from the bakery across the street. More than the flavor, it was their texture I wanted to recreate. The crusty top and caramel fudge center that you only can achieve with sugar, butter and flour. I knew these would be far from that. And in my mind that was all Luise’s fault. The whining escalated into a discussion (aka argument) and by the time the timer on my phone rang, things were, well, kind of tense between us. I cut off a corner piece of the baked brownie and quickly realized that they weren’t as awful as I had expected. Of course when Luise asked me, I did what any 36-year old teenager would do and grunted: “They were okay I guess”. In reality, they were actually pretty good. They didn’t have that crusty texture or typical sugar taste but they were still sweet, gooey but not heavy, chocolatey, energy packed and rich. I added frosting to make them a little more sassy - using dates as sweetener and avocado and coconut oil for an ultra lush and creamy consistency. They turned out really beautiful and jam-packed with good stuff. Rather than a dessert, I’d say that this is more like an energy bar-style brownie, and I found myself sneaking back to the fridge several times that day for another bite. We’re sharing the recipe and some notes below. But first, check out this little video from our youtube channel where we demonstrate how to make them. Since that first batch of brownies, there have been at least six more batches. A few vegan attempts and various flavor and texture variations. I have gathered a few notes that might come useful in case you want to give them a try. - We use very soft fresh dates that we buy in card board boxes and they are pretty affordable compared to loose weight or medjool dates. Sizes differ so use a scale if you want to be exact. - If you can’t find fresh dates you can use dried dates that you soak in water for a couple of hours. Drain the water before mixing. However, I wouldn’t use dried dates for the frosting as they need the dates to be super soft to achieve a smooth consistency. Try maple syrup instead. - If you arent used to sugar free desserts, you can add a couple of tablespoons maple syrup, honey or sugar to the batter. We have tried this recipe both with and without additional sweetening and they taste good both ways. It all depends on what you are used to and your expectations are. - We use a quite mild olive oil and it works really well with the chocolate flavor (not strong at all). However, if you don’t like olive oil, you can use, coconut oil, rapeseed oil or butter instead. - We have also tried a vegan, egg-free version using aquafaba (chickpea water) that we are sharing at the bottom of the recipe. We also tried making aquafaba using black bean water (because it’s a rest product of the beans in the recipe). It didn’t firm up as much when whisked but it did work as a binder. However, it looked kinda gross and added more bean flavor so we decided to stick with chickpea water instead. - We add coffee to the frosting to disguise the avocado flavor. If you dont like coffee, you can use almond butter or peanut butter instead to give it a flavor twist. - Sea salt flakes are great on top and we love the salt + chocolate combo, but desiccated coconut would also look good. - If you are allergic to nuts, you can mix toasted sunflower seeds into a flour and use instead of almond flour. And use pumpkin seeds instead of walnuts. Black Bean Brownie Bites with Chocolate Avocado Frosting Makes 24 bites These taste sweet but not overly so, see notes above if you prefer to make them sweeter. Vegan version below. 20 soft dates (approx 230 g /­­ 8 oz) 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 185 g cooked black beans (rinsed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml olive oil or other neutral oil 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml plant milk or regular milk 3 eggs 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g oat flour (or same amount rolled oats, mixed into a flour) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g almond flour 6 tbsp cacao powder 1 tsp baking powder 1 pinch salt 1 handful crushed walnuts (optional) Chocolate Avocado Frosting 6-8 soft dates 3 tbsp coconut oil 2-3 tbsp strong coffee 3 tbsp cacao powder 1 avocado Sprinkle with Sea salt Preheat the oven to 180°C /­­ 350°F. Pit the dates and add them to a food processor along with the rinsed black beans. Mix on high speed. Add oil, milk and eggs (leave out if you are vegan) and mix until smooth. Add almond flour and oat flour (you can make oat flour from rolled oats by simply blending them in a food processor or grinding them in a mortle and pester), cacao powder, baking powder and salt and pulse until everything is mixed. Stir in walnuts (and whipped aquafaba if you are making the vegan version). Place a baking paper in a 28 x 20 cm /­­ 11 x 8 inch rectangular baking dish and bake for 30 minutes. Remove the brownies from the oven once they are firm to touch and leave until completely cool. Make the frosting by mixing all the ingredients in a food processor until completely smooth. Taste and adjust the flavors, adding more dates (or maple syrup if you want it sweeter) and more cacao powder if you want it richer. Spread the frosting over the brownies, sprinkle with sea salt flakes and cut into bite-size pieces. Store in the fridge. To make them vegan: Use 3 tbsp more oat flour. Leave out the eggs and whisk 1/­­3 cup aquafaba (chickpea water) into soft peaks that you stir into the mixed batter together with the walnuts. The vegan version needs approx 45-50 minutes in the oven and will come out slightly stickier but firms up once it cools.

Peach and Zucchini Smoothie

July 30 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Zucchini Smoothie I love those stands at the farmer’s market, where the fruit is a little too ripe and bruised, and therefore discounted. I can never pass one by and end up stocking up on the rejected fruit to freeze for smoothies. Since there’s an amazing abundance of peaches around right now, I’ve managed to collect quite a bit of them, sliced and bagged, in my freezer. They are great for making the most refreshing smoothies, but can also be easily defrosted for a crumble. In any case, it’s always a great idea to buy and freeze some overripe peaches :) Like seemingly everyone else in the (smoothie) world, I’ve been changing up my smoothie routine by using various frozen vegetables in place of banana, for a lower sugar start to the day. So far, I’ve had success with a mix of steamed and frozen cauliflower and sweet potato, as well as raw, frozen zucchini. Zucchini is especially lovely in combination with peaches, and I’ve been really liking the very minimal smoothie that we’re sharing here today. It’s nothing more than frozen zucchini, peaches, basil and a splash of vanilla, whirled with your liquid of choice. It’s barely sweet and very refreshing, but if you prefer your smoothies on the sweeter side, you can add any sweetener you like, or even a banana. Lots of great weekend links below. Enjoy your Sunday :) Kitty – Chloe Sevigny’s directorial debut is magical Bonsergent Studio – the most beautiful vintage online store based in Paris Alison Scrapulla – in love with this photographer’s work (the double exposures!) Shiso Delicious – a plant-based bento master, her Stories are also great Recipes at The Fullest – so many good ones + beautiful photos Clarisse Demory in Another Mag – we love her work, really excited to see this more in-depth profile about her approach Hormone-Balancing Helva Bars – into these A Simple Table – why don’t I have this cookbook yet? Vegan Ice Cream Enters A Golden Age – always great to hear, and if you want to try making vegan ice cream at home, we have a bunch of recipes here Peach and Zucchini Smoothie   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 2 ripe, sweet peaches, plus more for garnish 1 medium zucchini handful of basil leaves splash of vanilla extract 1½-2 cups coconut water, water, almond milk or other liquid of choice bee pollen - for garnish (optional, not vegan) desiccated coconut - for garnish (optional) Instructions Slice the peaches and zucchini, and place them on a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Place in the freezer for about 2 hours or overnight, until frozen, then transfer to freezer bags to store. Combine the frozen peaches and zucchini with the basil, vanilla and liquid in an upright blender and blend until smooth. Serve, garnished with fresh peach slices, bee pollen and desiccated coconut, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Avocado Kiwi Smoothie and a Jus by Julie Cleanse Giveaway Almond Milk and Almond Pulp Cookies Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles - Ice Cream Sunday .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach and Zucchini Smoothie appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

3 Favorite Quick Treats

February 21 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

3 Favorite Quick Treats Our daughter’s school teacher sent along a pale blue little text book for her to draw and write in during our recent trip to Cape Town. Considering that Elsa’s previous writing experiences mostly consisted of scribbling random letters from the alphabet and signing her drawings (often reversed), we honestly didn’t expect this journal to be anything more than a sketch book. But to our surprise, she filled the pages with both drawings and sentences about her days. She is no Donna Tartt just yet. Her letters look a little wonky, she spells words exactly as they sound and writes without space between (so it all looks like a long hashtag): weesaasharkindeseetodey. But regardless of how much or little that happened each day, she found something to write about, she tried her best to get the spelling right and she filled that book with memories. The connection I am trying to make here is that this blog is Luise’s and my journal. And we have been bad at filling it lately - with memories and recipes. Ever since the children outnumbered us, it has been difficult to write. Not only due to lack of time and sleep, but we’ve also been looking for meaning, relevance and motivation. We have been doing this for more than seven years now and I have personally come to a point where I want everything to be so damn perfect every time that I often get stuck in this circle of “this is not good enough”. But seeing Elsa’s journal made me realise that we don’t always need the grandest of recipes or ideas. Sometimes a simple 5-minute snack or treat can be good enough. Okay, I don’t really think one snack is good enough. So we are actually sharing three today! These recipes are all great options when you need a late afternoon pick-me-up, a post workout treat or simple Tuesday dessert. Although different in their execution, they can all be made in a breeze and all of them also happen to include tahini. If you haven’t tried tahini with sweet flavours before, consider this your lucky day. It’s the bombest flavour combo! First up, easy but epic stuffed dates. I shared these stuffed dates on instagram a few weeks ago, calling them ugly delicious. Although a lot of people seemed to think that they weren’t ugly, I still argue that this isn’t a very glamorous dish. Frozen raspberries, grated ginger and tahini, mashed into soft dates is preferably something that is enjoyed under dim light in front of a tv series. Unhulled tahini is excellent for this dish because of it’s richer tones. And if you’ve got a dark chocolate bar (70-80%) lying around, you can break it up and cram small pieces of chocolate into the date along with the other ingredients. It’s probably the quickest and easiest sweet firework your mouth will ever experience. Tahini & Raspberry Stuffed Dates Makes 10 10 soft dates 1 tsp fresh ginger 3 tbsp tahini (preferably unhulled), almond butter or nut butter of choice 20 fresh or frozen raspberries a handful desiccated coconut dark chocolate (optional) Open up all the dates, discard the stones and place the dates on a plate. Grate the ginger over the dates and then fill them with approx 1/­­2-1 tsp tahini per date and two slightly mashed raspberries (and a small piece of chocolate, if using). Top with a scattering of desiccated coconut. Indulge. We obviously think smoothies are the ultimate quick treat, having written a whole book about them. They are easy to make, easy to improvise and easy to like. This recipe is not from the book but it combines many of our favorite smoothie ingredients mentioned in the book into one master smoothie which we often make in family size and portion out in mini bottles. Berries are always great in smoothies being low on sugar and high on freshness. Avocado and banana makes it exceptionally creamy. Dates add a caramel tone and cardamom, ginger and tahini blasts the flavours. Depending on the tartness of your berries, a squeeze of lime or lemon can also be good in this. Berry & Tahini Smoothie 2 large glasses 1 banana 1/­­2 avocado 2-3 soft dates 1 tsp freshly ground cardamom 1 tsp fresh ginger 1 tbsp tahini 1 cup /­­ 150 g frozen raspberries and blackberries 1 cup oat milk or other plant milk Add all ingredients to a blender and mix on high speed until smooth. Taste and adjust the flavour, add more ginger, tahini or cardamom if needed. Add more milk if it feels too thick. Pour into two large glasses or bottles and enjoy right away or store in the fridge with a lid on. On a recent car ride from Copenhagen to Stockholm, Luise picked up a snack pack of cottage cheese with topping. It is not something we often buy but it tasted pretty good and we started talking about making our own version of it, adding lots of crunch and more freshness along with the sweetness. We have combined cottage cheese with yogurt here to make it more creamy, fluffy, tangy and rich in protein  and this has become one of our favorite post workout meals lately. We serve it with chopped apples, an easy crunchy topping of toasted buckwheat groats and nuts and top it all with a delicious syrup made of honey, fresh ginger, cardamom and tahini. The syrup should taste quite strong of ginger to contrast the cheese and it’s really what makes this dish special, but if you are not a fan of ginger, use the lesser amount. If you’ve got a jar of our Ginger & Turmeric Honey Bomb at home, that can be used instead.   Cottage Cheese with Apple, Ginger Honey and Crunch Serves 2 (hungry people) or 4 (as a snack) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 50 g buckwheat groats 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35 g hazelnuts, roughly chopped 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1 cup /­­ 250 g cottage cheese 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml plain thick yogurt (turkish or greek style yogurt) 1 large apple 1 1/­­2-2 tbsp honey 1 tbsp tahini 1/­­2-1 tsp freshly grated ginger 1/­­2 tsp ground cardamom Dry toast buckwheat groats, hazelnuts and salt in a skillet or sauce pan on medium heat for approx 10 minutes, stir every now and then. While its toasting, divide the cottage cheese on two plates or four bowls. Discard the core from the apple and chop it in roughly 1/­­2 inch /­­ 1 cm pieces. Scatter the apple pieces over the cottage cheese. When the buckwheat and nuts smell fragrant and look golden, turn off the heat and scatter it over the cottage cheese and apple. Without rinsing the skillet/­­saucepan, use the after-heat in the pan to stir together tahini, honey, ginger and cardamom - it only need a little heat to combine easily. Drizzle generously over the two plates and finish with a sprinkle of cinnamon. Dive in!

Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp

February 10 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp Last week, I talked a little bit about my love for homemade nut milk, how it always tastes better than the store-bought kind, and how the amount of control I have over the process and ingredients makes it all worth the tiny bit of fuss. I’ve noticed that whenever I discuss making nut milk with anyone, the question of utilizing the leftover nut pulp is bound to come up. No one wants to throw it away, but not many people know what to do with it, either. I was in the same boat for years – sometimes, I would freeze the pulp for later use in place of almond flour in baked goods, which didn’t always work out because the pulp is not quite as dry as almond flour. Other times, I tried incorporating it into granola, but If I’m being honest, I often ended up throwing it away, not without some serious guilt. About a month ago, I opened up the question on instagram and got so many fascinating suggestions that went way beyond baking/­­granola: a base for stuffing, a thickener for smoothies, chicken feed, face scrub (!), and energy balls. I found the idea of pulp-based energy balls to be really compelling and set out to make both a sweet and a savory version. I’m really excited to share the results! Both of these recipes are ‘kitchen sink’-style and can easily act as a pantry cleanout aid. The sweet bites are full of toasty notes from the nuts, seeds and coconut, chocolatey and energizing with the addition of cacao, and sweetened with dates. The savory ones remind be a bit of the raw falafel I used to make back in the day. There’s miso, tahini, and tamari, as well as invigorating spices, herbs and even seaweed. Both make for an amazing pick-me-up snack, easy to transport and a breeze to prepare. And I definitely won’t be throwing away any more nut pulp. Savory Energy Bites   Print Serves: about 30 balls Ingredients 1 cup nut pulp, left over from making plain nut milk ¼ cup toasted unhulled sesame seeds, plus more for coating 2 tablespoons ground flax seeds 2 tablespoons sesame tahini 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon miso paste 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil ½ tablespoon tamari 1 teaspoon smoked paprika, plus more for coating 1 teaspoon turmeric, plus more for coating optional add ins 1 tablespoon dulse seaweed 3 scallions - thinly sliced 1 garlic clove - minced 1 tablespoon chopped dill Instructions Mix all the the ingredients in a food processor or in a bowl by hand, until well combined. Roll into balls about 1-inch in diameter. Coat with sesame seeds, turmeric and/­­or smoked paprika, if desired. Keep refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   Sweet Energy Bites   Print Serves: about 30 balls Ingredients 1 cup mix of various toasted nuts and seeds, such as hazelnuts, walnuts, pumpkin, sunflower or sesame seeds, plus more for coating 2 large, soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes 1 cup nut pulp, left over from making nut milk 4 tablespoons raw cacao powder 3 tablespoons honey or maple syrup, or to taste 2 tablespoons almond butter 2 tablespoons tahini 2 tablespoons chia seeds 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil optional add ins 1 tablespoon hemp hearts handful toasted coconut flakes or desiccated coconut 2-3 tablespoons cacao nibs ½ tablespoon mesquite powder ½ tablespoon moringa powder 1 teaspoon maca powder 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground ginger matcha powder - for coating raisins - for decorating Instructions Place toasted nuts/­­seeds into the bowl of a food processor and grind into a meal. Drain dates and add them to the food processor with the rest of the ingredients. Process until thoroughly combined. Roll into balls about 1-inch in diameter. Coat in seeds and matcha, if using, and decorate with various nuts and raisins, if using. Keep refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a week. 3.5.3226   Have you heard of Daily Harvest? They deliver healthy, ready-to-blend smoothies and ready-to-heat soups to your door, which casually include all kinds of superfoods like açaí, cacao, camu camu, adaptogenic mushrooms, astralagus, and ginseng, in addition to freshly frozen fruits and veggies. I love making my own soups and smoothies, but I’m not going to lie, having a wholesome and delicious option in the freezer is really nice on busy days, especially when I know that I can stand behind all the ingredients. If you happen to be in need of a healthful shortcut, use the discount code above to get 3 free smoothies or soups :) You might also like... 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Chocolate Beet Layer Cake with Pink Frosting and Chocolate Ganache .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices

January 5 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices This post was created in partnership with Amira. This month we are focusing on recipes that will hopefully be helpful to those wanting to hit the reset button after all the holiday eating and drinking. I wanted a very manageable weekday dinner to be the first in the series, because we haven’t had one up in a while, and because I myself have been on the hunt for some new but trustworthy, quick and wholesome meal ideas. Most of my focus right now is on completing the kitchen renovation, a good part of which my husband and I have been doing ourselves. It’s been dragging on much longer than we expected – a common theme when it comes renovations, as I hear. We are finally down to the small finishing touches, but they somehow seem to be the hardest to complete. Cooking up large batches of un-elaborate, nourishing dishes like this stew to have on hand during the week has been one of my strategies for staying sane throughout this whole process. It’s amazing how helpful a home-cooked meal can be during times of stress. When looking for inspiration for balanced winter weeknight meals, I often turn to South Indian cuisine for its array of delicious vegetarian dishes and Ayurveda-approved ingredients. This particular stew is based on a recipe for sambar – a mung dal (yellow split mung beans that are protein-rich and affordable) stew that comes in hundreds of variations. The base for sambar is most commonly made up of mung dal that’s been cooked down to a porridge-like consistency and spiced, after which almost anything goes. You can include one or many stew-friendly vegetables in season, as well as other fun add ins like desiccated coconut. I love the versatility of this dish and usually just add in whatever vegetables or greens I have on hand. For this version, I kept things simple and only added chopped butternut squash and dried coconut – it can be as simple or as involved as you’d like. The ingredient list might seem long, but it’s mostly composed of spices, which play a huge role in building flavor in this otherwise modest stew. Each spice also brings its unique healing properties to the table – fennel helps aid digestion, turmeric is anti-inflammatory, fenugreek helps with blood sugar balance and much, much more. Like many Indian dishes, sambar is traditionally served over rice, and I’ve been truly enjoying serving it over Amira’s fragrant Thai Jasmine Brown Rice. Amira sent me a few of their premium long grain rice varieties to try, and I was consistently impressed with their quality and how distinctly different each kind tasted. Besides the jasmine brown rice, the variety that stood out to me is their Smoked Basmati Rice, which has a very unique smoked flavor and is really good in salads, and as a base for all kinds of veggie bowls. I’m crazy about smoked foods, so that one really hit the spot. If you see Amira rice in your grocery store, give it a try, I think you’ll really enjoy it! Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices   Print Serves: 3-4 Ingredients 3 cups water ½ cup mung dal ¼ teaspoon turmeric ¼ teaspoon cumin ¼ teaspoon whole fenugreek seeds (optional) 3 sprigs fresh curry leaves (optional) 1 small yellow onion - chopped ½ medium butternut squash - peeled and cubed ¼ cup desiccated coconut sea salt 1 tablespoon red chili powder 2 tablespoons ghee or coconut oil ¼ teaspoon whole black mustard seeds 1 whole dried red chili - torn in half ⅛ teaspoon whole fennel seeds 1 tablespoon fresh lemon or lime juice 1½ cups cooked rice of your choice - for serving cilantro - for garnish (optional) coconut milk or yogurt - for garnish (optional) Instructions Bring 3 cups of water to a boil in a medium pot. Have a tea kettle or another pot with about 1 more cup of hot water ready, in case you need more water later in the process. Once 3 cups of water in the pot are boiling, add mung dal, turmeric, cumin, fenugreek and curry leaves (if using). Lower heat to establish a steady simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Mix periodically to ensure the mung dahl doesnt stick to the pan. Discard curry sprigs, if using. Add onion, squash, desiccated coconut, and salt to the pot. If it seems like there isnt enough liquid in the pot, add a little more hot water from the tea kettle until the vegetables have room to simmer in the water, keeping the dal consistency like a soupy porridge. Continue simmering, covered, for another 20 minutes or until the vegetables are cooked through. Stir in chili powder at half time. Mix periodically to prevent any sticking. Once the vegetables are around 5 minutes away from being done, warm ghee/­­oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add mustard seeds and let toast for about 30 seconds, tossing all the while. Add the chili and fennel seeds and toast for another 30 seconds or until fennel is toasted in color and fragrant. Add the toasted spices along with the ghee/­­oil from the pan into the pot with the stew, mix it in and let simmer, covered, for another 5 minutes. Once stew is done cooking, discard the pepper and mix in the lemon/­­lime juice. Taste and adjust the salt. Serve stew over rice, garnished with cilantro and coconut milk/­­yogurt if desired. Notes 1. You can add any vegetables/­­greens you have on hand in place of the butternut squash here and simmer until done, thats what makes this stew so versatile. 2. Curry leaves are completely optional here, but if you can get your hands on some, add them - their unique flavor works very well in this stew. 3. Traditional sambar calls for hing and tamarind. If you have one or both, add ⅛ teaspoon of hing to the pan with the toasting spices, towards the end and add to the stew with the rest of the toasted spices and ghee/­­oil. Add 2 teaspoons tamarind paste in place of the lemon/­­lime juice and simmer stew for another 5 minutes to let the flavor incorporate. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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A Summer of Ice Cream

September 3 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

A Summer of Ice Cream Somehow, we’ve reached the weekend that is considered by many to be the last hurrah of summer. It always goes by in a blink, and every year, the blink seems like the fastest one yet. Though very sentimental, I also can’t help but feel some excitement toward the cooler temperatures, fall produce and general coziness to come. At the beginning of this summer, we gave ourselves a challenge to come up with a new ice cream to post here every Sunday. We are happy to have fulfilled the plan, and the result consists of twelve original ice cream recipes that we are very proud of (+1 recipe from an author we love). Sometimes, I really love setting difficult-but-realistic goals for myself that I know will make me grow, whether personally or professionally – this one made me grow in both ways. Some weeks, it was definitely challenging to think up yet another frozen treat, but mostly, it was very rewarding and quite fun. I generally find myself having a more lighthearted approach, when it comes to ice cream recipe development, as opposed to the more serious savory recipes. The abundance of summer produce made the process of coming up with new flavors quite fluid, and I worked with what was available. Below, a round up of our summer of ice cream. It’s neat to see it all lined up chronologically, starting with rhubarb in the early summer, followed by strawberries, peaches, very light sorbets for the hottest of days, tropical milkshakes, and my youngest daughter’s birthday cake. We are currently brainstorming ideas for a similar weekend series to run during the colder months of the year, and would love to hear from you on what kind of recipes you’d like to see (snacks? sandwiches? soups? It doesn’t have to start with an S!). Have a lovely weekend :) Rose and Rhubarb Frozen Yogurt – Frozen yogurt is one of the easiest frozen treats to make, especially if you have an ice cream maker. All it takes is some good yogurt, whatever secondary ingredients you choose for flavor, and a quick whirl in the machine. Ive always found rose flavor to be very invigorating, and combined with the subtle tartness of the rhubarb and creamy tanginess of the yogurt, this is dessert and aromatherapy all in one bowl. Emma’s Strawberry Thai Basil Sorbet – Aside from eating them just as they are, nothing showcases seasonal fresh berries more than homemade sorbet. This one is from Emmas beautiful cookbook, My Darling Lemon Thyme - Recipes from My Real Food Kitchen. One of the things I adore about Emmas cooking style is her love of fresh herbs. Just like her, I often include herbs in sweet dishes, its a little trick to turn many ordinary desserts into a completely unique and memorable treat. The inclusion of Thai basil in this recipe is genius and makes this creamy sorbet even more refreshing, aromatic and summery. Its also hard to believe that this intense crimson colour comes just from strawberries - a real show stopper. Lavender Ice Cream with Chocolate Tahini Bits – My go-to vegan lavender ice cream recipe with the addition of rich and decadent chocolate-tahini bits. It has a creamy, luxurious texture, which combines so well with the refreshing flavors of lavender and chewy, bittersweet pieces of chocolate. Chamomile Honey-Lemon Ice Cream – Chamomile, honey and lemon are flavors that seem to have been made for one another. In this ice cream, they unite into a subtle taste that I can only describe as soothing, steadying and balancing. Theres that unmistakably floral quality from the chamomile, sweetness from the honey, a sour citrus note from the lemon, all combined in a cooling and smooth ice cream. Green Smoothie Pops – A green smoothie on a stick that can be easily eaten for breakfast on a very hot day, or as an extra nutritious dessert, on any day. Papaya Lime Sundae – Papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime - both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins - desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup. Pi?a Colada Milkshake – A recreation of my favorite beachside cocktail in non-alcoholic, vegan milkshake form. Peach, Honey and Thyme Lemonade Popsicles – These lemonade popsicles, with a bit of zing from ginger, have been in my beat-the-heat arsenal for many summers now - a dessert for the toastiest of days, requiring minimal effort. The lemonade can also be had in its original, un-frozen state, and is an incredibly refreshing, summery drink. Tahini Ice Cream Bars with Miso and Caramel and Chocolate – These vegan tahini ice cream bars, covered with a generous drizzle of miso caramel and chocolate, very distantly remind me of Snickers ice cream bars, which I used to love, but these particular ones are much more healthful and interesting in flavor. Superfood ‘Cherry Garcia’ Pops with a Chocolate Core –  A recreation of my favorite Ben & Jerrys ice cream flavor, made vegan and nutritious with the addition of a few energizing superfoods, and complete with a decadent chocolate core. Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream – A classic ice cream flavor in milkshake form. Its creamy, with little hard specs of cacao nibs, invigorating with the addition of fresh mint, and topped with a chickpea-based vegan whipped cream. Pistachio and Raspberry Fields Ice Cream Cake – Paloma’s birthday cake, named for her obsession with the Beatles. Pistachio and raspberry complement each other perfectly here, the pistachio flavor being nutty and earthy, while the raspberry becomes its perfect, juicy and fruity pair. The cacao buckwheat crust adds just the right hint of chocolate and crunch to the mix. Berry Creamsicles with White Chocolate Drizzle – These beauties are a breeze to make, requiring no ice cream maker, and are colored lilac with all of summers sweetest, sun-ripened berries. The white chocolate drizzle, made with cacao butter and cashews, adds a nice, extra bit of texture to the creamy berry base, but the creamsicles are great on their own as well, in case you dont want to bother with the drizzle. The post A Summer of Ice Cream appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday

June 26 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday Papaya is one of my favorite things to eat this time of year, so figuring out a papaya sorbet recipe that worked was very exciting. It admittedly took me a few tries. One version that involved banana came out tasting quite strange, while another one just tasted like plain ice.  Then I had a revelation about the fact that papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime – both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins – desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup, an amazing new discovery (thank you Laura for the tip). In the absence of this sorbet, we’ve been having fresh papaya slices with all the same add-ins, as an easy summer dessert. Since our book manuscript is due this coming Thursday, we’ve had our heads down and haven’t had the time to read any interesting articles for our Sunday link list. Instead, we thought it would be fun to compile a list of old and new cookbooks that have been inspiring us and helping us get through these final stages of the manuscript, whether with their recipes, visually or both. Read on for the list and have a relaxing Sunday! Bowl by Lukas Volger Gjelina by Travis Lett Hartwood by Eric Werner Nopi by Yotam Ottolenghi Ayurveda: The Science of Self Healing by Vasant Lad Dandelion and Quince by Michelle McKenzie (got a sneak peak from my publisher and it’s a beauty) Ripe and Tender by Nigel Slater It’s All Easy by Gwyneth Paltrow At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen by Amy Chaplin Hot to Cook a Wolf by MFK Fisher Sweeter Off the Vine by Yossi Arefi Papaya Lime Sundae   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 medium papaya - peeled, seeded and roughly chopped ½ cup freshly squeezed lime juice - from about 3 limes ⅓ cup maple syrup pinch sea salt cacao nibs - to taste desiccated coconut - to taste pure date syrup - to taste Instructions Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of cacao nibs, coconut and date syrup, in a blender and blend until smooth. Chill the mixture well in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Churn in an ice-cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon into a container and freeze for at least 2 hours before serving. Top with cacao nibs, desiccated coconut and pure date syrup. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Zucchini Blossoms with Roasted Eggplant Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

5-Ingredient Magical Fudgesicles

June 17 2016 My New Roots 

5-Ingredient Magical Fudgesicles Fudgesicles were a mainstay in the freezer of my childhood, and my go-to sugar fix if the cookie jar was empty. Since weve been blessed here in Copenhagen with a warm spring and early start to the summer season, day after day of blue skies and sundresses has jumpstarted my summer food fantasies. I felt like revisiting the frosty, chocolate-y pops that were such a relief in the sweltering heat, but this time, with a healthy plan of attack. In my cookbook, I made a killer ice cream from avocados and cashews. Knowing how creamy and delicious this combination was, I wanted to recreate a similar base, with dates as the sweetener and raw cacao powder as the chocolate element. So, I made a couple versions of these fudgesicles, since I wanted to eat more be thorough. The first experiment was with just cashews and avocado. The results were pretty delicious but pretty expensive, and a few of my taste-testers found the ice cream bars a little dry in the mouth. For the second version I scaled way back on the cashews and used coconut milk to enhance juiciness while maintaining creaminess. I also upped the cacao. Because chocolate. It was a perfectly balanced combination, and the version I am presenting you with today. The magical version. These are so lusciously creamy, sinfully rich-tasting – the kind of thing you put in your mouth and kind of can’t believe what’s happening. Vegan, almost raw, and full of whole food ingredients, they are also downright filling! They make a fabulous mid-morning or afternoon pick-me-up, especially with the raw cacao component, a deliciously effective, energy-boosting food. Dress them up with your favourite add-ins, or keep it simple and enjoy them as the five-ingredient bliss bars that they are. Cashew News! I was snacking on some cashews the other day (as one does) and offered some to a friend of mine, who declined. Her reason? Cashews are so fattening. Wait a minute, what? who started this ugly rumour?! Maybe this is news to you too, but cashews are actually one of the lowest-fat nuts out there. Weighing in at only 67% fat, next to almonds at 76%, hazelnuts at 86%, and macadamia nuts at 93%, cashews rank pretty low on the scale - and lets keep in mind that 66% of the fat in cashews is the heart-healthy, monounsaturated variety. Rejoice! And while we are clearing up misconceptions, cashews are not technically nuts, but seeds that adhere to the bottom of the cashew apple, an edible fruit native to South America. Cashew trees are in the same botanical family as mango and pistachio. The multi-step process to make cashews edible is quite involved, and typically includes steaming the whole seed pod, removing the outer shell, drying, and skinning. The inner shell layer of the cashew nut contains a caustic resin that can cause significant skin rashes, and is toxic if ingested. The raw cashews that you purchase at a grocery store health food shop are not typically raw, just not roasted. Because of the steaming step in conventional cashew processing, cashews cannot be considered a truly raw product. Truly raw cashews are available on specialty websites and in some health food stores, but at a premium since separating the cashews from their shell without the nut coming into contact with the resin is time consuming and must be done by hand. Cashews are an excellent source of the mineral copper. Copper helps our body utilize iron, eliminate free radicals, and build bone and connective tissue. It is also an essential component of a wide range of enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) which aids energy production and antioxidant defence. One-third of a cup of cashews delivers over 100% of your recommended daily intake of copper. A high-speed blender is recommended for this recipe, but if you dont have one make sure you blend until the mixture is as smooth as possible. You can add water to thin the mixture if it is too thick to blend, but keep in mind the more water you add, the less creamy the bars will be - more crystalline. No matter what, they will taste amazing. Because they’re magic. The fudgesicle recipe below is unreasonably delicious as-is, but it can act also as a base for you to flavour as you like! You can add toppings after removing the fudgesicles from their mold too. This involves melted raw or regular chocolate and your creative spirit! Dip or drizzle the chocolate over the frozen bar, and sprinkle away. MAGIC WANDS. This would make a very popular activity at a kids birthday party. Or my birthday party. Stop looking at me like that. Ive included some options for both flavourings and toppings to inspire you, but these are merely suggestions. I know all of you super enthusiastic foodies out there will come up with some stellar combos. Let me know in the comments if you do!     Print recipe     5-Ingredient Vegan Magical Fudgesicles Makes 4 cups /­­ 1 Liter /­­ 10 fudgesicles Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75g unroasted, unsalted cashews 1 14-oz can /­­ 400ml full-fat coconut milk 1 large, ripe avocado 1 cup /­­ 250g pitted, packed soft dates 1/­­2 cup /­­ 55g raw cacao powder (cocoa powder will also work) Optional add-ins: a few pinches sea salt vanilla (seeds from 1 pod, powder, or extract) a few drops of food-grade essential oils (peppermint, orange, almond etc.) finely diced fresh fruit (strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, mango etc.) a pinch of cayenne pepper espresso powder finely chopped toasted nuts (cashews, hazelnuts, almonds, pistachios etc.) Optional toppings: melted raw chocolate (recipe here) or melted dark chocolate cacao nibs finely chopped toasted nuts (cashews, hazelnuts, almonds, pistachios etc.) dried fruit (I used raspberry on the ones pictured) citrus zest (lemon, orange, lime) hemp seeds unsweetened desiccated coconut bee pollen Directions: 1. Place cashews in lightly salted water and let soak for 4-8 hours (overnight is fine). 2. Drain the cashews and rinse well. Add to a blender (a high-speed blender is highly recommended) with the remaining ingredients (and any flavourings, if using) and blend on high until as smooth as possible. Add water only if necessary - you want to mixture to remain quite thick. 3. Spoon mixture in popsicle molds. Firmly knock the molds on the counter a few times to remove any air bubbles. Insert a popsicle stick into each mold and place in the freezer until set - at least 6 hours. To remove popsicles, run the mold under hot water until you can easily pull a fudgesicle out. 4. If you want to decorate your fudgesicles, dip or drizzle them with melted chocolate and sprinkle with desired toppings. Eat immediately, or place back in the freezer to set until ready to enjoy. *   *   *   *   *   * In other very magical news, my latest Cody app video series is now online! This one is all about my favourite subject: SNACKS!!! Super-Charged Snacks to be exact. And every recipe is brand-new, incredibly delicious, and of course über healthy. If you haven’t seen the Protein-Rich Cacao Brownie video on my Facebook page yet, go have a look! You can preview all of the recipes here and purchase the plan too (it’s on sale!). Thank you so much for your ongoing support of My New Roots! Big love and gratitude, Sarah B. The post 5-Ingredient Magical Fudgesicles appeared first on My New Roots.

Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols

May 13 2016 My New Roots 

Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols Being someone who loves a meal with many elements, Sri Lankan food was pretty much my dream come true. Every meal is served with plenty of sides: sauces, chutneys, relishes, and pickles, to make each bite unique and surprising. Sambol is the word for this seemingly endless collection of condiments, and I lost count trying to sample them all in a week. I believe I mentioned in my previous post about Sri Lanka, how spicy the food is there. Like, blow-your-head-off spicy. And as if the curries themselves werent hot enough, the chili-based sambols on the side will certainly commit your taste buds to perplexing levels of pain. Pol sambol is the ubiquitous, fiery condiment served at breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It is probably one of the simplest dishes to make, consisting mainly of chili, shredded coconut, chili, lime, and chili - did I mention the chili? Yea. This mix ranges from very spicy to volcanically hot depending on whose table youre sitting at. On the second day of the trip, my tongue seeking refuge in something, dare I say it, borderline bland, I discovered one of the most delicious things I have ever tasted - and it wasnt bland to say the least, just not sweat-inducing. Seeni sambol, a fragrant, Sri Lankan caramelized onion jam, turned out to be incredible on everything from hoppers to curries, and could turn a pretty plain bowl of red rice into something remarkably special. I became totally obsessed with this sambol and it was the very first thing I attempted to make when I came home. I really cannot tell you enough how awesome this stuff is. Do yourself a favour and make a batch soon! The most memorable experience I had in Sri Lanka was learning to cook traditional recipes with two women in the local village. It was likely one of the most eye-opening culinary experiences Ive ever had - not only learning from such passionate and experienced cooks, but seeing their traditional kitchen, tools, and techniques really inspired me. Take their stove, for example. A large clay bench with large mounds molded into it held the earthenware pots in place, and the heat underneath was adjusted by adding more sticks to the fire, or taking them away. Genius. Above the stove was a large wooden wrack to hang beans, seeds, and herbs for fast drying, which I thought was a brilliant way to take advantage of the residual heat. Ingredients were prepped on the floor, since its cooler down there, and also nice to sit while youre working. The knife to cut veggies was actually attached to a stool, and instead of holding the blade, you hold the vegetables and basically drop them on top, slicing them in the air to fall onto a grass mat. The sambol was made by grinding all the ingredients together on a huge flat stone designed specifically for this task, and as such took all of ten seconds to prepare. Spoons were made from dried coconut shells. The plates were made of woven grass, topped with fresh lotus leaves from the nearby creek. The leaves protected the plates from the saucy curries, and when you were finished your meal, youd discard the leaf into the compost, so that there was literally nothing to wash! I mean. This day made me take a long hard look at how much stuff I use in the kitchen. Water, electricity, appliances - these women were literally using nothing but things from the earth around them and it made me wonder how weve come so far from that connection. Cooking has become so overblown, and it was this experience that reminded me to cook simpler and eat simpler. Get closer to the earth. I dont have some grand solution, but its food for thought. I’ll share a few notes on the recipes… You will likely think Ive lost my mind when you begin the task of slicing two pounds of onions (#worthit), but I promise you it is the correct amount, and youll see that it cooks down to nearly nothing. I tried half this amount my first time and it just simply wasnt enough. If youre going to go for this, you may as well make a batch that will last you at least a few meals, right? Fresh curry leaves are a definite preference for this recipe, but Ive never been able to find them here in Copenhagen so I used dried. Theyre not great, but better than nothing. If you dont want to gnaw on whole spices or curry leaves you can remove them after the seeni sambol is cooked, but it can be a bit of a treasure hunt situation, just sayin. Once Ive smashed the cardamom pods, I like to remove the outer skin and just add the inner seeds to the spics mix. I tend to leaves the cloves and curry leaves in since I like those bursts of flavour. The pol sambol recipe Ive written here is admittedly, a wimps version. Ill admit that I can only tolerate spice until it begins to overwhelm the other flavours in the food, so mine is strong but still edible on its own. I invite you to go with your instincts on this one and dial up the heat to suit your tastes. If you can find freshly grated coconut (or a fresh coconut that you can grate yourself) by all means use that instead of the desiccated variety! Some versions of pol sambol include curry leaves, but because I only had dried I left them out. If you can find fresh ones, add about a sprig for this recipe, and crush them well before incorporating. As far as serving these two sensational sambols go, they are pretty much great with All. The. Things. Rice dishes, curries, stews, soups, wraps, sandwiches, salads...I mean it! Once you taste them Im confident youll find infinite uses for them. The first photo is of steamed brown rice and the Kale Mallung recipe that I wrote from the last Sri Lankan post - still a major fav around here. I love this meal for breakfast with a poached egg, lots of seeni sambol and, ahem, lightly sprinkled with the pol sambol.     Print recipe     Seeni Sambol Makes 1 heaping cup /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 2 lb. /­­ 900g red onions 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil 10 green cardamom pods 8 cloves 3 Tbsp. dried curry leaves (or 2 sprigs fresh curry leaves if you can find them!) 1 cinnamon stick 2 tsp. fine sea salt 2 tsp. coconut sugar Directions: 1. Peel and slice the onions. 2. Pound the cardamom pods in a mortar and pestle until they have split open. You can remove the outer skin and just save the seeds inside, but its only if you dont like eating the exterior. 3. Place a large, heavy-bottomed pot over medium-high heat and melt the coconut oil. Add the cardamom pods, cloves, curry leaves, and cinnamon stick. Stir and cook until fragrant, about 3-4 minutes. Add the onions, salt and sugar, stir very well to coat and cook uncovered, stirring every couple minutes until the onions have completely melted down - this can take anywhere from 30-45 minutes. Be patient and enjoy the process! 4. Transfer seeni sambol to a glass jar and store in the fridge for up to one month. Remove from fridge at least half an hour before serving, as the coconut oil will cause the sambol to solidify in the fridge.   Pol Sambol Makes 4 cups /­­ 1 liter Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 180g desiccated coconut 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml warm water or coconut water 1 clove garlic 2 shallots or small red onions 1-3 red chilies (or as many as you think you can handle!) I used fresh Thai chilies 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. chili powder (or as much as you think you can handle!) juice of 1 lime Directions: 1. Combine the desiccated coconut with the water and stir thoroughly to combine. Let sit for 15-30 minutes until softened. 2. Place the garlic in a food processor and blend to finely mince. Roughly slice shallots and chili, and place them in the food processor with the garlic and blend to mince.  Add the softened coconut, salt, chili powder and lime juice. Blend on high to fully incorporate. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired.   A huge thanks to Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts  and Sri Lankan Airlines for making this incredible trip possible! Show me your sambols on Instagram: #MNRsambol The post Sensational Sweet and Spicy Sambols appeared first on My New Roots.

Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry & Kale Mallung

February 18 2016 My New Roots 

Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry & Kale Mallung Where do I even begin? I guess Ill start by saying that I feel like I am waking up from the most spectacular, flavourful, technicolour dream. Sri Lanka deeply touched me, from its incredible landscape, beautiful people and of course, the food. The food! The food. When I was first invited by Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts to go on a food tour of Sri Lanka, I was a bit uncertain - to be honest, I didnt know anyone who had visited Sri Lanka before, and I especially had no idea what the cuisine was like. I assumed that it was probably very much like Indian, but what I discovered is that it has its own totally distinctive flavours and cooking techniques. Sri Lankan people are very passionate about their food and the culture around it. From my perspective, they seemed especially connected to the earth and the bounty that springs year-round from their incredibly fertile land. Many of the worlds spices are grown on the island, so you can imagine how rich and complex their traditional dishes are. Sri Lankan food is also hot. Like, crazy hot. Chilies play a dominant role in everything from curries to relish and are accompany every meal of the day - even breakfast. An interesting way to start your morning, I might add, is being startled awake by an explosive plate of food. And with coconuts quite literally dripping from the trees everywhere you look, the backbone of many Sri Lankan dishes, both savoury and sweet, is coconut water, milk and flesh. Heavenly. And a welcome antidote to all that chile. Rice and curry is a Sri Lankan staple, and in fact the word food there is synonymous with this combination. Happily for me, there are countless vegetarian and vegan options to choose from. My favourites were jackfruit curry (mindblowing!), cashew curry (yes, a whole pot of cashews cooked in coconut milk), wingbean curry, mung bean curry, eggplant curry, lentil curry, and pumpkin curry. But my favourite curry of all? Beetroot curry. Surprising, eh? The first time I was offered this dish, I kind of thought that it was an accommodating east-west mashup or something, but no! Its a thing. And a wildly delicious thing at that. I never imagined combining beets and coconut before, but it works incredibly well. The earthiness of the beets contrasts perfectly with the sweetness of the coconut milk, and the beets are neither crunchy or mushy, but a perfectly balanced succulent-tender texture that pairs so well with rice. The other major love affair I had in Sri Lanka was with all the little side dishes that come with the curries themselves: sambol and mallung (or mallum). Sambol is like a relish, typically based on freshly shredded coconut (but not always), with a featured vegetable, along with chilies and lime. Pol sambol (coconut sambol) is ubiquitous and served at every meal I can remember. It varies in spiciness from table to table, but more often than not I couldnt eat more than a couple teaspoons with my curry - which was already insanely hot enough, thank you. Mallungs are “green dishes” made with cabbage, kale, broccoli, beans or other leafy veg. These are always cooked without any oil, and instead use just the heat of the pan and a little bit of water to steam the vegetable – a groovy technique in my opinion. Spices are used in mallung as well, and vary from recipe to recipe. They can be served warm or at room temperature, almost like a lightly cooked salad. Curry leaves are an essential ingredient in Sri Lankan food. Many people are confused by this name because they associate curry with a spice blend, and assume that curry powder must then come from dried and ground curry leaves. In truth the word curry vaguely refers to a dish prepared with spices, but means very little to Indian or South Asians, where curries originate. Curry powder is largely a Western creation, and should in fact be referred to as masala, meaning a spice mix. Most curries in Sri Lanka rely on whole spices, not ground or pre-mixed ones, so that the cook can balance flavours according to his /­­ her tastes. Anyway, back to the curry leaves. Small, dark green and glossy, they are deeply aromatic with a distinctive savoury-smoky scent that is difficult to describe. And no, they dont smell like curry powder - weve already established that. They can be difficult to find fresh here in Copenhagen (and I would imagine, many places in the world!), but dried ones are available at most ethnic grocers or specialty shops. With about half the pungency of fresh curry leaves, the dried ones are an okay substitute if thats all youve got, but do try and seek out some fresh ones - youll never look back! Plus, if you find them fresh, you can easily freeze them until your next curry. It was very difficult to decide what kind of Sri Lankan dish I would post first (oh yea, theres more to come...) but I chose beetroot curry and kale mallung because they are both relatively seasonal here in Denmark, and because I think that both of these recipes take us out of our comfort zone with familiar veggies, and make use of entirely unique cooking techniques. Youll find both applications totally surprising, I guarantee that, and I hope that they inspire you to make curry out of things you wouldnt normally, or try an oil-free, steamy stir-fry. Yum town. There is so much complexity and diversity to Sri Lankan food and I am forever inspired. I cannot wait to go back to this enchanted island to explore, and eat, once again.     Print recipe     Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry with Kale Mallung Serves 3-4 Ingredients: 1.3 lbs /­­ 600g red beetroots 1 large onion, finely chopped 3 cloves garlic 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 2 tsp. black mustard seeds 1 teaspoon coriander seeds 20 dried curry leaves curry leaves (or 1 sprig fresh) 2-3 small green chilies, finely chopped 1 cinnamon stick 1 tsp. fine sea salt, plus more for finishing 1 14 oz. /­­ 400ml can full-fat coconut milk juice of 1 lime large handful of cilantro 4 portions of cooked red or brown rice (red is more traditional) 1 batch Kale Mallung (recipe to follow) lime wedges to serve Directions: 1. Peel beets and cut them into matchsticks. Chop onions, slice garlic. Set aside. 2. In a large pot over medium-high heat, melt coconut oil. Add the mustard seeds, stir, and let cook for a couple minutes until they begin to pop (be careful that they do not burn!). Add the coriander, curry leaves, chilies, and cinnamon, stir well, and cook for one minute until fragrant. Add the onion and salt, stir to coat and cook until the onions are translucent, about 5-7 minutes. Add garlic, stir and cook one minute. Add beets and coconut milk, bring to a simmer, reduce heat and cover (make sure that the liquid is simmering very lightly, not boiling. Boiling over high heat will cause the coconut milk to split). Cook until the beets are tender, about 15-20 minutes. 3. While the curry is cooking, wash and roughly chop the cilantro. 4. To finish the curry, squeeze in the lime juice, stir, and add more salt to balance the flavours. Add cilantro and serve immediately over rice with the kale mallung and extra lime wedges. Kale Mallung Serves 3-4  Ingredients 1/­­2 cup /­­ 45g unsweetened desiccated coconut 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125ml coconut water 4 cups /­­ 130g shredded + packed kale 1 small red onion 1 tsp. ground cumin 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt, plus more for garnish 1 green chilli, if desired Juice of 1/­­2 lime, plus extra for garnish Directions: 1. Combine desiccated coconut and coconut water in a small bowl and let soak for about 30 minutes. 2. Slice onion in thin sections. Mince chili. Wash kale and spin dry. Remove any tough ribs, stack leaves and cut into thin ribbons. Set aside. 3.In a large, dry pot over medium heat, add the onions, salt and cumin. Stir often, letting the onions soften in the pan. Add a couple tablespoons of the liquid from the soaking coconut if the pot becomes too dry (reserve as much liquid as you can, however). After about 8-10 minutes, add the kale and the coconut mixture. Stir to coat, and quickly cover the pot with a lid so that the kale steams inside. Wait just 30-60 seconds – the kale is ready when it is bright green and tender. Remove from heat and squeeze in the lime juice. Season to taste. Serve warm or at room temperature.   A huge thanks to Cinnamon Hotels and Resorts for making this incredible trip possible!   The post Sri Lankan Beetroot Curry & Kale Mallung appeared first on My New Roots.

Pumpkin Pie Caramel Bars

November 17 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

And we arrrrre back! If you have read the updated version of our latest post, you know that last week was an exhausting one for us. We are sorry about the decision to pull that recipe but it made us so happy to read your cheering comments on instagram regarding honesty and transparency. We promised you a new recipe soon, and this one surely delivers. It’s a two layer, pumpkin pie caramel bar covered in dark chocolate. It takes a little jiggling to cover the bar in chocolate and some waiting for the pumpkin layer to set, but apart from that, it is pretty straight forward. Instead of making a separate caramel layer, we chose to combine our favourite date caramel recipe with a simple pumpkin pie recipe and it just made the whole thing a lot easier. And of course mega-delicious. When eaten straight from the freezer it has proper ice cream texture, and when left an hour in room temperature the inside gets more caramel-like. Personally, I prefer it somewhere in between - when the pumpkin caramel is a little soft but still quite frozen. We are not big on Thanksgiving celebrations here in Sweden but if we would arrange a Thanksgiving dinner, I think these would be optimal as a cold, sweet and modernised version of a pumpkin pie in between or after all the warm, savoury dishes. I already mentioned that it can get a little messy when you cover the bars in chocolate. If chocolate-messy-fingers isn’t your thing, you can make Pumpkin Caramel Slices instead of bars by leaving the mixture in the tin and pouring the chocolate (3 oz /­­ 80 g is enough) on top, so you get three visible layers instead of having the chocolate covering the sides. It’s a lot easier (but perhaps not as fun). Just remember to wait until the chocolate is firm before cutting up the slices. Pumpkin Pie Caramel Bars Makes 20 bars Coconut base 5 fresh dates, pitted 1 tbsp coconut oil 1 scant cup /­­250 ml /­­ 80 g desiccated coconut, unsweetened Salted Pumpkin Caramel 1/­­2 cup /­­ 70 g cashew nuts, pre-soaked for 3-5 hours 1 cup /­­ 250 ml /­­ 220 g canned pumpkin puree or homemade (see note how to make it) 4 tbsp tahini 4-6 tbsp drinking water 4 tbsp coconut oil 10 soft dates, pitted 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp ginger 1 pinch cloves 1/­­2 tsp flaky sea salt 150 g /­­ 5 oz dark chocolate, 70%. Add dates and coconut oil to a food processor and mix on high speed until you get a sticky paste. Add the coconut and mix again until all is combined. Line a 4 x 8 inch /­­ 10 x 20 cm loaf tin with parchment paper and scoop the coconut mixture into it. Use your palm to flatten out coconut tightly into one thin base layer and then place the tin in the freezer while creating the pumpkin caramel. Add all the pumpkin caramel ingredients to a blender or food processor and mix on high speed until smooth. Start with 4 tbsp water and then add a splash more if the mixture is too thick to blend. When completely smooth, taste and add more salt or dates if needed. Take out the tin from the freezer and scoop the pumpkin caramel on top of the coconut base. Use a spatula to smooth out the surface or knock the tin against the table a few times to get it even. Place back into the freezer for at least three hours or until completely firm. Use a knife to carefully flip the frozen mixture out of the tin. Trim the sides for more even looking bars then use a sharp knife to cut 20 bite-sized pieces, about 1 x 2 inches /­­ 2,5 x 5 cm, that you spread out on a parchment paper (or place back into the freezer while melting the chocolate). Melt chocolate in a water bath (here is a simple instruction video).Use a spoon to spread the chocolate evenly around each bar or simply pour the chocolate over them (or a combination of the both), leave the bottom uncovered. You can dip the bars straight into the chocolate but if you are not careful with the chocolate’s temperature, the cold bars will chill the chocolate which makes it harder to handle. Try to keep the bowl of chocolate over the water bath until the last bar is covered to ensure that the chocolate is evenly tempered and thus easier to handle. Store the bars in the freezer and eat chilled or slightly thawed. Homemade Pumpkin Puree Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F and line a baking tray with parchment paper. Cut one 1 small Hokkaido pumpkin or Butternut Squash into quarters, scoop out the seeds and fibrous strings and place cut-side down on the baking tray. Bake for approx. 25-45 minutes (depending on the size of the pumpkin) or until the skin is golden and bubbled and the flesh is tender. Set aside to cool. Spoon the flesh of the pumpkin into a food processor and process on a high speed until completely smooth. Store in the fridge in an airtight container for up to five days or in the freezer. Apart, from these bars, the puree can be used in Pumpkin Pie, Pumpkin Soup or the Pumpkin Waffles from Green Kitchen Travels.

Nut, Quinoa & Chocolate Bars

April 1 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Nut, Quinoa & Chocolate Bars This recipe picks up where our last post ended - it’s another great way to use nut butter. These bars are very simple and tastes just amazing: rich, chewy, crunchy, sweet and salty. Some of our friends called it a grown-up snickers bar although it’s a lot more energy packed and only made with a few good ingredients. It’s a great little dessert but also perfect as a post-workout snack. But before we jump to the recipe, there is another exciting thing we wanted to share. Apparently we’re one of the finalists in Saveur Blog Awards, in the category best use of video! We are so honoured to be included in this specific category since we still feel like rookies in the recipe video department. It’s so much fun to experiment with videos but we have also felt a bit trembling and unsure about the whole thing. So this truly made us happy! There are loads of new talents to explore so you should definitely head over to the saveur.com/­­blogawards to have a look. If you feel like casting a vote for us or any of the other finalists you just need to log in or register first. Thank you! To celebrate the nomination, we have created this little recipe video for the bars. Elsa is really in to ballet at the moment so she helped pick the music. If you like this video and would like to explore all our other, check out our youtube page: youtube.com/­­greenkitchenstories About this recipe. It’s decadent but energising, rich but still with a fresh punch from the ginger.  You can use any nut butter, we have tried it with various sorts and it seems to taste great regardless of sort. Our favourite is a mix of cashew, sunflower seeds and almonds. If you are allergic to nuts, we recommend using pure sunflower seed butter and skip the almonds in the recipe. Puffed/­­popped quinoa can be found in health food stores. We haven’t tried making it ourselves but would love to hear if any of you have tried it. You can replace the puffed quinoa with regular rolled oats or more nuts and seeds. Nut, Quinoa & Chocolate Bars Makes around 18 bars 2 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil 10 fresh soft dates, pitted 1 cup /­­ 250 ml /­­ 250 g nut butter (see recipe in this post) 1 tbsp fresh ginger, grated 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80 g raw pumpkin seeds/­­pepitas 1 cup /­­ 80 g puffed quinoa a handful raw almonds, coarsely chopped a pinch sea salt flakes, optional 3,5 oz /­­ 100 g dark chocolate (70%) 1/­­3 cup desiccated coconut (unsweetened) Melt coconut oil in a medium size sauce pan on low/­­medium heat. Mash the pitted dates with a fork and add to the sauce pan together with the nut butter and freshly grated ginger. Stir around until it all comes together and cook for just a few minutes on low heat. Remove from the heat. Add pumpkin seeds, puffed quinoa and chopped almonds. Taste and add salt if needed (depending on how salty the nut butter is). Line an 8 x 10 inch /­­ 15 x 20 cm baking dish with parchment paper and scoop the batter into it. Use the palm of your hands to press everything together tightly into an even rectangle, roughly 2/­­3 inch /­­ 2 cm high. Put in the fridge or freezer while melting the chocolate on a double boiler /­­ water bath. Pour the melted chocolate over the bars and use a spatula to distribute it evenly. Sprinkle with desiccated coconut and put back into the fridge or freezer until cold and firm. You can store the bars in the freezer and they will last for months or in the fridge if you plan on eating them within a few days. We prefer having them in the freezer and eating them just slightly thawed but still chilled.

Passionfruit & Coconut Macaroons

February 18 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Passionfruit & Coconut Macaroons I made these for Luise and Elsa on Valentine’s day with the intention of sharing the recipe here on the same day. I planned to call them Passionate Macaroons. But then I realised that I didn’t want to spend Valentine’s evening in front of a computer. So here they are, a few days late but just as good. Me and coconut macaroons go way back. Along with sticky chocolate cake, this was a treat that was easy enough for me to bake as a kid. So I did. Many times. And since then, I have been following more or less the same recipe, it’s so simple, quick, and delicious that I never found a reason to divert from it. That was until a few weeks ago. We were preparing our breakfast event at Little Bird Organics in Auckland when they handed us a bag of their passionfruit & macadamia macaroons that kind of blew my mind. Pairing passionfruit with coconut is just brilliant and it adds a new dimension to this classic cookie. I have borrowed their idea in my own version. The result is a very tropical, sweet and just slightly tart flavour mixed with all the richness that comes from coconut. This was also my first successful attempt at making them vegan without using an egg white as binder. Instead I use coconut milk, honey (or yacon syrup or maple syrup) and almond flour. They hold together well once they have cooled down but might be a little crumbly straight from the oven. Just pop them in the fridge if you want them firmer. You can replace the almond flour with almost any flour of choice, or cacao powder for a tropical chocolate version. Passionfruit & Coconut Macaroons (vegan + gluten-free) Makes 12 Depending on your preference and the sweetness of the passion fruits you might want adjust the honey accordingly before baking. We find this ratio to be just perfect for us. Vegans that don’t want to use honey can of course use one of the other sweeteners listed. We have tried this recipe with different versions of sweeteners and they all turn out good. 2 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil (or just extra coconut milk) 1/­­2 cup full-fat coconut milk 1/­­3 cup raw honey (or yacon syrup or maple) 1/­­2 vanilla pod, seeds scraped or 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla powder 2 cups desiccated coconut, unsweetened 3 tbsp almond meal/­­flour (or other flour if nut allergic) 1/­­3 tsp sea salt 3 passion fruits 1 lime, juice 50 g /­­ 2 oz dark 70% chocolate, for drizzling (optional) Preheat your oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Add coconut oil, coconut milk, honey and vanilla to a saucepan on medium heat and bring to a slow simmer. Add the desiccated coconut, almond flour and salt, stir and let it all come together into a sticky mess. Remove the pan from the heat, add passionfruit and lime juice and give it a good stir. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Use a large tablespoon, ice cream scoop or your hands to form the mixture into balls (about the size of a golf ball) with a flat bottom. Place them on the baking paper and bake for about 12 minutes in the oven. Let cool slightly before serving or start making the chocolate drizzle: Pop them in the fridge while melting the chocolate in a water bath. Take out the tray form the fridge, dip a teaspoon in the melted chocolate and drizzle back and forth over the macaroons. Repeat until you are happy with the amount of chocolate. Store in fridge, lasts for at least 5 days but will probably be gone within 24 hours.

Chia & Raspberry Breakfast

October 14 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Chia & Raspberry Breakfast It has become more and more obvious to me that Luise and I have lived these last years inside the eye of a whirlwind. Life seems calm when we sit here in our Stockholm kitchen, but recipes, apps, emails, comments, books, raising a child, freelancing, workshops, photography and social media are spinning around us faster and faster every month. Our old professions and lives have been swept away and new things have come along. It has been unreal, in the best kind of way. All of a sudden we are working with our passion and with each other. We are constantly learning new things and have no idea how the next month will look like. It is everything I dreamed about but never dared to hope for. But living in a whirlwind also makes me dizzy. This pace. This flow of information. This constantly updating instagram-pinterest-email-life that we are so addicted to. It’s hard to find balance. Luise and I talk too much about food, answer emails too late at night and sometimes forget to just eat dinner because we are so busy discussing or shooting a recipe. I am sure we are not alone in this. The feeling that you want to be more present and not always watch your kids laugh through the lens of an iphone. The theoretical solution is easy. To work on the day and turn off our phones during evenings and weekends. But it is so hard to change our habits, so we have talked about also taking a physical step outside of the whirlwind for a little while. Our rough plan is to spend two months in Melbourne, Australia, and then drive around New Zealand in a campervan for a month. We plan on being together. Watch Isac grow. Teach Elsa some English. Watch kangaroos. Play and hug a lot. But we will most probably also blog from the road. Perhaps do a food video from a camp kitchen. We might even do some kind of cooking class or food photography workshop somewhere on the way. As long as we are spending more time with each other than with the computer. We are still not sure what we can afford or where we will end up, but we will probably be traveling from the beginning of December to the end of February. We would love to get some advices from you guys. You think we would like Melbourne more than Sydney? Great food, cafes or restaurants that we shouldn’t miss? Would anyone be interested in attending a workshop, if we arranged one in Sydney/­­Melbourne or New Zealand? Is the idea of driving around in a campervan with Isac when he is only five months old too crazy? All input is appreciated. Thank you friends! This recipe is a variation of a chia pudding with a flavorful raspberry twist. It’s a simple, satisfying and very delicious breakfast or mid-day snack. Or even dessert. You can prepare it a day in advance and keep it in the fridge. If you are not yet familiar with chia seeds, they are filled with protein, omega 3 fatty acid and calcium, have a very mild flavor and are incredible at binding liquids. They are therefore great as egg replacers in baking recipes and in desserts and breakfasts such as this. The only disadvantage is the price. They are rather expensive, but you don’t need so much each time so they last long. I almost forgot, here is a video from our youtube channel where Luise show how to make this recipe and tell you why she likes it so much. Berry & Chia Breakfast Serves 1 Feel free to play around with this recipe. You could replace the raspberries with other berries or mashed fruit and the milk with freshly squeezed juice. Or you could blend some dates with the milk and serve it as a dessert. Use whatever toppings you prefer. We do recommend including some kind of nut butter, it adds a nice balance to the sweet and tangy fruit flavors. 1 cup /­­ 125 g fresh or thawed frozen raspberries 1 pinch ground vanilla 3 tbsp desiccated coconut, unsweetened 3 tbsp chia seeds 1 cup /­­ 240 ml plant milk (we prefer almond, coconut or oat milk) Topping nut butter hemp seeds kiwi fresh mint Mash the berries in a bowl using a fork. Add vanilla, coconut and chia seeds and combine. Pour over the milk and mix. Set aside to soak for minimum 30 minutes or overnight in the fridge. Serve in a bowl or jar topped with nut butter, hemp seeds, fruit and mint.

Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl

January 12 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl This post was created in partnership with Naked Nutrition. Two carrot-centric recipes in a row? Yes, and I can explain :) I got a whole lot of questions about making last Sunday’s remedy tonic in a blender as opposed to a juicer, so I thought this would be the perfect time to share the recipe for one of my favorite smoothies made with similar ingredients. This one comes together in a few quick minutes with the help of a high-speed blender and tastes very much like carrot cake in a bowl, with the added benefits of raw carrots, ginger, pea protein and spices. Carrot cake is among the desserts I crave most often, but I rarely make or eat it for all the obvious reasons – it’s cake, it’s involved, it’s quite a bit of sugar. Plus, once I figured out that a quick, healthful carrot cake smoothie bowl is a possibility, my cravings for the real deal have subsided. All the ingredients in this one are pantry staples for me. I keep a big bag of carrots on hand for soups and stews, ginger – for tea and as a general immunity saver and digestive, rolled oats – for a variety of breakfasts, and my spice rack is generally overflowing, since spices are key for building flavor in plant-centric cooking. So I know this bowl of goodness is always at arm’s reach, and I end up reaching for it quite often. Another good thing about this smoothie is that while it can most certainly be dessert, it can also easily pass for breakfast. I generally like to include protein powder in all of my smoothies to make a meal out of them and to balance my sugar intake with protein, since smoothies tend to be on the sweet, fruity side. There are so many great powdered protein brands and varieties out there, that I find that aisle in the grocery store to be quite an overwhelming place. I’m especially stumped by lengthy lists of ingredients – they look great on paper, but I always end up wondering if that tiny percentage of broccoli powder or sprouted-anything powder could offer much in terms of nutrition. I’ve been using Naked Nutrition’s plant-based protein powders for a few months now, and truly love everything about the brand, from their philosophy rooted in simplicity, to the high quality of their ingredients. All of their plant-based protein powders have no more than three whole-food ingredients with no added artificial sweeteners, flavors or colors. They carry a variety of plant sources for protein like pea, rice and even peanut butter (!), and have simple flavor options like unflavored/­­unsweetened, along with chocolate and vanilla. Naked Nutrition’s flavored powders are sweetened with coconut sugar, while I’ve found that many other healthy protein powder brands use stevia. As much as I aspire to love stevia, I haven’t been able to get on board with it at all – its flavor is the only thing I can taste when I add it to absolutely anything, so coconut sugar has been my #1 powdered natural sweetener choice for years. For this smoothie bowl, I like using either the vanilla pea protein or the chocolate one, but vanilla is my favorite for this recipe, since it goes very well with the carrot cake spices. I also love the naked rice when I don’t want any flavor or sweetener, and I can’t wait to try baking with the choc peanut butter. Can you tell I’m enthusiastic about this company? If you aren’t vegan, Naked Nutrition offers single ingredient grass-fed whey and casein proteins that are also undoubtedly great. Golubka Kitchen readers get 10% off all orders on Naked Nutrition + free shipping – use code SPINACH at checkout. Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl   Print Serves: 2-3 Ingredients for the smoothie 2 medium carrots - peeled 1 frozen banana 2-3 dates 1-inch piece ginger ¼ cup rolled oats 1 scoop vanilla protein 1 teaspoon cinnamon ¼ teaspoon nutmeg seeds from 3 cardamom pods 1-1 2/­­2 cups almond milk topping options toasted walnuts toasted desiccated coconut hemp hearts dried mulberries stovetop granola from our tahini-ginger smoothie Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a high-speed blender until smooth. Distribute between bowls, garnish and serve. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Ginger Marinated Tofu with Citrus Salsa Spiced Kombucha Moscow Mules & a Giveaway Black Sesame Cappuccino .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Mint Chocolate Power Bars

January 3 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Mint Chocolate Power Bars By placing two pillows under my left elbow, I can hold sleeping baby Gabriel with one arm and type this text on the laptop that is balancing on my right leg with the other hand. It’s brilliant! I can even reach that bowl of soaked oats with raisins, apple and crunchy peanut butter that stands there on the sofa table. Okay, maybe not brilliant. This balancing act is pretty tricky actually. And I suspect that my left arm will starting to go numb soon. I should probably focus on my son and just wait for Luise to get back from the shower. But I did promise 192 people on instagram that I would post this recipe today and I’ve already spent an hour tucking the other two kids to bed so I feel like I really need to do this now or I’ll be starting the year by breaking a promise. Therefore I am currently writing this post one-handed - sitting in a patchwork plaided sofa in a cute little airbnb apartment in Copenhagen that we’re renting for a few days - chewing on a peanut butter covered apple with a chubby little cherub snoring in my other hand. And Luise thinks I’m bad at multi tasking. Ha! Before we left, I prepared a batch of power bars for the car-ride down. When they don’t serve as car snacks, we use them as quick energy fuel at home whenever we or the kids are in need of a treat. A chocolate bar (or two) in my gym bag also makes a pretty compelling argument for dragging my tired daddy-of-three body to the gym. The bars rarely last long in our freezer. Lately, I have been completely hooked on this chocolate and mint combo. Combining fresh mint flavour with rich chocolate always seemed weird to me, but all of a sudden I have changed my mind. It’s brilliant and for some reason extra perfect as workout fuel. This recipe is based on the Hemp Bars in our first book but a little simpler and fresher in flavour. We top them with cacao nibs which not only make them look great but also adds a nice crunch to their texture. I asked Isac to assist me when I made these but he was pretty useless. When asked to pit the dates, he placed the dates in his mouth and the stones in the food processor (which nearly ruined the food processor). He also kept insisting that the cacao nibs were bombs that exploded into the bars, leaving giant craters after them. So if you think the bars look uneven, this little hooligan is to blame. By the way, I’m not writing one-handed anymore. Halfway along this post, I spilled some oats on Gabriel’s head so he woke up. Luise is nursing him now (and most probably also piercing an imaginary voodoo doll with my face on it with a thousand needles). I am not saying that I spilled on him on purpose, but it did make it a whole lot easier to write this text. Yup that was it. First post of the year. Giant craters, crying babies, voodoo dolls and eating chocolate at the gym. And I’m only 44 minutes late for my deadline. Not a bad start. Mint Chocolate Power Bars Makes approx. 18 bars  You can add a few tablespoons protein powder of choice (instead of the desiccated coconut) if you are making them as workout bars. Nuts can of course also be used instead of the seeds, if preferred. 150 g /­­ 1 cup mixed pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds, toasted if preferred 50 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup desiccated coconut, unsweetened 4 tbsp chia seeds 3 tbsp cacao powder 50 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup rolled oats 2 pinches sea salt 4 tbsp virgin coconut oil 200 g soft fresh dates (roughly 16 dates /­­ 1 packed cup), pitted 5 tbsp nut butter of choice (we love using a combination of tahini and cashew butter but peanut butter also works great) a few drops peppermint oil (or 2-3 tsp dried mint leaves, crushed) Topping 60 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup raw cacao nibs Line a 16 x 22 cm baking tin with parchment paper. Add the seeds, coconut, chia seeds, cacao powder, oats and salt to a food processor and pulse on high speed until coarsely crumbly. Pour into a bowl and add coconut oil, dates, nut butter, mint (oil or dried leaves) to the food processor. Run on high speed until entirely smooth and sticky. Add the seed and cacao crumbles and pulse quickly until mixed together. Help out with a spatula in case the mixture isnt combined. Taste and add more mint flavour or salt if needed, then pulse a few more times. Transfer to the baking tin and, using the palm of your hand or the back of a spoon (coated in coconut oil), press the mixture down very firmly to create an even and compact bar (roughly 2 cm high). Scatter the cacao nibs on top and use a spatula to press them down slightly into the mixture. Let set in the freezer for approx. 15-30 minutes before cutting into approx. 18 bars. Store the bars in an airtight container in the freezer and they will keep for a few months. You can wrap them in baking paper to make them more portable. Thaw them ever so slightly before serving. NB: For a nut-free alternative, replace the nut butter with a seed butter of choice.

Maple Cinnamon Grain-Free Granola

August 9 2016 My New Roots 

Maple Cinnamon Grain-Free Granola Cruising the health food store a few months back, I happened upon a bag of locally made, grain-free granola that really spoke to me. Something about its un-designed packaging, its minimalistic ingredients and flagrant chunks flirting with me through the cellophane window, begged me to take it home. The $15 price tag begged me to leave it on the shelf. So I went and perused the tea section, while spiritually distracted by the promise of crunchy sunflower seed clusters and juicy raisins. I went back. I picked up the bag and walked swiftly to the cash register so that I wouldnt change my mind on the way there. I bought it, ran home, tore open that bag and sat gorging myself on handful after handful of total luxury granola bliss. I did again the next week. And the following week too. It took about five rounds of $15 granola before I realized, firstly, how insane it was that I, Sarah Britton, would spend such a preposterous amount of money on something like breakfast cereal, and second, that I wouldnt just figure out how to make it myself. Grain-free granola is nothing new, but nothing Id ever tried making before since I love grains so very much. But as I tend to enjoy grain-centric breakfasts, pouring a bunch of mostly-oat granola on top of mostly-oat porridge seemed like oat overkill, ya know? It didnt take long to perfect this recipe and secure its place as a rotating staple in my household. I eat it on all kinds of things besides porridge too. Its great on top of chia pudding, smoothie bowls, chopped fruit, coconut yogurt, waffles and pancakes, and ice cream (the healthy kind, of course). And like all other granolas, this stuff is pretty addictive. Im warning you. This recipe is excitingly versatile, so dont get too caught up on the ingredients themselves - instead think of them as inspiration. If youre allergic to nuts, or you simply want to cut down on the cost of this recipe, simply swap out the nuts for more seeds. You can also replace the coconut if youre so inclined, use another spice instead of cinnamon, honey instead of maple syrup...you get the idea. Just make sure that whatever you choose to alter is substituted with the same amount of something else. If you dig dried fruit, chop up a bunch and add it to the mix after it’s cooled down. Apricots, figs, mulberries, and raisins are some of my favourites with this mix.        Print recipe     Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 liters Ingredients: 2 cups /­­ 275g raw nuts (I used almonds and hazelnuts) 2 cups /­­ 250g raw, shelled sunflower seeds 1 cup /­­ 80g unsweetened desiccated coconut 1 cup /­­ 60g large flaked coconut 3 Tbsp. chia seeds 1 Tbsp. ground cinnamon 3/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml expeller-pressed coconut oil, melted 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml maple syrup 1 tsp. vanilla extract (optional) Directions: 1.  Preheat oven to 300°F /­­ 150°C. Line two rimmed baking sheets with baking paper. 2. Add the nuts to your food processor and pulse to roughly chop. Add sunflower seeds and pulse to chop, until all nuts and seeds are about the same size. If you dont have a food processor, this step can be done by hand. 3. Place chopped nuts and seeds in a large mixing bowl. Combine the coconut, chia seeds, cinnamon, salt. Pour in the coconut oil, maple syrup and vanilla extract. Mix well to coat. Divide the mixture in half and spread out evenly onto the lined baking sheets (you can do this on one baking sheet if that is all you have, but in my experience it cooks more evenly with two). 4. Bake for 30-35 minutes, stirring a couple times from the 15-minute mark. The granola is ready when it is golden and fragrant. It will crisp up outside the oven as it cools. 5. Store fully-cooled granola in an airtight glass container at room temperature for up to one month.      This recipe was included in my online video series, Healthy Kickstart, that I produced with my friends over at Cody! If you’d like to see me making this recipe in the flesh, and the many other breakfast delights (such as the Grab-and-Go Carrot Bread below), click here. I had such a blast with this series, as I feel passionate about helping you to create mornings that are as delicious, vibrant and easy as possible! I hope you all enjoy. Deep gratitude for all of your ongoing support of My New Roots! In light, Sarah B Show me your Maple Cinnamon Grain-free Granola on Instagram: #MNRgrainfreegranola The post Maple Cinnamon Grain-Free Granola appeared first on My New Roots.

Elsa’s Berry Cupcakes

June 24 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Elsa’s Berry Cupcakes After quite a few years of cooking and developing recipes, we have managed to build up a little bit of confidence and don’t panic over kitchen fails or people’s opinions as easily anymore. But whenever our daughter asks me to bake for a few of her friends, my palms get all sweaty and my heart starts pounding. Seriously, nothing makes me more nervous than having to bake for a bunch of five- and six-year-olds. Elsa is finishing preschool this summer and her favourite teacher is also retiring, so last week she wanted to bake a dessert for all the children and teachers at the preschool. She started out with grand plans for a big cake shaped like a princess but (luckily for me) we landed on mini cupcakes with a raspberry frosting. We had just bought a mini muffin pan and it was the perfect opportunity to try it out as we got a lot of muffins from one batch so it was enough for all the children and teachers. These muffins are really delicious and moist with hints of coconut, banana, almonds and cardamom. It’s one of our go-to recipes that we change slightly every time. They are only sweetened with fruit and entirely gluten free (and we are aslo sharing a vegan version below). If you are allergic to nuts, you can blend (100 g /­­ 3 1/­­12 oz) sunflower seeds and use instead of the almond flour. Whenever Elsa initiates one of these baking sessions, she always starts with lots of enthusiasm only to loose interest after about 45 seconds, leaving us to do the actual work. This time she was much more persistent. She measured, blended, worked the batter and dropped it into the muffin tins. Halfway through the batch, we also started dropping a raspberry in the centre of each muffin and they turned out even better with that little berry pocket in the middle. Piping the frosting was the hardest bit. Elsa was utterly disappointed that hers didn’t turn out as pretty as the ones she had seen on our screens. But towards the end they at least started looking better than in the beginning. Since that first batch, we have made this recipe two more times. One time to check all the measurements and another time so we could try a vegan version. We are sharing both methods here below. You can of course also make normal size muffins and skip the frosting if you want to keep it simple. On another note, today we celebrate Midsummer in Sweden. We are going to be enjoying the last of these cupcakes and then we are off to find a maypole covered with flowers so we can jump like frogs around it! You think I am kidding? I am not. Banana & Coconut Cupcakes with Raspberry Pockets Makes 24 mini cupcakes or 12 regular Dry ingredients 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour 120 g /­­ 3/­­4 cup rice flour 45 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup desiccated coconut 2 tsp baking powder 1/­­2 tsp freshly ground cardamom 1/­­2 tsp vanilla powder 1 pinch salt Wet ingredients 14 soft dates (1 cup /­­ 150 g), stones removed (if using dried dates, soak them for an hour first) 1 ripe banana, peeled and cut into large chunks 4 tbsp coconut oil or butter, room tempered 180 ml /­­ 3/­­4 cup plain yogurt or plant based yogurt 3 eggs (for a vegan version soak 3 tbsp chia seeds in 9 tbsp water for 15 minutes, stir around and use instead of the eggs) 24 raspberries (fresh or frozen) Berry Frosting (recipe below) Preheat the oven to 200°C /­­ 400°F. Grease a muffin tin (mini or regular size) or line it with paper or silicon cup liners. Place all of the dry ingredients in a bowl, stir together and set aside. Add the dates to a food processor and blend on high speed. When smooth, add the banana and coconut oil and blend again. Finally add yogurt and eggs and blend until smooth and entirely mixed. Pour the wet ingredients into the bowl with dry ingredients and stir together. Drop the batter into the muffin tins, place 1-2 raspberries in the centre of each muffin and cover it with batter. Bake for 10 minutes (17-20 minutes if you are using normal size muffins) or until golden and just set. Prepare the frosting while the muffins are in the oven. Leave the muffins to cool before piping the frosting on top. Serve immediately or store in the fridge. Berry Frosting 70 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup raspberries (or strawberries) 3-4 soft dates, stoned 200 g cream cheese (or vegan cream cheese) Mix raspberries and dates in a food processor or with a hand blender until completely smooth. Whisk the berry mixture together with the cream cheese in a medium size bowl until pink and smooth. Scoop the frosting into a piping bag. Place it in the fridge for 20 minutes (or longer) to firm up before piping the frosting on top of the cupcakes.

Tropical Soba

June 1 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Tropical Soba The hotter the weather gets, the more I find myself substituting meals with just a ton of watermelon, mango or papaya, or even some kind of iced and very hydrating smoothie or drink. The heat brings out those strong cravings for all things hydrating, juicy, and cooling, and I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this. For something more substantial and nourishing, but still in line with all the aforementioned requirements for a hot summer day meal, there is this Tropical Soba. Papaya is one of my favorite tropical fruit. Of course, we didn’t have anything like it when I was growing up in Russia, so when I moved to Florida and tried papaya for the first time, I was blown away by its buttery consistency and complex, unfamiliar flavor. I was also pleasantly surprised by all its sunny health benefits – papaya is anti-inflammatory due to a wealth of vitamin C and beta-carotene, and some special enzymes, and contains other good stuff like potassium, magnesium, copper, fiber and folate, etc. (the list is quite long). I had a very similar story with mangoes, being completely overjoyed the first time I tried one. So when both of these fruit come into season, they sneak into all kinds of meals around here. Soba noodles are on high rotation in our house as well. Paloma, being in her very picky eater stage, will accept some kind of soba bowl any time of day, which I’m ok with, as the protein-rich buckwheat in soba makes the noodles filling and nutritious. For her, I tend to buy the 100% buckwheat soba, just to pack in as many extra goodies as I can into her meal, but I also like wheat/­­buckwheat blend soba, which tends to be more affordable. This recipe basically combines everything we want to eat at the moment. Nourishing, chilled soba noodles are the base, accompanied by sweet and luscious pieces of papaya and mango, jicama for a nice crunch, a sprinkle of desiccated coconut for some bite, basil, cilantro and mint for that herbal freshness, all dressed with a creamy coconut milk and lime sauce. A tropical dream in a bowl really. I hope you get around to making it sometime this summer :) Tropical Soba   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 1 large, ripe mango - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces ½ medium papaya - peeled and sliced into bite-sized pieces 1 small or ½ large jicama - peeled and cut into small cubes basil, mint, cilantro - to taste juice of 2 large limes - divided 1 8 oz package of soba noodles (I used these) sea salt Thai chili paste/­­sriracha - to taste (optional) 1 can light coconut milk unsweetened desiccated coconut - for garnish Instructions Combine mango, papaya, jicama and herbs in a large bowl. Squeeze juice of 1 lime over the mixture, toss to coat. Cook soba noodles in well salted water, according to instructions on the package, take care not to overcook. Drain over a colander, rinse briefly with cold water and shake off any excess water. Add soba to the bowl with the fruit, toss gently and squeeze juice from the second lime over the dish. Add a little squeeze of chili paste, if using, followed by coconut milk. Toss to coat well. You can add more coconut milk to make the dish soupier, if desired. Distribute between bowls or serving plates, garnish with desiccated coconut and more herbs. 3.5.3208   You might also like... Raw Rutabaga and Crispy Sage Pizza No Noodle Pad Thai Raw Caramelized Vegetables in Crispy Coconut Cups Raw Thanksgiving .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Tropical Soba appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chocolate Chia & Raspberry Parfait

March 4 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Chocolate Chia & Raspberry Parfait I realize that we have shared a couple of quick parfaits here before but it is quite nice to have a few different desserts to choose between when late nights cravings set in. Our Apple Crunch Parfait seems to have become quite popular (not only in our house) and this new parfait is just as good. Easily explained, it’s a chai spiced chocolate chia pudding topped with a lush and creamy raspberry mousse made from only 3 ingredients! It’s one of those happy coincidences when a really simple recipe also turns out to be deliciously addictive. I could eat the mousse with a spoon straight from the food processor (and I do when David isn’t watching) but turning it into a parfait feels a little classier. This is usually served a sweet snack or simple dessert in our family but I guess it could be a pretty awesome breakfast as well. We claim that this is an easy one to make. As a matter of fact, it is so simple that even Isac, our 18-months old toddler, can make it (well kind of). Just press play on this little video below and you’ll see for yourselves! Chia pudding is one of Isac’s newest obsessions. I can’t believe his shirt looks so clean on these photos as he normally pour those belly seeds all over himself in an attempt to gobble a full glass in less than five seconds. He’s a real speed eating little monkey. Chai & Chocolate Chia & Raspberry Parfait Serves 2 Chai & Chocolate Chia Pudding 3 tbsp chia seeds 250 ml /­­ 1 cup plant milk of choice (oat milk, almond milk, rice milk or coconut milk)  1/­­4 tsp ground cardamom 1/­­4 tsp ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp ground ginger 1/­­8 tsp grund clove 1-2 tsp cacao powder 1 pinch sea salt Raspberry Mousse 1 ripe avocado, stoned 200 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cups frozen raspberries (thawed) or fresh 4-5 soft dates, pitted Topping 8 fresh raspberries 2 tsp nut butter (we used cashew nut butter) 1 tbsp desiccated coconut (unsweetened) Whisk together chia seeds and plant milk in a bowl. Measure the spices into a small bowl, stir and then add them to the chia mixture along with cacao powder and salt. Whisk until all is mixed and there are no lumps. Leave to soak for 30 minutes, whisk one or two times in between to make sure it stays smooth. Prepare the raspberry mousse while the chia pudding is becoming thicker. Add raspberries, avocado and dates to a food processor. Run on high speed until smooth. Layer the chocolate & chai chia pudding with the raspberry mousse into two glasses or jars. Keeps in the fridge for 2-3 days in sealed jars without the topping.

Swedish Pancake Cake

February 9 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Swedish Pancake Cake I started counting how many pancake recipes we have posted since we started the blog and it’s surprisingly few. At least if you divide that number with the number of times we have made pancakes since we started the blog, which is embarrassingly many. We like pancakes in our family and I think we need to blog more about it. We have pancakes for breakfast, lunch or dinner at least once a week. So with a few hours left on Shrove Tuesday aka Pancake Tuesday, we wanted to throw in a little collection with some of our favourite pancake recipes from the past years - both sweet and savoury. We are also sharing the ultimate way to eat pancakes, in the form of a cake! If not for tonight, it’s an unbeatable breakfast (or dessert) for your loved ones on Valentine’s Day. The recipe is from our first book, The Green Kitchen, which btw is coming out on Portuguese this Spring (the 11th language it is being translated to, crazy!). We love American style pancakes that are stacked up high and topped with a drizzle of syrup and fruit. These Flour-free Banana, Blueberry & Coconut Pancakes are made simply with egg, banana, blueberries and desiccated coconut and they are much lighter than common American pancakes. The recipe is from The Green Kitchen but can also be found on Cooked.com. All our book recipes are actually available on the Cooked website, it’s a subscription based site but they have a 30-day free trial. Spinach Crepes with Chickpea, Apple & Tahini Filling. We have been making green pancakes for years and it’s simply achieved by mixing pancake batter in a blender with the addition of spinach (or beetroot). We serve these with a savoury filling for dinner but they also taste great on their own. Click here for the full recipe. And here is a video with us making them. Masala Dosa filled with Sweet Potato & Peas, Mango & Raisin Chutney and Raita. We loved eating dosa for breakfast in India and all the different fillings add so much flavour with both sweet and savoury tones. The dosa batter is made without eggs so these are perfect for vegans. This recipe is from Green Kitchen Travels and is available on Cooked.com. Coconut & Quinoa Pancakes with Clementine Marmalade. These vegan pancakes are from Amy Chaplin’s brilliant book that we blogged about last year. Here is the recipe. Buckwheat cr?pes with passion and mango syrup. Our version of French dessert cr?pes are topped with an addictive Mango & Passionfruit Syrup and a dollop of mascarpone. The recipe is from Green Kitchen Travels and can also be found on Cooked.com. Summer Berry Pancake Cake I have made different versions of this cake since I was a child, and I never get tired of it. I think it is so beautiful with all those stacks of pancakes, and the berries and cream squishing out from the sides. Traditionally you put jam between the layers, but we stick to fresh fruit, nut butter and date syrup. The pancakes should be very thin, so we always use a non-stick frying pan when we make these. You can prepare the pancakes one day in advance and assemble the cake just before serving. If fresh berries aren’t in season, you can use frozen instead./­­David Pancake Batter 200 g /­­ 1 3/­­4 cup buckwheat flour 3 large eggs (or 4 medium) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups soy milk or milk of your choice 1 tbsp butter, plus extra for frying pinch sea salt Layers 3 ripe bananas, sliced thin 225 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup raspberries, mashed with a fork 225 g /­­ 1 1/­­2 cup blackberries, mashed with a fork 125 g nut butter 120 ml raw date syrup (soft dates mixed with a splash of water in a blender) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups thick cream, chilled Topping 150 g /­­ 1 cup raspberries 125 g /­­ 1 cup blackberries 2 tbsp pistachio nuts, chopped To make the batter, add all the ingredients, plus 250 ml /­­ 1 cup  water to a large mixing bowl and whisk vigorously until you have a smooth batter. Make sure that there are no lumps of flour left. Refrigerate for 20 minutes. Give it a good whisk after you have removed it from the fridge, as the flour tends to sink to the bottom. Heat a 20 cm /­­ 8, preferably non-stick, frying pan on medium-high heat. When the pan is hot, add a few drops of oil and about 75 ml of the batter. Tilt the pan until the batter is evenly distributed. Fry for 45-60 seconds on each side, until the pancakes are golden and can be flipped easily with a spatula. Fry all of the pancakes - the batter should make about 15 - and place on baking paper to cool off. You can layer with baking paper between the pancakes to stop them sticking together. To assemble, pour the cold cream into a large chilled bowl. Use an electric hand mixer or a whisk to whip it until soft peaks form. Set aside. Put the cold first pancake on a cake stand. Spread a layer of thin slices of banana evenly over the top. Add another pancake and top it with about a third of the mashed raspberries. Then continue with next pancake and a third of the mashed blackberries. Continue with another pancake and carefully spread a thin layer of nut butter and date syrup on it. Add another pancake and spread with a layer of whipped cream. Then start all over with the banana layer. Continue until all the pancakes are covered. Top with whipped cream, fresh fruit and finely chopped pistachios. All photos from our first book by Johanna Frenkel.

Revolutionary Pancakes

May 17 2015 My New Roots 

Revolutionary Pancakes When I was pregnant, you wouldnt believe how many people told me how much fun it would be cooking for a little person someday. Although this seemed like an obvious thing, I kind of shrugged it off, thinking that it wouldnt be that awesome. I think part of me feared the pressure, or the possibility of cooking becoming more of a chore than a pleasure. Although Ive had my fair share of noggin scratchin, I have to say that cooking is now more than a pleasure. Its moved into a greater creative place, I feel freer, and Ive discovered so many cool things through the challenges. Take this recipe for example. Seeing as happy accidents seem to be at the core of what I do, its no surprise that the recipe for Revolutionary Pancakes evolved from something other than what it was originally intended for. In July of last year I blogged about Raspberry Ripple Buckwheat Porridge. Around this time, I was beginning to give my little babe whole grains, but because we chose to let him feed himself, it was hard to actually get enough in him - the floor had all it could handle, thank you. One day after blending the porridge up, I looked at the still-hot skillet on the stove from my husbands eggs, and mused about pouring my own breakfast into the pan. So I did. And it made a pancake. A pretty perfect, tasty, sprouted pancake that my baby could actually pick up and eat himself without supplying the hardwood with yet another coat of whole grain goodness. For the win. This got me pretty excited. Not only did I have a new and very popular meal for my wee one, but a new a very popular meal for myself. Ive been experimenting a lot for the last 9 months with this one and Im thrilled to say we have a rather fool-proof recipe on our hands, dear friends. Pancakes for everyone! And what is so revolutionary about them? These pancakes contain two ingredients. They are flour-free, sugar-free, gluten-free, and vegan.  They use soaked whole buckwheat and any other grain you have in your pantry; brown rice, quinoa, millet and amaranth are my favourites. Add-ins are welcome and sneaking some fruits, veg or superfoods into these is totally possible. Lastly, and my favourite aspect, is that you dont even get a bowl or spoon dirty in the process since you can soak the grains right in your blender, then pour the batter straight into the pan. Flour Power? I am trying my best to live a flour-free life. Why? Because even if I buy whole grain flour at the store, I dont really know how whole grain it actually is, how long its been since it was processed, and just how that went. If you consider foods three mortal enemies: heat, light and oxygen, flour seems like it may be on the losing end of this battle. Grinding grain inevitably exposes its insides to the three foes, so keeping grains whole right up until youre going to consume them is no doubt the best practice to avoid losing vitamins, minerals, and gaining serious un-desirables, such as oxidized fats. To remedy all of this, we can grind our own grain and use them right away. Soaking the whole grains first, then using them in a recipe such as this one, is the easiest method for most of us. We can also make our own flour, either in a dedicated grain mill (which can be expensive) or with something as simple as a coffee grinder. I also really love buying rolled oats (not quick-cooking or instant) and grinding them in my food processor to make flour. This is a really easy and inexpensive way to ensure Im getting a whole product, ground fresh and full of nutrients. If you are going to buy flour, make sure it has an expiry date (as all food should go bad at some point, eh?) and surprise! Keep it in the fridge. Thats right, all sealed up tight in a cool, dark place. If you are someone who does a lot of baking and goes through flour very quickly, no need to worry about this too much, but if youre a sporadic baker like me, keep the enemies at bay. I must be upfront and inform you that these are not like the familiar, light-n-fluffy American-style pancakes, or whisper-thin Eurpoean cr?pes. Because they are not made with white flour, or flour at all for that matter, they are substantial in taste and texture. On the grounds of their potential density, I like to make mine on the thin side, and relatively small. You can thin the batter out quite a lot if you do like cr?pes, but they will inevitably be chewier - a quality I quite like. Ive always been an enthusiastic pancake eater because they are the prefect blank canvas for all manner of healthy, tasty toppings. I like to crown these particular ones with homemade nut butter, fresh seasonal fruit, hemp seeds, coconut, and of course maple syrup, honey, or jam. As a bonus, I’ve included a quick recipe for luscious Ginger-Vanilla Cashew Cream. Since I posted a picture of it on Instagram, it would be almost cruel not to provide you with the ingredients and method, however simple it all is to make. What’s groovy about pairing this with the pancakes is that you’re already soaking grains for breakfast, so giving the nuts a bath before bed seems like no extra effort at all.     Print recipe     Revolutionary Pancakes Ingredients: 1 part buckwheat groats 1 part other gluten-free grain (quinoa, millet and amaranth all work well) about 2 parts water, as needed Optional additions: citrus zest, such as lemon or orange vanilla coconut sugar or maple syrup spices, such as cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, nutmeg, etc. fresh or frozen fruit (bananas are delicious) unsweetened desiccated coconut organic eggs tender greens, such as spinach protein powder Directions: 1. Soak buckwheat and other grain overnight in pure water with an acidic medium (such as apple cider vinegar or lemon juice, read more about that here). In the morning, drain and rinse well. 2. Place grains in a blender with water equal to the volume of grains used (if you used 1/­­2 cup buckwheat and 1/­­2 cup quinoa, use 1 cup water). Blend on highest setting until smooth, and add more water if needed. The consistency should be like pancake batter: fluid and pour-able but not thin and watery. Add any other elements youd like, but try to maintain the consistency - add more water if necessary. 3. Heat a large skillet or griddle with just a little bit of coconut oil or ghee. When hot, pour desired amount of batter onto the skillet, wait until bubbles form on the top and the batter becomes almost opaque, then flip. I recommend starting the first batch off in a really hot pan, then lowering the heat slightly to cook the rest. No need to add fat to the pan after the first round – once the pan is hot enough the pancakes should cook without the need for any additional oil. 4. Serve hot with desired toppings. Store leftovers in the fridge for up to three days. Freeze extras and reheat in a toaster oven before enjoying. Ginger Cashew Cream Makes about 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 1 cup /­­ 140g raw, unsalted cashews 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1 Tbsp. minced ginger 1/­­2 Tbsp. lemon juice 6 Tbsp. water seeds from 1/­­2 vanilla bean (optional, but delish!) Directions: 1. Place cashews in water and soak for at least 4 hours, up to 12. Drain and rinse. 2. Combine cashews with all other ingredients in a blender and blend on high until completely smooth. Taste and adjust sweetness to your liking. Store leftovers in tightly sealed container in the fridge for up to five days.   *   *    *    *    *    * One more exciting thing to mention is The Guardian’s magazine, Observer Food Monthly has published a story about the wave of healthy eating washing over the globe and the women who are at the forefront of this movement. The cover features The Hemsley Sisters, Ella Woodward, Anna Jones, and yours truly (a very dolled-up version, I might add). Read the article and get one of the spring recipes from my cookbook, here.

Coconut & Quinoa Pancakes

February 28 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Coconut & Quinoa Pancakes She had folded up her dress into an impromptu bag and filled it with sea shells in all sorts and sizes. “I’m taking these home” Elsa said while looking at me with a wrinkled nose and sharp mouth. I think she was waiting for me to tell her that we couldn’t fit anything more into our bags, but this time I gave in: “Sure, you can keep them in your room when we are back home.” We have reached the last leg of our trip and in just a few days we are flying back to Sweden. It’s a bit sad but at the same time exciting to get back into our home and kitchen.  Eeeh, who am I fooling? We are devastated and are constantly trying to think of different excuses to stay here: “What if we got infected with a virus so we weren’t allowed on the airplane…” or “What would happen if our passports got stolen?” . Seriously, this trip has been unreal. We have connected with so many friendly souls across Australia and New Zealand. Been invited to breakfasts, lunches and dinners with people we have never met before and also met a bunch of readers on picnics, signings and events. We are spending our last days revisiting our favourite spots, soaking up the sun and filling our bags with Elsa’s sea shells. We have a chapter about traveling with kids in our latest book, but considering how many questions we have received on the subject while we have been here, I think we might write something more about it in a later post. We tested and photographed this pancake recipe before we left Sweden, with the intention to post it while we were away. But somehow we completely forgot about it, until now. This is a recipe from our absolute favourite cookbook from 2014, Amy Chaplin’s At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen. What made us choose this recipe among the many great ones in the book, was that this was a gluten-free recipe with only one egg and a suggestion on how to make it vegan (with a chia egg). We love pancakes but always seem to make ours quite heavy on eggs, so we have been on the look-out for good vegan breakfast pancakes. And these deliver! They have plenty of texture and body. And apart from the quinoa soaking overnight, they can be done in no-time (or as Amy puts it: “theyre the fastest pancakes youve ever made”) We can’t recommend her book enough. If you  like our food, you are going to love Amy’s. Her book was released in the US last year and will be out in Australia and the UK in June.  We served these with our own Clementine Jam. We have been experimenting with different citrus jam and marmalade recipes all winter. The photos show a cooked version, but since then we have grown much fonder of a simpler uncooked version using chia seeds. What we like about it is that it keeps the fresh flavours from the citrus whereas cooked jams and marmalades become a tad bitter and overly sweet. This Citrus Chia Jam is very easy to make and taste just like sun-ripe citrus fruits. Coconut & Quinoa Pancakes (recipe from At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen by Amy Chaplin) Makes ten 4-inch /­­ 10 cm pancakes 1/­­2 cup uncooked quinoa, soaked for 12 to 24 hours in 1 cup filtered water 1/­­2 cup rolled oats 3/­­4 cup unsweetened desiccated coconut 1 cup unsweetened almond milk 1 egg or 1 tsp chia seeds soaked in 1/­­4 cup filtered water for 15 minutes 2 tbsp melted extra virgin coconut oil (more for cooking) 2 tsp ground vanilla 1 tsp baking powder 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla 1/­­2 tsp cinnamon zest of 1 lemon Drain and rinse quinoa, and place it in an upright blender. Add oats, 1/­­4 cup coconut, almond milk, egg, coconut oil, vanilla, baking powder, and cinnamon. Blend on high speed for about 40 seconds or until completely smooth, scraping down sides as necessary. Add remaining coconut and lemon zest and stir with a rubber spatula to combine. Warm a wide cast iron skillet over medium heat; add about 1 teaspoon coconut oil and spoon in 1/­­4 cup batter for each pancake. Spread the batter out a little with the back of a spoon to make a 4-inch pancake. Cook for about 3 minutes or until surface is covered with bubbles and bottom is golden and beginning to brown. Flip and cook for another 2 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from skillet and repeat with remaining batter. These pancakes are best hot off the pan, but they can also be kept warm in a 200?F oven as you cook the whole batch. Quick Citrus Chia Jam 5 mandarins or citrus fruits of choice, peeled and most of the white rim discarded 2 tbsp honey (more or less depending on the sweetness of the citrus fruits) 2 tbsp chia seeds Peel two of the mandarins and chop the slices into small pieces that you place in a small bowl. Cut the remaining mandarins in half and squeeze out all the juice into the bowl. Add honey and chia seeds. Use a fork to whisk until all is combined. Leave in the fridge for a few hours or overnight. The chia seeds will bind the juice into a jam-like consistency. Store in a sealed jar in the fridge for up to 3-5 days.       PS. Green Kitchen Travels is being released in German, Dutch, Swedish and Danish during these next couple of weeks. Check out our book page for more info!

Vegan Passionfruit & Coconut Macaroons

February 18 2015 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegan Passionfruit & Coconut Macaroons I made these for Luise and Elsa on Valentine’s day with the intention of sharing the recipe here on the same day. I would have called them Passionate Macaroons. But then I realised that I didn’t want to spend Valentine’s evening in front of a computer. So here they are, a few days late but just as good. Me and coconut macaroons go way back. Along with sticky chocolate cake, this was a treat that was easy enough for me to bake as a kid. So I did. Many times. And since then, I have been following more or less the same recipe, it’s so simple, quick, and delicious that I never found a reason to divert from it. That was until a few weeks ago. We were preparing our breakfast event at Little Bird Organics in Auckland when they handed us a bag of their passionfruit & macadamia macaroons and they kind of blew my mind. Pairing passionfruit with coconut is just brilliant and it adds a new dimension to a classic cookie. I have borrowed their idea in my own version. The result is a very tropical, sweet and just slightly tart flavour mixed with all the richness that comes from the coconut. This was also my first successful attempt at making them vegan without using an egg white as binder. Instead I use coconut milk, honey (or yacon syrup or maple syrup) and almond flour. They hold together well once they have cooled down but might be a little crumbly straight from the oven. Just pop them in the fridge if you want them firmer. You can replace the almond flour with almost any flour of choice, or cacao powder for a tropical chocolate version. Passionfruit & Coconut Macaroons (vegan + gluten-free) Makes 12 Depending on your preference and the sweetness of the passion fruits you might want adjust the honey accordingly before baking. We find this ratio to be just perfect for us. 2 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil (or just extra coconut milk) 1/­­2 cup full-fat coconut milk 1/­­3 cup raw honey (or maple or yacon syrup) 1/­­2 vanilla pod, seeds scraped or 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla powder 2 cups desiccated coconut, unsweetened 3 tbsp almond meal/­­flour (or other flour if nut allergic) 1/­­3 tsp sea salt 3 passion fruits 1 lime, juice 50 g /­­ 2 oz dark 70% chocolate, for drizzling (optional) Preheat your oven to 350°F /­­ 180°C. Add coconut oil, coconut milk, honey and vanilla to a saucepan on medium heat and bring to a slow simmer. Add the desiccated coconut, almond flour and salt, stir and let it all come together into a sticky mess. Remove the pan from the heat, add passionfruit and lime juice and give it a good stir. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Use a large tablespoon, ice cream scoop or your hands to form the mixture into balls (about the size of a golf ball) with a flat bottom. Place them on the baking paper and bake for about 12 minutes in the oven. Let cool slightly before serving or start making the chocolate drizzle: Pop them in the fridge while melting the chocolate in a water bath. Take out the tray form the fridge, dip a teaspoon in the melted chocolate and drizzle back and forth over the macaroons. Repeat until you are happy with the amount of chocolate. Store in fridge, lasts for at least 5 days but will probably be gone within 24 hours.

Raw Bounty Bars

June 11 2014 My New Roots 

Raw Bounty Bars Oh how times change. If you were to hand me a Bounty Bar 20 years ago, I would have looked at you like you had gone coconuts (ahem, sorry). Bounty Bars were sick-a-tating, and most certainly on the bottom rung of the candy ladder because coconut was a vegetable in my mind and therefore decidedly not edible even when smothered in chocolate. I dont know when I came to my senses, discovered that coconut was in fact a not vegetable, and also totally delicious. These days, Ill go so far to say that I dont know what my life would be like without dear coconut around, as I likely employ one or more of its products on a daily basis. You can imagine then, that being in Bali was quite a gas for me, as its dripping with coconuts, quite literally. I loved being able to get fresh coconut water every morning; mammoth orbs heavy with well over a liter of liquid gold, for under a dollar. Freshly shredded coconut at the market, coconut palm sugar by the bagful, young coconut flesh blended in smoothies... it was the business! One of the highlights of the trip was visiting Big Tree Farms -  a place where they make incredible coconut  products among other things, such as raw cacao and sea salt. As Ive been using their delicious coconut palm sugar for a while now, it was pretty amazing to see where the magic happens and meet the sweet people behind the sweetness. I was also introduced to a new product: coconut nectar! A gorgeous, full-flavoured syrup that looks a lot like honey, but with a citric, smoky flavour that surprised and delighted me. Coconut Nectar of the Gods Coconut nectar, and the coconut palm sugar that is made from it, have been produced and enjoyed for over 6,000 years. In fact, the first documented sweeteners ever used are that from coconut palms (Coco Nucifera). Coconut nectar is made by harvesting the sap from the coconut palm blossom, which is collected twice daily by the farmers at Big Tree. They climb up each trunk in the morning, remove the vessel full of sap, slice the very tip off of each flower bundle and place an empty vessel underneath it to collect sap until the evening when they will repeat the process. The sap is then boiled down to remove all the water it naturally contains, leaving a thick, caramel-like syrup, which can then be cooled and bottled.  To make coconut sugar, that same syrup is cooled and then rubbed, creating granules of the delectable coconut sugar that I love so much. You can watch a very cool video about the whole tree to table process, here. Coconut nectar is high in minerals, such as potassium, magnesium, zinc and iron. It is happily low glycemic, ranking 35 on the GI scale, compared to agave at 42, honey at 55, cane sugar at 68. This is due to coconut sugars composition of long-chain saccharides, which are absorbed by the body at a slower rate than something like refined white sugar. Coconut sugar also contains amino acids, which are thought to slow down the rate at which the sugar is absorbed into the bloodstream, acting as a buffer of sorts. You can read more about Big Tree Farms Coconut Nectar and Palm Sugar nutrition here. After visiting Big Tree, I was feeling creative and hungry for chocolate. I decided to get my Willy Wonka on and recreate a favourite treat to pay homage to my coconut adventures, and also because, lets face it, Bounty Bars are delicious. This is my (nearly) raw version of the classic candy, a very easy and scrumptious translation using simple ingredients. They are totally rich and coconut-y, just like the real thing, but way better because they taste real – not like science. The chocolate is smooth, rich and decadent, and the filling is extra coconut-y due to the virgin coconut oil I use. If you have a good-quality virgin coconut oil, I suggest employing it here, as you want to emphasize the coconut flavour. This is one of the few times I use virgin coconut oil, as I usually dont want everything tasting of the tropics, but in this case I definitely do. If you dont have any, regular coconut oil is fine. And if you dont have any coconut nectar not to worry - substitute it with honey or maple syrup and the results should be almost the same. These should be stored in the freezer, especially in the height of summer when the chocolate can melt in the heat. Plus, biting into one of these is quite refreshing when the 4 oclock summer sun hits and you need something sweet to rouse you from your nap. These are also really fun to make - who doesnt love a good candy project? Get your kids involved, get your friends into it, and create some candy bars that you actually wont want to share with anyone who has helped you. Youve been warned.     Print recipe     Raw Bounty Bars Makes 12 candy bars Coconut Filling 2 cups /­­ 175g unsweetened desiccated coconut 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml coconut oil, melted (virgin coconut oil if you have it) 2 Tbsp. coconut nectar (substitute with honey or maple syrup) 1-2 Tbsp. raw honey or maple syrup (depending on how sweet you like it – you can also use coconut nectar) 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 vanilla bean, seeds scraped 1 Tbsp. water Raw Chocolate 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60 ml melted coconut oil 2 Tbsp. /­­ 30ml melted cacao butter 1/­­3 cup /­­ 30g raw cacao powder 1/­­4 cup raw honey a couple pinches salt, to taste Directions: - In a double boiler (or a glass bowl over a pot of simmering water) melt coconut oil. Remove from heat and add coconut nectar, honey, sea salt and vanilla seeds, whisk to combine. Set aside. - Place coconut in a large bowl and sprinkle the tablespoon of water over top, stir well. Pour the coconut oil mixture over and fold to combine, using your hands if necessary. Taste for sweetness and adjust if necessary. - Line a 7×7 (18x18cm) baking pan with plastic wrap, leaving plenty of extra to hang over the sides. Press the coconut mixture firmly into place, especially around the edges. (If you dont have a baking pan, just use the plastic wrap as an edge, pulling it up around the open ends, pressing firmly to ensure it is compact.) Wrap edges around coconut and place in the freezer to firm, at least 30 minutes, up while you make the chocolate. - In a double boiler (or a glass bowl over a pot of simmering water) melt coconut oil and cacao butter. Add honey and whisk to combine. When completely uniform, remove from heat and sift in cacao, and add sea salt. Taste for sweetness and saltiness, and adjust accordingly. - On an open work surface, place a piece of parchment paper underneath a cooling wrack (and oven wrack will work just fine, but it helps if whatever you choose fits into your freezer). Make space in your freezer for the wrack to fit. - Remove coconut from the freezer, unwrap and cut into 12 bars of equal size. Round off the ends by slicing off the corners if you like (this is just for aesthetic reasons, but its up to you!). One by one, place a coconut bar into the liquid chocolate and turn over a couple times to coat. Remove with a fork, allowing any excess chocolate to drip back into the bowl, then place on the cooling wrack. Repeat with remaining bars. Once all the bars have been done and they  re no longer dripping, place wrack in the freezer for the chocolate to harden, about 15 minutes. Remove from freezer and repeat the process, giving each bar with one more coat of chocolate. Return bars to the freezer. -  If you have any chocolate remaining, remove chocolate bars from the freezer and drizzle it over top in a design that you like (its fun to do with a plastic sandwich bag – simply slice a teeny corner off of one end and pipe chocolate onto the bars). Return to the freezer to firm up completely, at least one hour. Then remove bars from wrack and store in an airtight container in the freezer for up to two months.


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