currant - vegetarian recipes

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currant vegetarian recipes

Swirled Mousse Jars + US book events

April 11 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Swirled Mousse Jars + US book events So, David and I had a full evening without the kids last weekend (we still had the baby to look after but that is basically like holiday for us). Our grand plan was to go out for dinner at a busy Swedish/­­Japanese restaurant which we haven’t been to for years. Then rent a proper Hollywood movie and watch it in the couch (instead of the usual watching-half-a-tv-series-on-the-phone-while-the-kids-are-sleeping-on-top-of-us-mode) while eating a yummy dessert. It turns out that the food at that restaurant wasn’t as good as we remembered it and the movie was the worst catastrophe movie we have ever seen. Dessert was however right on point. Our first intention was to buy ice cream but we both felt slightly nauseous after dinner so David said he would improvise and make something fresh instead. These jars took 10 minutes to prepare (which he since then has speeded up to 7), looked pretty, had very few ingredients and tasted super good - creamy and limey with dark chocolate, crunchy nuts and nut butter on top. It’s a dessert that is very nice to keep up your sleeve, so we thought we’d share it with you. Encouraged by last weeks video, we did a short one of this recipe as well. Press play! US book events! And on the subject of being kid-free. David and I (+baby) are coming to the US for the release of our new book there. Yippie! We will be in New York for a couple of days to do some PR and press stuff. We have teamed up with Sur La Table and we’ll be doing a hands-on cooking class there on Sunday 30 April. Get your tickets for the class here! Be aware that there are only a limited amount of seats. We will also have a little mingle, book signing and Q&A at CAP Beauty on Monday May 1st. We would LOVE to meet and chat with as many of you as possible there. We don’t have an RSVP-link for that yet but will let you know as soon as we do. David will then continue on to the West coast for some more events there. I would have loved to join him but I simply couldn’t handle too many days of work while also looking after the little one + jetlag. And I don’t want to be away from the other kids too long either. Sorry! David is the funny and talented one of us anyway so you should definitely go see him. Although he will probably tell a lot of lies about me - dont believe him ;) The schedule isn’t entirely ready yet. He will host another Sur La Table cooking class in Los Angeles May 5th. Get your tickets here! There will also be a mingle, book signing an Q&A at Credo Beauty in LA and we will post the link for that asap. We will update soon with more information about a possible event in San Francisco too. Lots of love! /­­Luise PS. Notice that the baby currently is back on a no-name status - aaargh! Okay, back to these jars. You might recognize that the base is similar to the Key Lime Mousse in Green Kitchen Travels. The smart thing here is that we use the same base for the top layer as well but with an additional flavor, which makes it really simple and quick. Enjoy! Super-Quick Swirled Mousse Jars Serves 2 Note: It’s optimal to use chilled avocados or chilled glasses as you don’t want the bottom layer to be lukewarm. Best advice is to keep ripe avocados in the fridge. Or look for frozen precut avocado, which is becoming increasingly popular in the supermarkets (and often cheaper than buying fresh). 2 avocados 3 lime 6 soft dates, stoned 1 cup /­­ 150 g frozen blackcurrants (or frozen blueberries, raspberries or blackberries)  1/­­2 tsp cardamom 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml yogurt Topping 1 oz /­­ 20 g dark chocolate 10 almonds 2 dollops nut butter of choice Cut the avocados in halves, remove the stone, scoop out the flesh and add it to a food processor or blender (a food processor is a little easier as it has a wider base and this is thicker than a smoothie but a blender works if you add a splash of water) along with the juice of 3 lime and 6 soft dates. Mix until creamy, adding a splash of water if needed. Taste and add more lime or dates if needed. Scoop out half of the mousse into 2 jars. Add berries and cardamom to the remaining avocado mousse in the blender and mix again until smooth. Add a few spoons of yogurt to the jars and then add the berry mousse. Use the backside of a spoon to swirl the layers a bit and then top with dark chocolate, almonds and a large dollop of nut butter. Enjoy!

Carrot Pudding with Cardamom – Carrot Kheer Recipe

April 11 2017 Vegan Richa 

Carrot Pudding with Cardamom – Carrot Kheer RecipeCarrot Pudding with Cardamom – Carrot Kheer Recipe. Shredded Carrots slow cooked with almond milk, roasted nuts and cardamom. Serve as is or top with toasted nuts, seeds and chia. Vegan Gluten-free Grain-free Soy-free Nut-free option This carrot pudding is is mix of gajar halwa and rice pudding /­­kheer. The carrots are shredded and roasted a bit then cooked further in non dairy milk. The pudding is flavored with cardamom. Use other spice of choice, such as cinnamon, nutmeg or saffron. Add in some turmeric for a breakfast pudding. This makes a great dessert or breakfast. Sweet carrots need only a bit of additional sugar added. you can omit the sweetener and add more of chopped dried dates, figs or currants and a touh of maple syrup if needed.  Gorgeous, simple, gluten-free and grain-free. Easily made nut-free. Perfect for Easter.Continue reading: Carrot Pudding with Cardamom – Carrot Kheer RecipeThe post Carrot Pudding with Cardamom – Carrot Kheer Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Vegan Banana Bread with Toasted Walnuts and Coconut

February 2 2017 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Banana Bread with Toasted Walnuts and CoconutVegan Banana Bread with Walnuts. Classic Super moist Banana bread with toasted nuts and coconut. No Palm oil. Vegan Recipe. 1 Bowl, 1 Blender. There cannot be too many banana breads right. I love my 1 Bowl Banana Apple Bread. Its the right amount of sweet, moist and banana-ey. Its slightly different from the classic pound cake like banana bread. This version inspired by the many tips on serious eats, has shredded coconut, coconut oil, toasted nuts and lots more spice. The resulting loaf is a caremelly, bananey, nutty goodness, that you want to snack on morning and evening.  The wet ingredient list is blended up. Blend up the whole banana. The dry mixed in a bowl. Mix both, pour into a pan, Sprinkle walnuts and bake. Simple and ahmazing.  The bread is like a less sweet pound cake with amazing texture. I like to toast the walnuts and the coconut for deeper flavor. Add spices of choice. I use cinnamon, cardamom, nutmeg. These Bakery style Banana bread is great as is or with a drizzle of maple. If you use very ripe bananas and add in dried fruit like dates and currants, you can omit the added sugar.  Make this Coconutty 1 Bowl Vegan Banana Bread! Continue reading: Vegan Banana Bread with Toasted Walnuts and CoconutThe post Vegan Banana Bread with Toasted Walnuts and Coconut appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Brown Rice Kheer Recipe. Vegan Rice Pudding

October 24 2016 Vegan Richa 

Brown Rice Kheer Recipe. Vegan Rice PuddingBrown Rice Kheer Recipe. Vegan Rice Pudding. Indian Kheer for Diwali festival. Brown Rice simmered in almond cashew milk with cardamom, roasted nuts and currants or raisins. Vegan Gluten-free Recipe.  Diwali is this weekend! And that means sweets, savories, chivda, lighting oil lamps, prayers for prosperity and happiness and meeting everyone to share wishes.  Kheer is one of the favorite desserts in the festive season. It is easy, delicious with a dash cardamom or saffron and simmered for a long time till the rice is soft and almost dissolving into the milk. One of my aunts makes amazing kheer with soft rice that has soaked up all the milk and flavor, which would be slow cooked, chilled and served. I know rice pudding can be a like or dislike dish depending on memories and flavors. But for me memories around kheer are about all the extended family getting together, celebrating festivals and enjoying thick and fresh Indian Rice Pudding.  Continue reading: Brown Rice Kheer Recipe. Vegan Rice PuddingThe post Brown Rice Kheer Recipe. Vegan Rice Pudding appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Turmeric Steel Cut Oats Recipe

April 5 2016 Vegan Richa 

Turmeric Steel Cut Oats RecipeHow to make perfect Turmeric Steel Cut Oats or Golden Milk Oats with toasty oats, turmeric, cinnamon and cardamom. Serve with Strawberries, chia seeds and other garnishes of choice. Easy Make ahead Breakfast Recipe. Ready in 30 minutes. Pin this post.  I have never been a fan of oatmeal made with rolled oats. Its just something about the texture and flavor that throws me off. I have tried old fashioned oats in oatmeal using various methods, mixed with various grains and what not, without luck. However, what works for me is oat flour and oats in baking. Lately, I discovered that I really like steel cut oats in terms of texture and flavor. So steel cut oats make my morning porridge or pudding instead of the old fashion oats.  This sunny Steel cut oats porridge is a breeze to put together. With the bright turmeric to brighten up your day, the subtle cinnamon and cardamom, the porridge can easily masquerade as a creamy dessert. Dress up your bowl as you wish. I use some pretty strawberries, currants, chia and pepita seeds. Turmeric is staple in a lot of savory Indian dishes. It is a fabulous spice to add to the diet with all its anti-inflammatory properties. The oats are toasted in a little oil. They can be dry roasted as well. Then simmered in a water and milk mix until cooked through. Then Turmeric, spices and sweetener are mixed in for another few minutes of simmer. Served warm or chilled with toppings of choice. Use broken wheat or buckwheat groats for variation.  Start the day with the best breakfast with these Turmeric Steel Cut Oats aka Steel cut oats in Golden Milk! Continue reading: Turmeric Steel Cut Oats RecipeThe post Turmeric Steel Cut Oats Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Blackcurrant and Lavender Pie

September 4 2015 seitan is my motor 

Blackcurrant and Lavender PieToday’s Vegan Mofo challenge is called “Tell us about a weird food combination that you love.” Ha, good one. I don’t think I like a single weird food combination. I am very boring when it comes to flavours and sweet and sour is already too much for me. When I think about new recipes for this blog, I usually go for complementing and supporting flavours. Some of these combinations could be labeled as weird. For example, I like tart berries a lot and I like to exaggerate their flavour by pairing them with herbs. Black currants, sea buckthorn, blackthorn (sloe) are rarely sold at stores. They haven’t made it next to the much sweeter varieties such as raspberries, strawberries, and cultivated blueberries. Black currants, sea buckthorn berries, or sloes all have different flavours, but they have one thing in common. If you taste them, their flavour makes you think of Scandianvian forest, of moss and water drops on dark green leaves. You can smell conifers and moldy soil. Or in the case of sea buckthorn you can feel the wind in your face and hear the waves. These berries have a complex flavour, a hint of intractability, that is not pleasant for everyone. Some of their flavour comes from the essential oils and tannins present.  That is why they are not widely popular, I think. But this is what makes them so outstanding. Herbs usually have essential oils, too and that’s why they go so well with tart berries.  My favourite combination used to be berry plus rosemary, but this year I finally made use of the lavender bush in our yard. I used two teaspoons of dried lavender buds, but you can halve the amount, if you don’t trust this flavour combination. But that probably doesn’t count as weird anymore. If you don’t have black currants available you can use blueberries.   Print Black Currant and Lavender Pie IngredientsFor the crust 210 g (1 3/­­4 cups) flour 200 g (2 2/­­3 cups) ground hazelnuts 100 g (1 sifted cup) powdered sugar 100 g (1/­­2 cup) granulated brown sugar 110 g (1/­­2 cup) soft refined coconut oil 60 ml (1/­­4 cup) vegetable oil 1/­­2 teaspoon ground vanilla 1/­­2 teaspoon salt For the topping 450 g blackcurrant jam (storebought or homemade) 2 teaspoons dried lavender buds InstructionsTo make the crust, combine all ingredients except for the oils in a bowl. Add coconut and vegetable oil and knead until a crumbly dough forms. Reserve 1/­­4 of the dough for the topping and form the remaining dough into a disk. Wrap in foil and place in the fridge for 30 minutes. Preheat oven to 200°C (400°F). Grease a round pie or tart pan with a diameter of 28 cm (11 inches). Roll the dough out between two sheets of plastic foil and press into the bottom and the edges of the pan. For the filling combine jam and lavender buds. (If the jam is very thick you can heat it for easier handling.) Pour into the crust and form the reserved dough into large crumbs. Distribute on top of the cake. Bake for 35 minutes and let cool completely before removing from the pan. 3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­09/­­blackcurrant-and-lavender-pie/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com

Doughnuts with Berry Glaze

July 14 2015 seitan is my motor 

Doughnuts with Berry GlazeOne day my daughter was sick and stayed home. In the afternoon we made a little walk around the neighbourhood, which is a city neighbourhood with lots of grocery stores, shops, and bars. It was spring and still cold and rainy. We walked past a bakery with had put a sign out. It pictured a couple of doughnuts, all in different bright colours. When F. saw the sign she begged me to buy a batch. The bakery was one of those chains with self service and products made with much more than flour, yeast, salt, and water. Germany has come a long way with its bakeries, but it’s not a good one. Discounter stores with self service are popping up everywhere and their products are so cheap that they can’t be made in a bakery where employees are paid decent wages. Instead of quality you get a jamboree bag of enhancers and preservatives. These baked goods don’t keep fresh very long and taste pretty bland, but they can be produced quickly and without skilled employees, I guess. I didn’t want to spill all that over my kid, so I pulled out my second argument and mumbled something about “crushed bugs” in the glaze and asked her if she wanted to make her own doughnuts instead. After that I immediately thought, “Damn, why did I say that? Doughnuts take time and patience.” Even if I sometimes have these character traits, my doughter definitely doesn’t know what they mean. Ah, well. Sometimes I am my own little discounter store. I like shortcuts, too. So I decided we should pull out the doughnut pan and make some baking powder leavened baked treats instead of yeast leavened deep-fried ones. I used a simple muffin recipe as a base and for the frosting I cooked some raspberries, strained the juice and mixed it with powdered sugar. These quick fix donuts are not comparable to their fried counterparts, but my daughter still thought they were perfect. Since all kids love bright colours, these would be great for any kind of children’s (birthday) party and we will probably make them again. And even if you’re not a kid, you deserve bright colours and a little sugar, too. Note: The colour of the glaze can vary a bit. For some reason mine came out very bright red the first time I made these. The next time the glaze had more dark pink shades. So if you want red instead of dark pink, use frozen (or fresh) red currants or strawberries instead. The light pink version that you can also see in the pictures was made by thinning the glaze with some lemon juice. Print Doughnuts with Berry Glaze 12 doughnuts IngredientsFor the doughnuts 280 g (2 1/­­3 cups) all-purpose flour 150 g (3/­­4 cup) sugar 1 3/­­4 teaspoons baking powder 1/­­2 teaspoon ground vanilla 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 240 ml (1 cup) soy milk 120 g (1/­­2 cup) vanilla flavoured soy yoghurt 6 tablespoons oil For the glaze 130 g (1 cup) fresh or frozen raspberries 120 g (1 unsifted cup) powdered sugar sprinkles (optional) InstructionsGrease a 12-hole doughnut pan and preheat oven to 180°C (350°F). To make the doughnuts, combine all dry ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Add liquid ingredients and stir until most lumps are gone. Pour into the prepared pan and bake for 25 minutes or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean. Let cool for 5 minutes, remove from the pan and let completely before applying the glaze. For the glaze, place berries in a small pot and cover with a lid. Cook for about 5 minutes or until the raspberries have broken down. Drain the berries and reserve the juice. Place the powdered sugar in a small bowl. Add 2-3 tablespoons of berry juice. Start with 2 tablespoons and stir to see if youve reached the desired consistency (silky and pourable, but not too thin) and add more liquid if necessary. Brush the doughnuts with the glaze, coat with sprinkles and let dry completely.3.1 http:/­­/­­www.seitanismymotor.com/­­2015/­­07/­­doughnuts-with-berry-glaze/­­ Copyright (C)2015 All rights reserved. www.seitanismymotor.com Doughnuts with Berry Glaze is a post from: seitan is my motor

Movie on a Mission: Inhabit

April 9 2015 Vegetarian Times 

Movie on a Mission: InhabitPhoto: Costa Boutsikaris  The result of a three-year odyssey in what director/­­cinematographer Costa Boutsikaris calls his veggie-oil-solar-powered-filmmaking-mobile-unit (a converted VW van), Inhabit: A Permaculture Perspective documents ecological design systems in action across the U.S. Northeast and Midwest--from large-scale farms to urban rain gardens. Viewing permaculture as creating a regenerative agriculture that has the permanence and resilience of nature, Boutsikaris here answers questions about his visionary, and at the same time down-to-earth, film. Rather than reducing human impact, Inhabit looks at our leaving a footprint as a positive thing. How does that work? The modern environmental movement tells us that the only thing we can do is to shrink our footprint and be less bad. If you take that logic to its furthest extent, its saying that humans are inherently bad and that they less they exist, the better! Permaculture, which is an ecological design science, is about redesigning our systems so that they meet human needs while simultaneously regenerating the ecosystems within which we live. Its about going beyond sustainability because its asking, What is it were trying to sustain? Permaculture seeks to create not just sustainable but regenerative systems that heal the natural environment while feeding the people within it. If humans can have a regenerative footprint, that is much more exciting and empowering, and a huge impact is something we want to have. Where does permaculture fit in with animal welfare? There are no ecosystems that dont have animals, so, if youre designing a forest farm or garden where you want to mimic natural relationships, youll incorporate animals in their most natural state, eating bugs, grasses, etc., and cycling nutrients back into the soil just like in nature. Whether the animals are harvested or not is entirely up to the farmer, and we filmed examples of both vegans and omnivores, but the goal is always to design an ecosystem where the animals can be in a natural state and be a positive force in that ecosystem. Some we visited were not raising animals for meat, but merely having them as allies providing their many awesome ecosystem services and helping transform the landscape back into a much healthier and diverse state. Where could someone start with applying permaculture principles to their lawn or backyard? The first thing to do is to look at the all the inputs coming onto your site: rain, sun, wind, etc. Then look for ways to best capture those inputs: a rain barrel, solar panels, a wind turbine, trees, plants, etc. Look for opportunities for gardening like full-sun spots and shady spots, and use this map to design where a small vegetable garden could go and where shade-loving berries like red currants could go. If you want to set up a vegetable garden, explore sheet mulching and hugelkultur beds. Think about other options for the shaded areas, like growing shiitake mushrooms on logs and creating small ponds for frogs. If eggs are part of your diet, look at ways that chickens could benefit your garden, like eating pests and scratching up soil for future planting spots. The fun part is seeing how all these pieces start to form relationships, and where they mutually support each other and benefit each other just like in an ecosystem.

Blackberry Hazelnut Crumble Bars

September 26 2014 My New Roots 

Blackberry Hazelnut Crumble Bars   I am writing this on the very first day of autumn. Copenhagen has welcomed this season with classically crisp air and blindingly bright sun. People are stretched out along the banks of the harbour in the afternoon light, soaking in what will be the last blows of summers fight. Ugh. Can you feel it? Last week my family and I were out at our garden. On the cycle back home we stopped by the blackberry bramble that has overtaken a major section of the vacant land nearby. It towers over me, and extends along the bike path for half a block or more, an impenetrable wall of thorns and fruit. Happily there were a few berries left, just enough to pick for a dessert and a handful to snack on with my boys. Languishing in the last morsels of hot sun we felt the seasons shifting ever-so-slightly and celebrated with the ripest and blackest of berries, like summer captured in edible jewels.   But I got the berries home and suddenly I felt a lot of pressure. Kind of like when you impulse-buy those crazy-looking mushrooms at the farmers market and worry that whatever youre going to be making isnt special enough so you let them sit in your fridge too long until they go bad. Forehead slap. That was not going to happen to my berries. No way. Here was my thought process: Sarah B, relax. You like blackberries. You like crumble. You make too many crumbles. You dont make too many bars. Crumble bars. Whats a crumble bar? Stop asking questions. Lets do this.   I proceeded in the best way I knew how, by browsing the internet for ideas. It turns out crumble bars do exist, but I couldnt find any versions that were all that virtuous. Subbing this for that while keeping things as simple as possible, I came up with an edition that is made with whole foods, totally vegan, and easily made gluten-free. The crust is light and flaky, the filling is rich and bursting with juicy flavours and the crumble topping is crunchy and satisfying. Although I use hazelnuts in mine, you could substitute those with almonds - just leave a few of them really big because biting into a large toasted nut is delicious, especially combined with the oozy and sweet fruit center. Heavenly. Next year I am definitely going to try these bars with black currants in the early summer months, and maybe raspberries later on.   Freezing and Cooking: How do they affect nutrients? Pssst. I have a secret. Sometimes in the off-season, I do something totally crazy. I buy frozen berries. What is a nutritionist such as myself doing purchasing and even recommending frozen foods to people? For one, I live in Denmark where the availability of fresh food is pretty sad in the winter, obviously. And second Im a person that does things like everyone else, such as relying on conveniences when need be. Im okay with that. But what kind of affect does freezing have on foods, say blackberries for instance? Youd be surprised, and likely thrilled to learn, that freezing does not completely spoil the vitamins and minerals in food. In fact, youre looking at a mere 10-15% nutrient loss across the board. Vitamin C is the one vitamin that is most likely to dissipate, as once the fruit or veggie has been plucked from its source, vitamin C levels start to decline almost immediately. Luckily, vitamin C is the single more common and easily obtained vitamin in nature, and you can make up for that loss somewhere else in your day.   And what about cooking? This is a little more complicated, as it varies according to the specific nutrient in question and the type of cooking method. Fat soluble vitamins (D, E, K) are not destroyed by heat alone, and vitamin A is relatively stable. The B-vitamins are also heat stable, except for panthotenic acid (B5). Folate breaks down at very high temperatures. Vitamin C is the nutrient that takes the biggest hit by far, as it is one of the most delicate vitamins in nature. It is not only destroyed by heat, but also exposure to air and light. It is also water-soluble, meaning that steaming something containing vitamin C will be surely destroy it. As a general rule, minerals are very heat stable, especially when using cooking methods that do not employ water, like roasting or baking - there is almost no loss whatsoever. If you are steaming, boiling, braising, or blanching foods, both vitamins and minerals will leach out into the water. To preserve these precious nutrients, save the broth to drink, or freeze it for later use in a soup or stew. I use it to puree my babys food. Hell never know his millet porridge was cooked with broccoli water! Since this blog is read the world over, there will of course be a few of you out there who cant get themselves to a blackberry bramble, simply because it isnt the right season. No worries. Find a grocer with organic frozen blackberries and go to town. You should not wait to make these. Seriously.       Print recipe     Blackberry Hazelnut Crumble Bars Makes 12-16 bars Crust: 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ 250g rolled oats, divided (gluten-free if desired) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml applesauce 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml pure maple syrup 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50g whole rolled oats 3/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 tsp. baking powder Filling: 4 cups /­­ 400g blackberries (fresh or frozen) 1/­­2 Tbsp. ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. ground nutmeg 1/­­4 tsp. fine grain sea salt zest of 1 organic lemon 1/­­2 Tbsp. arrowroot powder (or organic, non-GMO cornstarch) 1 Tbsp. maple syrup Crumble Topping: 1 cup /­­ 100g rolled oats 2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 2 Tbsp. coconut oil (or ghee) 2/­­3 cup /­­ 75g hazelnuts 1/­­2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1/­­4 tsp. sea salt 2 Tbsp. flour, gluten-free if desired (I used brown rice flour) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350°F/­­175°C. 2. In a food processor blend 2 cups /­­ 200g oats on high until you have a rough flour. Add applesauce, maple syrup, coconut oil, and vanilla. Pulse until moist. 3. In a separate bowl combine the remaining 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50g rolled oats, salt, and baking powder. Add food processor contents and fold to combine, using your hands to mix - the dough will be quite firm. 4. Place the dough into a lightly greased 8x8 brownie pan and press firmly, especially around the edges - it helps to wet your hands so that the dough doesnt stick. 5. Without cleaning the food processor, add the all the ingredients for the crumble topping, and pulse a few times to mix. You can chop the ingredients as finely as you like, but I left mine very chunky - its your call. 6. To make the filling, place all ingredients in a medium bowl and toss to combine. Put them on top of the uncooked crust and spread evenly - the berries should just cover the crust in one layer. 7. Sprinkle the crumble topping over the blackberry layer. Place in the oven for 30-35 minutes, until slightly golden on top. Let cool completely before cutting into bars. Store in the fridge for up to five days.

Sour Cherry Pie – Mom’s Specialty

July 29 2014 Golubka Kitchen 

Sour Cherry Pie – Mom’s Specialty There are three foods from back home that I find myself missing consistently – wild mushrooms, black currants, and sour cherries. I made sure to eat good portions of each while I was visiting my mother in Russia this past May. Most people won’t eat black currants and sour cherries raw, as they are, but add the slightest touch of sweetness to them, and your heart will be stolen. Sour cherries made it into many of my meals – from morning yogurt to salads, to ice-cream. And of course there was the Sour Cherry Pie – my mom’s specialty. When we finally arrived at my mom’s house after a very long transatlantic journey, we knew what would be waiting for us at teatime – a fragrant and pillowy pie, jeweled with sour cherries. All her grandchildren get a wild sparkle in their eye when talking about grandma’s pie – it is a family-wide obsession. Paloma, the youngest, had her initiation and was quick to join the circle of cherry pie lovers. My mom always makes sure to preserve some sour cherries while they are in season. She pits them with a hair pin, then freezes some and cans the rest with a little sugar. That way, she always has ammunition for when company turns up. I was curious to make a gluten-free version of the pie and began the search for ingredients. What has become second nature to me at home, turned out to be quite a challenge in Russia. Finding all kinds of gluten-free grains there is not a problem – buckwheat, millet and quinoa are widely available, but flours made of those grains are not. I freshly grind my own flours at home, but only with the help of my high-speed blender, which was absent in my mom’s kitchen. I finally used a coffee grinder and ended up with grainy, but perfectly workable flours. I really loved the final result – the overall flavor of the pie was different from mom’s of course, but delicious in its own way. One more thing before we get to the recipe - Public speaking has hardly been my favorite thing, in fact I find it absolutely terrifying. During the four years of working on this blog, I ran into situations when I had to speak in front of big groups of people, during cooking classes and such. As difficult as it was to get started, I’ve noticed that when I speak about the subject that I absolutely love, my fear disappears and I actually enjoy the process. Our cookbook coming out has brought on a new wave of public events, and after a little over a month of book talks, I’ve noticed the stage fright getting lighter every time. For that, I accredit my friendly and encouraging audiences -thank you so much for coming out to support me, listen with great interest, and ask thoughtful questions. Sour Cherry Pie (adapted from here) Note: Green markets and health food stores have sour cherries while they are in season, for a very short period of time. You can find frozen sour cherries in many Eastern European stores in the U.S. – our local Russian market sells them. Feel free to use regular cherries or other fruit/­­berries. The best ratio between the dough and cherries is to have just enough dough to barely cover each cherry. The dough will rise during baking and the balance between the juicy, tart berries and the sweet dough will be perfect. 1 cup full fat coconut milk 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 cup brown rice flour 3/­­4 cup millet flour 3/­­4 cup quinoa flour 1/­­4 cup almond flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 3/­­4 teaspoon sea salt 1/­­2 cup Turbinado sugar plus 1 tablespoon for sprinkling on top zest of 2 lemons 3 eggs 1/­­4 cup olive oil 3-5 cups or more pitted fresh or frozen and partially thawed sour cherries – the more the better (substitute with regular cherries or other fruit/­­berries) 1. Preheat oven to 350 F (180C). Thoroughly grease an 8-10 inch cake pan or line with parchment paper. Combine the coconut milk and lemon juice in a bowl and set aside. 2. In a large bowl, combine all the flours, baking powder and salt. 3. In a separate bowl, combine 1/­­2 cup sugar and lemon zest and rub together until fragrant. Add in eggs, coconut milk mixture and olive oil, and whisk to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the dry and mix to combine. 4. Gently fold in the cherries, reserving about 1/­­3 of them. Pour the batter into the cake pan, topping with the reserved cherries and sugar. 5. Bake for 50-60 minutes until golden, and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Let cool in the pan for about 30 minutes before removing. Store refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 3 days.

Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder

August 10 2016 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder This post was created in partnership with Moringamio. This little blog started out as a raw foods recipe journal. Back then, in 2010, I was struggling with some very unexpected health issues that kept popping up after I had my second daughter a bit later in life. My thyroid was acting up, and I had trouble sleeping, but none of the treatments offered by the doctors seemed right to me. Most of the medicine was meant for covering up the symptoms, and not any actual healing, while having terrifyingly long lists of side effects. I decided to go the holistic route, having been into natural healing since I was very young, and having had some previous success with homeopathy and herbs. I started looking into healing through diet, and came across a little paperback on raw food, and how it had changed a whole family’s life by allowing them to regain their health. Something clicked after I read that book – the idea that plants can feed our cells in the most powerful way just made so much sense to me. I was incredibly inspired from that point on and ate and ‘cooked’ exclusively raw for a while, which really helped me feel much better. Since I was cooking up a storm, Masha and I decided to document the recipes online, and here we are, six years later. The recipes and my diet have evolved since then to be much less restrictive, but still largely plant-based. But I’m really here today to talk about an avocado, oat and nut breakfast porridge that I discovered during that honeymoon phase of eating raw foods. It was somewhat similar to the overnight oats I have for you today, but a bit more weighed down with nuts and sweetness. Upon making it for the first time, I was amazed at how easy and tasty it was, and became completely obsessed, eating it every morning for months on end. I recently remembered about that breakfast, not without some nostalgia, and decided to elaborate on the original recipe. These overnight oats are a breakfast that will likely keep you full past noon, perfect for a busy day when lunch seems like a distant prospect. It’s quite energizing and full of healthy fats and fiber, not to mention absolutely delicious. The texture here is fluffy from the oats and peach puree, and the fresh berries add juicy bursts throughout the creamy porridge. I think I’m obsessed all over again. There’s also a special, new-to-me ingredient in these overnight oats that I’m very excited about – moringa leaf powder. I first learned about moringa when my friends went blueberry picking at a nearby farm, where the farm’s owners also grew moringa and raved about it endlessly. My friends ended up coming home with a moringa seedling, to plant in their own back yard. Moringa powder is made of ground up leaves from the moringa tree, which is a drought-resistant tree from south Asia and Africa. Many parts of the plant have been utilized for culinary and healing purposes since the antiquity, and widely used in Ayurvedic medicine. Moringa is very nutritionally dense, containing all nine essential amino acids, along with vitamins A & C, iron and calcium, earning itself the label of ‘superfood,’ and you know you love those :) It has a pleasant, grassy aroma, sort of similar to matcha, which I love, but also very much its own, unique product. So of course I was very excited when Moringamio sent me their moringa leaf powder to sample, as their stuff is the best of the best, being incredibly high-quality, organic and very fresh. I’ve tried it in lattes and smoothies, and it works perfectly in these overnight oats, making the breakfast even more invigorating and nutritious. For more moringa recipes, check out Amy’s breakfast bowl and Sophie’s matcha moringa latte. Enjoy! Peach and Avocado Overnight Oats with Moringa Powder   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 3 medium, sweet and ripe peaches or nectarines - pitted and roughly chopped ¼ cup honey or maple syrup, plus more for serving, if desired 1¼ cup rolled oats - I used old-fashioned and gluten free 2 tablespoons chia seeds 1 ripe but firm avocado freshly squeezed juice from ½ lemon 1 tablespoon moringa leaf powder handful hemp hearts or other nuts (optional) topping suggestions cacao nibs goji berries bee pollen hemp hearts dried mullberries fresh berries sliced peaches fresh mint Instructions Place peaches and honey/­­maple syrup in a blender or food processor and pulse until pureed. Thoroughly mix the peach puree with the rolled oats and chia seeds in a medium bowl, cover and refrigerate overnight. In the morning, roughly chop avocado and place it into a food processor, along with lemon juice, oat and peach mixture, moringa leaf powder and hemp herts/­­other nuts, if using. Pulse briefly to combine. Taste and add a splash of honey if desired. Serve with fresh berries, cacao nibs, goji berries/­­dried mullberries, bee pollen, etc. (see topping options above). 3.5.3208 This post was created in partnership with Moringamio, with all opinions being genuine and our own. Thank you for considering the sponsors that help keep Golubka Kitchen going. You might also like... 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1 Bowl Vegan Pumpkin Bread Recipe

November 11 2015 Vegan Richa 

1 Bowl Vegan Pumpkin Bread Recipe Easy One Bowl Pumpkin Loaf today before we start up with the Holiday Menu plans. Soft, full of pumpkin, pumpkin pie spice, hearty and delicious. 15 minutes and in the oven. Bake until done. The hardest part is waiting for the loaf to cool. The loaf tastes best after a few hours. This loaf is based off my 1 bowl pumpkin cream cheese muffins. Why change something when it works.  Add nuts of choice, dried fruit or chocolate chips to the batter. Top with nuts, pumpkin seeds, chocolate chips or a streusel of choice! Serve with hot Pumpkin spice Caramel Latte or other hot drinks of choice. Use sweet potato or butternut squash puree for variation. Continue reading: 1 Bowl Vegan Pumpkin Bread RecipeThe post 1 Bowl Vegan Pumpkin Bread Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Summer Celebration Fruit Tart

July 20 2015 My New Roots 

Summer Celebration Fruit Tart Hello summer people! Its celebration time! Im here to deliver the party favours ...a seriously tasty treat and a whole lotta food porn. Ready?   This tart is everything you want from a summer recipe: quick to make, foolproof, delicious, and uses all the delights of the season. Since I am well aware that you would rather be spending your time at the beach or on the dock and not in the kitchen, making this treat will only take up about half an hour of your day, and the rest you can enjoy nibbling and relaxing! I couldnt quite settle on which meal this recipe would best be suited for, so Ill let you decide on that one. Its a perfectly respectable breakfast (you’re welcome), but would also make a lovely brunch side, afternoon iced tea accompaniment, or after dinner dessert. Because you can make the crust ahead of time, it can also be taken to a picnic or barbeque and assembled before serving. The crust is vegan and gluten-free, made with toasted sunflower seeds and buckwheat flour, with a touch of lemon for zing. It is a good, all-around pastry base that can also be pressed into a tart form if youd like a more tidy-looking dessert. I like the un-fussiness and rusticity of just rolling out the dough (and because Im lazy). With its tattered edges and uneven shape, it looks like we all should in summer: loose, wild, and free! For a big time saver, Ive opted to use yogurt for the topping instead of making a cashew cream. If you would prefer a non-dairy option, try the cashew cream recipe from this post.  It would be smashing on this tart! The fruit is also your call, just use whatever is in season around you. We are finally enjoying the annual berry explosion here in Denmark, the one I wait for the entire year, and this recipe is truly a celebration of the juicy abundance, sumptuous colours, and bright flavours all around. Toss on a combination of favourites, or go for a solo fruit that you really want to highlight. This tart can carry itself well into the autumn as well, using plums, pears and figs as well. As for garnishes, although they arent totally necessary, this tart is really delicious with the addition of a few extras. I tossed on a small handful of fresh herbs; peppermint and lemon balm, because I happened to have them on hand, but what a difference they made! Verbena would be so delicious too, or spearmint, bergamot, or even chocolate mint. And because I am obsessed with bee products, I couldnt resist sprinkling the tart with pollen and topping each slice with a good chunk of honeycomb. Nothing is bad with honeycomb on top. Ever. With that, I leave you with the recipe, and sun-drenched love wishes to all of you out there romping around and being wild little bunnies. Big hugs and fruit tarts, Sarah B     Print recipe     Summer Celebration Fruit Tart Serves 4-6 Sunflower Buckwheat Crust Ingredients: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 45g sunflower seeds 1 cup /­­ 160g buckwheat flour pinch sea salt zest of 1 lemon 3 Tbsp. coconut oil, very cold 1 1/­­2 Tbsp. pure maple syrup 1-3 Tbsp. ice water, as needed Topping: 1 cup Greek-style, plain yogurt (preferably from goat or sheeps milk) seeds from 1/­­2 vanilla bean 1 Tbsp. pure maple syrup or honey a few handfuls of seasonal fresh fruit (I chose cherries, strawberries, red currants and gooseberries) fresh herbs (I used mint and lemon balm) bee pollen + honeycomb, if desired Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 375°F /­­ 190°C. 2. In a dry skillet over medium heat toast sunflower seeds, tossing frequently, until fragrant and golden, 3-5 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool. Place seeds in a food processor and pulse until they resemble sand. Next add the remaining crust ingredients, except the ice water. Pulse to bring everything together and incorporate the oil. With the motor running, dribble in the water, one tablespoon at a time until the dough is no longer crumbly - do not add more than you need. 3. Empty the dough onto a large piece of parchment paper. Gather it into a rough ball, then place a sheet of parchment paper on top and using a rolling pin roll out into a circle about 12 /­­ 30cm in diameter. Slide crust onto a baking sheet and place in the oven to bake until golden, about 20-25 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool completely. 4. While the crust is baking, combine the yogurt, vanilla seeds, and maple syrup. Set aside. Wash all fruit and slice if desired. 5. Assemble tart right before serving (otherwise the crust will get soggy) Spread yogurt onto the crust, and top with fruit. Garnish with fresh herbs, bee pollen and honeycomb if desired. Enjoy immediately.

Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos

June 28 2015 Golubka Kitchen 

Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos Paloma and I made it to my hometown in the Southwest of Russia, where we are thoroughly enjoying our stay at grandma’s house. Because I don’t get to visit here very often, my days are completely packed with family, friends, daily trips to the market, nature walks, and all sorts of leftover business. This time, we added a kitchen renovation to the mix, along with piano and swimming lessons for Paloma. The days fly by, and I’m always caught by surprise when the night falls and it’s time for bed. As usual, we’re indulging in my mom’s home cooked delicacies and consume the local berry harvest by the kilo. The most abundant crops right now, which we have no access to in Florida, are sour cherries, black, red and white currants, wild strawberries and mulberries. We walk around with berry-stained hands and wouldn’t have it any other way. I prepared this recipe in Florida, right before we left, where a very hot summer was in full swing, making me want to stay away from the oven as much as possible. I craved crunchy raw vegetables like kohlrabi and jicama, along with chilled watermelon and ripe mango, which often replaced my lunch. I came up with this easy salad – a combination of jicama, mango, avocado and grilled corn with loads of cilantro and lime juice. It’s a quick and refreshing dish on its own and even more filling and delicious when served in a taco shell. Lastly, I have a bit of housekeeping to discuss. If you haven’t signed up for our newsletter, you can do so here. We recently changed the format to a better looking one, and along with recipe updates, the newsletters will include seasonal ingredient highlights and any other Golubka Kitchen related news. And for the French readers, the translation for the Rhubarb Raspberry Fizz from Sarah Kieffer’s guest post is up here. Mango, Jicama and Grilled Corn Tacos serves 4-6 2 ears of corn – grilled 1 medium jicama – sliced into cubes or small matchsticks 2 ripe, sweet mangos – cut into small cubes ground chipotle – to taste (optional) 1-2 limes 1 bunch cilantro 1-2 ripe but firm avocados – cubed your favorite taco shells hot sauce of choice Cut kernels off grilled corn ears. Combine corn kernels,  jicama and mango in a large bowl, add chipotle, if using. Squeeze lime juice over. Add cilantro leaves and mix gently. Distrribute the salad between taco shells, top with abocado slices, sprinkle with more lime juice, cilantro leaves and your favorite hot sauce. Serve right away.

Panettone

December 17 2014 Vegan Dad 

Panettone Warning: this recipe is not as accessible as some of my other baking recipes and will require a bit of experience and time to pull off. The recipe is similar to the brioche recipe I posted last week in that it uses mashed potatoes in lieu of eggs, and in that you need to work a fair amount of fat into the dough. A stand mixer is key to getting this done efficiently. The other key ingredient is sourdough starter/­­barm which will give your final loaves a spectacular taste and texture. I like to make a firmer barm because it holds up in the fridge for longer--my barm is 12 oz of flour, 5-6 oz water, 4 oz old barm. If your barm is wetter you might have to add more flour to the final dough. I like to make two smaller loaves because they are easier to bake consistently. The recipe is veganized from Reinharts The Bread Bakers Apprentice. Makes 2 loaves INGREDIENTS Sponge - 7 oz barm - 8 oz lukewarm soy milk - 4.5 oz all purpose flour Fruit Mix - 6 oz golden raisins - 3 oz currants - 3 oz dried cranberries - 4 oz alcohol (rum, brandy, whiskey) - 1 tbsp lemon extract - 1 tbsp vanilla extract Method, Day One: 1. Cut up the barm and place in the warm soy milk for 5 mins to soften. Add the flour and mix well with a wooden spoon until smooth. 2. Cover the bowl and let rise until bubbly--about 4 hours. Refrigerate overnight. 3. Mix together all of the fruit mix ingredients in a bowl. Cover and let sit at room temperature overnight. Stir occasionally to coat the fruit. INGREDIENTS Final Dough - the sponge from Day 1 - 13.5 oz all purpose flour - 1.5 oz sugar - 3/­­4 tsp salt - 1 tbsp instant yeast - 2 oz mashed potato (i.e. potato that has been boiled in its skin, cooled, skinned, and mashed) - 1 oz water - 2 oz soy milk - 1/­­4 tsp turmeric - 4 oz vegan butter, at room temperature - 5 oz sliced almonds - soy milk for brushing Method, Day Two: 1. Remove sponge from the fridge and let warm up for an hour. 2. Whisk together flour, sugar, salt, and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer. 3. Blend together potato, water, soy milk, and turmeric with an immersion mixer (I do it in a glass 4 cup measuring cup). Heat to room temperature in the microwave. 4. Add sponge and potato mixture to the flour. Use the dough hook to bring everything together into a dough. Let rest for 5 mins. 5. With the dough hook on med-lo speed, add in the vegan butter 1/­­4 at a time making sure the previous addition is incorporated before adding them next. This will take around 10 mins. The dough should be very soft and shiny. 6. With the speed still on med-lo, add the fruit mixture with any remaining liquid, and the almonds. Knead until well incorporated. The final dough will be very soft. 7. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface. Using floured hands, Stretch and fold the dough about six times. If the dough is too wet to work with, gently knead in flour before stretching and folding again. Resist adding too much flour--the dough will be very tacky but not sticky. It will firm up as it rises. 8. Shape into a ball and place in a large well-oiled bowl. Cover and let rise for 2 hours. 9. Prepare two 8 inch round pans. Cut a piece of parchment to fit in the bottom. Cut a 3 strip of parchment to make a collar on the inside of the pan. Hold it in place with a a piece of tape on the outside or a staple (like you see in this picture, but not so high). 10. Divide the dough into two, and shape into balls. Gently press into the prepared pans. The dough does not need to touch the sides but it should mostly fill the pan. 11. Brush the loaves with soy milk, then mist with oil. Cover the pans and let rise in a warm place for about 2 hours. The trick here is to make sure you wait for a good rise or the loaves will split in the over from rising too quickly. The dough should have just about doubled. 12. Preheat the oven to 325 with the rack in the bottom third of the oven. 13. Bake for about 1 hour, or until the loaves reach 185 in the middle. 14. Remove the bread from the paper and pans and let fully cool before serving.

Blueberry & Blackberry Crumble

August 13 2014 Green Kitchen Stories 

Blueberry & Blackberry Crumble This is a recipe that has been going on repeat all summer in our family. It is such a simple and tasty (vegan and gluten-free) dessert that even my dad asked for the recipe so he could bake it himself. And that says a lot, considering that my dad rarely serves any other desserts than ice cream when we are visiting. He has a summer house a bit outside Stockholm and the blueberries are literally flooding the forests around the house this time of the year. We picked the blueberries for this crumble there, which of course makes it taste extra good. If you are not lucky enough to have a forest filled with blueberries around your house, store-bought berries would work fine as well. You can even use frozen berries and use it as a winter recipe. Before the blueberries and blackberries were in season, we also did this recipe with red currants and raspberries - also great! It’s a vegan recipe but if you prefer, you can replace the coconut oil with butter. We have created this youtube video for the recipe that not only demonstrates how easy it is to prepare, but also gives you a hint of how gorgeous the forest blueberries are when we pick them. We recorded these new videos just a few weeks ago and Luise did an amazing job, considering the size of her pregnant belly. So make sure to check it out! Baked Blackberry & Blueberry Crumble Berry Filling: 2 cups /­­ 225 g blueberries 2 cups /­­ 225 g blackberries 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla 2 tsp lemon juice 1 tbsp maple syrup or honey Crumble Topping: 2 1/­­2 cups /­­ 240 g rolled oats (cert. gluten free if you are allergic) 5 tbsp almond flour/­­meal (or ground almonds) a pinch sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground vanilla 5 tbsp maple syrup or honey 5 tbsp cold-pressed coconut oil, room temperature Preheat the oven to 175°C /­­ 350°F. Rinse all berries. Place in a baking dish and toss with vanilla, lemon juice and maple syrup. Prepare the crumble in a separate bowl. Start by mixing oats, almond flour, salt and vanilla. Then add maple syrup and coconut oil. Use your hands to mix until combined. Pour the crumble filling evenly over the berries. Bake in the oven for 35-40 minutes until the fruit juices are bubbling around the edges and the crumble is firm and lightly browned. Serve as it is or with a dollop of yogurt or vegan ice cream on top. Keeps for 3-5 days in the fridge. Freezes and reheats well. ************************* PS! We are coming to London for some book related events in September. I will be teaching a Guardian Masterclass in Food Photography & Styling, the 24 September. It’s a half-day course that ends with a short workshop and photo shoot. There are only 20 spots available so hurry if you want to join. Click here to read more about it and to book tickets! We will let you know about any other events in London as soon as possible. /­­David PS2! If anyone was wondering. Still no baby.


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