dandelion - vegetarian recipes

dandelion vegetarian recipes

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes

January 1 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes Lauren Haynes is a folk herbalist, medicine maker, plant enthusiast, and the founder of Wooden Spoon Herbs, a small apothecary line based in the Appalachian mountains. Take a look at Lauren’s shop offerings, and you’ll be immersed in a world of plant-powered tinctures, salves, oxymels, and teas, each one more magical than the other. In this interview, Lauren tells us about self-care as a form of self-respect, kindness as a form of beauty, her favorite plants for stress, beauty, and colds (and more!), the importance of sourcing her ingredients locally and working with what’s available, as well as exercise, sustenance, inspiration, procrastination, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? Oh, open and free, absolutely. Since I work from home, things end up being pretty routine: tea, emails, breakfast. But if I have my way I love to see how the day unfolds uninhibited. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. Most mornings start with a hot tea or something creamy with raw milk and occasionally marshmallows. I check and return emails first thing, then Ill meditate and make some breakfast and get to work. On lazier mornings well go into the small town nearby and eat eggs benedict and read the paper. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My new favorite nighttime tool is the Flux app for my computer. It gradually turns your screen from blue light to orange with the arc of the day, so the blue light doesnt deter melatonin production come bedtime. Other than that, just reading a great book until my eyes get tired. Living out in the county where its dark and quiet helps me sleep soundly every night. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – smoked salmon omelette with sauteéd greens Lunch – egg salad sandwich with a bowl of good soup Snack – fruit or hummus or a little chocolate Dinner – soul food: pinto beans, cornbread, a baked sweet potato and collard greens, topped with hot sauce and ferments and a slice of blue cheese -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I drink tea most mornings. Sometimes matcha or Earl Grey, or sometimes just ginger and lemon balm, to ground and calm myself before a hectic day. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Um... yes, check. I have a major sweet tooth and Lilys stevia-sweetened chocolate bars save my life. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Right now my regimen includes fish oil, Mothers Best beef liver pills, a tincture of medicinal mushrooms, and evening primrose oil. I also love using lymphatic herbs steeped in vinegar throughout the year. Every spring I steep whatever edible herbs are coming up naturally in raw apple cider vinegar: plantain, violet leaf, dead nettle, dandelion greens, chickweed and cleavers. That lasts me all year and keeps me feeling vital, just a spoonful a day. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I try to exercise but if I have a full schedule its the first thing I cut out. I live on a tract of wilderness, so walking a few miles a day is super easy and I do that interspersed with yoga when Im feeling too tired to get outside. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? A little bit of both! Its definitely hard to make the time for it since I work from home and just go, go, go. I definitely find walking in the woods pleasurable, so that keeps me motivated to exercise. I cant even imagine going to a gym... Maybe someday. Exercise is something Im starting to get excited about. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? True beauty is when someone makes you feel like your soul is illuminated by the way that they treat you. Thats what is beautiful to me. If I want external beauty, Ill just scroll Instagram for a bit, you know? But true kindness is actual beauty. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Laidback is how I would describe my skincare routine. See also: erratic. I use a rosewater and witch hazel toner daily (Poppy & Someday), followed by a blend of rosehip and carrot seed oil (Zizia Botanicals). Sometimes I use a gentle rose quartz scrub on my face (Aquarian Soul), followed by oil cleansing, but usually Im pretty lowkey. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Yes! Nettle and alfalfa infusions, and also evening primrose oil internally. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Drink tons of water, sleep as much as you can, and wear red lipstick. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress? Consistent routines are hard for me, but I am constantly checking in to make sure I dont get overwhelmed by stress, even if that means five minutes of yoga in the middle of the day. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? I really love regular acupuncture treatments and massage, as well as daily meditation and moxibustion. Calming teas that ease tension, like ginger and chamomile. Also just goofing off as much as I can get away with. You cant be silly and stressed at the same time. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? My first line of defense is a few dropperfuls of fire cider. I make one called Sunshine Cider with turmeric and rosehips, but my friend Gretchen made me some with habanero peppers and that always helps me stay on the right side of health. Fire cider, a shot of elderberry syrup and then some red root tincture, an amazing lymphatic herb that relieves a sore throat. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? They definitely bleed together, as I work from home and run my business with my partner. I try to take the weekends off and get out of the house daily to break up the work mode, even if its just a drive to the post office. Luckily, I love my work because its a huge part of my life. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? Honestly, mindfulness is key. Just checking in with myself constantly to see how Im feeling, why Im feeling that way and what I need. I just take little tea or chocolate breaks or go put some sun on my face or make a nourishing meal. A hot shower if Im feeling cold. Self massage if Im feeling anxious. Shutting the computer if Im getting tired. And making time for the little things that make me happy, like reading a book. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Cleaning up my diet was key for me in resolving a lot of health issues. In college I was just eating garbage and drinking alcohol and doing all the teenage things. Once I realized that youre literally what you eat, and started treating my body with respect, a lot shifted for me. I really feel like that small change helped align me with the path Im on now, which is 100% what Im supposed to be doing. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Im usually brimming with ideas and running myself ragged trying to make them all happen, so if I struggle with anything its occasional procrastination. Usually this looks like doing the easier things on my to-do list before the hard-hitting work chores, which isnt such a bad thing. I just kind of let myself have some slower times, because I work really hard. I may sip tea and pull tarot cards and then eventually get a burst of energy. Or sometimes I do nothing for like two full days. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. So, so many. I love The Gift of Healing Herbs by Robin Rose Bennett and Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz, as well as so many books from the 70s by obscure hippies and natural living advocates. Living on the Earth by Alicia Bay Laurel, for example. Knowledge -- What was your path to studying herbology and founding Wooden Spoon Herbs? I came to herbs when looking for a path to self-sufficiency. I romanticized living off the land, providing all that I would need for myself through my connection to the earth. And thats basically how it happened. I got all the books I could find about herbalism, read them, and started making herbal remedies. I started selling them slowly and it just kind of took off. Then I got to put my business hat on and thats been such a rewarding challenge. -- Can you talk a little bit about your decision to work only with herbs native to your home region of Appalachia? Theres so much to say about this. When I started opening my eyes to the bounty that surrounded me, it struck me as absurd to order herbs from suppliers that sourced from the far corners of the earth, when we had so many of the same herbs that could be sourced from the bioregion of Appalachia. For example, why am I going to order nettle that comes from Croatia when my friend has an acre of it on her farm? And no offense to Croatia or the herbalists that use those sources, but it just wasnt for me. I saw the opportunity to create a righteous supply chain and source from local farmers and forage my materials. To this day I still source directly from small organic farms around the country. Appalachias medicinal herbs are legendary: ginseng, goldenseal, bloodroot. People from all over the world use these herbs exclusively. And many of the herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine grow in Appalachia, because when the continents were Pangea parts of what is now China and parts of Appalachia were the same land. The geography of these regions is still very similar, and that is really special. So I wanted to learn about these plants for myself, because they are my neighbors and we share the same space. Not to mention that my family has been on this land for at least five generations, probably more. Its my most recent ancestral tradition, and I think its really important to learn about the traditions of your own ancestors so that youre not co-opting someone elses. Our pasts are precious. Finally, I believe in slow, local medicine for the same reasons I believe in slow, local foods – because theyre more potent and they taste better. -- What are some of your best-selling products and what herbs is your customer most excited about at the moment? My bestsellers are the Anxiety Ally, Brain Tonic, Moontime Magic and Migraine Melter tinctures. Elderberry Sumac Syrup is always a hit, as well as the Golden Cocoa (adaptogenic golden milk meets hot chocolate). I also have some new, more esoteric offerings based on the elements, and the Spirit one has been selling really well. I think my customers are just always after herbs that ground and expand the spirit, which is super beautiful. That and herbs for stress, always. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment?  Podcasts! All the podcasts: Medicine Stories, Thats So Retrograde, So You Wanna Be A Witch, Being Boss. That and the color cobalt blue. -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? I love seeking out hot springs, getting massages and acupuncture, going to the movies with my partner and eating at good restaurants. In the summer, swimming in the river behind my house and lying in the sun. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Caravan by Stephen Gaskin Song/­­Album – Tried So Hard by Gene Clark Piece of art – the entire Motherpeace tarot deck -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? My favorite mohair cardigan, a striped shirt, high-waisted leggings and denim, Poppy & Somedays Gypsy Rose Toner, whatever books Im reading, a notebook and Uniball pen, magazines, calming tinctures, bagged tea, thermos, Ricardo Medina botines, charcoal toothbrush -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Jess Fuery, Beatrice Valenzuela, Shiva Rose, the founders of Cap Beauty, Ashley Neese, Connie Matisse of East Fork Pottery, jeweler Annika Kaplan, Erica Chidi Cohen, Rachel Craven, Beth Kirby of Local Milk, Rachel Budde of Fat and the Moon, Kristen Dilley of Nightingale Acupuncture, and, naturally, Ilana Glazer Photos by Beth Kirby and Lauren Haynes You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Haynes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Top 10 Benefits of Green Smoothies

April 6 2017 VegKitchen 

Top 10 Benefits of Green Smoothies The benefits of green smoothies are many and varied -- they’re easy to digest, keep you hydrated, increase your energy, get your skin glowing, and more. They can include spinach, lettuce, kale, and collard greens. For the more advanced green smoothie drinker, you can also add parsley, dandelion greens, watercress -- really, any leafy green […] The post Top 10 Benefits of Green Smoothies appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage

November 6 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage This past week, we posted a recipe for a Whole Braised Holiday Cauliflower, which was pictured served with this very nourishing and super tasty Celeriac and Parsnip mash. We promised to come back with the mash recipe this weekend, so here it is. I grew up on mashed potatoes – my mom probably made them twice a week or more, which is quite standard for a Russian household, where potatoes somehow make it into every meal every day. I love mashed potatoes to this day and can easily put away a good portion, which I think is true for a lot of people due to the dish’s comfort food status. I remember discovering that other roots could be eaten as a mash upon moving to the U.S. – I was at one of my first Thanksgiving dinners and was quite impressed with the mashed sweet potato option that was offered. Slowly, I came around to the idea at home, and now, whenever I have a craving but don’t feel like being weighed down by the inevitably large portion of mashed potatoes I will consume, I make something similar with other, more nutritious and lighter roots. This celeriac and parsnip mash is my absolute favorite version for that scenario. Each of the pale roots are known for their unique, characteristic flavors, which combine well in this mash and become quite complementary with that earthy sweetness they both have going on. This is mash elevated – lighter and more nourishing than mashed potatoes and more interesting in flavor than mashed sweet potato, but still starchy, creamy and very comforting. This stuff is great to have on your holiday table to surprise your guests with something new, yet familiar, or just make a batch of it to have alongside your meals for the week, to get more nutritious wintery roots in your diet. Frying up sage leaves until they are crispy is an easy trick for fancying up a modest looking autumn dish like this one, and the chip-like sage itself is surprisingly delicious. There are some weekend links after the jump, have a cozy Sunday ;) How to Master the Art of Getting Noticed – Austin Kleon’s advice to aspiring artists Salad for President – always so much good stuff on this website, like Leif Hedendal cooking salad at the David Ireland House, Yuri Shimojo’s home and Japanese Crudité Recipe, Laila Gohar’s food as installation art and more The Woman Code Cleanse Review – just read Alisa Vitti’s The Woman Code (and loved it), and was very excited to read about Dana’s experience of the gentle four-day cleanse proposed in the book Noël Graupner – new instagram crush, plant-based private chef with an Ayurvedic tradition background and great photography skills Street Vendors of Hanoi, Photographed from Above – amazing Jade Rolling – have you tried it? I saw a lady doing this on the subway recently (weird setting for that), and it looked really relaxing. Three New Cookbooks, for Health’s Sake – so many health-centered cookbooks coming out nowadays, and these three look great (two of them are from our publisher!) I have a copy Dandelion and Quince and it’s a beauty. Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 large or 2 medium celeriacs - peeled and roughly chopped 2-3 parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped sea salt 1 large red onion - peeled and sliced into 8 wedges 1-2 garlic heads - separated into cloves (no need to peel the cloves) coconut oil - to taste freshly ground black pepper any plant milk or cooking water from boiling the roots - to taste ghee or olive oil - to taste 1 small bunch sage - leaves smoked paprika - for garnish (optional) olive oil - for garnish (optional) Instructions Preheat oven 400° F (200° C). Bring celeriac and parsnips to a boil in a large pot of water. Reduce heat to a strong simmer and cook vegetables for 10-15 minutes, until soft throughout, adding salt towards the end. Place onion and garlic onto a parchment paper-covered baking tray. Add coconut oil, salt, pepper and mix well. Bake for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, garlic should be done but the onions might need more time - in this case, remove garlic from oven and finish baking the onion until completely soft and caramelized. Slip garlic cloves out of their shells. Drain the boiled vegetables, reserving some of the cooking liquid if youll be using it in place of plant milk. Place vegetables into a large bowl together with the roasted garlic and mash with a potato masher to your desired consistency. Place roasted onion and ½ cup plant milk/­­cooking water into a blender and blend until smooth. Add blended onion to the mashed vegetables, adding more liquid if needed to achieve your desired consistency. Add ghee or olive oil to taste. Alternatively, mix all the vegetables in a food processor together with the plant milk/­­cooking liquid, which will make for a smoother, less textured puree. Heat 2-3 tablespoons coconut oil in a medium pan on medium heat. Add well-dried sage leaves to the pan along with salt and pepper and fry, stirring, for a couple of minutes until crispy. Mix the oil left over from frying the sage into the mash. Optionally, mix in some of the crispy sage into the mash as well. Garnish mash with crispy sage, smoked paprika and olive oil, and serve. Notes You can use just celeriac or just parsnips for this mash as well. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Spice-Roasted Carrots with Lentils from Modern Potluck (& a Givea... Sweet Potato and Brussels Sprout Gratin Chocolate Fudge with Fresh Sage and Goji Berries Raw Rainbow Lasagne with Heirloom Tomatoes, Mushrooms, and Castelvetra... .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca

October 12 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca This weekend, we are off to a log cabin in the Appalachian Mountains with the whole family. Our kitchen is finally being taken apart in preparation for renovations, so we’re getting away from the dust and craziness for a week while the space gets stripped. The cabin is in a pretty remote and quiet place, and the leaves are turning – all great reasons to chill, hike, meditate, and get some much needed sleep. I’ve already packed up all the ingredients for this mocha to bring on the trip, since it’s been my favorite thing to drink in the mornings, and I can’t wait to sit on the cabin porch, sipping on this cozy herbal coffee. The base for this drink is roasted chicory root, a common coffee substitute, which gives it the deep flavor and rich color. In the U.S., chicory coffee is known as New Orleans style coffee, where it became popular during the Civil War, when the importing of coffee was stalled due to blockades. Chicory is also very common throughout Europe, and I grew up in a culture, where it was highly regarded as a medicinal plant and foraged in the summer for making herbal tea. Chicory is easy to distinguish in the wild due to its bright blue flowers (pick some if it grows around you!) and is related to dandelion, so you can use Dandy Blend here if you can’t get your hands on pure chicory (Dandy Blend includes both dandelion and chicory roots). It contains no caffeine, is rich in vitamin C and has the highest concentration of inulin of all plants. When roasted and ground, chicory miraculously resembles the flavor and depth of coffee. These days, I mostly try to stay away from caffeine, so coming up with drinks that will provide some of that much-needed comfort in the morning, minus the jitters, makes me quite happy. I add raw cacao and maca powders here for an energy boost, which also contribute more wealth to the flavor and take this drink into the ‘mocha’ territory. I’m in love with this cozy sip and find myself craving it throughout the day. It’s great hot and equally as good chilled, after some time in the fridge, or even iced. We’ve accumulated quite a few interesting links, which we are sharing today. We will be back with our weekend link roundups, along with all kinds of other good stuff very soon ;) Enjoy. Inside Glossier – I find this beauty company’s no-makeup makeup strategy and image quite fascinating and inspiring, so I found this in depth article and interview with their founder very interesting How I Built This – I listen to podcasts almost every day in the kitchen, and get very excited when a new, high-quality one comes out. This one is by NPR and has a series of interviews with successful entrepreneurs about how they started their businesses. So far they’ve interviewed creators of Instagram, Vice, Spanx and more. Reluctance NY – love cool bakery instagrams like this one Sans Ceuticals Journal – a natural beauty company with a journal full of clever, health-centric recipes like lacto pickles, Buddhist lunch, vegan butter, Bloodlesss Mary, vegan berry Eton Mess and much more How the Sugar Industry Shifted Blame to Fat – this is crazy!!! Navigating the Beauty Supplement Aisle Interview with Jacqui Lewis – Vedic meditation teacher Lauren Spencer King – studio and short interview, love the photos here Eat This Food – refreshingly unique food blog design Behind the Scenes with Solange + love her new, perfectly pastel videos, one, two Herbal Mocha with Chicory and Maca   Print Serves: 2 Ingredients 1 teaspoon roasted and ground chicory root 2 soft Medjool dates - pitted 1⅓ cup boiling water 1 cup unsweetened almond milk or other plant milk 1 tablespoon raw cacao powder 2 teaspoons maca powder ½ tablespoon mesquite powder (optional) seeds of ½ vanilla bean (optional) 1 teaspoon coconut oil - if drinking hot (optional) Instructions Place chicory into a strainer or a tea bag and combine with dates in a heat-proof vessel. Pour boiling water over them and leave for 10 minutes to steep. Combine chicory coffee, dates, almond milk, cacao, maca, mesquite, vanilla, and coconut oil, if using, in an upright blender. Blend until smooth and frothy. Serve warm, chilled or over ice. 3.5.3208 You might also like... 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Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables

April 15 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables I’m a savories-for-breakfast type of person, although you wouldn’t be able to tell when looking at the breakfast section in our recipe index. I’m working on correcting that and including more non-sweets in the mix. I enjoy an occasional smoothie bowl or porridge with dried fruit, especially when making them for Paloma, but having a breakfast that’s not too sugary always sets me up for the day in the best way possible. During the Flordia growing season, when I go to the farmer’s market every weekend, I like to have a salad for breakfast. I can make it filling or light, depending on my needs that day, but I just cannot resist those super fresh greens any time of the day. When it’s a bit chillier outside, I love a savory porridge with any seasonal add ins, which is where these creamy steel cut oats come in. Steel cut oats have a longer cooking time than their rolled counterparts, but, in my opinion, their superior flavor and texture makes it all worth it. They have a potential to be very creamy, but not too mushy, and to maintain a nice bite, which I’m crazy about. Consider making this breakfast this weekend. It takes a little more time and attention than a quick weekday breakfast, and it’s loaded with all the green and crunchy things that spring provides to us this time of year – sugar snaps, snow peas, asparagus, greens and broccoli. There are mushrooms and pine nuts too, for ultimate indulgence. The great thing about this recipe is that you can customize it according to what you have, to your mood, or time of year. Add fruit instead of veggies, sprinkle with favorite crunchy toppings, include spices, and so on. Enjoy the weekend! Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables serves 4 -6 2 tablespoon neutral coconut oil or ghee – divided 1 cup steel cut oats 3 cups hot water sea salt – to taste 1 cup homemade almond milk or canned coconut milk 1/­­4 cup pine nuts 1/­­2-1 lb shiitake – stems removed, caps sliced about 1 1/­­2 cup broccoli florets large handful sugar snaps/­­snow peas – strings removed if present about 5 asparagus sprigs – tough ends removed, sliced diagonally about 1 cup green peas – fresh or frozen about 2 cups baby spinach/­­arugula/­­dandelion/­­watercress 1 tablespoon tamari 1. Warm 1 tablespoon coconut oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat until melted. Add steel cut oats and toast until golden and fragrant. 2. Add 3 cups of hot water and salt. Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a slow simmer and let cook, covered, for 25 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent oats from sticking to the bottom of the pan. Add almond/­­coconut milk and simmer, partially covered, for another 15 minutes. Keep stirring periodically to prevent any sticking. Use this time to prep vegetables. 3.When the porridge is about 10 minutes from being done, warm the remaining 1 tablespoon of oil in a medium saute pan over medium low heat. Add a pinch of salt and pine nuts and toast them for about 2 minutes, until golden. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. 4. Increase heat to medium. Add shiitake, broccoli, sugar snaps, asparagus and a pinch of salt and saute for about 5 minutes, until vegetables are bright green. Add peas and spinach, stir until spinach just wilted. Stir vegetables and tamari into the porridge, once its cooked. Remove from heat and let stand for a couple of minutes. 5. Distribute between bowls to serve, garnish with toasted pine nuts.

Salad with Ghee Poached Radishes and Smoked Salt

May 12 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Salad with Ghee Poached Radishes and Smoked Salt Sarah B. of My New Roots hardly needs an introduction. Her blog has been a major source of inspiration for a long time now, and I look forward to her new posts, which are always full of interesting culinary ideas and encouraging nutritional facts. Sarah has a talent for explaining the benefits of whole foods in a friendly, approachable, yet very knowledgeable way, which without fail leaves me hungry after reading her posts. Sarah was one of the few people to see an early copy of our cookbook and wrote a very kind review, for which we are thankful. Sarah’s new, much anticipated cookbook is a beauty, full of inspiring photographs, engaging writing and appetizing recipes. She covers the basics – sprouting, nut milks, ghee and the like – and then goes on to presenting delicious, healthy recipes for all five seasons, dividing Summer into Early and Late Summer (with which I agree with much enthusiasm – those two are quite different in terms of produce). I chose to make this spring salad with Ghee Poached Radishes, having never tried cooked radishes before. I immediately regretted waiting to try it as long as I did. Sautéing radishes rids them of any bitterness, transforming them into mildly sweet, silky spheres. I even threw them on pizza, which turned out delicious. Smoked sea salt is another interesting ingredient that this recipe calls for. I bought a bottle of it months ago but could never find a dish to incorporate it into. I was happy to finally utilize the beautiful, grey colored salt in this recipe, and it worked perfectly with the buttery radishes. Among the recipes I plan on trying from the My New Roots cookbook are Caramelized Fennel on Herbed Polenta, Roasted Cauliflower with Lebanese Lentils and Kaniwa, Ginger-Rosemary Roasted Grapefruit, Salt ‘n’ Pepper Chocolate Chip Cookies, and I’m confident that any reader of this blog will benefit from having Sarah’s book on their kitchen bookshelf. Salad with Ghee Poached Radishes and Smoked Sea Salt 1 bunch radishes – tops removed 2 tablespoons ghee (I’ve also tried unrefined neutral coconut oil here, it works well) 2 garlic cloves – minced pinch of sea salt 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 2 teaspoons raw honey or pure maple syrup about 3 cups arugula or other salad greens (the original recipe calls for dandelion) smoked sea salt – for sprinkling over the salad sunflower sprouts or other microgreens for garnish – optional 1. Slice radishes in half lengthwise or quarters for bigger sized ones. 2. Melt the ghee (or coconut oil) in a large pan over medium low heat. Add garlic and saute for about one minute. Increase the heat to medium and add radishes, cut side down, together with a pinch of salt. Saute for about 10 minutes until they become translucent and tender, but not mushy. 3. Drizzle the vinegar over the radishes and toss to coat. Remove the pan from heat and drizzle honey over, tossing to incorporate. 4.  Arrange arugula or your greens of choice on plates, top with radishes and drizzle the juice from the pan over the salad. Garnish with microgreens, if using, and season with smoked sea salt.

Rhubarb Vanilla Meringue Tart

May 6 2015 seitan is my motor 

Rhubarb Vanilla Meringue TartI am so behind on blogging, it’s embarrassing. My draft folder is full. But there is something that keeps me from posting here. One and a half months ago I took up learning another language. Right now my head is spinning. I am trying to memorise personal pronouns, tense prefixes and suffixes, and weekdays. Before that I spent three weeks learning to trill the r. Which I was never able to do before, and believe me, I tried. But now, with the help of several Youtube videos (especially this and this one), I can do it most of the time if it’s surrounded by some nice vowels. I also learned to read and write. Yes, that is right. I am learning to read and write all over again. Because I left my European comfort zone by taking up an Arabic class. I was always decent at learning languages – except for Latin, but that was because there’s no one to talk to unless you’re friends with the pope – and I guess that’s why I signed up for this new class without thinking twice. Well, it has been challenging. And slow. We learned to read, we’re practicing to write, and we’re doing tons of grammar. My small talk skills are still very lacking. But I guess I should be more patient.  I am getting a general concept of the language and that is very important and useful. It’s something you don’t feel you have at first when everything is written in letters you can’t read. When even the alphabet comes in a completely new order and with several letters you cannot pronounce. And when there’s not a single similarity to any other language you learned before. Because those languages were either related to Latin (Spanish) or Latin and German (English) or German (Norwegian). All of this is very exiting but naturally it steals a lot of time. Time I would normally spent cooking and photographing for this blog. Instead of baking or reading other blogs,  I am now watching Arabic Youtube videos. Last Sunday, when I tried to practice for a dictation exercise, I was reminded that there was about a kilo of rhubarb in our kitchen. And  I had promised to make a cake. But what cake? My brain was toasted, I had no ideas for any kind of recipe. So I looked at my blog and decided to do a simplified version of a rhubarb pie I posted four years ago (wow!). At that time I felt bad for putting the recipe up. It was a delicious cake but it called for an uncommon ingredient: dandelion honey. Rhubarb is such a simple and humble vegetable, so why add something as fancy to the ingredient list of this pie? I probably was just super exited about my little jar of vegan honey. (To be honest, it’s not really fancy. You can make it at home, it’s made from sugar, water, and dandelion flowers.)Whatever, last Sunday I rewrote the recipe. The tart/­­pie is now made with the most accessible ingredients you can think of. It’s a simple recipe, with a very tender, sweet crust and  a tart filling that calls only for a hint of sugar. But there is a little twist to it. I made another batch of marshmallow fluff  for an easy and super sweet and sticky meringue topping. A perfect Sunday treat and some brain food that made learning those letters and prefixes a lot easier. Notes: Refinded coconut oil is very common where I live. If you cannot get it and don’t mind the coconut flavour, use unrefined coconut oil instead. Margarine should work fine, too. To make the marshmallow fluff for this recipe, double the amount of sugar (100 g or 1 cup powdered sugar). You can also omit the fluff and use coconut whipped cream instead, or leave the tart naked. Print Rhubarb Vanilla Meringue Tart IngredientsFor the rhubarb filling 750 g rhubarb, sliced into 1 cm (1/­­2 inch) pieces (6 cups or 1 lb and 10 oz) 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar 1 tablespoon cornstarch For the crust 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 250 g flour (2 cups plus 1/­­2 tablespoon) 200 g (1/­­2 cup) sugar 110 g (1/­­2 cup) soft refined coconut oil, cubed zest of one orange For the custard 240 ml (1 cup) soy milk 30 g (1/­­4 cup) cornstarch 50 g (1/­­4 cup) sugar For the soft meringue 1 recipe marshmallow fluff made with 100 g (1 cup) powdered sugar InstructionsTo make the filling, combine rhubarb, sugar, and cornstarch. Let sit for about an hour and stir well from time to time. To make the crust, mix salt, flour, and sugar in a bowl. Add coconut oil and orange zest. Mix with your hands and form into a crumbly dough. Make sure the fat is incorporated well and there are no lumps of coconut oil remaining. Grease a springform pan (26-27 cm or 10 inch) with fat. Preheat oven to 180°C (350°F). Pour the dough into the pan. Press into the bottom and the sides of the pan. (Only line about 2.5 cm or 1 inch of the sides with dough. You just want a small border, so the filling doesnt leak.)Set aside. For the custard, combine soy milk, cornstarch, and sugar in a small saucepan. Whisk until the starch is dissolved and bring to a boil. Cook for 1-2 minutes, or until thickened. Pour over the crust. Sprinkle rhubarb on top. Bake for 40 minutes. While the tart is baking, prepare the marshmallow fluff. Transfer to a piping bag with a star tip right before the cake is done. Pipe dollops on top of the tart, increase the temperature to 200°C (400°F) and bake for another 10 minutes, until the meringue is browned. Let cool completely and remove from pan. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­05/­­rhubarb-vanilla-meringue-tart/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com Rhubarb Vanilla Meringue Tart is a post from: seitan is my motor

Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday

June 26 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday Papaya is one of my favorite things to eat this time of year, so figuring out a papaya sorbet recipe that worked was very exciting. It admittedly took me a few tries. One version that involved banana came out tasting quite strange, while another one just tasted like plain ice.  Then I had a revelation about the fact that papaya always pairs amazingly well with lime – both are tropical in flavor, and lime gives creamy and mild papaya just the right hint of brightness and zing. Presented here as a very refreshing version of a sundae, with delicious and healthful add-ins – desiccated coconut, cacao nibs (which we sprinkle on everything sweet in this house), and a drizzle of Lady Date pure date syrup, an amazing new discovery (thank you Laura for the tip). In the absence of this sorbet, we’ve been having fresh papaya slices with all the same add-ins, as an easy summer dessert. Since our book manuscript is due this coming Thursday, we’ve had our heads down and haven’t had the time to read any interesting articles for our Sunday link list. Instead, we thought it would be fun to compile a list of old and new cookbooks that have been inspiring us and helping us get through these final stages of the manuscript, whether with their recipes, visually or both. Read on for the list and have a relaxing Sunday! Bowl by Lukas Volger Gjelina by Travis Lett Hartwood by Eric Werner Nopi by Yotam Ottolenghi Ayurveda: The Science of Self Healing by Vasant Lad Dandelion and Quince by Michelle McKenzie (got a sneak peak from my publisher and it’s a beauty) Ripe and Tender by Nigel Slater It’s All Easy by Gwyneth Paltrow At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen by Amy Chaplin Hot to Cook a Wolf by MFK Fisher Sweeter Off the Vine by Yossi Arefi Papaya Lime Sundae   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 medium papaya - peeled, seeded and roughly chopped ½ cup freshly squeezed lime juice - from about 3 limes ⅓ cup maple syrup pinch sea salt cacao nibs - to taste desiccated coconut - to taste pure date syrup - to taste Instructions Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of cacao nibs, coconut and date syrup, in a blender and blend until smooth. Chill the mixture well in the refrigerator, preferably overnight. Churn in an ice-cream maker for 20 minutes or according to the manufacturers instructions. Spoon into a container and freeze for at least 2 hours before serving. Top with cacao nibs, desiccated coconut and pure date syrup. 3.5.3208 You might also like... Zucchini Blossoms with Roasted Eggplant Raw Summer Fruit Samosas and a Guest Post for My Sweet Faery Black Bean Chocolate and Fig Cookies Kaffir Lime Mango Ice-Cream .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Papaya Lime Sundae - Ice Cream Sunday appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Q & A: Daily Greens CEO and Breast Cancer Survivor Shauna Martin

October 27 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Q & A: Daily Greens CEO and Breast Cancer Survivor Shauna Martin In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness month, we asked breast cancer survivor Shauna R. Martin ten questions to get to know her and her business a little better. Shauna is not only surviving but thriving as founder and CEO of Daily Greens, which is distributed in more than 2,000 outlets including Whole Foods, Krogers,  Safeway, and Costco. VT: What inspired you to begin juicing? Shauna: I vividly recall sitting on the floor of my shower with water and tears streaming down my face trying to figure it all out. I could not stop thinking . . . why me? What did I do wrong? On July 28, 2005, my sons first birthday, I had been diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of thirty-three. My life was flashing before my eyes, as I struggled with the question of whether I was ready to die. It did not take me long to conclude that I was in fact not ready to die–I had a young child and a husband to live for! I had to muster the strength to get out of the shower and take care of my family, but 9 months of chemotherapy and a year of surgeries to first remove my breasts and then reconstruct them had left me weak, bald, and hopeless. After all that I had been through, my doctors told me I still had an up to 40% chance of a recurrence. I wondered how that could that possibly be, after everything I had done to fight my cancer over the past two years? One thing I knew for sure: I had to stay alive for my son and husband, so I resolved to get up off the shower floor and do something about it. I had heard that food could have powerful healing attributes, so I decided to investigate. I read everything I could get my hands on, and my journey lead me to understand that a plant-based diet, filled with raw vegetables, could not only help detox my body from all the toxins from my breast cancer treatment, but it could also potentially prevent a recurrence of my breast cancer. I was so excited to finally find something that would be under my control, so I went for it. I read that the most efficient way to consume raw veggies was to juice them, so I ordered my first juicer and started making a green juice every day. I immediately started to regain my energy and my former stamina. My hair grew back quickly, my skin and eyes started to glow. I was blown away, so I studied further and determined that the right thing for me was to move to a fully plant-based diet. This took several years of slowly eliminating animal protein from my diet, but when I finally got there, the result was amazing. I still eat a fully vegan and plant-based diet 10 years later, and I now know the answer to the why? I was meant to go on my breast cancer journey and struggle so that I could help bring a message of health and hope to America! VT: Whats the process for making these juices? Shauna: All of our juices start with a base of dark leafy greens because greens are the most nutrient dense plants on the planet. We source raw, organic whole greens, veggies, and fruits from farmers we know. We then cold-press them in our state-of-the-art juicing facility. We make them safe for our customers by then putting our finished bottles in our high pressure machine which kills harmful bacteria, while preserving all the nutrients. VT: Tell us about the flavors. Shauna: Our core line of green juices consists of six wonderful flavors using a variety of dark greens, juicy veggies, and fruits. They are all low in calories and sugars, with no added water. We use a large variety of dark greens, ranging from spinach and kale to watercress and dandelion greens, with names like, Renew, Elevate, and Harmony. The very first flavor that I juiced and took to the farmers’ market was Vitality, which I developed after attending a BBQ with my friends and family in Texas. I knew if I was going to get folks in my home town of Austin, Texas to drink a dense green juice it needed to have that familiar sweet and salty taste of BBQ with a kick of heat. Vitality has pineapple juiced with the kale, pink Himalayan salt, and a touch of jalapeno. We also have a line of plant-based hemp protein drinks infused with super greens and other fabulous ingredients like matcha green tea. Our line of hemp milks are a convenient and natural source of plant-based protein, iron, and calcium. We launched the first nationwide line of kid-friendly raw, organic green, and fruit smoothies kmade from whole fruits and greens, making raw, organic, ready-to-drink green smoothies available for the whole family. Finally, our core line of green juices is available in a cleanse kit which contains an excerpt from my Daily Greens 4-Day cleanse book with instructions for completing a 4-day juice and raw food cleanse. VT: Whats your personal favorite flavor? Shauna: Purity, which is the original juice that I started making 10 years ago to help heal myself. Purity is wonderfully simple blend of just greens and veggies. Lately however, I have really been loving Rejuvenate, a blend of carrot and collard greens with a touch of turmeric. VT: Whats the best compliment youve received from someone trying a delicious green juice? Shauna: I was hosting a book signing one day at Whole Foods and a woman came rushing in and said she had just completed my 4-Day juice and raw food cleanse using Daily Greens juices and my vegan raw food recipes. She said: I have felt so terrible for so many years, and after drinking your juices and eating your raw vegan recipes I have more energy and feel better than I have in my entire life. Please tell me how I can continue to feel this way forever! I explained that all she had to do was continue her habit of drinking a green juice every day in combination with a plant-based diet. VT: What are the benefits of a cleanse? Shauna: Periodically giving your intestines a break from digesting will help cleanse your cells of toxins and detox both your body and your mind. This can be accomplished by doing a juice and raw fruit fast during the day and then consuming a raw vegetable dinner, high in fiber, to help move toxins out of the body. It is important to include green juice in any cleanse to continually infuse the body with nutrients and electrolytes as well as lots of high fiber salads and raw vegetable dishes to help move the intestines on a regular basis. Check out our blog, Are Juice Cleanses Healthy? VT: Whats your favorite recipe on Vegetarian Times website? I love this Orange-Sunflower-Slaw recipe. It is very similar to a slaw I make on a regular basis in the summer, but with the addition of orange and sunflower seeds. So fun and yummy! VT: Which breast cancer organizations does Daily Greens benefit? Shauna: Daily Greens has partnered with and donates a portion of its top line sales to the Young Survival Coalition. This is the only national organization specifically focused on the needs of young women battling breast cancer. Having gone through breast cancer at such a young age, I understand the huge need for resources for women under the age of 40 facing breast cancer, and the YSC provides those resources on a national basis. VT: Whats one thing people would be surprised to learn about these juices? Shauna: Folks are usually really surprised at how good our Daily Greens juices are. They are also usually surprised at how different all of them taste, given that they are all very similar in color. VT: What is one thing people should know about the juices? Shauna: I really believe so much in the healing power of drinking a green juice every day, so I encourage folks to try all of our Daily Greens flavors until they find the one that they crave. If folks dont have access to Daily Greens ready-to-drink juices then I encourage making them at home. Whatever it takes, my mission and vision is that everyone gets a green juice in their life each and every day.      

A Book Tour and a Full Heart

May 11 2015 My New Roots 

A Book Tour and a Full Heart Hi. Its been a while. I guess I should have expected that touring with my cookbook would be more than just totally life-affirming and amazing - turns out its quite a time-intensive thing, and in between gigs I find it difficult to much other than feed myself and rest! But I am not complaining, just explaining my absence. I could actually fill this entire post with my overflowing gratitude for everything thats happened in the past few weeks. But I think some pictures would help tell the story - I once heard that each one is worth a thousand words. I will take a brief moment however to say thank you. Everyone who has been a part of and engaged in this tour in some way has really put it all in perspective for me. Its so strange how most of what I do is completely solitary, and even when I put a post out into the world, I cannot see who is reading, where, or that they actually cook the recipes. In a way, I like it this way - less pressure and responsibility for little ol me, because if I were to actually comprehend the scope of this I may feel slightly overwhelmed. But this project, my cookbook, finally being out in the physical world and me along with it, has shown me that My New Roots is so much bigger than I could have imagined. Meeting so many of you at book signings, lectures, cooking demos, and connecting through conversation across a dinner table, hearing your stories, how this little blog has touched you or changed your life in some way, feels like a miracle to me. And I am so, so humbled. Ive received boundless inspiration through these connections, and proof that this isnt just some teeny project anymore, but a veritable force. Much like literal roots this has grown silently under the surface, going deep and lateral and gaining enough life force before breaking through to where it receives the light it needs to thrive. That is what this tour is: a surfacing and a confirmation that we are building a powerful community of healthy people. I feel like every drop of energy Ive put into My New Roots from the first day has just hit me like a spectacular tsunami of love. A question I was asked a lot on tour was about the food blogging community, and whether or not I think it is competitive. Without hesitating, I always said heck no!, because my experience is quite the opposite. Among my peers I feel nothing but support, camaraderie, and celebration for one anothers achievements. When I asked fellow bloggers to review the cookbook, of course they said yes, because that is how we roll. I am honoured to post their gorgeous photos below, and share their perspectives on my recipes. So if you havent received a copy of the book yet, you can try out a number of the dishes from their posts! Thank you to everyone who participated. You are such an inspiring and talented bunch of people, and I am proud to share the blogosphere with you. Laura at The First Mess took a stab at making my raw vegan version of the Ben & Jerry’s classic and well-loved Chunky Monkey, and definitely one-upped me by adding a swirl of date syrup for a ripple effect. Nice one, Laura. You rock. Get the recipe here. Sara of Sprouted Kitchen tested and wrote about one of my favourite recipes in the book, Sunflower Sesame Seed Brittle, and one that I made many times on tour for readers to taste! You can read her post here. Emma from My Darling Lemon Thyme made my scrumptious Roasted Pumpkin on Black Rice with Tangerine Tahini Sauce. This sauce is boss, ya’ll. Pour it on everything! Check out the post and recipe here. Angela over at Oh She Glows made my scrumptious Banoffee Pie! A combination of banana, toffee, and coconut cream. Get the recipe here. Lane of Green Spirit Adventures made my Oyster Mushroom Bisque. Check out the recipe here. If you’re making recipes from the book and want to tag them, here’s what I’m using: #MNRcookbook And now for just a few highlights from the events in North America. Thank you again to everyone who helped put these together, and to all of you who came out to give me a high-five. It meant so much to me. A stunning dinner at Burdcok & Co. in Vancouver. The meal was all spring recipes from the cookbook. My interview and audio-only cooking demo – an interesting experience! – with the imcomparable Cherly McCay of CBC radio. Hear the program here, and skip to 35:45 to catch my segment. Enjoy! Barbara-Jo’s Books to Cooks hosted a My New Roots dinner right in the bookstore! A night to remember for sure. I did three televised cooking demos in Canada. Thanks to Global and CTV for their support! Book signing at the always inspiring Moon Juice in Los Angeles. I was high on green nut milk and all the love! Getting a tad silly with Jo and my Pi?a Colada Passionfruit Popsicles at Delish.com. I’ll post the video once it’s live. It’s a real hoot! Food52 invited me for lunch! I cooked my Ghee-Poached Radishes on Dandelion Greens with Smoked Sea Salt for lunch.  The Q&A and book signing at NeueHouse in NYC. Thanks to my gorgeous friend Pippa of Sous Style for the incredible night! Lastly, an interview at my all-time favourite station Heritage Radio Network in Bushwick, Brooklyn. And quite possibly the coolest recording studio of all time. I’ll post the podcast once it’s online!   So, I’m back in my kitchen now. A new blog post (a very rad one) is on the way and I know you’re going to love it. Stay tuned dear friends. xo, Sarah B

Mediterranean Vegetable Noodle Soup

October 27 2014 Meatless Monday 

Here’s an easy way to pack more of those super-healthy Mediterranean foods into your diet! Greens are stewed with tomatoes, fresh basil, sage and rosemary. Whole wheat macaroni and chickpeas transform this otherwise light soup into a hearty lunch. This recipe comes to us from Marti of Tofu n Sproutz! Serves 4. - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 sweet onion, finely chopped - 2 cloves garlic, minced - 2 cups tomato juice - 1/­­2 cup red wine - 2 cups fresh tomatoes, finely chopped - 2 cups low sodium vegetarian broth - 2 cups chickpeas, cooked, or 2 cups white beans, cooked - 3 tablespoons fresh basil, minced - 2 tablespoons fresh sage, finely minced, or 1 teaspoon dried sage - 1/­­2 teaspoon fresh rosemary, finely minced - 1/­­2 cup uncooked whole wheat macaroni, ABC or orzo pasta - 2 cups greens*, finely chopped - several drops hot sauce - salt and pepper, to taste *quicker cooking greens like chard, spinach, dandelion greens or beet greens work best in this soup. Place a large saucepan over medium-low heat. Cook the onion and garlic in the olive oil for 5-7 minutes, or until the onion is transparent. Add the tomato juice, wine and tomatoes. Simmer for 20-30 minutes, or until the tomatoes start to break down. Add the vegetable broth, cooked chickpeas or white beans, basil, sage and rosemary. Increase the heat to medium-high and bring the soup to a boil. Add the uncooked pasta and reduce the heat to simmer. Simmer for about 7 minutes, or until the pasta is cooked, but still firm. Add the green and simmer for 5 minutes more, or until the greens are soft and lightly cooked and the pasta is cooked to taste. Season with the soup with hot sauce and salt and pepper to taste. The post Mediterranean Vegetable Noodle Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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