cucumber - vegetarian recipes

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cucumber vegetarian recipes

Grilled Paneer

November 26 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Grilled Paneer (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Grilled Paneer (Indian Cottage Cheese Appetizer) Grilled Paneer makes for a great appetizer that compliments any main course dish. Grilled paneer is quick and easy to put together, making it the perfect party appetizer. I will be preparing this appetizer a lot this holiday season because it is perfect to serve at get together and bring to potlucks. - 1 1/­­2 cup paneer (cubed in 1 square and 1/­­2 thick) - 1/­­2 cup bell pepper (cubed, yellow and green to give the color) - 1/­­2 cup cherry tomatoes - 2 tsp oil - 1 Tbsp green chili (finely chopped, optional) - 2 Tbsp cilantro (finely chopped, hara dhania) - 1 tsp fresh lemon juice Spice Mix - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp black salt - 1/­­2 tsp roasted cumin seed powder - 1/­­8 tsp black pepper - 1/­­8 tsp red chili powder -  Mix the spice mix and keep aside. you can make this spice mix in a large quantity and keep it ready to go whenever you need it. - Heat heavy flat frying pan on low medium heat, add the oil in to warm frying pan. Spread the paneer cubes dont over lap them. Grill the paneer from both sides, this should take about 2 minutes. Take them out from frying pan. - Use the same pan and grill the bell pepper, for about 2 minutes stirring occasionally, bell pepper will have some brown spots. Take them out from frying pan. - Use the same pan and grill the tomatoes for about 1-2 minutes, tomatoes will have some blisters. Take them out from frying pan. - In a bowl toss the paneer with spice mix, use the spice mix about in half the quantity, adjust for you taste, cilantro, green chili and lemon juice. - Serve the grilled paneer with side of bell pepper and tomatoes and sprinkle little spice mix over bell pepper and tomatoes. - A healthy and delicious appetizer is ready to serve. Note: This spice mix known as chaat masala can also be used to spice up any food. It especially tastes good when it is sprinkled over sliced cucumber and tomato or over pakoras. You can make the chaat masala in a larger quantity and keep it ready to go whenever you need it. The post Grilled Paneer appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice

October 24 2018 My New Roots 

Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice   Ive now been blogging for eleven years (11years!!!). And in those eleven years, you know what Ive learned about you? You love sweet potatoes. You love tahini. And you love sauce. And if I post anything with those things - or even better - a combination of those things, I know its going to go over well. I often get preoccupied with making my recipe posts totally out there with crazy ingredients, involved techniques, and lose sight of the fact that a lot of you like really simple things too. Just like me. And just like me you like sweet potatoes and tahini and sauce. The sweet potato wedges with tahini-honey sauce and everything bagel spice that I posted on Instagram drew many requests for the recipe. I thought it would be way too easy, but your encouragement reminded me that its okay if its easy! We all have a place for uncomplicated in our lives.     I was first introduced to everything bagel spice while teaching cooking classes down in the states this past summer. One of the women in the group proclaimed that it took avocado toast to the next level, and after trying it once, I was totally hooked. She gave me two jars of the flavour confetti before I flew home, and I have just recently shaken out the last grain of salt. Without a clue on where to buy such a random thing in Canada, I set out to make my own - only I decided to be highly practical and mix up a laughably large batch because it is literally good on everything. For those of you who arent familiar with everything bagel spice mix, its the simplest combination of flaky salt, onion flakes, garlic flakes, sesame seeds, and poppy seeds, which classically tops an everything bagel. It doesnt sound like that much, but trust me, if it can make a white, doughy   this blend far more than the sum of its parts. A generous sprinkle on any dish makes it all that much more dimensional, seasoned, and delicious. My favourite applications for it include sliced garden tomatoes, cucumber, steamed green beans, roasted beets, goat cheese, cauliflower, popcorn, green salads, steamed brown rice or quinoa, eggs, hummus, and sweet potatoes...you see where Im going with this. Maybe its faster to write a list of the foods that it wouldnt be good on? Chocolate cake. There, that was easy.     But Im actually here to talk about sweet potatoes. These gorgeous golden roots are now in season, and the last local tubers being pulled from the earth as I write this. Since I live so close to a number of organic farms here in Ontario, I thought it would be fun to go see them being harvested. I called around my area to see if anyone still had them in the ground, and I got lucky when one place, Fiddlehead Farm, called me back with good news and an invitation out to their field. Fiddlehead Farm is run by a tribe of boss women who support over 150 local families through their CSA program, and hold stands at four different markets. These ladies are busy, and growing a diverse range of vegetables, greens, and herbs that seemed to stretch on for miles. I could tell from walking around the property how passionate they were about their work, and how deeply they care for their little corner of the earth. What an inspiration! Heather, the farms co-owner, hopped off her tractor to introduce herself and show me the goods. She pulled back a tangle of stems and gave a good yank to unearth a juicy bunch of sweet potatoes, all clumped together like a vegetable cuddle puddle. Jackpot! She said it had been a really good year for this particular crop, and right under my feet were literally hundreds of roots waiting patiently to be harvested before the impending frost. Seeing how things grow and meeting the people that work so hard to bring these food gifts to us gives me a deeper appreciation for every bite I take.     Sweet potatoes are nutritional powerhouses, as one of natures best sources of beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is a carotenoid form of vitamin A - an essential anti-inflammatory and antioxidant nutrient. The intensity of a sweet potatos orange flesh is a direct reflection of its beta-carotene content, so find the most vibrant ones you can, and dig in. Remember that you need a little fat to help your body absorb beta-carotene, so a drizzle of olive oil, or dousing your taters in a sauce like the one in this recipe is an important step in receiving those life-giving nutrients. Not a bad deal if you ask me. Sweet potatoes can be enjoyed roasted, steamed, sautéed, or even eaten raw, but however you choose to eat them, keep those skins on! The skin of a sweet potato is loaded with extra fiber to regulate blood sugar and support digestion, potassium to maintain normal blood pressure, and iron to deliver much-needed oxygen to your cells. Scrub sweet potatoes firmly with a soft vegetable brush - you want to remove the dirt but not take the skin away. When purchasing sweet potatoes, look for smooth, even skin without bruises or soft spots. Avoid buying sweet potatoes that are in the fridge, since cold temperatures negatively affect their flavour. Once you get them home, store them in a dry, and well-ventilated place away from a hot spot (like near the stove or on top of the fridge). Instead of keeping them in plastic, which can cause them to mold, store them in an open paper bag to extend their life.   Some notes on the recipe. Other methods Ive seen online for everything bagel spice do not suggest toasting the seeds beforehand, and I think this is a major miss. It makes a huge difference giving the sesame and poppy seeds a quick tour in a hot pan to coax out more of their flavour. If youre in a rush or simply cant be bothered, thats fine, just know that youll be missing out on some bonus taste points. And if you dont want to make three cups of the mix to start, simply half, or even quarter the recipe. I am pretty confident that youll love it though, especially once you try it on avocado toast. The Tahini Honey Sauce makes about one cup (250ml), which is plenty to cover the sweet potato wedges, but make a double batch if you want a great staple dressing for the week ahead. Its delicious on simple green salad, folded into cooked grains, drizzled over roast vegetables, or on avocado toast. The honey taste is present, but not overpowering, so feel free to add more if you want to ramp up the sweetness. For a vegan version, use maple syrup or date syrup in its place.       Print recipe     Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini- Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice Serves 4 Ingredients: 3 medium organic sweet potatoes (about 1 1/­­2 lbs. /­­ 650g) coconut oil (expeller-pressed and flavour-neutral) sea salt flat-leaf parsley and /­­ or cilantro for garnish chili flakes toasted pumpkin seeds Tahini-Honey Sauce (recipe follows) Everything Bagel Spice Mix (recipe follows) Tahini-Honey Sauce Makes 1 cup /­­ 250ml Ingredients: 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml tahini 1/­­3 cup /­­ 80ml water 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. extra virgin cold-pressed olive oil 1 Tbsp. raw liquid honey (substitute with maple syrup for a vegan version) 1 small clove garlic, minced 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Big Batch Everything Bagel Spice Mix Makes 3 cups /­­ 430g Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g garlic flakes 3/­­4 cup /­­ 85g onion flakes 3/­­4 cup /­­100g sesame seeds (any colour you like) 1/­­2 cup/­­ 85g poppy seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 80g flaky sea salt (I used Maldon) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. 2. Scrub the sweet potatoes well under running water. Slice them lengthwise into wedges of your desired thickness. Place them on a baking sheet with space between them (if theyre too close together theyll steam each other and get soggy), and roast for about 20-25 minutes, depending on their size. Remove from the oven when fork-tender. 3. While the sweet potatoes are roasting, make the Tahini-Honey Sauce by placing all the ingredients in a blender and blend until completely smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary. To thin, add a little water and blend or stir until the desired consistency is reached. Store leftovers in the fridge for five days. 4. Make the Everything Bagel Spice Mix In a dry skillet over medium heat, toast the sesame seeds until fragrant. Remove from heat and let cool. Place poppy seeds in the same skillet, and toast over medium heat until fragrant. Remove from heat and let cool. In a large jar combine the cooled sesame and poppy seeds, garlic flakes, onion flakes, and salt. Shake or stir to combine, and secure with an airtight lid. Store in a cool, dry place away from direct light. Keeps for 3-4 month. 5. To serve, drizzle the Tahini-Honey Sauce over the sweet potato wedges (you can keep them on the baking sheet or plate them as desired), then sprinkle generously with the Everything Bagel Spice Mix, and top with fresh herbs, toasted pumpkin seeds, and chili flakes (but get creative, these are just suggestions!). Enjoy. I want to sign off with a sincere thanks for the past eleven years of support from all of you. It’s hard for me to believe that I’ve been creating in this space for so many years now (I’ve never done anything for this long!), but I wouldn’t have the motivation to keep going if it weren’t for your curiosity, enthusiasm, and appetite for the heart work I put in here. I know that I’ll stay hungry if you do Let’s keep going, together. In sincere gratitude and love, Sarah B. *   *   *   *   *   * I have great news, dear friends! Due to the overwhelmingly positive response to the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box, we have reopened the sales so that you can still receive (or give!) the box before the holiday season. Click here for more information, and to subscribe. Thank you very much for your ongoing support of My New Roots! The post Sweet Potato Wedges with Tahini-Honey Sauce and Everything Bagel Spice appeared first on My New Roots.

The Best Quinoa Salad

October 24 2018 VegKitchen 

The Best Quinoa Salad Unlike rice and wheat, quinoa is not a grain. Quinoa is the fruit of a plant from the same family as spinach and beets. Quinoa shines in salads, and if you want to eat gluten free, it’s the perfect food. On the nutrition side, it contains a large amount of high-quality protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and many micronutrients. Thanks to its nutritional composition--somewhat different from other cereals--and its unique taste, its inclusion in the diet brings variety to the menu. 3.0 from 1 reviews Save Print The Best Quinoa Salad Prep time:  20 mins Cook time:  25 mins Total time:  45 mins Serves: 5-6   Ingredients 1 cup of uncooked quinoa ½ cup of uncooked green lentils 1 red pepper cut into small cubes ½ English cucumber cut into small cubes ½ tomato cut into small cubes 1 cup fresh parsley Instructions Cook the quinoa and lentils according to package directions and set aside Add all the ingredients of the salad in a large bowl Mix all the ingredients of the dressing together, add to the ingredients , mix well And thats it! 3.3.3077   The post The Best Quinoa Salad appeared first on VegKitchen.

Couscous Salad with Tangy Dressing

October 15 2018 Meatless Monday 

This plant-based recipe is low in sodium and helps keep blood pressure control in check, providing less stress on the kidneys. It is also low in saturated and total fat, helping blood vessels supply necessary oxygen and nutrients to the heart and kidneys. This recipe comes to us from the National Kidney Foundation. Serves 7 - 1  tablespoon minced  Garlic - 1  tsp, leaves  Oregano – Dried - 1  teaspoon  Allspice - 2  lemon yields  Lemon Juice – Fresh - 1  cup, whole  Raw Snow Peas, Sugar Snap Peas - 1/­­2  cup  Frozen Corn - 1/­­2  cup chopped  Carrots - 1/­­2  cup, chopped  Yellow Bell Pepper, Raw - 1/­­2  cup, chopped  Red Bell Pepper, Raw - 3  large  Cucumber – Peeled - 1  cup  Couscous – Dry   1. In a large bowl, mix together chilled couscous, cucumbers, red pepper, yellow pepper, carrots, snow peas, and corn. 2. In a small bowl, whisk together lemon juice, All spices, dried oregano, minced garlic, and olive oil. The post Couscous Salad with Tangy Dressing appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Cucumber (Kheera) Raita

October 12 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Cucumber (Kheera) Raita (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Cucumber (kheera) Raita Cucumber Raita is a delightful refreshing side dish and compliment to any meal. Raita is made so many ways, but the main ingredient is always the yogurt. Cucumber raita is one of my favorites especially during the summer. This is a quick and easy recipe. I also like to serve cucumber raita as a spread or dipping sauce.  - 1 cup yogurt (curd, dahi) - 1 cup cucumber (shredded) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp black salt - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (roasted) - 1/­­8 tsp black pepper - 1/­­2 tsp green chili (finely chopped) - 1 Tbsp mint leaves (finely chopped) - 1/­­8 tsp red chili pepper (for garnishing) -  In a bowel beat the yogurt until it is smooth and creamy. - Peel and shred the cucumber. - Mix shredded cucumber, salt, black salt, cumin powder, green chili, mint leaves to yogurt and mix it well. - Garnish with chili powder and few mint leaves. Serve chill. Notes Use the measurements for your guide line, especially in this recipe you can adjust all the ingredients to your taste easily.   The post Cucumber (Kheera) Raita appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Corn Salad

September 26 2018 Oh My Veggies 

It’s time to prepare salad for lunches, so if you are looking for a quick and savory salad to try, this is it!! Light and full of flavor, I guarantee that this will be a success not just for your lunches but for your next family party, especially if you are a fan of corn. Prep time: 20 minutes Servings: 6 Ingredients Vinaigrette 3 tbsp of olive oil 2 tbsp lemon juice 2 tbsp chopped flat parsley 1 tsp sugar 1 tsp Dijon mustard 1/­­2 tsp dried oregano Salad 1 cup of cherry tomatoes 1 English cucumber, cubed 180 ml (3/­­4 cup) diced feta cheese 125 mL (1/­­2 cup) of green onion Instructions In a bowl combine all the ingredients of the vinaigrette and whisk together. Add the salad ingredients and mix well. Put the salad in the refrigerator until ready to serve.

Baked Eggplant Fries

September 11 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Baked Eggplant FriesCrunchy and delicious, these Baked Eggplant Fries are a surefire way to make an eggplant lover out of just about anyone. And because theyre baked, not fried, theyre good for you too! Serve them as a side dish or enjoy them as a snack or appetizer. Dipping them in tzatziki sauce is a must. Baked Eggplant Fries Crunchy and delicious, these fries are a surefire way to make an eggplant lover out of just about anyone. And because theyre baked, not fried, theyre good for you too! Serve them as a side dish or enjoy them as a snack or appetizer. Dipping them in tzatziki sauce is a must. - One large eggplant, peeled and sliced vertically into 1/­­2-inch slices - 1/­­2 cup flour of choice ((all-purpose, rice, or chickpea are good choices)) - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - 1/­­8 teaspoon cayenne - 1 cup plain unsweetened almond milk or other nondairy milk - 2 tablespoons ground flaxseed blended with 1/­­4 cup water in a blender until thick - 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice - 1 cup dry bread crumbs - 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast - 2 teaspoons dried oregano - 1 teaspoon dried basil - 1 teaspoon smoked paprika - Tzatziki Sauce, recipe follows, for serving - Cut the eggplant slices lengthwise into 1/­­2-inch strips. If the strips are too long, cut them in half. Set aside. Preheat the oven to 425°F. - In a shallow bowl, combine the flour, salt, pepper, and cayenne, and mix well. In a second shallow bowl, combine the almond milk and flaxseed mixture, stirring to blend. In a third shallow bowl, combine the bread crumbs, nutritional yeast, oregano, basil, and paprika. - Dredge the eggplant strips in the flour mixture, then dip them in the milk mixture, and then roll them in the breadcrumb mixture. Arrange the strips in a single layer on the prepared baking sheet. Bake for 15 minutes, then flip over and bake for about 10 minutes longer, or until golden brown and crispy. Sprinkle the hot fries with salt. Serve hot with a bowl of the sauce. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington.     Vegan Tzatziki Sauce The refreshing and flavorful sauce made with yogurt, cucumber, and seasonings is extremely versatile. Serve it with the Baked Eggplant Fries. Its also good as a dip for warm pita bread or crunch pita chips, or as a spread for sandwiches. - 3 cloves garlic (crushed) - 1/­­2 small cucumber (peeled, seeded, and quartered) - 1/­­4 cup vegan yogurt - 1/­­4 cup vegan sour cream - 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill (mint, or parsley) - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - In a food processor, combine the garlic and cucumber and process until finely minced. Add the yogurt, sour cream, lemon juice, dill, and salt and pepper to taste. Process until well blended, then transfer to a bowl. Taste to adjust the seasoning if needed. Cover and refrigerate until needed. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington. The post Baked Eggplant Fries appeared first on Robin Robertson.

10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for August

August 14 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for AugustThe hot humid weather is back in full force and so is my desire for quick and easy meal solutions. On hot days like the ones weve been having lately, I prefer to do any cooking that needs to be done early in the morning to save me from heating up the kitchen later in the day. Today, I’ve put together a list of some of my favorite vegan recipes for the blisteringly hot days of August. 10 Cooling Vegan Recipes August Cucumber and White Bean Ceviche - Traditionally made with raw fish or scallops, I like to make this lime-marinated salad from Peru with cucumbers and white beans for a nice contrast of refreshingly crisp and creamy. Fire and Ice Sesame Noodles - The evocative name refers to the heat from the sriracha and the cold since I usually serve this dish chilled. You can serve it at room temperature, if you prefer, but fire and room temperature just doesnt have the same ring to it. Indonesian Gado Gado - Gado-Gado is an Indonesian main-dish salad of raw and cooked vegetables tossed with a spicy peanut sauce. The flavor improves with time, so plan on making this crunchy salad the day before you need it. Bánh M? Tostadas - East meets West in this tasty fusion combo. Tostada means toasted in Spanish and is the name of a Mexican dish in which a toasted tortilla is the base for other ingredients that top it. Bánh m? is a popular Vietnamese sandwich that features crisp pickled vegetables, fragrant cilantro, chiles, and zesty hoisin and sriracha sauces. Soba Slaw - Plus - The Soba Slaw in Quick-Fix Vegan, with its chewy noodles and crunchy cabbage and carrots, is a nice refreshing salad on its own. To make it a heartier meal, however, I usually add some cooked shelled edamame or some diced baked tofu, and a little sriracha sauce to give it some heat. Chilled Glass Noodles with Snow Peas and Baked Tofu - This light but satisfying salad should be prepared at least 30 minutes ahead of time for the best flavor. Made from mung bean flour, glass noodles are also called cellophane noodles, bean thread noodles, and harusame. English Garden Salad- Little gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head-- and its perfect for this English Garden Salad. Chickpeas Nicoise - One of my favorite flavor combos is the one found in a Nicoise Salad:  the melding of creamy potatoes, fresh green beans, sweet tomatoes, and piquant olives hits all the right flavor notes. Watermelon Paletas- These watermelon popsicles make a refreshing end to a spicy meal or a cooling snack on a hot day. Pina Colada Squares -  These no-bake treats arent too sweet if you use unsweetened coconut. The post 10 Cooling Vegan Recipes for August appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Danish Summer Tacos

July 8 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Danish Summer Tacos Here is an unconventional but yet great taco recipe that we want you to try. It includes making tortillas from grated zucchini/­­courgette and filling them with a creamy and crunchy yogurt, cucumber and potato salad. Think of it as a light and summery take on tacos that probably will drive taco conservatives mad but make the rest of us happy. Because one more way to eat taco is not a bad thing. The zucchini tortillas is a recipe we have been making for the past couple of months, using egg, almond flour and parmesan to bind them together. We first saw this idea floating around on various Pinterest boards. If you have been making our vegetable flatbreads, this is a thinner version that is more elastic (mainly because of the cheese) and therefore works great as a soft tortilla shell or wrap. The creamy yogurt salad is our version of a Danish summer salad (sommersalat). It is traditionally made on smoked fresh cheese, creme fraiche, radishes, cucumber and chives and it is a classic summer dish, served on top of a sm?rrebr?d or inside a sandwich. We have upgraded the traditional version with strawberry, apple, dill, parsley and cooked potatoes and it is truly a delightful combination of flavors and textures. The sweet and fruity notes works very well with the fresh herbs and cooked sliced potatoes. It is pretty difficult to come by smoked fresh cheese if you live outside of Denmark so our version instead has full fat yogurt, lemon juice and dill. If you do find smoked fresh cheese you should definitely replace half of the yogurt with it in this recipe. We are actually writing this from Denmark as we are spending a few summer weeks with our Danish family so apart from smoked cheese, we will also be feasting on r?dgr?d med fl?de, sm?rrebr?d and p?laegschokolade. Leave us a comment if you give this a try, we’d love to hear what you think. Happy summer! Danish Summer Zucchini Tacos Makes 6 Zucchini Tortillas 2 zucchini (4 cups grated) 1 large egg 1/­­2 cup loosely packed grated parmesan cheese 25 g /­­ 1/­­4 cup almond flour sea salt & pepper Danish summer salad 4 cooked new potatoes 1/­­2 cucumber 4 radishes 6 small tomatoes 10 strawberries, pitted 1 apple, cored 4 stems dill 4 stems parsley 1 cup thick plain yogurt 2 tbsp mayonaise (optional) 1/­­2 lemon, juice sea salt & pepper For assembling 6 crispy lettuce 6 tbsp alfalfa sprouts Preheat the oven to 200°C and line a baking tray with baking paper. Grate the zucchini on the roughest side of a box grater. Place in a sieve and squeeze out any excess water from the grated zucchini. Transfer to a mixing bowl and combine with a whisked egg, grated cheese, almond flour, salt and pepper. Measure out 60 ml /­­ 1/­­4 cup of batter for each flatbread, place on the baking paper and use the palm of your hand to shape them into flat discs. Bake in the oven for about 20 minutes until golden and firm. Cut potatoes, cucumber, radishes, tomatoes, strawberries and apple into small cubes and transfer to a mixing bowl. Finely chop dill and parsley. In another bowl stir together dill, parsley, yogurt, mayonaise, lemon juice, salt and pepper and add to the cubed ingredient bowl. Gently combine so all ingredients are covered in the herby yogurt mixture. When the zucchini tacos/­­tortillas have cooled slightly, place a lettuce in each and 2 spoonfuls of summer salad and top with sprouts. Serve immediately.

Vegan Sesame Crusted Avocado Salad

May 21 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegan Sesame Crusted Avocado Salad I have to admit that I had my doubts about this recipe. While I was coating each avocado wedge in almond flour and sesame seeds, I couldn’t help but think that it was a waste of time (and two ripe avocados) to bake them when they tastes perfectly good au natural in a salad. We’ve done some previous baked avocado experiments and even if some of them were pretty good, they were honestly just as good raw. But David had his mind set on these. He said that “They will almost look like fried chicken wings” which made me exactly zero percent more keen on the idea. But when we took out the tray with golden crusted sesame avocado wedges from the oven, they did actually look pretty good. The texture really is key here. The crust is firm and crunchy and when you bite into it the avocado inside almost melts with softness. The almond flour gives the crust a sweet nuttiness. Since we wanted to keep this recipe vegan, we tried aquafaba (chickpea brine) instead of egg to bind the coating to the avocado flesh and it worked like a charm. It holds the coating firmly in place and you can’t taste it at all. I also love the idea of using chickpeas in a salad and the brine for coating. No waste! So, for all you avocado lovers that already eaten your own weight of guacamole, avocado toasts, avo-choco mousse and other desserts. Here is a new one for you to try. You can make these as snacks and serve with a dipping sauce. I imagine a sweet soy-based dip, chimichurri, srirachamayo or yogurt dip would be good. In this recipe we have instead used them in a simple salad with quinoa, chickpeas and green grapes and Asian flavored dressing that pairs great with the sesame crust. Sesame Crusted Avocado & Quinoa Salad Serves 4 as a lunch Sesame Crusted Avocado Wedges 2 avocado 1/­­2 cup aquafaba (the brine from the chickpeas in the salad) 1 tbsp lemon juice 1/­­2 cup /­­ 50 g almond flour 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75 g sesame seeds 1 tsp sea salt flakes Quinoa Salad ingredients 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85 g raw quinoa 70 g /­­ 1 small bag lettuce (baby kale, lamb’s lettuce, watercress or lettuce of choice) 1 x 400 g /­­ 14 inch tin cooked chickpeas (save the brine) a handful green grapes, halved 10 cm /­­ 4 inch cucumber, thinly sliced a handful toasted almonds, chopped Dressing 2 tbsp soy sauce 2 tbsp sesame oil 1 tbsp rice vinegar or apple cider vinegar 1 tbsp maple syrup Set the oven to 200°C /­­ 400° F. Place a baking paper on a baking sheet. Cook the quinoa in 1 cup /­­ 250 ml salted water for 15-20 minutes, until small tails appear on the seeds. Open the chickpea tin. Pour the brine into a small bowl and rinse the chickpeas. Add lemon juice to the brine and set aside. Stir together almond flour, sesame seeds and salt in a second bowl. Cut the two avocados in half and remove the stones. Take off the peel and slice the avocado into thick wedges. Dip each wedge into the brine and then in the almond and sesame coating, turning it to make sure it is entirely coated. Spread out the coated avocado wedges on the baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes or until the crust is golden. Stir together the dressing and pour half of it over the cooked and drained quinoa and the rest into a little dressing jar. Add the chickpeas and toss to combine. Arrange the quinoa in the bottom of a wide salad bowl. Add lettuce and then scatter green grapes, radishes and cucumber slices across the bowl. Top with the sesame crusted avocado wedges and toasted almonds. Drizzle the rest of the dressing over the salad right before serving. Enjoy!

Green Pancakes - Three Ways

May 10 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Pancakes - Three Ways We love green pancakes (aka spinach cr?pes) in our family and are constantly exploring more ways to incorporate them into various meals. We have got lots of examples and ideas in our cookbooks but here are three new favorites: 1. Add mustard, lentils, sliced tomato and cheese to you pancakes. Fold them up, bake them quickly until the cheese melts and serve with a fresh lentil and melon salad. 2. Fill them with sweet potato, spinach, feta, yogurt and zaatar. Then roll them up and slice them into picnic rolls. 3. Make a banana split pancake bowl with some whipped cream, yogurt, raspberries, nut butter and chocolate. We are sharing all of these recipes below. You can either make the pancakes from scratch or use fridge cold leftover pancakes for these recipes. They are not vegan but if you use our vegan chickpea pancakes as base, you can easily modify the fillings to suit a vegan diet. Hummus, pesto, ajvar or coconut yogurt are excellent creamy toppings on vegan pancakes instead of yogurt and cheese. The recipe for the batter comes from our Green Kitchen at Home cookbook and we have included it in the bottom of this post. They are the most easy flippable gluten free pancakes we know. Pancakes work as a quick dinner in our family as the batter literally takes 30 seconds to mix together so we can have the first pancakes on the table within 5 minutes (admittedly I don’t always let the batter rest even if I recommend it). Gruyere, Mustard & Lentil Pancake Melt Serves 4 as a lunch This is the pancake equivalent to melted cheese sandwiches. It’s a great way to give old pancakes new life. We love it with lots of mustard (obviously use less for kids) and a crunchy salad for balance. 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 8 slices gruyere cheese (or another cheese) 4 large teaspoons mustard 8 cherry tomatoes 200 g /­­ 1 cup cooked lentils (store bought are fine) 1 bag mixed lettuce 1 avocado 1 galia melon (or other melon) 10 cm /­­ 4 inches cucumber olive oil balsamic vinegar salt & pepper Make the batter and fry the pancakes if you haven’t done so already. Place two slices cheese in the middle of each pancake. Spread a layer of mustard on the cheese, slice the tomatoes thinly and lay them on top of the mustard along with a small handful lentils. Fold the pancakes into quarters and place in a baking dish with a drizzle of olive oil on top. Bake at 200°C/­­400°F for 10-12 minutes or until the cheese has melted. Meanwhile, chop up lettuce, avocado, melon and cucumber and place in a salad bowl. Add the remaining lentils. Drizzle with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt and pepper and toss. Serve the pancake warm with salad on the side. Sweet Potato & Za’atar Pancake Picnic Rolls Makes 20 rolls You can use almost any veggies in pancake rolls. Just make sure you have something creamy and sticky as base to bind them together. For a vegan version, use hummus instead of yogurt and tofu instead of feta cheese and sprinkle with nutritional yeast. Next time, we’ll add some crushed walnuts for crunch, pomegranate seeds for extra tanginess and maybe a couple of mint leaves for a fresh flavor twist. 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 1 large sweet potato cinnamon 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 cup full-fat Turkish yogurt 200 g feta cheese 2 handfuls spinach, chopped 1 cup cooked chickpeas 2 tbsp za’atar (an awesome spice blend that you can find in Middle Eastern stores) 2 tsp chili flakes (optional) Set the oven at 200°C/­­400°F. Cut a sweet potato in half lengthwise, brush each cut side with a little oil and cinnamon. Place on a tray and bake for 40 minutes or until the flesh is soft and golden. If you haven’t prepared the batter and fried the pancakes, now is the time to do so. When the sweet potato is ready, use a fork to mash the flesh (you can mash it in its own skin to save some dishes). Squeeze over lemon juice and extra cinnamon while mashing. Spread out sweet potato mash on one half of each pancake and thick yogurt on the other half. Cut the feta cheese into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­3 inch thick sticks and place them in the centre of each pancake. Add a small handful chopped spinach, a couple of chickpeas, a generous drizzle za’atar and some chili flakes (if using). Roll up the pancakes as tightly as possible and slice into 2 inch /­­ 5 cm rolls. Sweet Pancake Banana Split Serves 4 4 green pancakes (see recipe below) 1 cup whipped cream 1 cup greek yogurt 4 bananas 1 cup raspberries 4 tbsp nut butter 4 tsp honey 30 g /­­ 1 oz dark chocolate 1 handful hemp seeds or slivered almonds Place each pancake in the bottom of a small bowl. Add dollops of whipped cream and yogurt. Cut the bananas into bite-sized pieces and spread out in the bowl. Add raspberries and drizzle with peanut butter and honey. Sprinkle with finely chopped dark chocolate, hemp seeds and top with a few mint leaves. Spinach Cr?pes (in our house they are know as Green Pancakes) Makes 10-14, depending on the size of your pan and thickness of your pancakes 5 eggs 150 g /­­ 1 cup rice flour (both light or wholegrain works, as does spelt flour) 500 ml /­­ 2 cups oat milk, or milk of choice a large handful spinach a small handful herbs (basil, mint or parsley) sea salt Crack the eggs into a blender or food processor. Add the rest of the ingredients and blend on high speed until smooth. Leave to rest for 20 minutes before starting to fry them (you can fry them right away but they will be a little harder to flip). For frying, add a little butter or coconut oil to a 20 cm /­­ 8 inch non-stick frying pan/­­skillet on medium heat. Once hot (this is important or else it will stick), whisk the batter then ladle 80 ml /­­ 1/­­3 cup into the pan. Let fry for 1-2 minutes or until small bubbles form on the surface and the base is golden. Run a spatula around the edges to make sure it has detached from the pan, before carefully flipping it over and frying the other side for another minute. Transfer to a plate and repeat with the rest of the batter (you may need to reduce the heat slightly after the first cr?pes). To store the cr?pes, keep them in an air-tight wrap in the fridge and they will be good for 3-4 days.

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes

January 4 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Favorite New Year Reset Recipes Happy New Year, friends! We wanted to stop by with a round-up of 18 vegan and gluten-free New Year reset-friendly recipes that are vegetable-forward and deeply nourishing, but also satisfying and delicious. We’ve got you covered on healing soups and stews, vibrant mains, energy-boosting breakfasts and snacks, a powerful cold remedy drink, and even a minimally sweetened dessert that still very much tastes like a treat. Wishing you all the health and happiness in 2018 :) No-Recipe Healing Soup (v, gf) One of our most popular recipes of 2017. This is a highly customizable soup, built on a powerful broth made with immunity-friendly ingredients. It’s delicious and warming, but especially helpful to those under the weather or low on energy. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Versatile Mung Dal Stew with Healing Spices (v, gf) A deeply nourishing and simple stew recipe, heavily influenced by South Indian cuisine, with a high potential for customization. Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew (v, gf) The ultimate, cozy stew from our Fall Meal Plan, loaded with so many star ingredients of fall/­­winter fare: mushrooms, carrots, garlic and onion, as well as jarred tomatoes, brussels sprouts and lentils. Check out the whole meal plan, too – it has all kinds of other great ideas for a new year reset menu for a whole week. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup (v, gf) A soup that’s both creamy and chunky, full of grounding, winter-appropriate ingredients. Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip (v, gf) Mango season is coming soon, and this curry is the perfect way to celebrate the sunny fruit’s arrival. Besides the mango, it’s loaded with all kinds of other nutritious, health-promoting produce like broccoli and fennel. Make sure to seek out 100% buckwheat soba noodles to make this recipe gluten-free. Mung Bean Falafel (v, gf) Mung beans make for a great alternative falafel base. They are incredibly nutritious and affordable, and their cooking time is a lot shorter than that of chickpeas. This falafel is very simple to prepare, and it makes for a perfect component to complete a bright and flavorful veggie bowl. Creamy Millet Polenta with Rainbow Chard and Chickpeas (v, gf) An incredibly savory, alternative polenta recipe made with millet instead of corn. Simple in looks, but surprisingly complex in flavor. Taco Collard Green Rolls (v, gf) All the flavors of a great veggie taco, contained in a collard green roll. A crowd-pleaser through and through. Fennel Marinated Zucchini and Mung Beans (v, gf) If you happen to have access to good zucchini this time of year, try out this light, plant-powered dish. One of my favorites to prepare when I’m feeling sluggish and non-vibrant. Glazed Tofu with Limey Cucumber Noodles and Mango (v, gf) Another great recipe for ushering in mango season. Cucumber noodles are a life-changing discovery, and the glazed tofu technique is our absolute favorite way to prepare tofu. Quick Marinated Beans (v, gf) A great thing to make on the weekend, to have in the fridge throughout the week. These marinated beans are able to transform any salad or bowl into a complete, satisfying meal. Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut (v, gf) Incorporating more fermented foods into your diet is always a great idea, especially during a new year reset. Gut health is everything! If you are up for a home fermentation project, consider making this colorful sauerkraut. Omit the blueberries if you can’t find any this time of year. Sweet Potato Toast, Two Ways (v, gf) Taking a break from grains or bread? Sweet potato toast might be the perfect thing to curb any toast cravings or withdrawals you may be having. It’s also just a really delicious dish in its own right. Immunity-Boosting Beet and Camu Camu Breakfast Bowl (v, gf) Raw beet, avocado, cranberries, camu camu: these are just some of the ingredients in this powerful, immunity-boosting bowl. Makes for a perfectly vibrant breakfast. Quick Blender Pancakes, Three Ways (v, gf) These are truly healthy pancakes, made with nutritious, protein-rich, gluten-free grains, and vibrant veggies. The blender technique makes them very easy to put together, too. Sweet and Savory Energy Bites (What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp) (v, gf) Having healthy snacks on hand is the key to success, in our opinion. These energy bites are one of our favorite things to make with leftover nut milk pulp, and they make healthy snacking easy and delicious. Almost Savory Raw Chocolate (v, gf) We know that a lot of people take a break from sugar after all that holiday indulgence. This chocolate recipe is a life-saver for any true chocoholics having a hard time with that idea (aka us). You can make it with zero sugar, but still feel like you’ve had your chocolate fix after having a square or two of this stuff. It’s gold! Turmeric, Carrot and Ginger Remedy (v, gf) If you or anyone around you is thinking of getting sick, MAKE THIS! It’s helped us and countless friends of ours fight off colds in their beginning stages. It’s also an invigorating and firey tonic, perfect for any bitter winter day. You might also like... Mango Curry with Fennel and Parsnip Simple Spicy Strawberry Gazpacho Garlic Onion Veggie Dip from Food Loves Writing Spaghetti Squash Mung Bean Lasagna .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Favorite New Year Reset Recipes appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Green Peanut Butter Sandwich + Smoothie

November 21 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Green Peanut Butter Sandwich + Smoothie Hey! First of all, thanks for all your cheering words on the news of our marriage. That was fun! Secondly, I promised a lot of persons on instagram that we would share a chocolate recipe which currently goes by the working name Taco Brownies. But all the interest in them made me a little anxious so I’m heading back into the kitchen today to test another round before we’re ready to post them. Here is something to snack on while you wait. A peanut butter sandwich and a green smoothie. Technically, a sandwich hardly qualifies as a recipe. But what we want to say with this point is really just that you should try peanut butter on a savory sandwich. I love all kind of nut butter sandwiches and even if I usually top it with sliced bananas, apples, strawberries or a sweet compote, this savory version is my most recent addiction. Crispy lettuce and cucumber add a nice textural contrast to the sandwich without competing with the peanut butter flavor. The cottage cheese makes it moist and yummy and the chickpeas ... well I don’t know why the chickpeas are there actually. I guess I just like chickpeas inside my sandwiches. This sandwich is yummy, sticky, crunchy, rich and yet fresh somehow. We usually make it with a good quality rye bread but anything goes. I just realized that this is a green sandwich without avocado so we should perhaps call it “the-death-of-avocado-sandwich-sandwich” or something catchy like that. Anyway, it’s good. And it’s not impossible that you already have the ingredients at home. So, try it! For the other recipe, I’ll let Luise do the talking. It was her idea to pair the sandwich with a smoothie and since she is queen Latifah of green smoothies I am sure she has something clever to say. /­­David Here’s something clever for you. Make this smoothie. It’s that good. It has lots of green vegetables and a mild and fresh taste with tones of lemon and ginger. Just the way I like it. Also, using frozen vegetables makes the smoothie creamy and more nutritious and you can skip the ice. It also works really well paired with a sandwich as well because (most of) you have two hands and now you can have a good snack in each hand. We actually wrote a “In The Other Hand” chapter for our smoothie book with lots of great snacks, but we couldn’t fit it in the book. Lots of love! /­­Luise Green Peanut Butter Sandwich Makes 2  Just one note on peanut butter. Read the ingredient list in the supermarket and go for the brands that only list peanuts (and maybe salt). You can of course use other types of nut butters as well, I’d especially recommend cashew butter for this, but it’s usually a lot pricier. 4 slices rye bread 4 tbsp peanut butter a few leaves crispy lettuce 5 cm /­­ 2 inches cucumber 4 tbsp cottage cheese 4 tbsp chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans 2 tsp olive oil  pea shoots thyme Spread peanut butter on each bread slice. Rinse the lettuce and cucumber. Tear the lettuce into smaller pieces, slice the cucumber thinly and place both on top of each peanut butter sandwich. Top with cottage cheese, chickpeas, a drizzle of olive oil, pea shoots and thyme. Put the sandwich together, wrap with sandwich paper and dig in. Broccoli & Ginger Smoothie 2 normal glasses or 1 very large If you don’t have a super powerful blender, start by mixing all ingredients except broccoli and banana (because they are thicker and will slow down the blender blades). When mixed until smooth, add the last ingredients and mix again. If you like it a little sweeter, you can add a fresh date or more banana. 4-5 florets frozen broccoli (or frozen cauliflower) 1 large banana 1 large handful fresh spinach 1 large handful fresh kale 1 large knob fresh ginger 1 slice lemon, peeled 1-2 cups plant milk, (oat milk /­­ rice milk /­­ almond milk) Add all ingredients to a high speed blender and mix until smooth. Taste and adjust the flavor and consistency if needed. Pour into two glasses or bottles.

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway

September 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + GiveawayThis post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes, fermenting crock giveaway below. I grew up with home-pickling and fermenting as the norm. Food in the Soviet Union was not only scarce, but also highly seasonal, so if you didn’t take care to preserve some tomatoes or cucumbers for the winter, you wouldn’t be able to taste any until the next summer. My mom made sure to stock our cool basement with jars of pickles, tomatoes, and fruit preserves every summer, as did pretty much every woman around. Other common fermentation projects included kombucha (or the ‘tea mushroom’ as we call it) way before it was cool, kefir, and of course sauerkraut. I can’t say that I’ve continued all these traditions. I do make my own kombucha, but I can’t motivate myself to do a big batch of pickles, and you can buy such good ones in the store anyways. Same goes for tomatoes, especially since California grown ones are available all year round, and will do if a big craving hits. Sauerkraut is a different story though, because it takes very little work, and the return is so good. I’ve fermented sauerkraut in jars and in big pots, inventing weighted contraptions out of any appropriately-sized object I could find, but what I’ve always dreamed about is a nice, clay fermenting crock with custom weights that fit inside perfectly. The two things that have stopped me from getting a proper fermenting crock were the hefty price tag and the considerable size that they usually come in, which is not very countertop-friendly. I was incredibly excited when Raw Rutes reached out about their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock, because it addressed those two points perfectly. It’s petite and sits on my countertops very compactly, yet it can still fit two small-medium heads of shredded cabbage. It’s also quite a bit more affordable than traditional crocks. I love that it’s a clean white too, because they are often brown – not my favorite color, at least for my kitchen. If you’re not familiar with fermenting crocks, the main thing to know is that they make the whole fermenting process really easy and safe. All you have to do is shred whatever vegetables/­­fruits you want to ferment, salt them with either salt or salty brine until they are covered with water, weigh them down, and leave them be for a few weeks while they magically transform. The natural clay that the Yaozu crock is made with makes the environment clean and safe, and the water channel up top takes away the need for an airlock. The crock comes with clay weights, which fit inside perfectly, and ensure that all your veggies are submerged in the brine, which prevents any mold from developing. It’s truly a magical pot. For my first fermenting project, I wanted to do a sauerkraut that was a bit more colorful and exciting than the traditional kind. I used purple cabbage together with blueberries and apple, with a bit of coriander seeds for extra interest in flavor. It took about a week and a half, and came out really delicious. The predominant flavor is of sauerkraut, but there are juicy, sweet and salty bursts from the blueberries, as well as a bit of crunch and sourness from the apple. I can’t wait to experiment more. I even know my next project – the fruit kimchi from Sandor Ellix Katz’ book, The Art of Fermentation. Making your own kraut/­­any fermented vegetables is a really addicting activity. Once you try your first batch, you won’t be able to stop, which is great, since fermented foods are so nourishing. Probiotics are on the tip of everyone’s tongue nowadays – we’ve all heard that having a balanced microbiome is key for good health. Completing little fermenting projects at home and enjoying the results daily is the perfect, incredibly affordable way to contribute to that gut health of yours :) Giveaway: Raw Rutes, the charming online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, is giving away their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock to one Golubka Kitchen reader. To enter to win, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite fermented food until October 11th, 2017 (USA only). Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut   Print Serves: about 2 large jars Ingredients 2 small-medium heads of red cabbage 2-3 tablespoons sea salt 2 green apples - peeled and sliced into 1-inch sticks 12 oz blueberries 2 teaspoons coriander seeds (optional) Instructions Rinse your cabbages and remove the outer leaves. Save a few of the leaves and set them aside. Cut the cabbages in half and cut out the core. Cut each cabbage half into quarters and shred on a mandolin slicer or with a sharp knife. Put the shredded cabbage in a large bowl and mix in the salt, then massage it well until the cabbage starts to release juices. Let the cabbage sit in the bowl for about 30 minutes to release more juices. Mix in the apple slices, blueberries, and coriander with your hands. Pack everything tightly into your fermenting crock using your fist. Cover the surface with the reserved cabbage leaves - this will make sure that nothing will float to the top. Place the ceramic weights on top. At this time, all the contents of the crock, including the ceramic weights, should be completely submerged in juices. If thats not happening, let everything sit for a few more hours and see if the cabbage releases more juices to submerge. If there is still not enough liquid after a few hours, make brine with 1 cup filtered water and 1 teaspoon sea salt. Pour the brine into the crock, until the weights are just covered with the liquid. Its important to have everything submerged in liquid at all times to prevent any mold from forming. Pour brine or filtered water into the water channel and cover the crock with its lid. Let everything ferment for 1-2 weeks, tasting periodically, until the flavor is sour to your liking. Refill the water in the water channel as it evaporates. After a few days of fermenting, the brine should be nice and bubbly. If you have a cool basement, you can also start out the fermentation in a warmer room for the first week, and then move the crock to the basement to finish off the process (the basement should not be too cold!). Once your sauerkraut is done, pack it into clean glass jars, covered with brine, and keep it refrigerated. Save some of leftover brine to use as a starter in your next fermentation project, which will kick-start the process much quicker. You can also take little shots of the brine for a nice probiotic, booster. Have fun! 3.5.3226 You might also like... No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Babamesco Dip Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways

October 12 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Vegan Aubergine Polpette - Three Ways Our first thought was to do a classic Lady and the Tramp Spaghetti and Meatball dish with this polpette recipe, but then we decided that it was too expected. So here is instead another spin on our one makes three-series. Where we use one staple food in three different recipes. We really love this series because it reflects so much how we actually eat. It’s not always an entirely new meal every day but more of a flow where the same components are repeated with new pairings. These polpette or vegan meatballs are perfect for this. They are good on their own - tender and very flavorful. And they are also insanely versatile, rolled into a wrap, tangled into pasta, paired with a spicy tomato sauce and hummus or tossed in a crunchy vegan take on a caesar salad. Vegan Aubergine Polpette Makes around 40 balls 2 medium sized aubergines 2 red onions 4 tbsp olive oil 100 g /­­ 1 cup almond flour 120 g /­­ 1 cup cooked lentils 4 tbsp pickled capers, drained and finely chopped 2 tbsp raisins zest from 1 lemon 15 leaves basil leaves salt Preheat the oven to 200°C  /­­ 400°F. Peel and chop the onion finely and chop the aubergine into small dices. Stir fry both in a large skillet with the oil for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until very soft. When soft, add to a food processor with the rest of the ingredients. Pulse a few times to mix everything together. You want a very chunky sticky texture but dont pulse too much or youll end up with a mushy mixture. Remove the knife blades and shape 30-40 small balls with your hands. Place them on a baking tray covered with baking paper and bake for 25 minutes. Store in the fridge or freeze them. Scroll down for three ways to serve them. Hummus with spicy tomato sauce, polpette and cucumber salad 1 batch vegan aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 1 batch Hummus, see this recipe or store-bought hummus Spicy tomato sauce Serves 4 1 tbsp olive oil 1 red onion 1 garlic clove 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp harissa paste (or 1 red chili) 2 x 400 g tins tomatoes 1/­­2 tsp sea salt, to taste Heat the oil in a large sauce pan on medium heat. Peel and finely chop the onion and garlic and add them to the sauce pan  together with the spices. Let sauté for a few minutes until soft not browned and then add  the tomatoes and salt. Let cook for at least 20 minutes, until rich and fragrant. It will become sweeter and rounder in flavour the longer you leave it on. Store the sauce you are not using tonight in glass bottles in the fridge. Cucumber salad 1/­­2 cucumber 2 tsp olive oil 1/­­2 lemon, juice + zest 1 pinch sea salt 1 small handful fresh dill Finely dice the cucumber and place in a bowl. Add olive oil, lemon juice and zest, salt and dill and toss to combine. Arrange the hummus in shallow bowls and make a well in the middle. Place a couple of spoonfuls tomato sauce in the well, add a few aubergine polpette and a few spoonfuls cucumber sallad. Vegan Wrap with Polpette, Ajvar and Krauts Serves 4 4 wrap breads /­­ tortilla breads, gluten free or whole grain 4 lettuce leaves 4 cavalo nero or kale, stems removed 1 cup cooked white quinoa 4 tbsp ajvar dressing 1/­­2 cucumber, cut into sticks 4 tbsp sauerkraut (see recipe here) 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) Place one lettuce leave and one kale leave on each tortilla bread, then place 2-3 tbsp quinoa in the middle, a dollop ajvar, cucumber slices, sauerkraut and top with a couple of aubergine polpette. Fold the top and bottom edges over the filling. Roll the whole tortilla from left to right to wrap in the filling. Roll some parchment paper around them and tie with a string to hold them together. Vegan Ceasar Salad with Polpette Serves 4 1 head Cosmopolitan lettuce 1 batch aubergine polpette (see recipe above) 2 avocados, stone/­­peel removed and sliced 2 small apples, cored and sliced 2 tbsp sunflower seeds, toasted Dressing 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml cold pressed neutral oil (organic rapeseed) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 125 ml soy milk, unsweetened 2-3 tsp lemon juice 1 tsp dijon mustard 1 tbsp pickled capers, drained 1 large pinch salt Add all dressing ingredients to a tall glas or blender cup. Mix with a stick blender on high speed for about 15 seconds or until you have a creamy white dressing. Taste and adjust the flavours to your preference. Add more oil and blend again if you like it thicker. Tear the lettuce into bite size pieces and place in a mixing bowl. Add 2 tbsp vegan mayo dressing and toss to cover. Then transfer to a serving platter and arrange avocado slices, apple slices and aubergine polpette and last, scatter over toasted sunflower seeds.

Swedish Breakfast + Win a trip to Sweden!

October 3 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Swedish Breakfast + Win a trip to Sweden! Hi! We had to take some time away from this space while finishing the manuscript for our next book but we are super happy to be back here blogging again. We have got a couple of fun recipes lined up for the next weeks but are starting off with our favorite meal of the day and a competition with a seriously AMAZING prize! Keep reading to see how you can win a trip for two to Sweden to stay at forest restaurant and resort Stedsans in the Woods. First let us talk about this week’s recipe. If you are following us on social media you know how fond we are of porridge. Oat is the quickest and most common porridge grain but today we are sharing the recipe for another favorite - a simple and warming buckwheat and cardamom porridge topped with Swedish blueberries, nut butter and foamy oat milk. Buckwheat groats take a little longer to cook than oats but they provide a uniquely chewy and soft texture. We cook them with dried prunes or dates for a little sweetness and the trick for the best texture is to cook it until all water is absorbed. If you haven’t tried buckwheat porridge before, consider this your wake-up call! And now on to the competition. In collaboration with Visit Sweden, we are giving away a trip for two to Stedsans in the Woods, a fantastic restaurant experience and resort in the middle of the forest. To enter the competition, prepare a Swedish inspired breakfast (think porridge, muesli, berries, buttermilk, crisp bread, open faced sandwiches, boiled eggs etc) and share it on instagram using the hashtag #VisitSwedenFood. Together with a jury from Visit Sweden, we will choose the best contribution and announce the winner on 1 November 2018. The competition is open worldwide. The price includes flights/­­transportation for two people, transfer to/­­from Stedsans in the Woods and one night for two people in a double room at Stedsans in the Woods cabin/­­tent stay on Thursday, Friday or Saturday from May 2019. See whats included here. Buckwheat & Cardamom Porridge with Blueberries  Serves 4 1 cup /­­ 200 g whole buckwheat groats 2 cups /­­ 500 ml water 1 pinch sea salt 1/­­4 tsp ground ginger 1/­­4 tsp cardamom seeds (or ground) 3 dried prunes, stones removed and chopped Toppings wild blueberries (thawed frozen works well) nut butter Oat milk, foamed hazelnuts, chopped hemp seeds Rinse the buckwheat in hot water. Add buckwheat, water and the rest of the ingredients to a sauce pan, bring to a boil and lower the heat. Let gently simmer for about 20 minutes. Stir occasionally to prevent it to sticking to the bottom of the pan. When the water is absorbed the porridge should be just about ready, but keep stirring for another minute or so to get the perfect texture. Serve in bowls topped with blueberries, nut butter, oat milk, chopped hazelnuts and hemp seeds.   Crisp Bread Sandwich Serves 4  4 crisp breads or seed crackers 4 tsp butter (sub for olive oil for a plant-based alternative) 4-8 thin slices hard cheese (we use a variety called Prästost), use mashed avocad for a plant-based option 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced thinly 8 cherry tomatoes, sliced sprouts or mini greens salt & black pepper olive oil to drizzle Spread the crispbread with butter. Add a few slices of aged cheese to cover and top with thin slices of cucumber and tomatoes. Sprinkle with mini greens, salt and pepper and drizzle with a bit of olive oil over. This competition is arranged in collaboration with Visit Sweden. The value of the price is approx. 2 500EUR. Any tax will be paid by the winner.

Authentic Gaspacho Soup

September 22 2018 VegKitchen 

Authentic Gaspacho Soup An authentic gazpacho, prepared according to the Spanish method--perfect on hot summer days! This typical dish is nothing less than a cold soup made from tomatoes and peppers. It is spicy and seasoned with sea salt. Its a simple recipe, refreshing, nutritious and not expensive to make. The recipe is basic and open to any addition or removal of ingredients according to your preferences. Prep Time: 20 minutes Servings: 8 Ingredients cold water as needed 50 ml of extra virgin olive oil 25 ml of red wine vinegar salt to taste 1 kg of tomatoes 1 garlic clove, peeled 1 onion, chopped, 2 cucumbers in sections, 2 chopped green peppers, Preparation Dip the tomatoes in a pot of boiling water for 30 seconds. Remove and steep into a bowl of ice water to stop cooking. Let stand for a minute, then peel the tomatoes. Remove the hard part of the core. In the blender bowl, combine tomatoes, chopped onion, chopped cucumber, chopped pepper, clove garlic, olive oil, red wine vinegar, and a little salt; reserve a little of the chopped cucumber, chopped pepper and chopped onion for presentation. Reduce to a smooth puree. Use the amount of water needed to […] The post Authentic Gaspacho Soup appeared first on VegKitchen.

Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi)

September 5 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi) I have a subscription to Bon Appétit, and I haven’t been able to get this Persian frittata recipe out of my head ever since I saw it in one of their issues this past year (there’s also a video of Andy Baraghani expertly making it here). The frittata is called kuku sabzi and is often served during Persian New Year that is celebrated on spring equinox, welcoming spring with the abundance of herbs in the dish. I’m obsessed with any food that requires a ton of herbs, and this frittata is loaded with parsley, dill, and cilantro. I also like making vegan ‘frittatas’ with chickpea flour, since I’m completely in love with socca, and chickpea frittatas are like socca x 100. Since this vegan version of kuku sabzi is taken out of context and tradition, I thought we could add our own spin on the meaning here. Instead of a welcome-spring dish, it can be a farewell-summer one. Herbs are still abundant at the farmer’s market where I live, and I see them as such a gift of summer. At the same time, I’m noticing all these subtle signs of fall creeping in. The days seem a tiny bit shorter, there’s often a chill in the air in the evenings, and some trees are already beginning to yellow. This time of year is so abundant, but also very fleeting, which makes it even more beautiful and worth savoring. So let’s load up on local, sun-fed herbs while we can. Since fresh herbs are so readily available to many of us, we might take them for granted as a commonplace food. In truth, herbs are our everyday superfoods. Just think of the intense flavor that they provide – that intensity also signals their concentrated, nutritional power. I live in a city with windows that never get sun, but one of my biggest intentions is to soon live somewhere where I can have an herb garden (and beyond). Sprinkling fresh herbs on everything is a always a great idea, but this recipe really packs them in at 4 1/­­2 cups! Just a reminder that if you have a high-speed blender or grain mill, you don’t have to buy chickpea flour. You can just grind up dried chickpeas, which will also save you a few bucks. All in all, this recipe is pretty easy. The biggest effort you’ll have to make is chopping up all of the herbs and veggies. The rest is basically just mix and bake. I served this frittata with market cucumbers and sun gold tomatoes, topped with the tzatziki sauce from Simply Vibrant. You can also eat it on its own, or topped with coconut yogurt or cashew cream. Hope you enjoy this one :) Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi)   Print Serves: 1 9-10 frittata Ingredients 2 cups chickpea flour 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon sea salt 1 teaspoon turmeric powder pinch of red pepper flakes a few grinds of black pepper 3 tablespoons avocado, olive, or neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pans 2½ cups purified water 1 onion - finely chopped 1 large leek - thinly sliced into half-moons 2 garlic cloves - minced 1½ cups chopped cilantro 1½ cups chopped parsley 1½ cups chopped dill Instructions Preheat oven to 500° F (260° C). Prepare a 9-10 pie or tart dish by oiling it well. In a large bowl, mix together the chickpea flour, nutritional yeast, sea salt, turmeric, red pepper flakes and black pepper with a fork. Gradually pour in the oil and water, whisking them in as you pour. Mix until smooth and let sit while preparing the vegetables. Heat a glug of oil in a medium sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onion and leeks along with a pinch of salt, and cook, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes, or until soft and cooked through. Add the garlic and cook for another minute, until fragrant. Add the sautéed vegetables to the bowl with the batter, along with the cilantro, parsley, and dill. Fold everything in, making sure that the ingredients are dispersed well throughout the thick batter. Transfer the batter to the oiled pie/­­tart dish, patting it down with a spoon to form an even layer. Bake for 2o minutes. Open the oven door slightly to let any steam escape and proceed to bake for another 10 minutes, or until the top of the frittata is solid to the touch and nicely browned. Let cool, slice, and serve with yogurt or your favorite creamy sauce. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Late Summer Oat Milk Smoothie with Figs and Grapes Peach and Zucchini Smoothie Celeriac Parsnip Mash with Crispy Sage Gluten-Free Winter Squash Gnocchi .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Vegan Herb Frittata (Kuku Sabzi) appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

English Garden Salad

August 7 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

English Garden SaladLittle gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head-- and it’s perfect for this English Garden Salad. If you cant find Little Gem lettuce, substitute another type of lettuce, such as Boston or Bibb. English Garden Salad Little gem lettuce has spoiled me for other types of lettuce--its everything we love about butter and romaine lettuce, all in one compact little head. If you cant find Little Gem lettuce, substitute another type of lettuce, such as Boston or Bibb. - 4 ounces thin asparagus or young green beans trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces - 1 cup green peas, fresh or frozen - 2 to 3 heads Little Gem lettuce or other tender lettuce, coarsely chopped (about 5 cups total) - 4 cherry or grape tomatoes, halved lengthwise - 1/­­2 English cucumber, thinly sliced - 4 red radishes, trimmed and thinly sliced - 1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon leaves - 1 tablespoon snipped fresh chives - 1 tablespoon torn small fresh mint leaves - 3 tablespoons olive oil - 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice or white wine vinegar - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1/­­8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - Pinch sugar - Steam the asparagus and peas over boiling water, using a steamer pot with a perforated insert until crisp-tender, 2 to 3 minute. Run cold water over the vegetables to stop the cooking process, then drain and pat dry. - Transfer the cooled vegetables to a large bowl. Add the lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, radishes, and fresh herbs. - In a small bowl, combine the oil, lemon juice, salt, pepper, and sugar. Drizzle over the salad and toss gently to combine. Serve immediately. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington.   The post English Garden Salad appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake

June 23 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Smörg?st?rta - Savory Rye Sandwich Cake Hey friends and happy midsummer! We spent midsummer eve at a friends house, dancing like frogs around a flower covered midsummer pole. It’s one of many weird traditions that we do in Sweden on this longest day of the year. Today we are off to Noma (as in one of the coolest restaurants on earth) to test their new plant focused menu that is launching next week. We’re very excited - obviously for Noma, but also for eating a fancy dinner together with zero kids around. Before we are leaving, I wanted to post this little recipe that we uploaded to our youtube a few days ago. Just like frog dance, this savory layered sandwich cake is also a very Swedish thing. It is called smörg?st?rta and is traditionally made by layering white bread with mayonnaise, creme cheese, whipped cream, dill, chives, shrimps, salmon and a bunch of other stuff. It’s basically like a sandwich gone wild. Even if we are not completely sold on the very heavy traditional version, there is something intriguing about the concept of a sandwich cake. So we made our own version, using rye bread and three colorful and fresh (but still quite rich) spreads in between. One green spread with avocado, dill and peas. One white spread with egg, sauerkraut and creme fraiche. And one purple spread with beans, beetroot and sunflower seeds. We cover it with cream cheese with a sting of horseradish and lots of finely sliced veggies and flowers. It looks great, is fun to make and really delicious. Sandwich cake FTW! Check out this recipe video to see how we make it. This is the perfect savory dish to make for a party, brunch or gathering with friends. You can easily half the recipe or make it vegan by skipping the egg layer and replacing the cream cheese with coconut cream. If you want to try a gluten-free version of this cake you could either simply use a gluten free bread, or bake 4 trays of our vegetable flatbreads (this option is a little time consuming but would probably taste amazing). Smörg?st?rta (Savory Rye Sandwich Cake) Serves 12-16 Green Spread 300 g /­­ 2 cups cup green peas 1 small lemon, juice 1 bunch dill, chopped 2 avocados, flesh scooped out 2 tbsp olive oil 1 large pinch salt White Spread 6 hard-boiled eggs 250 g /­­ 1 cup creme fraice or sour cream 2 tbsp capers 4 tbsp sauerkraut a pinch black pepper Purple Spread 1 cup sunflower seeds, soaked for an hour in water 1 x 400 g tin white beans, drained and rinsed 2 cooked beetroots, roughly chopped 1 small lemon, juice 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil salt and pepper Assembling 36 slices of sourdough rye bread (or bread of choice), thinly sliced 500 g cream cheese 1 tbsp grated horseradish Decoration 1 avocado, sliced or shaped into a rose 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced thinly 1 small bunch of asparagus, thinly shaved 1 lemon, halved and thinly sliced mache lettuce chives, finely chopped Start by making the spreads. Add all the ingredients for the green spread to a food processor and mix until smooth (or use a bowl and a hand blender). Taste and adjust the flavour to your liking. Transfer to a bowl and clean the food processor. For the white spread, peel and roughly chop the eggs, place in a bowl and gently stir through cr?me fraiche, capers, sauerkraut and a little black pepper. Set aside. Drain and rinse the sunflower seeds for the purple spreads and add them to the food processor (or use bowl and hand blender) along with beans, beetroot, lemon juice, olive oil and a good grind of salt and pepper. Pulse a couple of times until combined but still a little chunky. To assemble: Trim any hard ends off the bread and line up the rye slices so you have a rectangle, 3 slices wide and 3 slices long. Spread the green spread evenly on top and then place another layer of bread. Now layer they white spread evenly on top. Place another layer of bread, followed by the purple spread. Place the final 9 slices of rye on top. Add cream cheese to a mixing bowl and grate in the horseradish. Whisk to make sure it’s incorporated, taste and add more if desired. Use a palette style knife to cover the cake with a layer of cream cheese. Decorate with an avocado rose, ribbons of cucumber, shaved asparagus, machet lettuce, slices of lemons, chives and flowers. Or whatever you think looks good. Tip: You can make this cake 12-24 hours ahead and store in the fridge to let the spreads soak into the bread and soften it up a bit. Then add the cream cheese and decorations right before serving.

Barbecued Waffle Iron Tofu

May 10 2018 FatFree Vegan Kitchen  

Barbecued Waffle Iron Tofu Tofu is coated in sugar-free barbecue sauce and then quick-cooked on a waffle iron for the chewiest, most flavorful tofu in under 10 minutes.(...) Read the rest of Barbecued Waffle Iron Tofu (984 words) (C) svoisin for FatFree Vegan Kitchen, 2018. | Permalink | 52 comments Post tags: Gluten-free, Higher-fat, Ridiculously Easy, Soy, Sugar-free, Under 200, Weight Watchers Points The post Barbecued Waffle Iron Tofu appeared first on FatFree Vegan Kitchen.

Sweet Potato Sandwiches

February 9 2018 My New Roots 

Sweet Potato Sandwiches Necessity is the mother of invention, and when youre missing all of your kitchen equipment, you get creative. Weve been living out of a single suitcase for some months now, and although I have found a couple of major necessities in the mountain of unpacked moving boxes, I havent been able to locate my silicon loaf pan. As someone who makes the Life Changing Loaf of Bread on the reg, its been a challenge living without, but a stellar opportunity to come up with bread alternatives that dont involve a lot of ingredients or special equipment. As I was chopping up some sweet potato for a soup a couple of weeks ago, it dawned on me: what if I cut the sweet potato the other way and turned it into a slice of bread?! It was just crazy enough to work. And it did. Ever since then, Ive been roasting sweet potato slices once a week, keeping them in my fridge and having a sandwich-like-thing when the mood strikes. Its delicious! Not to mention wildly satisfying and so easy to make. Ive experimented with different herbs and spices on the sweet potatoes, using special salts, and even drizzling with flavoured oils once theyre out of the oven. So far, Im digging smoked salt and garlic powder, but the cinnamon, ginger, and cardamom combo was a close second at breakfast, smeared with chunky hazelnut butter.    The spread Ive come up with as a pairing to this sandwich sitch, is a horseradish and beetroot schmear. Partly because I like saying the word schmear, but mostly because its incredible in combination with the sweet potatoes. Its earthy, spicy, and complex - a great counterpoint to the sweetness of the spuds. I also like the texture difference: the sweet potatoes are so smooth and creamy, while the beet schmear is chunky and toothsome. If youve never had fresh horseradish before, be prepared to be blown away! This stuff is so, so special and delicious, I have no idea why its such an under-utilized root veggie. A part of the Brassicaceae family, horseradish shares ties with mustard, broccoli, cabbage, and wasabi. In fact, most commercially-available wasabi is made of horseradish (along with mustard, starch, and green food dye) since wasabi is challenging to grow and therefore much more expensive. But that familiar and addictive rush of sinus-clearing pleasure-pain? Thats the action of isothiocyanate, the compound found in wasabi, horseradish, and strong mustard that gives off heat when crushed, grated, or chewed. This stuff tends to mellow out once it hits the air, which is why horseradish snobs (they exist!) insist on grating it fresh. In the case of my schmear here, it will still taste delish a day or two after youve made it, but you may want to grate a little fresh over the top for a boost. Its the best way to clear out those nasal cavities this side of a neti pot! Horseradish has been used as powerful winter medicine for hundreds of years. Widely recognized for its expectorant capabilities, it is incredibly effective at removing mucus, and aiding with bronchial and lung disorders. Horseradish is a good source of vitamin C and zinc, two key players in immune system support, so consuming it in the colder months will help ward off the seasonal bugs flying around. For sore throats and coughs, combine one tablespoon of freshly grated horseradish with one teaspoon of raw honey, and one teaspoon of ground clove to some warm water. Sip the brew slowly, or use it as a gargle. This is more of a concept than a recipe, and a chance to try out sweet potatoes in a new way. Cut them as thick or as thin as you like. Mine are around 1cm, but that is just my personal preference. Remember that the slices will definitely shrink a bit during cooking, so slice them a tad thicker than you would want the finished roasted slice to be. You can even make shapes with a cookie cutter – great for kids lunches! Let your imagine run with this one, and keep me posted on which spreads and seasonings youre vibing on.     Print recipe     Sweet Potato Sandwiches Makes 6-8 sandwiches 2-3 fat, stubby sweet potatoes (organic if possible) coconut oil for rubbing (optional) salt and pepper + other spices or herbs 1 batch Horseradish Beet Schmear (recipe below) sliced fresh veggies: bell peppers, cucumber, avocado, sprouts, grated carrot etc. Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 375°F /­­ 190°C. 2. Wash and scrub sweet potatoes well, then slice lengthwise into 1 cm-thick slabs (approximately .4 inches). Place on a baking sheet and rub with coconut oil if using, and sprinkle with salt and pepper, plus any other spices or herbs youd like. 3. Place in the oven and bake until tender, about 20-25 minutes. Remove from oven and use immediately or store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for up to five days. 4. To assemble, spread one slice of sweet potato with the Horseradish Beet Schmear. Top with your favourite sliced veggies, sprouts, salt and pepper and another slice of sweet potato. You can also add mustard, vegan mayo, or any other condiment that you like. Enjoy! Horseradish Beet Schmear Makes 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 1 lb. /­­ 500g beets (about 4-5 small) coconut oil for rubbing 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. freshly grated horseradish, or more to taste 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt, to taste 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Rub beets with a little coconut oil, set on a baking try, and place in the oven. Roast for 20-30 minutes until you can easily pierce the beets with a sharp knife tip. 2. Remove baking tray and let cool until you can handle them. Slide off the skins, or use a vegetable peeler. Roughly chop the beets and set aside. 3. In a food processor, pulse garlic until minced. Add horseradish, tahini, lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper, then blend on high to combine. Add the chopped beets and pulse to chop. Blend as much or as little as you like – I like my spread a bit chunky. Taste and adjust seasoning as necessary. Some may like more horseradish - go for it! Remember that the bite will mellow out when its mixed with everything in the sandwich. 4. Use immediately, and store any leftovers in a tightly sealed container in the fridge for up to five days. Although the past few months of life limbo have been pretty frustrating, there are so many exciting things on the horizon that I cannot wait to share with you! First, my family and I are getting closer and closer to our new move-in date (you can watch house renovation updates on my Instagram Stories). Second, Im heading to Palm Springs for an EPIC bloggers retreat organized by my friend Sasha Swerdloff at the end of this month. And Im finishing up details on a sweet collaboration with one of my favourite juice bars in Toronto, that we will launch with a free public event! Stay tuned for more details on all the things. Love you guys. Now go have a sandwich, Sarah B   The post Sweet Potato Sandwiches appeared first on My New Roots.

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford

December 3 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford Trinity Mouzon Wofford is the founder of GOLDE Turmeric, a line of high-quality turmeric blends for golden milk, lattes, and more. We are in love with everything GOLDE, and were so excited to get a peek at its radiant founder’s wellness routine. In this interview, Trinity tells us about her rule-free approach to self-care, her path to self-acceptance, and the importance of giving the body exactly what it’s craving, as well as a Geisha-approved moisturizer that works wonders for her skin, her number one cold remedy that’s likely in your kitchen right now, exercise, beauty, stress, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think having some form of a routine is crucial to your mental health when you run a business from home. It’s been sort of tricky as of late because we’re in transition from our home in Upstate New York to moving back down to Brooklyn. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. On an ideal day, I’m up around 6:30am and checking my phone for email and GOLDE‘s social media. Following that, I’ll do a bit of stretching to loosen up, and then hop in the shower. After I’ve gotten ready, I’ll sit down to work and make a to-do list for the day -- this is crucial for me. I forget things and get really anxious about what I’m forgetting if I don’t bother to organize my thoughts and tasks in advance. I’ll usually dig into whatever those tasks are for an hour or so before pausing for breakfast. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? My partner, Issey, and I always make sure to have a cut-off time for work, barring emergencies. Once that point rolls around (it varies day-by-day), I’m usually catching up on the news or my favorite blogs while Issey preps dinner. We’ll eat together and then usually end off binging some TV show. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Issey’s miso soup with tons of mushrooms and seaweed. He makes it completely from scratch using his mom’s recipe. Lunch – Lunch is usually whatever is leftover from dinner that week  -- lately its a lot of hearty stews. Snack – We’ll do a little crudite plate with raw veg from the farmer’s market: carrots, turnips, radishes, persian cucumbers. Always with some cheese and seed crackers. Sometimes also with wine. Dinner – Tibetan food from our favorite spot in Jackson Heights, Queens. It’s a lot of dumplings (momos), noodles, and warming soups. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I can’t, really. I love the taste of coffee, but it turns me into a shaking, anxious mess. I always start the day with a turmeric tonic made with one of our blends -- usually cacao or original because the matcha also makes me a bit hyper. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? Yes, yes, yes. I try not to “keep it in check” so much as listen to it with a variety of foods. Sometimes it’s fruit or homemade popcorn with coconut sugar. Sometimes it’s half a box of Dots eaten while laying on the couch. Refined sugar is trash for your system, but so is getting too regimented with your foods. I keep it light (emotionally) and eat what I’m craving. When junk food isn’t off limits, you’re not going to crave it every day. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? Well, turmeric, of course. It makes such a difference in my skin and immunity. Issey loves it for instant allergy relief. There are apparently over 10,000 medical studies on its effects on the body --it’s really incredible. We’re also huge proponents of ashwaghanda in our household. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Upstate New York is not exactly the land of boutique fitness, so it can be more challenging to get in a sweat on the regular. I focus mostly on stretching and going on walks/­­hikes on the weekend. I think I’ve probably gained a bit of weight since I’ve been up here because I’m not moving as much as I did in NYC, but I don’t really mind. It’s okay for your body to fluctuate with your circumstances, as long as you’re treating it with respect. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? It varies. I really like working out as a method to clear my head, so often I do look forward to it. But that said, I don’t really try to push myself too much. If you want to be a world-class athlete, then by all means, train 2+ hours a day. I’m just looking to keep my body and psyche in good health, so if I don’t feel like making it to my workout, I don’t feel the need to punish myself later. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I grew up black in a very white town, so I’ve had a lot of really emotional moments coming to terms with what beauty means for me. At the moment, I like to keep things really natural with my curls out and minimal makeup. It took a while to accept my looks for exactly what they are, so now I’m really openly embracing it. I feel more beautiful now than I did 5 years ago, mostly due to opening myself up to the concept that I’m perfectly fine just as I am. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I try to keep my routine relatively simple. I’ll wash my face with raw African black soap or something gentle like Cerave. I love Drunk Elephant products, and I apply their C-Firma and B-Hydra serums every day. They help a lot with keeping my skin clear and getting rid of dark marks. After that I’ll moisturize with raw shea butter, or a cream that has that. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? Turmeric, again. Because it’s anti-inflammatory, I’ve found it to be really helpful in clearing up redness or breakouts. Besides that, I try not to get too bogged down with a ton of supplements. I focus mostly on eating a variety of plants every day. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. Shea butter is amazing for my skin. My partner’s Japanese mother recently put me on to this cream called Secret de Maiko. It contains shea butter and a few other natural, organic ingredients. Apparently this is what young Geisha girls would use as a moisturizer/­­makeup base. This cream is better than pure shea butter because it won’t leave you greasy at all. I use it twice daily. It’s great for keeping your skin clear and calm. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Well, cannabis helps. I use a vaporizer pen so there’s no smoke-related health detriments/­­lingering smell. I really want to try the Hmbldt pen because I’m a sucker for sharp design. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? There’s going to stress sometimes. I try to deal in healthy ways like going for a walk to clear my head, or talking to a close friend about whatever I’m dealing with. But life isn’t perfect, so sometimes you just end up being a bit tense for a few days. I think that’s normal and natural -- I try not to fight it too much. You have to let yourself feel it so that you can process it and move past it. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Garlic!! At my old job, everyone in the office knew about this because I would practically through bulbs of raw garlic at anyone who complained of illness. Nothing works better for immediately beating a bad cold. If I feel something coming on, I take 2-3 whole cloves (swallowed like horse pills) with a ton of water. That can save you in just a couple hours -- it’s crazy. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I really like to work, so what I consider to be a healthy work/­­life balance might not be the right approach for someone else. I genuinely enjoy spending my free time dreaming up new campaigns, product ideas, or designs for GOLDE. I guess that’s the benefit to doing your own thing -- it doesn’t always feel like work. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I’ve gotten a lot better with this with age. I try not to have any food or exercise rules. Being militant about your body is not self-care, and it can really easily spiral into disordered behavior that veers on the edge of “orthorexia.” I mostly just listen to my body and allow itself what it wants, whether that has to do with food, movement/­­exercise, socializing vs. indulging my natural introvert, etc. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I really think doing away with rules (re: food, etc.) has been the most important change I’ve made. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with avoiding gluten or dairy because it upsets your stomach or causes breakouts, but don’t complicate your life with structure that does not serve you. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? Usually moments like these mean I need to re-focus myself. I’ll start by making to-do lists, and go from there. Knowledge -- What was your path to starting GOLDE? I was pre-med at NYU, with plans to practice holistic medicine. By my senior year of college, I wasn’t so sure about spending more time and money on schooling, and sort of fell into a marketing role at a tech startup. I really loved the creative aspects of marketing, and found that GOLDE was a way of combining my interests in sharp branding with making holistic health more accessible. The interest in turmeric actually came from my mom, who has Rheumatoid Arthritis. She noticed a huge difference in her overall levels of inflammation when she started incorporating it into her daily routine -- that’s when I started paying attention. -- How do you approach the sourcing of your ingredients for GOLDE? We actually just started sourcing all of our turmeric with a company called Diaspora Co. They focus 100% on supporting ethical and high-quality spice trade that empowers rather than disenfranchises the people of color who have been growing and ingesting medicinal plants like turmeric for generations. The turmeric that we’re going to be using is an heirloom variety with almost twice the typical amount of curcumin. It’s grown on a fourth-generation, family-owned farm in India, and farmers are paid 6X the standard commodity prices to ensure truly fair wages. We’re really excited to be featuring a product that’s not only incredibly high-quality, but also works to re-build lingering inequality left in the wake of colonialism. -- What’s your favorite way to use your wellness blend? I love to have it just with hot water and raw honey in the morning. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Heading to the Union Square Greenmarket is one of my favorite activities. When I’m in the city, I like to go every Monday morning when it’s not too crowded. It’s mostly just you and the chefs (or their assistants?) shopping for what they’ll be preparing that day. I also love infra red sauna. I go to Higher Dose in the East Village. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozie Adichie Song/­­Album – Songs in the Key of Life – Stevie Wonder -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? I am nowhere near as regimented as our dear Joan. Usually my suitcase is packed haphazardly with whatever clothing is clean and well-suited for the weather. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? More people of color, please! A few of my favorites: Diane Chang Yaminah Mayo Dr. Tiffany Lester Latonya Yvette Nikisha Brunson Alex Elle Lauren Ash Sana Javeri Kadri Photos by Sana Javeri Kadri, Issey Kobori and Nico Behnzukeh. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Amy Chaplin Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Laura Wright Self-Care Interview Series: Chi San Wan .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Trinity Mouzon Wofford appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Veggie Tray Extra Everything

October 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Veggie Tray Extra Everything We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up either eating our meals standing up or snugged on an extra chair on a corner. Its a small but pretty striking symbol that: A) I am too sentimental about my furniture. B) We werent entirely prepared for how life with three children would be. I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up. I first shared this recipe/­­method about a week ago on Instagram stories (hence the poor image quality above) and judging from the number of direct messages in my inbox, I thought I’d post an more outlined version here as well. We cannot get enough of tray bake dinners in our family. They are simply one of the easiest and most delicious weekday solutions we know and this recipe represents much of what we love about food. Easy to make, easy to like, easy to adapt. It combines warm and cold and sweet and savory. It is vegetable centered, comforting and leaves a minimum of dishes. And the kids like it too. Our twist is that we add lots of fresh ingredients to the tray once it’s ready in the oven; yogurt, pesto, lettuce, spinach, black beans and pomegranate seeds. They add texture and make it feel more like a proper meal. Some days we act like adults and put plates on the table. Other days we just stick the kids a fork each and we all eat from the same tray (sorry mum!). Weve shared the recipe exactly as we made it last week but weve also included a list of variations below the recipe. So don’t get hung up on any specific ingredients, simply use this more as a starting point. The important thing in this recipe is the combination of roasted ingredients + fresh veggies + fruit + something creamy. I hope you give it a try. All-in-One Veggie Tray We wrote a similar recipe for the September issue of Jamie Magazine. We added raw spiralized vegetables (makes it even prettier!) and halloumi instead of yogurt. We add kale and Brussels sprouts midway through roasting since they need less time. The goal is that they will be perfectly crunchy at the same time as the other vegetables are ready. It can be a little tricky to time it right on your first try but second time around you usually get the hang of it. Warm ingredients 1 kg /­­ 2 lbs potatoes 3-4 carrots, peeled 1 broccoli  250 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb Brussels sprouts 3-4 large kale leaves olive oil Cold ingredients 2 handfuls baby spinach 1 avocado 1 cup cooked black beans yogurt pesto (you can thin it out with a little olive oil) lemon Cut potato, carrots and broccoli into bite-sized pieces. Add to a large tray and drizzle with oil and salt. Bake at 200°C /­­ 400°F for approx. 15-20 minutes. Cut the Brussels sprouts in halves. Trim off the thick stalks from the kale and tear the leaves into smaller pieces. Drizzle with oil and salt, add to the tray and bake for 10-15 minutes more or so. The vegetables are ready when they are golden and tender and the kale chips are crunchy. Scatter baby spinach, sliced (or mashed) avocado, black beans, dollops of yogurt and pesto evenly over the vegetables. Squeeze over a little lemon and drizzle with oil. Dig in! Variations Roasted ingredients: Carrots /­­ Broccoli /­­ Cauliflower /­­ Cabbage /­­ Sweet potato /­­ Bell pepper /­­ Brussels Sprouts /­­ Kale /­­ Potatoes /­­ Parsnip /­­ Beetroot Fresh ingredients: Lettuce /­­ Aragula /­­ Spinach /­­ Avocado /­­ Cucumber /­­ Cherry Tomatoes /­­ Spiralized Carrots, Beetroot or Zucchini Fruit: Apple /­­ Orange /­­ Pear /­­ Pomegranate Seeds /­­ Grapes Sauce: Yogurt /­­ Tahini /­­ Pesto /­­ Romesco /­­ Hummus /­­ Dijon Vinaigrette /­­ Coleslaw Extra: Nuts /­­ Seeds /­­ Beans /­­ Boiled eggs /­­ Halloumi cheese /­­ Feta Cheese /­­ Goat’s Cheese

Sweet Potato Bhel Recipe – Indian Snack Salad with Puffed Rice, Mint and Tamarind Chutney

August 30 2017 Vegan Richa 

Sweet Potato Bhel Recipe – Indian Snack Salad with Puffed Rice, Mint and Tamarind ChutneyBhel Recipe – Indian Street Food style Snack Salad with Sweet Potato, Mint and Tamarind Chutney in 20 Mins. Puffed Rice tossed with cooked sweet potato, nuts, onion, cucumber and tomato and dressed in chopped mint and 5 minute Tamarind Chutney. Vegan Bhel Puri Recipe. Can be glutenfree and nutfree.    Bhel /­­Bhel Puri is a popular Indian street snack which has a combination of puffed rice, bhel mix, chopped up tomato, onion, cubed cooked potato, mint and cilantro or mint cilantro chutney, tamarind chutney. Bhel mix is usually some crispy chickpea flour noodles + crackers + toasted nuts mixture that you can find at an indian store. Depending on the area, Bhel can have other veggies, sprouts, or some oil and othr names like Churmuri, Jhalmudi. For this version, I use puffed brown rice. You can use any other puffed or krispie grains such as quinoa, wheat, kamut or millet. Instead of regular potato I use cooked sweet potato in today’s recipe. Sweet Potatoes amazingly well with the sweet sour 5 minute Tamarind chutney and minty flavor profile. Try it! Add sprouted or cooked Mung beans, chickpeas or lentils to the mix to make it a filling snack. Also see video below. Continue reading: Sweet Potato Bhel Recipe – Indian Snack Salad with Puffed Rice, Mint and Tamarind ChutneyThe post Sweet Potato Bhel Recipe – Indian Snack Salad with Puffed Rice, Mint and Tamarind Chutney appeared first on Vegan Richa.


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