cumin - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Tofu and Vegetable Stew

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways

Schezwan paneer recipe | paneer schezwan | schezwan chilli paneer

Poha pakoda recipe | poha pakora recipe | easy & crisp veg snack










cumin vegetarian recipes

Gobi Pakoras (Crispy Cauliflower Fritters)

October 13 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Gobi Pakoras (Crispy Cauliflower Fritters) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Gobi Pakoras (Crispy Cauliflower Fritters) Gobi Pakoras or Crispy Cauliflower fritters are a mouthwatering appetizer. Crispy on the outside and soft on the inside, these pakoras are addicting! These work as a tasty pairing with your afternoon tea or a spicy delicious snack before any meal. - 3 cup cauliflower florets (cut into about 1 inch florets) - 1/­­3 cup besan (gram flour ) - 3 Tbsp corn starch (arrow root) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­4 tsp red chili powder - 1/­­8 tsp baking soda - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp ginger paste - 1 green chili (finely chopped) - 2 Tbsp cilantro (finely chopped, hara dhania) -  Boil the cauliflowers, add just enough water to cover the cauliflowers. After water comes to boil, cook for about 5 minutes over medium heat. Turn off the heat and drain the water. Let cauliflowers come to room temperature. Cauliflower should be just little tender, not soft. - In a bowl mix all the ingredients together, besan, corn starch, coriander powder, cumin seeds, red chili powder, salt, baking soda, ginger, green chili and cilantro. Mix it well. - Sprinkle the dry mix over cauliflower, gently mix it coating all the cauliflower with spices, add water little at a time as needed, I used about 1/­­4 cup of water. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium high heat. The frying pan should have about 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put little batter in the oil. The batter should raise to the top but not change color right away. - Drop the cauliflower slowly in the oil making sure dont overlap them. - Fry the cauliflowers until they turn golden brown, turning them occasionally. This should take about 6-8 minutes. - When they are golden brown, take them out with a slotted spoon. Place them on a paper towel to absorb the extra oil.   Note: We are not making a batter, use just enough water to coat the cauliflower florets evenly with spice mix. If you fry them on high heat Pakoras will not be crispy and if they are fried on very low heat Pakoras will be greasy. They especially taste delicious when they are served with Tamarind Chutney and hot cup of tea. They are also easy and quick to make. Surprise your guests and treat them with these mouthwatering crispy gobi pakoras. You will also like to see the recipe for Paneer Pakora and Chai. Enjoy! The post Gobi Pakoras (Crispy Cauliflower Fritters) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways

October 12 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways Our first thought was to do a classic Lady and the Tramp Spaghetti and Meatball dish with this polpette recipe, but then we decided that it was too expected. So here is instead another spin on our one makes three-series. Where we use one staple food in three different recipes. We really love this series because it reflects so much how we actually eat. It’s not always an entirely new meal every day but more of a flow where the same components are repeated with new pairings. These polpette or vegan meatballs are perfect for this. They are good on their own - tender and very flavorful. And they are also insanely versatile, rolled into a wrap, tangled into pasta, paired with a spicy tomato sauce and hummus or tossed in a crunchy vegan take on a caesar salad. Vegan Aubergine Polpette Makes around 40 balls 2 medium sized aubergines 2 red onions 4 tbsp olive oil 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour 120 g /­­ 1 cup cooked lentils 4 tbsp pickled capers, drained and finely chopped 2 tbsp raisins zest from 1 lemon 15 leaves basil leaves salt Preheat the oven to 200°C  /­­ 400°F. Peel and chop the onion finely and chop the aubergine into small dices. Stir fry both in a large skillet with the oil for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very soft. When soft, add to a food processor with the rest of the ingredients. Pulse a few times to mix everything together. You want a very chunky sticky texture but dont pulse too much or youll end up with a mushy mixture. Remove the knife blades and shape 30-40 small balls with your hands. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper and bake for 25 minutes. Store in the fridge or freeze them. Scroll down for three ways to serve them. Hummus with spicy tomato sauce, polpette and cucumber salad 1 batch vegan aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 1 batch Hummus, see this recipe or store-bought hummus Spicy tomato sauce Serves 4 1 tbsp olive oil 1 red onion 1 garlic clove 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp harissa paste (or 1 red chili) 2 x 400 g tins tomatoes 1/­­2 tsp sea salt, to taste Heat the oil in a large sauce pan on medium heat. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic and add them to the sauce pan  together with the spices. Let sauté for a few minutes until soft not browned and then add  the tomatoes and salt. Let cook for at least 20 minutes, until rich and fragrant. It will become sweeter and rounder in flavour the longer you leave it on. Store the sauce you are not using tonight in glass bottles in the fridge. Cucumber salad 1/­­2 cucumber 2 tsp olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice + zest 1 pinch sea salt 1 small handful fresh dill Finely dice the cucumber and place in a bowl. Add olive oil, lemon juice and zest, salt and dill and toss to combine. Arrange the hummus in shallow bowls and make a well in the middle. Place a couple of spoonfuls tomato sauce in the well, add a few aubergine polpette and a few spoonfuls cucumber sallad. Vegan Wrap with Polpette, Ajvar and Krauts Serves 4 4 wrap breads /­­ tortilla breads, gluten free or whole grain 4 lettuce leaves 4 cavalo nero or kale, stems removed 1 cup cooked white quinoa 4 tbsp ajvar dressing 1/­­2 cucumber, cut into sticks 4 tbsp sauerkraut (see recipe here) 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) Place one lettuce leave and one kale leave on each tortilla bread, then place 2-3 tbsp quinoa in the middle, a dollop ajvar, cucumber slices, sauerkraut and top with a couple of aubergine polpette. Fold the top and bottom edges over the filling. Roll the whole tortilla from left to right to wrap in the filling. Roll some parchment paper around them and tie with a string to hold them together. Vegan Ceasar Salad with Polpette Serves 4 1 head Cosmopolitan lettuce 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 2 avocados, stone/­­peel removed and sliced 2 small apples, cored and sliced 2 tbsp sunflower seeds, toasted Dressing 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml cold pressed neutral oil (organic rapeseed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml soy milk, unsweetened 2-3 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp dijon mustard 1 tbsp pickled capers, drained 1 large pinch salt Add all dressing ingredients to a tall glas or blender cup. Mix with a stick blender on high speed for about 15 seconds or until you have a creamy white dressing. Taste and adjust the flavours to your preference. Add more oil and blend again if you like it thicker. Tear the lettuce into bite size pieces and place in a mixing bowl. Add 2 tbsp vegan mayo dressing and toss to cover. Then transfer to a serving platter and arrange avocado slices, apple slices and aubergine polpette and last, scatter over toasted sunflower seeds.

Quick Mixed Beans and Corn Stew

October 12 2018 VegKitchen 

Quick Mixed Beans and Corn Stew Kind of a simplified chili, heres a hearty stew featuring beans and corn. If your beans are cooked, or youre using canned, this comes together very quickly when you want a cool-weather dinner in a hurry. Serve with a simply prepared grain like quinoa, rice, or couscous and a big salad. Serves: 6 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 large onion, chopped 1 large carrot, peeled and chopped 2 to 3 cloves garlic, minced 1/­­2 medium zucchini, diced 15- to 16-ounce can red or pinto beans, drained and rinsed 15- to 16-ounce can chickpeas or black beans, drained and rinsed 2 cups cooked fresh or frozen corn kernels, thawed 15- to 16-ounce can fire-roasted or Mexican-style stewed tomatoes, chopped, with liquid 1 to 2 jalape?o peppers, seeded and minced, or one 4- to 7-ounce can mild green chilies 2 to 3 teaspoons good-quality chili powder 1 teaspoon ground cumin Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Chopped fresh cilantro as desired, optional Heat the oil in a small soup pot. Add the onion and carrot, and sauté over medium heat until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic and continue to sauté until the onion is golden. Add the remaining ingredients […] The post Quick Mixed Beans and Corn Stew appeared first on VegKitchen.

Cucumber (Kheera) Raita

October 12 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Cucumber (Kheera) Raita (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Cucumber (kheera) Raita Cucumber Raita is a delightful refreshing side dish and compliment to any meal. Raita is made so many ways, but the main ingredient is always the yogurt. Cucumber raita is one of my favorites especially during the summer. This is a quick and easy recipe. I also like to serve cucumber raita as a spread or dipping sauce.  - 1 cup yogurt (curd, dahi) - 1 cup cucumber (shredded) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp black salt - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (roasted) - 1/­­8 tsp black pepper - 1/­­2 tsp green chili (finely chopped) - 1 Tbsp mint leaves (finely chopped) - 1/­­8 tsp red chili pepper (for garnishing) -  In a bowel beat the yogurt until it is smooth and creamy. - Peel and shred the cucumber. - Mix shredded cucumber, salt, black salt, cumin powder, green chili, mint leaves to yogurt and mix it well. - Garnish with chili powder and few mint leaves. Serve chill. Notes Use the measurements for your guide line, especially in this recipe you can adjust all the ingredients to your taste easily.   The post Cucumber (Kheera) Raita appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Coconut Spinach and Lentil Dal

September 18 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Coconut Spinach and Lentil DalThis Coconut Spinach and Lentil Dal recipe combines two Indian classics: lentil dal and saag paneer. The spinach from saag paneer (without the cheesy cubes of paneer) is paired with a protein-rich lentil dal in a creamy coconut sauce. Coconut Spinach and Lentil Dal This recipe combines two Indian classics: lentil dal and saag paneer. The spinach from saag paneer (without the cheesy cubes of paneer) is paired with a protein-rich lentil dal in a creamy coconut sauce. - 1 cup dried lentils - 1 teaspoon ground turmeric - Salt - 1 tablespoon neutral vegetable oil or 1/­­4 cup water - 1 medium yellow onion, chopped - 1 clove garlic, minced - 2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger - 1 hot green chile, seeded and minced - 1 teaspoon ground cumin - 1 teaspoon ground coriander - 1 teaspoon garam masala - Pinch ground cardamom, optional - 1 14.5-ounce can diced fire-roasted tomatoes, drained and finely chopped - 8 to 10 ounces fresh or frozen spinach, steamed and chopped - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves - 1 13.5-ounce can unsweetened coconut milk - Combine the lentils in a large saucepan with 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil. Decrease the heat to low, add the turmeric, and simmer partially covered for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover and continue to simmer until the lentils are soft and the liquid is absorbed, about 15 minutes. - While the lentils are cooking, heat the oil or water in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic, ginger, and chile, and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the cumin, coriander, garam masala, cardamom, if using, and tomatoes, stirring constantly for about 30 seconds longer. Stir in the spinach, coconut milk, and cilantro and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the spinach mixture to the lentils and stir well to combine. Taste to adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington. The post Coconut Spinach and Lentil Dal appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Easy Homemade Salsa – 5 Min Blender Salsa

September 10 2018 Vegan Richa 

Easy Homemade Salsa – 5 Min Blender SalsaAre you ready for this 5 minute – Easy Homemade Salsa. This fresh tomato salsa is super quick to make in a blender or a food processor and is always a hit at the party. Vegan, Glutenfree, Soyfree, Nutfree recipe.  Jump to Recipe What do I write about Salsa, that has not been said before. It is one the easiest, most versatile thing, goes with everything dip. I whip it up on a whim and we always have savory snacks or chips. Or add to a tacos, wraps, nachos or a bowl with spiced up beans or veggies. I think everyone can use more. How do you like yours?  Just 7 ingredients.. Tomatoes, onion, jalapeno, cilantro(omit if you dont like it), garlic, cumin, black pepper. Try my version of salsa. Refreshing and so Delicious.Continue reading: Easy Homemade Salsa – 5 Min Blender SalsaThe post Easy Homemade Salsa – 5 Min Blender Salsa appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Khasta Mathri - Indian Savory Crackers

August 26 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Khasta Mathri - Indian Savory Crackers (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Khasta Mathri – Indian Savory Crackers Khasta Mathri is a popular, classic savory snack. You can serve these Mathries with pickle at tea time or you can enjoy as is! For all the upcoming holidays, Mathries make a good snack to have around to serve to all guests. They also make for a simple but special homemade gift. - 1 cup all-purpose flour (maida or plain flour) - 2 Tbsp sooji (semolina flour) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­4 tsp black pepper (crushed) - 1/­­4 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1/­­2 cup chilled water - 2 drops lemon juice - oil to fry -  Mix the flour, sooji, salt, black pepper, cumin seeds, lemon drops and oil. Note lemon should be just 2-3 drops, we are not adding this to flavor, lemon is added to give the crispness, also Mathries will absorbed less oil. - Add the chilled water slowly, mixing with your fingers as you pour. Do not knead the dough. The dough should be soft. -  Cover the dough and let it sit for at least fifteen minutes. Divide the dough into about 20 equal parts, I decided to make 14. - Take each part of the dough and make a flat ball shape. Roll them into 2-inch circles. Prick each mathri with a fork about 6-8 places, both sides each, to prevent puffing the mathri when frying. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on low medium heat. The frying pan should have at least 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put a small piece of dough in the oil. The dough should make the oil sizzle and come up slowly. -  Fry mathri in batches, making sure to place just enough mathri to cover the frying oil. Fry them until both sides are a light golden-brown. This should take about 5-7 minutes. Take them out over paper towel, which will absorb the extra oil Suggestions Serve the Khasta Mathri with cranberry pickle, or Chatpata Aloo Khasta Mathris can be stored for a couple of months in airtight containers. If the mathris are cooked on high heat, they will be soft.   The post Khasta Mathri – Indian Savory Crackers appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Aloo ki Kachori

August 12 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Aloo ki Kachori (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Aloo Ki Kachori (Kachori With Potato Stuffing) Aloo Ki kachori is a delicious, spicy, fried puff bread. Aloo Ki kachori can be part of the main meal or it can even be served for breakfast with a hot cup of chai. This kachori also makes a mouthwatering appetizer that can be served with Green Chutney as chaat. For Dough - 1 cup all-purpose flour (maida, plain flour) - 2 Tbsp sooji (samolina) - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 2 Tbsp oil (canola, vegetable) - 3 drops lemon juice - 1/­­3 cup chilled water (approximately ) For Filling - 1 cup boiled peeled potatoes (roughly mashed) - 1 Tbsp oil (canola, vegetable) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 Tbsp green chili finely chopped - 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro (hara dhania) To Make Dough -  Mix the flour, sooji, salt, lemon drops and oil. note lemon should be just 3-4 drops, we are not adding to flavor, lemon is added to give the crispness. - Add the chilled water slowly, mixing with your fingers as you pour. - Do not knead the dough. The dough should be soft. - Cover the dough and let it sit for at least fifteen minutes. Make Filling -  Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium high heat. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil; if it cracks right away oil is ready. - Add cumin seeds as cumin seeds crack, add all the ingredients, potatoes, red pepper, green chilies, cilantro, and coriander powder, mix it well while stirring the mix keep pressing. - Filling should be not very dry, this should take about 5 minutes. - Stir in garam masala and amchur. Add more salt or amchur according to taste. - Let the filling cool to room temperature, mix it well this should have texture of firm dough. To make Kachoris -  Take the dough and knead it for a minute. Divide the dough in twelve equal parts. - Mash the dough lightly and divide in 12 parts filling should be about same size as dough. - Take one part of the dough and with your fingers flatten the edges and make into 3-inch circle. Leaving center little thicker then edges. - Mold the dough into a cup and place filling in the center. Pull the edges of the dough to wrap the dal filling. Proceed to make all 12 balls. - Let the filled ball sit for three to four minutes before rolling. It helps spreading the filling evenly. - Set the kachoris on a surface with the seams facing up. Using the base of your palm, slowly flatten them into about three inches in diameter, or use the rolling pin roll the kachori with light hand. - Heat the oil in frying pan over medium heat frying pan should have about one inch of oil. To check if oil is ready put a little piece of dough in the oil. Dough should sizzle and come up very slow without changing the color. - Fry them on medium-low heat. After they start to puff, slowly turn them over. Fry until golden-brown on both sides. If the kachoris are fried on high heat, they will get soft and will not be crispy. Serve the kachories with cilantro chutney or tamarind chutney. The post Aloo ki Kachori appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Aloo Palak Paratha (Flatbread with Potato and Spinach stuffing)

July 22 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Aloo Palak Paratha (Flatbread with Potato and Spinach stuffing) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Aloo Palak Paratha (Bread with Potato and Spinach Stuffing) Aloo Palak Ka Paratha, a flat bread with a potato spinach stuffing. This paratha is a perfect breakfast treat for the family and friends. Aloo Palak ka Paratha also makes a good lunch box meal to take to work or school. My favorite way to serve Aloo Palak Ka Paratha, with yogurt, or Tomato chutney. For Dough - 1 cup whole wheat flour (Chapati ka atta) - 2 tsp oil (canola oil or vegetable oil) - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 1/­­3 cup water (use as needed) Filling - 1 cup mashed potatoes (boiled peeled and roughly mashed ) - 1 cup spinach finely chopped - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­2 tsp mango powder (aamchoor) - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp chili flakes - 1/­­4 tsp garam masala Also Need - 1/­­4 cup whole wheat flour for rolling the paratha - 2 Tbsp oil for cooking the paratha Tips - Potatoes should not be over cooked, they should be tender, if potatoes are over cooks they absorbed extra water that will make the filling very moist and difficult to roll. - Before chopping the spinach remove all the stems wash and pat dry. - If filling is too moist mix 1-2 tablespoons besan. Making Dough -  Mix flour salt and oil add water as needed to make soft dough. Knead the dough well on a lightly oiled surface, dough should be soft but not sticking to your fingers. Cover the dough with a damp cloth and set aside for at least 15 minutes. Making Filling - Mashed potato should be at room temperature, mix all the ingredients for filling together and mix it well. Taste the filling and adjust the salt pepper to taste. Making Paratha Divide the dough into four equal parts and form into balls. Divide the aloo palak filling into four parts filling should be about the same size as dough balls. - Roll dough ball into a 3 circle. Place a filling ball in the center. Pull the edges of the dough to wrap it around the filling. Repeat to make all four balls. Let the filled balls settle three to four minutes. Meanwhile heat a heavy skillet on medium high heat until moderately hot. To test, sprinkle water on the skillet. If the water sizzles right away, the skillet is ready. - Press the filled ball lightly on dry whole wheat flour from both sides.Using a rolling pin, roll the balls lightly to make six-inch circles, keeping the sealed side of the ball on top. If the dough sticks to the rolling pin or rolling surface, lightly dust the parathas with dry flour. - Place the paratha on the skillet. When the paratha starts to change color and begins to puff up, flip it over. You will notice some golden-brown spots. - After few seconds, drizzle one teaspoon of oil over the paratha. Flip the paratha again and lightly press the puffed areas with a spatula. Flip again and press with a spatula making sure the paratha is golden-brown on both sides. Repeat for the remaining parathas. -  Paratha are best served hot and crispy. They will be soft if not served hot. If you are not going to serve them right away, cool them on a wire rack to keep them from getting soggy. - Parathas can be kept unrefrigerated for up to two days wrapped in aluminum foil or in a covered container. For later use, parathas can be refrigerated three to four days or frozen for up to a month. Re-heat using a skillet or oven.   The post Aloo Palak Paratha (Flatbread with Potato and Spinach stuffing) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus

June 14 2018 My New Roots 

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus If there is one trick Ive learned in all of my years cooking, both at home and in restaurants, it is this: caramelized onions can make almost anything taste amazing. Theyre the ridiculously simple, yet magical ingredient that turns an ordinary dish into something so rich-tasting and satisfying that people go ...oh hi excuse me, this is incredible. I think the simple reason that caramelized onions taste so good, is because they are a labour of love. Not like an all-day stirring the pot kinda deal, but most definitely a food that you cant just leave on the stove and dive into an Instagram vortex. No. Caramelized onions take care and attention, at least for the better part of half an hour, and the results are so worth it I bet youll catch yourself multi-tasking at the stove tonight just to have some on hand to gussy up your omelet this weekend (boss move there, by the way). The more accurate reason that caramelized onions taste so good however, isnt technically caramelization - its called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction is a browning reaction similar to caramelization, but with one distinct difference: caramelization is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars, while Maillard is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids (proteins). And yes, there is enough protein in an onion to elicit this response - how thrilling for us! Although the Maillard reaction is very complex and complicated, what we do know is that it requires heat to transform and rearrange sugars and amino acids to create new and fantastic flavour molecules in and on your food, making it even more delicious. If youve ever eaten a golden slice of toast, enjoyed a rich cup of coffee, or nibbled on a grilled vegetable, youve experienced the pure pleasure that all of this this chemical commotion is responsible for. Science! Harnessing the power of the Maillard reaction can make you a better cook, because things that are browned properly taste more intensely, more complex, and well, better. Without even being aware of it, its the reason youll reach for the roasted veggies with the crispiest edges, or the reason that you prefer a fried egg over a boiled one (no judgement!). There are a couple ways of making this spectacular series of chemical reactions work for you, and the first is high heat. Maillard will not occur at very low temperatures, especially in situations where the food is not in direct contact with the heat, like it is on a skillet or grill for instance. When youre roasting veggies, make sure the oven is at least 400°F /­­ 200°C. When youre making pizza, you can crank it up even higher, to get those beautifully blistered crust edges that make your mouth water. The second way is to keep the food youre cooking on the dry side. For instance, have you ever noticed how if you wash mushrooms (which you should actually never do), theyll never really get brown and crusty? Too much moisture! Instead, brush those fungi gently to remove any dirt or debris, then put them in a screeching hot pan with some ghee and dont stir them. I talk more about this technique here. This is the same reason you need a large pan for these caramelized onions, since theyll need the space to allow the water to evaporate around them. If the onions are too close together, theyll only steam each other. Eew. If you’re oven roasting vegetables for dinner, cut them in the morning and leave them out all day uncovered so that the surface water will evaporate, and the veggies will brown more easily. Yes, this seems like a bit of a hassle, but the culinary nerd in me admits that its cool because it works. So, where does the hummus come into this story? Well, hummus is pretty much a food group in my world. Ive made so many variations with so many kinds of legumes, spices, alt seed butters, toppings, and stir-ins, that I could hardly believe I had never tried it with the ingredient that could single-handedly save humanity: caramelized onions. I knew that deep richness of the onions would meld perfectly with the creamy dip, and make the flavour even better. I wasnt wrong! The only thing that I wanted to improve upon, was the protein content - not because Im obsessed with protein, but simply because I thought it could be higher. To do that I simply swapped out the traditional chickpeas for white lentils, or urad dal. We not only get more protein from this change-up, but almost double the fiber, with less sodium, less fat, and less sugar. Sweet. This dip is the perfect, rich compliment to all the crisp and light, early summer veggies popping up. I went to my friends farm and picked some seriously beautiful radishes and young carrots, which paired so well with the caramelized onion flavour. I also had some Life-Changing Crackers on hand, which always make dipping more delicious. One thing I changed from the first version to the third, was the onions on top. Instead of blending all of them into the dip, I used about a third of them on top, which allows you to scoop a few tender morsels up with each bite. This delivers even more caramelized onion flavour and texture, which, let us be reminded, is the whole point of this exercise. Even though this hummus keeps well for at least five days in the fridge (you can even freeze it!), it is best eaten freshly made at room temperature, since the flavour is at its peak then. And because you’re wondering, you can find white or ivory lentils at Indian grocers, Middle Eastern markets, or some natural food stores. They are the skinned and split version of urad dal, which is black, so make sure you buy the huskless version! If you cant find them at all, simply use chickpeas - it will be just as delicious.     Print recipe     Caramelized Onion and White Lentil Hummus Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup raw white lentils (huskless split black mapte beans /­­ urad dal dhuli), soaked if possible 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. balsamic vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 tsp. ground cumin heaping 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1 batch caramelized onions (from the recipe below) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish Directions: 1. Start by cooking the lentils. If youve soaked them beforehand (even an hour helps!) drain and rinse them very well. If youre starting from raw, place the lentils in the cooking pot, cover with plenty of water and vigorously swish them around with your hands. When the water becomes murky, drain and repeat until the water is clear, or mostly clear (this can take 3-4 rounds). Place lentils in the cooking pot and cover generously with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook partially covered for about 20-30 minutes, depending on whether or not you soaked them. The lentils should be cooked until mushy. If the pot becomes dry during cooking, simply add more water. Once cooked, drain the lentils if there is any remaining water. Set aside to cool. 2. In a food processor pulse the garlic until finely minced. Add the tahini, lemon juice, balsamic, salt, cumin and pepper, then blend until combined. Add the cooked lentils and blend on high until smooth. Lastly, add about two-thirds of the caramelized onions, and pulse to incorporate them into the dip. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. 3. To serve, spoon the hummus into a serving bowl. Make a small divot in the center of the dip and spoon in the remaining caramelized onions. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with your toppings of choice (I used toasted black sesame and chive flowers for a splash of colour, but this is totally optional). Serve with crispy fresh veggies and crackers or toasted flatbreads. Enjoy. Caramelized Onions Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. neutral-tasting coconut oil or ghee 1 lb. /­­ 500g yellow onions 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Peel the onions and slice them as evenly as possible into half-rounds. 2. Melt coconut oil or ghee over medium heat in the largest skillet you have. Add the onions, then salt, and stir well to coat. Once the onions are coated, turn the heat down to a medium-low, stirring occasionally - more often towards the end - until theyve fully caramelized, about 25-30 minutes. If the pot becomes too dry during cooking, reduce the heat a tad, or add a teeny bit of water adn stir well. In the end, youre looking for soft, silky, and golden brown goodness! Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days, or freeze for 3 months. If it’s your first time caramelizing onions and you’re feeling intimidated, here is a stellar step-by-step tutorial from Bon Appétit. It varies ever so slightly from my method, but you’ll get the picture! Big love and happy hummus, Sarah B. Show me your hummus on Instagram: #mnrcaramelizedonionhummus  *   *   *   *   * Hello dear friends! There are only a few spots left for our January 2019 Wild Heart High Spirit retreat and we’d love to see you in Bali!  Join us along with 15 other women to unwind, reconnect, and find the inspiration to ignite you on your health journey. Our thoughtfully-designed program will awaken and nourish your entire being – body, mind, and spirit! This is a true celebration of life, and we get to do it together in paradise! Come see what all the magic is about.  Much love, Sarah B, Mikkala and the Golden Circle Retreats team The post Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust

December 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Since this is our last recipe of 2017, we wanted to make sure that it’s a special one. It needed to check all the boxes we usually try to check with our recipes: nourishing, delicious, seasonal, beautiful, convenient, and a little bit unexpected. This veggie and lentil-centered one pan pie is all of those things. It’s very cozy and fun to prepare, too. If I had a choice, most of my savory dishes would be one-pan dishes :) Convenience is hard to beat. That little bit of initial effort you put into assembling all the ingredients for a single-pan dish pays off incredibly well when you end up with a big meal, plus a ton of leftovers for the week, having only used one pan or pot in the process. This one-pan dish is something like a vegetable pot pie, but the crust is made up of thinly mandolined winter roots – potatoes, sweet potatoes, and celery root. The filling is shredded Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and red lentils (you can add barley, too, for a grain component) that cooks in a mixture of healing spices and coconut milk. The whole thing is packed with a great variety of plants. It’s perfect for those looking to up their intake of vegetables after the holidays, but still wanting to keep their cooking hearty and cozy. The ingredient that takes this dish into the complete meal category are the red lentils. Vegetable dishes are great on their own, but adding any kind of pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas, dry peas) to your plant-centric meals will up their nutrition and ability to satisfy quite a bit. Pulses are incredibly nutrient-dense, like superfoods, but they are also very affordable, unlike most other superfoods, so it’s a win-win all around. Try adding about a half a cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – your cooking will greatly benefit from them, and you’ll be on your way to discovering a whole new world of deliciousness (of you haven’t already, of course). Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Happy New Year! Thank you so much for visiting GK, trying out our recipes, and reading up on the self-care series. It all means so much to us .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Big Batch Golden Milk

December 18 2017 My New Roots 

Big Batch Golden Milk So we moved. Across the ocean. Its been a wild ride so far with plenty of excitement and relief coupled with awkward transitioning, and astronomical culture shock (small town Ontario is preeeeeetty different from Copenhagen). Were also renovating a very old home by Canadian standards, and the hidden surprises lurking under every lifted floorboard are creating a project slightly larger and lengthier than predicted. But wouldnt it all be so boring and predictable without those fun discoveries?! Right! Who needs a kitchen anyway? Oh wait. Amongst the self-inflicted chaotic state of affairs, Ive actually found some peace in the simple living weve got going on. Since we dont really have any friends in our little village yet, theres been plenty of time to actually take care of myself and our family. Afternoons are spent building toy train sets, cooking big batch meals, and making snacks for the days ahead. Ive started taking aerial yoga and NIA, going for nature walks every day, and having candlelit baths on the regular. Funny what removing ones social life will make room for! An important part of my self-care routine these past weeks is my simple ritual of making golden milk. Warm, comforting, and satisfying, this drink has everything needed to combat winter blues and movers remorse (I kid, I kid). Usually I make golden milk on the fly, one cup at a time, but recently I realized how handy it would be to just make a huge batch and have it ready to spoon into some hot milk when the mood strikes. Genius. For those of you that arent yet familiar with this wonder drink, Im excited for the vibrant, spicy world that is about to open up to you. Golden milk, or haldi ka doodh, actually dates back thousands of years in Ayurvedic tradition where it has been used to aid digestion and respiration, prevent colds and flu, decongest the liver, ease sprained muscles and joint pain, purify the blood, clear the skin, and aid sleep. The main ingredient in golden milk responsible for all of this awesomeness is the curcumin in turmeric, a compound that is responsible for its vibrant hue. Curcumin has been widely studied for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties, but it is also supports detoxification, helps balance blood sugar, and lowers the overall risk of cancer. How do we get the most out of this powerful phytonutrient? Simply by combining it with black pepper and fat - two important ingredients in golden milk! A compound in black pepper called piperine actually helps the body absorb curcumin, and shows to increase the bioavailability of it by up to 2,000 percent. And the good news is, you only need a very small amount to reap the synergistic benefits. Then melt a little coconut oil in, and the curcumin can be directly absorbed into the bloodstream through the lymphatic system. That’s a cooperative one-two punch of absorption and deliciousness. Once mixed, your Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend will last for up to six months. Keep it in a cool, dry place out of direct light - a closed cupboard is perfect. Do not store it right next to the stove or on top of the fridge, where the warm environment will speed spoilage. We wanna keep our medicine fresh! The Big Batch Golden Milk recipe below makes about 120 servings, so there is plenty to divvy out to your most beloved, and even save some for yourself. Make sure to include the directions so that your lucky recipients can make golden milk themselves. Ive divided them below so that you can print out just the single serving instructions for your friends and family. I’ve also included a recipe if you want to sample just one cup for yourself before committing to an entire jar. My version of golden milk has a few more spices than some blends that Ive tried, but this unique combination just tastes that much better. If youre on a tight budget, or you simply cannot find some of the spices listed, leave them out. The main ingredients you need are the turmeric, ginger, cinnamon and black pepper. The others are there for added health benefits and of course flavour, but the recipe will still be delicious without them. The milk for this recipe is totally flexible. Coconut is classic, but almond, cashew, or hemp are tasty options. You can also do half milk, half water if you like. It will be less creamy, but its great if youre trying to make your milk stretch a little farther! The most important thing to remember when making golden milk is to not overheat the spices, as they will become bitter-tasting and therefore not all that enjoyable. If you choose to use milk in your recipe, warm it gently on the stove, then remove from heat and gently whisk in the golden milk spice blend. If youre going with water, do NOT pour boiling water over the spice blend, but instead pour the recently-boiled water into a cup, let it cool for 30 seconds or so, then whisk in the golden milk spice blend. I also advise you not to add the honey or coconut oil until the spices have been stirred into the liquid youre using, as theyll incorporate easier if the spices have dissolved. If you want to use a vegan sweetener, maple syrup is my favourite choice, but brown rice syrup, coconut palm sugar, and stevia are also good options. I also love adding a sprinkling of vanilla powder right at the end for some extra va-va-voom. I recommend enjoying your golden milk first thing in the morning (right after your lemon water, of course!), or right before bed. If its a particularly cold day outside, this intelligent spice combo will warm your cells up from the inside out. Or, if youre looking for a luxurious way to unwind down after a long day, I find that golden milk is also a very effective sleep tonic. Whatever the time you choose to enjoy this drink, you will absolutely love its warm, and satisfying vibes. Make it a ritual yourself: spoon lovingly, stir consciously and sip gratefully. One more thing I should mention, is that the Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend is not only delicious as a drink, but that it can also be incorporated into a number of your favourite recipes. Toss a teaspoon into a smoothie, stir some into your morning porridge or pancake batter, fold it into a basic cookie dough or cake batter, and even try it in curries, soups and stews. The flavour is warming and pungent, so use it anywhere youd like a burst of sunshiny spice that is as good as gold.     Print recipe     Big Batch Golden Milk Spice Blend Makes approx. 120 servings Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200g ground turmeric 2/­­3 cup /­­ 70g ground ginger 1/­­3 cup /­­ 35g ground cinnamon 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground black pepper 2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cardamom scant 3 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cloves 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground nutmeg 3 Tbsp. 20g ground star anise 1/­­4 cup 20g ground coriander Directions: 1. Combine all spices in a large bowl. Stir well, then transfer to a large jar or several smaller ones, and seal with an airtight lid. Keeps for up to 6 months.     Print recipe     Golden Milk Ingredients: 1/­­2 Tbsp. golden milk spice blend 1 cup milk of your choice (coconut milk is classic, but I also like cashew milk or hemp milk) 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. virgin coconut oil 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. sweetener of choice (I like raw honey) Directions: 1. In a small saucepan over medium heat, warm milk until just before it simmers. Whisk in golden milk spice blend until smooth. Remove from heat and stir in coconut oil and sweetener, if desired. Enjoy!     Print recipe     If you want to make just one batch of my golden milk, heres the single-serve recipe. Single-serving Golden Milk Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 tsp. turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. ginger 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon pinch black pepper pinch cardamom pinch cloves pinch nutmeg pinch star anise pinch coriander I wish you all a super sweet holiday with tons of delicious food shared amongst family and friends, and that your 2018 is bursting with health and happiness. Much love to all out there, from my chilly, but cozy, little corner of the world to yours. xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * In wrapping up 2017, I cannot help but look on the Wild Heart High Spirit retreats with deep gratitude and pure joy. I had a strong vision for the endeavor from the beginning: gather women in a beautiful and serene space, teach them how to reconnect to their bodies through food and movement. But I never imagined just how deep these lessons would go, how profound the changes would be, and how much fun we would have! After three this year, I can confidently say these experiences are incredibly special, and I feel very lucky to work with such a talented partner to create them. Thank you to all of the women who have traveled from all corners of the earth to join us. We love you! Here are some highlights from our trips to Bali, Ibiza, and Portugal. Click on the images below to see photos from each of our magical locations. .       We also have some very special community partners who have generously made our experiences even more abundant! Big thanks to: Naturgligolie Coconut Bowls Jukserei Pachamama Raw Bite Four Sigmatic Gourmet Print Shop We are now weaving plans for future retreats. If you are interested in learning more or joining us one day, please sign up to our mailing list to be kept up to date. We hope to see you one day soon! The post Big Batch Golden Milk appeared first on My New Roots.

Kitchen Creativity

December 12 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Kitchen Creativity In a break from my usual recipe posts, I’d like to share an excerpt from Karen Page’s new book entitled Kitchen Creativity. Beyond a cookbook, Kitchen Creativity is a guide to inventive cooking (without recipes!) that will inspire you to think, improvise, and cook like the world’s best chefs. Great cooking is as much about intuition and imagination as it is about flavor and technique. Kitchen Creativity gives insights into these creative processes from more than 100 top restaurant kitchens, including the Bazaar, Blue Hill, Daniel, and Dirt Candy. Based on four years of research and dozens of in-depth interviews, Kitchen Creativity illuminates the methods of culinary invention. Part I reveals how to learn foundational skills, including how to appreciate, taste, and season classic dishes before reinventing the classics from a new perspective. Part II’s A-to-Z entries are an invaluable culinary idea generator, with exercises to prompt new recipe ideas and combinations. While not a cookbook, nor a vegan book, for that matter (although vegan chefs and ingredients are very well represented), Kitchen Creativity has a lot to offer for cooks looking to broaden their creativity in the kitchen.  The following is an excerpt from Kitchen Creativity on one of my favorite topics, umami… “Umami” from Kitchen Creativity by Karen Page The taste of umami is imparted by glutamate, a type of amino acid discovered in 1908 by Dr. Kikunae Ikeda of Tokyo Imperial University. In studying kombu (kelp), Ikeda managed to isolate glutamate as its own compound, giving it the name of umami, which translates as savoriness. Thus, 5,000 years after the discovery of salt, and 4,000 years after the discovery of sugar, and 3,500 years after the discovery of sour (vinegar), umami is a relatively new taste concept. Japanese cooks had been using umami-rich ingredients intuitively for centuries, long before their scientific properties were discovered to enhance flavor. While we first mentioned umami in our 1996 book Culinary Artistry, it did not begin to gain more widespread acceptance until after 2000 when glutamate receptors were discovered on the tongue. The main sources of umami are those deriving from 1) the amino acid glutamate (found in, e.g., kelp); and those deriving from 2) so-called nucleotides--such as a) adenylate (aka AMP, which is found primarily in fish and shellfish), b) guanylate (aka GMP, which is found primarily in plants and fungi, e.g., shiitake mushrooms, esp. dried), and c) inosinate (aka IMP, which is found primarily in meat and fish, e.g., bonito flakes). The big umami magic happens when one or more nucleotides are combined with glutamate, as there is a synergistic affect--resulting in umami with as much as eight times the potency. Umami Dynamics Umami can enhance a bland dishs appeal with mouth-filling savoriness. Umami can also enhance a dishs perceived sweetness, while tempering its perceived bitterness. If you find yourself with too much of a good thing when it comes to umami, try balancing with salty, sweet, bitter, acidic, or piquant ingredients. Umami is a taste that tends to linger on the palate--something referred to as a long finish in the wine world. Because it contributes to the qualities of deliciousness and satiation, umami is especially prized as a taste in dishes and menus. Note: Certain herbs and spices can also emphasize a dishs savory aspects, such as bay leaf, cumin, oregano, paprika, sage, and thyme. Using Umami Chefs praise black garlic (aka fermented garlic) for its ability to add depth and earthiness to dishes ranging from vegetables to meats. If you doubt umamis importance as one of the five primary tastes, consider the fact that leading chefs like Michael Anthony, Eric Ripert, and Jean-Georges Vongerichten believe dashi to be a key component of their cooking. Some chefs use it to replace liquids in countless preparations, from brines to broths to salad dressings. Chefs have rising enthusiasm for all manner of fermented ingredients (e.g., fermented soybeans, kimchi, miso, pickles, sauerkraut), which bring umami to dishes including vegetables. The corn smut known as huitlacoche is prized as a Mexican delicacy, not only by chefs cooking in the vernacular like Rick Bayless, but also mainstream chefs who find themselves using it in quesadillas, soups, and tacos. Sean Brock declares is insanely delicious and luxurious, like black truffles. Kombu (aka kelp, the sea vegetable) is prized for its umami by Yoshihiro Narisawa. Brad Farmerie is fanatical about miso, which allows him to achieve a rich mouthfeel without butter or cream. Miso is an integral part of Farmeries roasted chile caramel Brussels sprouts, which involve caramelizing sugar (sweet) before adding chiles (hot), cilantro stems (bitter), lime juice (sour), fish sauce (salt/­­umami), and miso (richness). He adds miso to sweet potatoes + brown butter + rosemary to create another dish hes not able to take off the menu. Other chefs will add misos (e.g., white) to salad dressings or soups for an umami boost. From his time in Japan, Michael Anthony picked up a love of sea weeds and pickles. Thomas Henkelmann describes rich, flavorful stocks as essential for cooking in every season. Umeboshi paste is prized by chefs, including Isa Chandra Moskowitz of Omahas and Brooklyns Modern Love, for its umami quality. Moskowitz adds it to her Caesar salad dressing for its anchovy flavor. Even native Brits like Mark Levy fall prey to the charms of white truffles, which he prizes for their mysterious aroma and short availability. Excerpted from Kitchen Creativity: Unlocking Culinary Genius--with Wisdom, Inspiration, and Ideas from the Worlds Most Creative Chefs by Karen Page (Little, Brown, October 31, 2017). Save Save Save Save The post Kitchen Creativity appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford

December 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Trinity Mouzon Wofford is the founder of GOLDE Turmeric, a line of high-quality turmeric blends for golden milk, lattes, and more. We are in love with everything GOLDE, and were so excited to get a peek at its radiant founder’s wellness routine. In this interview, Trinity tells us about her rule-free approach to self-care, her path to self-acceptance, and the importance of giving the body exactly what it’s craving, as well as a Geisha-approved moisturizer that works wonders for her skin, her number one cold remedy that’s likely in your kitchen right now, exercise, beauty, stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think having some form of a routine is crucial to your mental health when you run a business from home. It’s been sort of tricky as of late because we’re in transition from our home in Upstate New York to moving back down to Brooklyn. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. On an ideal day, I’m up around 6:30am and checking my phone for email and GOLDE‘s social media. Following that, I’ll do a bit of stretching to loosen up, and then hop in the shower. After I’ve gotten ready, I’ll sit down to work and make a to-do list for the day -- this is crucial for me. I forget things and get really anxious about what I’m forgetting if I don’t bother to organize my thoughts and tasks in advance. I’ll usually dig into whatever those tasks are for an hour or so before pausing for breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My partner, Issey, and I always make sure to have a cut-off time for work, barring emergencies. Once that point rolls around (it varies day-by-day), I’m usually catching up on the news or my favorite blogs while Issey preps dinner. We’ll eat together and then usually end off binging some TV show. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Issey’s miso soup with tons of mushrooms and seaweed. He makes it completely from scratch using his mom’s recipe. Lunch – Lunch is usually whatever is leftover from dinner that week  -- lately its a lot of hearty stews. Snack – We’ll do a little crudite plate with raw veg from the farmer’s market: carrots, turnips, radishes, persian cucumbers. Always with some cheese and seed crackers. Sometimes also with wine. Dinner – Tibetan food from our favorite spot in Jackson Heights, Queens. It’s a lot of dumplings (momos), noodles, and warming soups. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I can’t, really. I love the taste of coffee, but it turns me into a shaking, anxious mess. I always start the day with a turmeric tonic made with one of our blends -- usually cacao or original because the matcha also makes me a bit hyper. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Yes, yes, yes. I try not to “keep it in check” so much as listen to it with a variety of foods. Sometimes it’s fruit or homemade popcorn with coconut sugar. Sometimes it’s half a box of Dots eaten while laying on the couch. Refined sugar is trash for your system, but so is getting too regimented with your foods. I keep it light (emotionally) and eat what I’m craving. When junk food isn’t off limits, you’re not going to crave it every day. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Well, turmeric, of course. It makes such a difference in my skin and immunity. Issey loves it for instant allergy relief. There are apparently over 10,000 medical studies on its effects on the body --it’s really incredible. We’re also huge proponents of ashwaghanda in our household. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Upstate New York is not exactly the land of boutique fitness, so it can be more challenging to get in a sweat on the regular. I focus mostly on stretching and going on walks/­­hikes on the weekend. I think I’ve probably gained a bit of weight since I’ve been up here because I’m not moving as much as I did in NYC, but I don’t really mind. It’s okay for your body to fluctuate with your circumstances, as long as you’re treating it with respect. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? It varies. I really like working out as a method to clear my head, so often I do look forward to it. But that said, I don’t really try to push myself too much. If you want to be a world-class athlete, then by all means, train 2+ hours a day. I’m just looking to keep my body and psyche in good health, so if I don’t feel like making it to my workout, I don’t feel the need to punish myself later. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I grew up black in a very white town, so I’ve had a lot of really emotional moments coming to terms with what beauty means for me. At the moment, I like to keep things really natural with my curls out and minimal makeup. It took a while to accept my looks for exactly what they are, so now I’m really openly embracing it. I feel more beautiful now than I did 5 years ago, mostly due to opening myself up to the concept that I’m perfectly fine just as I am. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I try to keep my routine relatively simple. I’ll wash my face with raw African black soap or something gentle like Cerave. I love Drunk Elephant products, and I apply their C-Firma and B-Hydra serums every day. They help a lot with keeping my skin clear and getting rid of dark marks. After that I’ll moisturize with raw shea butter, or a cream that has that. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Turmeric, again. Because it’s anti-inflammatory, I’ve found it to be really helpful in clearing up redness or breakouts. Besides that, I try not to get too bogged down with a ton of supplements. I focus mostly on eating a variety of plants every day. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Shea butter is amazing for my skin. My partner’s Japanese mother recently put me on to this cream called Secret de Maiko. It contains shea butter and a few other natural, organic ingredients. Apparently this is what young Geisha girls would use as a moisturizer/­­makeup base. This cream is better than pure shea butter because it won’t leave you greasy at all. I use it twice daily. It’s great for keeping your skin clear and calm. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Well, cannabis helps. I use a vaporizer pen so there’s no smoke-related health detriments/­­lingering smell. I really want to try the Hmbldt pen because I’m a sucker for sharp design. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? There’s going to stress sometimes. I try to deal in healthy ways like going for a walk to clear my head, or talking to a close friend about whatever I’m dealing with. But life isn’t perfect, so sometimes you just end up being a bit tense for a few days. I think that’s normal and natural -- I try not to fight it too much. You have to let yourself feel it so that you can process it and move past it. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic!! At my old job, everyone in the office knew about this because I would practically through bulbs of raw garlic at anyone who complained of illness. Nothing works better for immediately beating a bad cold. If I feel something coming on, I take 2-3 whole cloves (swallowed like horse pills) with a ton of water. That can save you in just a couple hours -- it’s crazy. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I really like to work, so what I consider to be a healthy work/­­life balance might not be the right approach for someone else. I genuinely enjoy spending my free time dreaming up new campaigns, product ideas, or designs for GOLDE. I guess that’s the benefit to doing your own thing -- it doesn’t always feel like work. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I’ve gotten a lot better with this with age. I try not to have any food or exercise rules. Being militant about your body is not self-care, and it can really easily spiral into disordered behavior that veers on the edge of “orthorexia.” I mostly just listen to my body and allow itself what it wants, whether that has to do with food, movement/­­exercise, socializing vs. indulging my natural introvert, etc. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I really think doing away with rules (re: food, etc.) has been the most important change I’ve made. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with avoiding gluten or dairy because it upsets your stomach or causes breakouts, but don’t complicate your life with structure that does not serve you. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Usually moments like these mean I need to re-focus myself. I’ll start by making to-do lists, and go from there. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting GOLDE? I was pre-med at NYU, with plans to practice holistic medicine. By my senior year of college, I wasn’t so sure about spending more time and money on schooling, and sort of fell into a marketing role at a tech startup. I really loved the creative aspects of marketing, and found that GOLDE was a way of combining my interests in sharp branding with making holistic health more accessible. The interest in turmeric actually came from my mom, who has Rheumatoid Arthritis. She noticed a huge difference in her overall levels of inflammation when she started incorporating it into her daily routine -- that’s when I started paying attention. -- How do you approach the sourcing of your ingredients for GOLDE? We actually just started sourcing all of our turmeric with a company called Diaspora Co. They focus 100% on supporting ethical and high-quality spice trade that empowers rather than disenfranchises the people of color who have been growing and ingesting medicinal plants like turmeric for generations. The turmeric that we’re going to be using is an heirloom variety with almost twice the typical amount of curcumin. It’s grown on a fourth-generation, family-owned farm in India, and farmers are paid 6X the standard commodity prices to ensure truly fair wages. We’re really excited to be featuring a product that’s not only incredibly high-quality, but also works to re-build lingering inequality left in the wake of colonialism. -- What’s your favorite way to use your wellness blend? I love to have it just with hot water and raw honey in the morning. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Heading to the Union Square Greenmarket is one of my favorite activities. When I’m in the city, I like to go every Monday morning when it’s not too crowded. It’s mostly just you and the chefs (or their assistants?) shopping for what they’ll be preparing that day. I also love infra red sauna. I go to Higher Dose in the East Village. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie Song/­­Album – Songs in the Key of Life – Stevie Wonder -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I am nowhere near as regimented as our dear Joan. Usually my suitcase is packed haphazardly with whatever clothing is clean and well-suited for the weather. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? More people of color, please! A few of my favorites: Diane Chang Yaminah Mayo Dr. Tiffany Lester Latonya Yvette Nikisha Brunson Alex Elle Lauren Ash Sana Javeri Kadri Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Issey Kobori and Nico Behnzukeh. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Chana with Sweet Potatoes

September 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

One of Indias most popular dishes -- Chana Masala -- features chickpeas simmered with tomatoes. This recipe features sweet potatoes and greens to make the dish even more interesting and satisfying. This recipe comes to us from Oldways. Serves 4   - 1/­­2 large onion, chopped as you like - 1 tablespoon vegetable oil of your choice - 1 teaspoon cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 1/­­2 teaspoon turmeric - 1/­­2 teaspoon coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cloves - 1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes - 1-2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger - 1 (15 oz) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes - 2 small or 1 large sweet potato, cut in chunks - 1/­­2 (15 oz) can light coconut milk or 1/­­4 can of regular coconut milk - 1 cup chopped spinach or other greens   Heat the oil in a large skillet, and cook the onion 4-5 minutes until soft and slightly golden. Add the dry spices. Amounts dont need to be exact; start with these amounts, and adjust to your taste later. Add the garlic and ginger then continue cooking gently for ten minutes to allow the flavors of all the spices to marry with the onions. Now add the tomatoes, chickpeas, sweet potatoes (cut large or small, depending on how you like them) and coconut milk. Bring to a boil, cover, and simmer on low for 45 minutes. The potatoes will soften sooner than that, but keep cooking to develop the flavors. Just before youre ready to serve, add the chopped greens and cook for a few minutes until the greens are wilted. Add salt to taste, and serve with brown rice or some other grain, or with some whole wheat naan. Active time: 1 hour The post Chana with Sweet Potatoes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetarian Chili with Corn and Soy Beans

September 15 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegetarian Chili with Corn and Soy Beans Here is a tasty recipe for a small budget. This is where the chili comes in--this great classic, a thousand times reinvented. This is a really simple version that is prepared in a single saucepan in an hour! If you want to spoil yourself a little bit more, serve it with a vegetable sour cream, avocado, fresh tomato cubes, and organic corn chips. But its honestly so tasty that you can eat it plain! You can also serve it as a garnish on fries, on nachos, on a baked potato, on a veggie dog, or even in a sloppy joe! The possibilities are endless when you have a creative imagination. Preparation: 5 minutes Cooking: 1 hour Total: 1 hour 5 minutes Servings: 4   Ingredients  1 tablespoon olive oil 1 large chopped onion 3 chopped garlic cloves 1 can (28 oz) drained diced tomatoes 1 can (28 oz) crushed tomatoes 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 to 2 tablespoons chili spices 1 tablespoon ground cumin 1 tablespoon ground coriander 1 tablespoon sugar 3/­­4 cup frozen corn kernels 3/­­4 cup canned red kidney beans, rinsed and drained 3/­­4 cup thawed frozen soy beans (edamame)   Preparation In a saucepan, heat the oil to medium […] The post Vegetarian Chili with Corn and Soy Beans appeared first on VegKitchen.

Paneer Methi (Methi Malai Paneer) Recipe by Manjula

September 7 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Paneer Methi (Methi Malai Paneer) Recipe by Manjula (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Paneer Methi (Methi Malai Paneer) Paneer Methi is a delicacy of Northern India. This recipe is paneer with creamy gravy flavored with dry fenugreek leaves known as Fasoori Methi. Paneer Methi is a perfect side dish for formal dinner or even a quiet dinner where you want to impress someone. Any way or time you serve this, it is delicious. - 1-1/­­2 cups paneer cubed in about 1/­­2 inch pieces (used 8oz paneer) - 1-1/­­2 cups tomatoes (chopped) - 1 Tbsp ginger (chopped) - 1 green chili (chopped) - 2 Tbsp oil - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1/­­4 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1/­­4 tsp red chili powder (lal mirch) - 2 Tbsp cashew powder (kaju) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1 tsp fennel seed powder (saunf) - 1 Tbsp dry fenugreek leaves (kasoori methi) - 1 tsp salt - 1-1/­­2 cup milk - 1/­­4 tsp garam masala -  Rub the kasoori methi between your palms and remove the stems if there is any, set aside. -  Blend tomatoes, ginger, green chili to fine paste. Set aside. - Heat one teaspoon of oil in a pan on low heat stir fry the paneer until they are light gold in color, take them out. - Heat the remaining oil in a sauce pan on medium heat. When the oil is moderately hot add cumin seeds. (Cumin seeds should crack right of way). Lower the heat too low, add asafetida, turmeric, chili powder, and cashew powder stir for a minute. - Add tomato paste, coriander, fennel seed powder, salt and kasoori methi, keep stirring till tomato start leaving the side of the pan, this should take 3-4 minutes. Add milk, and cook for 2-3 minutes. Add paneer and let it cook over low heat for 2-3 minutes. This is the time you can add water as needed if gravy is too thick. Add garam masala stir and turn off the heat. -  Paneer Methi is ready.  To make vegan, Substitute paneer with tofu and milk with coconut milk Serve Paneer Methi with Naan, or Lacha Paratha. The post Paneer Methi (Methi Malai Paneer) Recipe by Manjula appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Masala Lauki Ki Sabji

August 19 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Masala Lauki Ki Sabji (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Masala Lauki Ki Sabji Lauki is a simple and healthy vegetable side dish that is also known as opo squash, or Bottle Gourd. Lauki is a staple vegetable in most Indian homes because of its many known health benefits. The vegetable itself is rather bland, so I love manipulating its flavor.  - 1 medium size lauki peeled and cut into bite-sized pieces (will make about 4 cups) - 2 medium size tomatoes (finely chopped – will make about 1 cup) - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable) - 1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 2 Tbsp besan (gram flour) - 1/­­8 tsp fenugreek seeds (methi) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1 tsp shredded ginger (adrak) - 1 Tbsp finely chopped green chili - 1 tsp salt - 2 Tbsp finely chopped cilantro (hara dhania) -  Heat the oil in a saucepan. Oil should be moderately hot. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil. If the cumin seed cracks right away, the oil is ready. -  Add the cumin seeds, asafetida, and fenugreek seeds stir for few seconds. Lower the heat add the besan (besan gives the light aroma and thickness to the gravy) and stir for few seconds. Add coriander powder, red chili powder, turmeric, ginger and green chili stir for few seconds then add tomatoes and salt. Increase the heat medium high. Cook stirring until spices start leaving the oil this should take about 3-4 minute. - Last add lauki and about 1 cup of water and let it cook until lauki is tender. This should take about 10 to 12 minutes.  Notes: lauki can take longer in cooking and more water depends how tender the lauki. Serving suggestion: Masala Lauki can be served with Roti or paratha, or  dal paratha       The post Masala Lauki Ki Sabji appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Matar With Spicy Gravy (Green Peas Masala Curry)

July 30 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Matar With Spicy Gravy (Green Peas Masala Curry) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Matar With Spicy Gravy (Green Peas Masala Curry) Matar With Spicy Gravy is a super delicious side dish made using green peas which tastes amazing in combination with either roti or rice. Matar with spicy gravy is one of my favorite side dish. - 2 cup green peas (I am using frozen peas) - 1 cup tomatoes (chopped ) - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1 Tbsp besan - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania ) - 1/­­4 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder (lal mirch) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 Tbsp ginger paste - 1 Tbsp green chili (finely chopped) - 1/­­4 tsp garam masala - Heat the oil in a saucepan. Oil should be moderately hot. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil. If the cumin seed cracks right away, the oil is ready. - Add the cumin seeds, and asafetida, after cumin seeds crack add the besan ( besan gives the light aroma and thickness to the gravy) and stir for few seconds. Add all the ingredients except green peas, tomatoes, ginger, green chili, red chili, coriander, turmeric, and salt. Cook stirring until spices start leaving the oil this should take about 3-4 minute. - Next add green peas and about 1-1/­­4 cups of water and let it cook until peas are tender. This should take about 4-6 minutes. -  Serving suggestion: Matar With Spicy Gravy can be served with any bread or rice. The post Matar With Spicy Gravy (Green Peas Masala Curry) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Aam ka Panna (Raw Mango Drink)

July 9 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Aam ka Panna (Raw Mango Drink) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Aam Ka Panna (Raw Green Mango Drink) Aam ka Panna (Raw Green Mango Drink) is a refreshing mango drink that is made from raw green mangoes and some mild spices. This chilled drink is great for hot summer days as it has a very nice cooling effect. - 2 cup raw cooking mango peeled and cubed, - 3/­­4 cup sugar (adjust as needed) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp black salt - 1 tsp dry roasted cumin seed powder - 1/­­4 tsp black pepper - 1/­­4 cup mint leaves For Serving - Few fresh mint leaves (for garnishing) - 2 cup crushed ice - Peel the mango, slice it into large pieces and remove the seed. - Boil the mango slices in about 2 cups of water until the mango slices are well cooked. It should take about 10 minutes. - After the mango cools off, blend the mango with all the ingredients except use 1/­­2 cup of sugar we will add the sugar as needed. - Add about 2 cups of water, taste the panna and adjust the salt and sugar. Panna should have the consistency of orange juice.  - Serve over ice and use fresh mint leaves as a garnish. The post Aam ka Panna (Raw Mango Drink) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset

January 16 2018 My New Roots 

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset Happy 2018 dear friends! I hope that you all had a restful and relaxing holiday, and that youre ready to take on the new year. As most of you know, the past few months have been all-over-the-place (literally) for my family and I, so Ive been giving myself plenty of freedom when it comes to what Im eating and how often Im exercising. With my regular routines out the window, Ive felt an immense sense of liberation - its great to let go once in a while! - but now its gotten to the point where my body is really craving some stability and grounding, especially after the holidays. Sometimes I like to go drastic and embark on a 10-day juice fast or something like it, but my body and my mind arent feeling a hard-core anything at the moment, so Im turning to kichadi to gently ease my way back into eating with more balance. Kichadi, sometimes called and spelled khichdi, kitchari, kitcheree or khichri, is the famous one-pot wonder Indian dish that combines rice and lentils or quick-cooking pulses or legumes, such as mung beans. Its best known in Ayurvedic tradition as a cleansing and complete protein meal, very easy to digest, and a cinch to make! It is delicious, super comfort food, and even if youre not down with eating the exact same thing for every meal for several days in a row, youll be thrilled to learn its also the perfect thing to tuck into on a cold winter night. Because of its simplicity and ease, many people find that doing a kichadi “mono-diet” is very pleasant and far less of an ordeal than a juice fast for example (although I need to be clear that a juice fast is far deeper and more effective). Taking three to seven days to eat this dish exclusively gives the digestive organs a serious break since kichadi is very easy to break down and assimilate. And because digestion is at the core of human health, putting a practice in place that supports this essential process makes room for the miracle of self-healing: something the body is constantly striving for, but often distracted from by poor dietary and lifestyle choices. When we forgo processed foods, alcohol, caffeine, and common allergens for a few days, we give our bodies the space it needs to do what it naturally does anyway: clean itself up! I like to eat a kichadi diet in the colder months when the weather is unfriendly and I need some reassuring, grounding, warm food - and juicing sounds about as fun as a hole in the head. Its also a wonderful way to glide yourself into the process of cleansing if youve never tried it before. Since it doesnt involve abstaining from food, most first-timers find it totally do-able, and dare I say it, enjoyable! Ive just completed three days of eating kichadi for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and Im feeling sooo much more balanced, clear-headed, and energized - the ways I would like to feel at the beginning of a brand new year! I hope that this simple and realistic reset is up your alley, and that you give it a go. First things first, youre going to need to do a bit of planning for the kichadi diet. Set a realistic goal for yourself - ideally youll be eating this dish for at least three days, up to seven, but if one is all you can handle, that is okay too. Since youre eating throughout this practice, going about your regular life is usually fine, but if you want to go the extra mile and give yourself a real treat, do the kichadi diet over a long weekend or break from work so that you can focus on some other cleanse-enriching experiences, such as a massage, a sauna visit, daytime napping, reading an actual book, and maybe even going offline completely. Gasp! I started my kichadi diet on a Monday and carried out my normal routine with work and family life, and just made sure to give myself lots of juicy personal time in the evenings (essential oil bath, yin yoga sesh, early lights out etc.). Aside from a cleanse-classic mood swing on the last day, no one around me even noticed what I was doing. Since they were too busy eating pizza.    Before you begin youll want to start by cutting back on alcohol, caffeine, sugar, meat, dairy, processed foods, and anything else you know is throwing you off balance. If you abstain from these things for at least a couple of days before you begin, your experience will be much smoother, as you won’t be distracted by gnarly withdrawal symptoms while you’re trying to chill. You can also add any bad habits you have to your hit list, and reduce or eliminate the daily practices that arent making your life extra groovy. Whatever day you are starting the kichadi on, soak the rice and pulses /­­ legumes together the night before. This step is important for improving the digestive qualities of kichadi, but if you are really pressed for time or you forgot, get them in water as soon as you can. Remember that even soaking for an hour is better than nothing! Cook the kichadi daily if possible, since the fresher the food is, the more energy, or prana it contains. My recipe makes about six servings for my appetite (eight for people who eat less) and I can easily stretch one batch over two days if no one else in my family wants it. Regardless, youll have to make at least two batches if youre going for three days, and I would not recommend keeping kichadi around for longer than that. Freezing is an option, but freeze it in the portion size youd want to eat so that youre not heating more than you need at one sitting.        Daily routine The night before: soak the rice and pulses together in plenty of filtered water overnight. Morning: upon rising, drink a large glass of warm water with freshly squeezed lemon juice, followed by another glass of pure water. Make your first batch of kichadi, and enjoy it for breakfast. Store leftovers in the fridge. Midday: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for lunch. Evening: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for dinner. Night time: Drink a cup of herbal detox tea if desired, enjoy something that nourishes you (bath, meditation, stretching) and go to bed early. Repeat for three to seven days. Kichadi Reset tips 1. Eat when youre hungry. This may seem like an obvious one, but many people eat according to the clock, instead of listening to their bodies. Take these days to really tune in and see when your body actually desires food, and how much you need to eat to feel satisfied. When you feel real hunger, your body is giving you the signal that it is actually ready to receive. 2. Cook mindfully. Remember that cooking is something to be grateful for. If you normally approach cooking from a lets get this over with standpoint, use this opportunity to make your meal prep a ceremony, and see it as a gift to yourself. Take your time washing and cutting vegetables, delight in the sound of the spices popping, the scent that wafts up while youre peeling ginger. The attention and intention you put into your food will come back to you, and nourish you in ways that you never thought possible. 3. Keep things interesting, by adding a squeeze of lime instead of lemon to your kichadi. You can use parsley instead of cilantro, and adjust the spices to suit your personal taste. If you really need some variety, top the kichadi with some of your favourite sprouts, grated raw carrot, or fold in some spinach while its still hot. 4. Cravings are normal, especially when youre knowingly depriving yourself! If you feel a craving coming on, first identify what the craving is. Be curious...maybe it has nothing to do with the food, but more your emotional or mental state. If you really cant shake the feeling, drink water first, then try a piece of fruit, or some raw veggie sticks. 5. Drink a lot of water. The body functions optimally when properly hydrated. It is especially important when were resetting, since were letting go of things that need to be flushed out. Water is essential to this process, but it will also prevent cravings, combat fatigue and brain fog, and keep the bowels moving. Remember to drink water away from mealtimes for optimal digestion (30 minutes before eating, 2-3 hours after unless youre very thirsty). Other beverages, even if they are mostly water like coffee and tea, are not water. Only water is water. After the Kichadi diet Although it is extremely tempting to celebrate and indulge after denying oneself certain things, this is not the best time to do so. Even though this process keeps your digestive system humming along, your body is still in a sensitive place. Introduce new foods slowly, and keep combinations small and uncomplicated (i.e. dont have a meal with 20 different foods together). Limit meat, dairy, sugar, and processed foods for as long as possible. That congratulatory slice of cake should wait until youre pretty much back to normal, or maybe even find an alternative ; )     Print recipe     Simple and Cleansing Kichadi Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1/­­2 Tbsp. cumin seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. coriander seeds 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1 cinnamon stick 1-2 Tbsp. minced ginger (to taste) 1 large tomato, chopped (optional) 2 medium yellow onion, diced 2 medium carrots, chopped 1 small /­­ 250g sweet potato (or other seasonal root veggie), chopped 1 cup /­­ 200g brown rice 1/­­2 cup /­­ 110g mung beans or brown lentils 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 cup /­­ 140g green peas, frozen or fresh 4 cups /­­ 1L water (or more, as needed) a couple handfuls finely chopped cilantro lemon to garnish Directions: 1. If possible, soak the rice and pulses together overnight, or for 8-12 hours. Drain and rinse very well. 2. Melt the oil in a large stockpot. Add the cumin and mustard seed and fry just until the mustard seeds start to pop. Add the remaining spices, stir and then add the tomato and ginger (if youre opting out of the tomato, simply use a few splashes of water). Fry for a couple minutes until fragrant. 3. Add the onion, carrots, sweet potato, brown rice, mung beans, salt, and water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook for about 45 minutes, until the rice and beans are soft. About five minutes before serving, add the peas whether fresh or frozen, and cook until they are warm. Add more water for a stew-y consistency, or if the pot becomes dry while cooking. 4. Serve kichadi hot, garnished with cilantro and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Give thanks and enjoy. I hope that many of you try the kichadi diet out, and rejoice in the fact that there is no need to do something radical and overly deprivational during the winter. This is a time for closing in, for being quiet and gentle, and nourishing oneself in a tender way. And remember, you can enjoy this delicious kichadi even for a day, and any season of the year when you need to find your equilibrium once again. Its a tasty way to come back to center, every time, anytime. In health, vibrancy, and abundance for the year ahead, Sarah B. Show me your kichadi on Instagram: #mnrkichadi The post Kichadi: The Realistic Reset appeared first on My New Roots.

Rice and Potato Cutlets

December 23 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Rice and Potato Cutlets These Rice and Potato Cutlets are a tasty treat as a tea time snack or you can also serve them as an appetizer. They are crispy outside and soft inside. This is a quick and easy recipe and a good way to use left over rice. - 1 cup rice (cooked) - 1 cup potatoes (boiled, peeled, and shredded) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1 Tbsp green chili (chopped) - 1 tsp ginger (finely chopped) - 2 Tbsp cilantro (finely chopped, hara dhania) - 1/­­4 tsp fresh lemon juice - In a bowl mash the rice, rice should be semi mashed add potatoes mix it well now add all the other ingredients, salt, cumin seeds, green chilies, ginger, cilantro and lemon juice. Mix should be firm and will be consistency of a sticky dough. - Grease your palm and divide them into 12 pieces I wanted to make them in small size. Roll them in patties. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium high heat. Frying pan should have about 1 of oil. Oil should be moderately hot. Test the oil putting a small piece of mix, this should up right of way. Drop the cutlets slowly into it, taking care not to overlap them. - Fry the cutlets until they are golden brown, turning occasionally. This should take about 5 minutes. Take them out over a paper towel. - For best taste serve them hot. Cutlets taste great with cilantro chutney. - Potatoes should be not over cooked, that will make mix soft and cutlets can break in the oil while frying. - If oil is not hot enough cutlets will be greasy. Rice and potato min should not be very soft otherwise cutlets will break in oil. The post Rice and Potato Cutlets appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

aloo matar recipe | aloo mutter recipe | alu matar recipe

December 13 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

aloo matar recipe | aloo mutter recipe | alu matar recipealoo matar recipe | aloo mutter recipe | alu matar recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. the recipe steps for aloo mutter recipe is very basic and simple. it is basically prepared with simple onion and tomato based sauce and tempered with dried fenugreek leaves or methi leaves with cumin seeds. the tempering of fenugreek leaves gives a new flavour and dimensions as compared to other traditional punjabi curries. Continue reading aloo matar recipe | aloo mutter recipe | alu matar recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Aloo Gobi

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chunks of potato and cauliflower soak up the rich flavors of toasted cumin, turmeric and dried coriander in this traditional dish. Try serving this curry with basmati rice or the flatbread naan for a quintessential Indian feast. This recipe comes to us from Prerna of Indian Simmer. Serves 2 - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds - or - 1 teaspoon mustard seeds - 1/­­4 onion, chopped - 2 tablespoons dried coriander - 1 teaspoons red pepper powder - I teaspoon turmeric - 1 teaspoon curry powder - 1 medium cauliflower, cut into bite sized florets - 1 potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 inch cubes - 1 tablespoon cilantro, chopped Place the oil in a medium wok or frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the cumin or mustard seeds and cook for 1-3 minutes, or until they start popping. When the seeds pop, add the onion. Cook for 3-5 minutes, or until the it turns golden. Season the onion with the dried coriander, red pepper powder, turmeric and curry powder, taking care to stir and ensure all spices are evenly distributed. Add the cauliflower florets and potato cubes. Stir, cover with a lid and turn heat down to medium low. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 12-15 minutes or until the potatoes and cauliflower are al dente. Uncover, stir and cook 4-7 minutes more, or until the vegetables are fully cooked. Divide into 2 portions, sprinkle with cilantro and enjoy! The post Aloo Gobi appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Middle Eastern Lentils & Rice

November 13 2017 Meatless Monday 

In this Middle Eastern classic also known as Mujaddara, onions are caramelized until sweet and brown to season the green lentils and hearty brown rice. Cinnamon and cumin complement the caramelized onion to spice this traditional dish which wont break the bank. This recipe comes to us from Anne of Apron Strings. Serves 6 - 1 cup brown rice - 2 cups green lentils, rinsed and sorted - 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided - 3 large onions, sliced - 1 teaspoon cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 teaspoon salt - freshly ground black pepper, to taste - 1 cup flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped - a sprinkle extra virgin olive oil, for serving Place the rice in a saucepan over medium high heat with 2 cups of water and a dash of salt. Bring the rice to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, cover and cook for 45-50 minutes, or until the rice is cooked through. Drain. While the rice is cooking, cover the lentils with 2 inches of water in another pot over medium high heat. Bring the lentils to a boil and continue boiling for about 20-25 minutes, or until the lentils are cooked through, but not yet mushy. Drain. While the lentils and rice are cooking, place the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the onions, stirring to make sure the slices have separated and are coated in oil. Reduce heat to low and cook for about 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions have caramelized. When the rice, lentils and onions have completed cooking and caramelizing, toss them together in a large bowl. Season the rice, lentils and onions with the cumin, cinnamon, salt and black pepper to taste. Divide the lentils and rice into 6 equal servings. Sprinkle each serving with the parsley and drizzle with the extra virgin olive oil and enjoy! The post Middle Eastern Lentils & Rice appeared first on Meatless Monday.


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