cracker - vegetarian recipes

cracker vegetarian recipes

Your Diet and Diabetes: What You Need to Know

November 11 2019 Meatless Monday 

Your Diet and Diabetes: What You Need to KnowChances are you know someone affected by diabetes, a condition that impacts the lives of about 30 million Americans. Approximately one in three American adults has prediabetes -- a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes -- and of that population, 90% dont know they have it. Think you or a loved one may be at risk? Take (or share) the 60-second American Diabetes Association (ADA) type 2 diabetes risk assessment quiz and find out. The good news is that most cases of type 2 diabetes are preventable through simple lifestyles changes. The three most important things to do: lose weight, if needed; eat healthy, and be active. Reducing meat and increasing plant-based foods in your diet is one important step in lowering your risk of type 2 diabetes. This November is Diabetes Awareness Month, so to help make the connection between diet and diabetes, weve introduced a new hashtag -- #DontLetDietBeatUs - along with social media graphics to to increase awareness of how eating more plant-based foods and less meat can help lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. All throughout the month, we will be posting recipes, cooking hacks, and shopping tips with the hashtag #DontLetDietBeatUs to help manage and prevent a prediabetes or diabetes diagnosis. You can also download our new set of creative materials , so you can help spread the word on how a meatless diet can reduce your risk of diabetes. Weve also collaborated with our experts at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future to compile a list of eating tips that can help you or a loved one reduce your risk of diabetes. Incorporate More Plant-Based Food Choices into Your Diet Substitute red meat with nuts, whole grains, beans, peas, lentils, legumes and other meat alternatives like tofu, and tempeh. Whole grains are especially important, as they are packed with nutrients like selenium, potassium, and magnesium, low in fat, and fiber rich.  Additionally, research shows an inverse relationship between whole grains intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes.  Dont forget according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, at least half of your grains for the day should be from whole grains. Make Half Your Plate Fruits and Vegetables Here are two ideas on how to make it easy: 1) eat seasonally, when produce is fresher and lower cost, and 2) if you cant find it fresh, frozen fruits and vegetables are picked at peak ripeness and are quickly frozen, preserving their nutrient content and flavor. Buy them when they are on sale and keep a few bags handy for stir fries, soups, quiches, or casseroles, and smoothies. Choose Heart-Healthy Fats Use healthy oils for cooking, like canola and olive oil.  Nuts, seeds and avocado are good for an afternoon snack and best of all, theyll keep you full when those mid-afternoon munchies strike. Limit Fried Foods and other Foods High in Saturated and Trans-Fat These foods are associated with a high risk of cardiovascular diseases. Saturated fats are found mostly in meats and high fat dairy. Trans-fats are common in processed foods, such as cookies and crackers. Reduce Intake of Added Sugars Avoid sugar-sweetened beverages such as juice, soda and energy drinks and sweets such as baked goods, candy, ice cream. For more information on the relationship between diet and diabetes, click here If youve already been diagnosed, a couple of extra tips to manage your diabetes: o Be active all days of the week o Work with a health professional to manage your diabetes. Remember knowing your ABC (A1C, Blood pressure, and Cholesterol levels) of diabetes is important in helping you manage the disease successfully.  To help you understand the A1C test better, click this link on the ADA website . The post Your Diet and Diabetes: What You Need to Know appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day

October 4 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day Happy October! Today we’ve got the coziest recipe for ushering in the first full month of fall – a cauliflower bake from Amy Chaplin’s beautiful new cookbook, Whole Food Cooking Every Day. This recipe has everything we ever want in a comforting, fall dish: mushrooms, caramelized onions, chickpeas, and hearty greens, all covered by a fluffy, almost cheesy blanket of vegan cauliflower souffle. We’ve been so excited for the release of this cookbook, being huge fans of Amy’s work. Her first book is a true bible of whole food cooking, filled with kitchen wisdom and an incredible variety of plant-forward recipes. We learned so much from that volume, like the fact that it’s best to cook beans with a sheet of kombu for better digestion and that making a curry spice blend at home is very much worth it for the unbelievable flavor. Much like Amy’s first cookbook, Whole Food Cooking Every Day is monumental and thorough, with beautiful photography woven throughout. The book is organized in a brilliant way – each chapter presents a base recipe, which is then elaborated on with different ingredient variations. The Cauliflower Bake chapter that we worked from features a recipe for a fluffy cauliflower topping, which can go over a number of different fillings. Here are some examples of other base recipe chapters: Genius Whole-Grain Porridges, Gluten-Free Breads, Simple and Healing Soups, Baked Marinated Tempeh, Seeded Crackers, Easy Cakes. Don’t all of those sound amazing? If you’re ever in the market for a trusted resource on colorful, everyday whole food cooking, look no further. We hope you’ll enjoy the cozy bake Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day   Print recipe from Whole Food Cooking Every Day by Amy Chaplin Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the cauliflower topping 1 large head (2½ lbs) cauliflower - cut into 1½ florets ½ cup raw pine nuts, cashews, or macadamia nuts 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast, plus more to taste ½ teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste for the mushroom and onion filling 3 tablespoons extra-virgin coconut oil 1½ lbs shiitake mushrooms - stems removed and caps thinly sliced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme 3 medium onions - quartered and thinly sliced lengthwise ½ teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste 6 cups (6 oz) sliced Swiss chard - tough stems removed 1½ cups cooked chickpeas (1/­­4 cup cooking liquid reserved) or 1 15 oz can (drained) 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar ¼ cups filtered water if using canned chickpeas 2 teaspoons arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon filtered water freshly ground black pepper Instructions to make the cauliflower topping Set up a steamer pot with about 2 inches of filtered water in the bottom (the water shouldnt touch the bottom of the basket) and bring to a boil over high heat. Arrange the cauliflower florets in the steamer basket, cover, and steam for 10-12 minutes, until the cauliflower is cooked through but not falling apart. Remove from the heat and set aside. Put the nuts, olive oil, yeast, and salt in a high-powered blender and add the steamed cauliflower. Starting on low speed and using the tamper stick to help press the cauliflower down, blend, gradually increasing the speed to high, until completely smooth and thick; use the tamper stick to keep the mixture moving and to scrape down the sides as you go. This will take a couple of minutes. Season with more nutritional yeast and salt to taste and blend to combine. to make the mushroom and onion filling, and assemble Preheat the oven to 375°F (190° C). Warm a large skillet over medium-high heat and pour in 1 tablespoon of the oil. Add half the shiitakes and the thyme, stir to coat with oil, and cook for 10-12 minutes, stirring only every minute or two (to allow the mushrooms to brown), until the shiitakes are golden brown. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. Repeat with another tablespoon of oil and the remaining mushrooms. Wash and dry the skillet if there are blackened bits on the bottom. Add the remaining tablespoon oil to the pan, then add the onions and cook over medium heat for 8 minutes, or until beginning to brown. Cover the pan, reduce the heat to low, and cook for 10 minutes, or until the onions are soft and lightly browned. Remove the lid, add the salt, and cook uncovered for another 5 minutes, or until the onions are caramelized. Add the chard, cover, and allow to steam for 3 minutes, or until tender. Add the chickpeas, cooked mushrooms, tamari, balsamic vinegar, and chickpea cooking liquid or ¼ cup water, raise the heat, and bring to a simmer. Dissolve the arrowroot in 1 tablespoon water, stir, and drizzle into the simmering mixture, stirring constantly. When the mixture has returned to a simmer, remove from the heat and season to taste with pepper and more salt. Transfer the mixture to an 8-inch square or equivalent baking dish and smooth the surface. Spread the cauliflower topping evenly over the filling. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the filling is bubbling and the topping has begun to set. Turn on the broiler and broil the bake for 3 to 6 minutes, until the topping is golden and browning in parts. Remove from the oven and allow to sit for a few minutes before serving. Once cooled, leftovers can be stored in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 3 days. To reheat, put the bake in a baking dish, cover, and warm in a 400° F (200° C) oven until heated through. Notes Here are some modifications we made while making the recipe based on what we had on hand. It turned out delicious this way as well. - We used half shiitakes and half crimini mushrooms. Crimini take a little longer to brown but otherwise work well here. - We used sage instead of thyme and also topped the bake with some crispy fried sage. - We used coconut aminos instead of tamari - those two are pretty interchangeable. - When baking, the filling tends to bubble up and drip out of the dish, so its helpful to set the baking dish over a baking sheet, to catch the drippings and avoid a smoking oven. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Recipe | Basil & Sun-Dried Tomato Crackers

July 8 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Making your own crackers seems a lot more complicated than it actually is. But this works in your favor, because when you make these delicious Basil & Sun-Dried Tomato Crackers, people are going to be really impressed. You don’t have to tell them that it was easy; just let them be in awe of your culinary skills! I had wanted to make crackers for a while, but in my head, it was some epic process like canning or making caramels (which I’ve done, and it was most definitely an epic process). Crackers, however, are not an epic process at all. They’re a little bit fussy, but they’re fairly easy to make and quick too. That said, it took me more than one try to get these right. So now you can benefit from my mistakes! Here’s what I learned: Roll these out thin. Thin. Because if you don’t, they won’t be crispy and crackery. They’ll be sad and soggy. No one wants to eat soggy crackers! Except my husband, who ate my first batch of soggy, too-thick crackers. “They’re a good starting point,” he said. Which is supportive husband speak for, “These are barely edible.” Take the time to chop […]

Silken Tofu and Sun-Dried Tomato Dip

July 5 2019 VegKitchen 

Silken Tofu and Sun-Dried Tomato Dip This combination of silken tofu and sun-dried tomatoes makes a delicious appetizer when served with whole grain crackers and raw veggies. Its also wonderful as a spread for sliced fresh baguette. Photos by Hannah Kaminsky. The post Silken Tofu and Sun-Dried Tomato Dip appeared first on VegKitchen.

How to Make Cashew Mayonnaise

June 7 2019 Oh My Veggies 

I feel like I need to clarify the title of this post a little bit. Maybe it would be better if I called it “How I Make Cashew Mayo.” I don’t make cashew mayo the traditional way, so this isn’t THE definitive cashew mayo recipe. It’s MY cashew mayo recipe. It’s a little bit different from others because: 1) A lot of cashew mayo recipes are raw. Mine is not. 2) My recipe isn’t raw because I use vegetable broth in it. This adds a little boost of extra flavor. 3) I don’t add anything to sweeten my cashew mayo. See? It’s different. And I can’t promise you that it tastes exactly like real mayo (because it was the 80s when I last had real mayo), but it makes a mean sandwich spread and it’s great on crackers or as a dip for veggies too. Are you ready to get started? Here’s how to make cashew mayo! Put one cup of raw cashews in a bowl and cover them with water. Let them sit for a few hours–about two to four is a good amount. Drain and rinse the cashews, then pop them in your blender or food processor with […]

Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri)

April 21 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri) Achari Mathries, is a traditional staple snack in North India. They are usually served with spicy pickles, but in this recipe I have added mango pickle spices in the dough instead to add a tangy flavor to the mathri itself. With my family, mathries are a must have while travelling, and now with Achari Mathri, we no longer need the pickle, so it becomes one less thing to carry.  - 2 cup all purpose flour (planin flour, maida) - 1/­­2 cup fine sooji (samolina) - 1-1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­4 tsp dry ginger powder (saunth) - 1/­­4 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1/­­2 tsp fennel seeds crushed (saunf) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1 tsp yellow mustard seeds powder - 1/­­2 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 2 tsp red chili flake (adjust to taste) - 4 Tbsp oil - 3/­­4 cup lukewarm water (use as needed) -  Mix all the ingredients except the water. Add the water little at a time, kneading into a firm dough.  Cover the dough and set aside for 15 minutes or more. Prick them with a fork all over the rolled dough, so the Mathries do not puff when frying, and Mathries stay crisp. -  Divide the dough into 3 equal parts. Take each part of the dough and make a flat ball shape. Roll them into about 12-inch circles and thickness of salted crackers. -  Take a cookie cutter and cut them in rounds. I am using 2-1/­­2 inch cookie cutter. Use the size and shape to your choice. -  Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium heat. The frying pan should have at least 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put a small piece of dough in the oil. The dough should make the oil sizzle and come up slowly. -  Make sure to place just enough mathris in the oil it should be easy to turn them. Fry the mathris until both sides are light golden-brown. This should take about 7-8 minutes. Tip - Achari Mathries can be stored for a couple of months in airtight containers.  - If the mathries are cooked on high heat, they will be soft. - You will also enjoy Gulab Jamuns, Besan Ki Burfi, Plain Mathri The post Achari Mathri (Masala Mathri) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

How to Save The Chutney

February 28 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

How to Save The Chutney Chutney are a big part of the condiments that I serve and I always like to keep them handy since they have long shelf life. These chutneys are used as an extra source of flavor with many appetizers, snacks, and chaat (whether it be sweet, sour,spicy, etc.). They are great to have readily available, because it makes life so easy when preparing a large menu, especially when you are in mood to have something spicy or when you make a sudden plan to entertain family or friend for afternoon tea. You can easily take any kind of dry snacks that you have on hand, even boiled potatoes, chickpeas, or crackers and turn them into a mouth-watering treat. These two chutneys, in my opinion, are a staple to every household preparing Indian food. I have their recipes on my website. Tamarind Chutney This chutney can be refrigerated for months. I like to make it thick in texture so that I can adjust the thickness of the chutney depending on what I am using it for. This exotic, sweet and sour chutney and can be called the ketchup of the east! This is delicious as a dipping sauce for French fries, as a spread over crackers, or even as a zesty addition to a rice dish. You really can never go wrong with it. Cilantro Chutney I prefer to prepare this in a large quantity in advance and freeze it in ice cube trays. You can store the frozen cubes in a zip-lock plastic bag. When you ready to serve, defrost as many cubes of chutney as needed. And after so many years, I have finally learned how to keep the vibrant green color of chutney. When blending the chutney, use crushed ice to blend instead of room temperature water; I was amazed by the difference it makes. Keep looking out for my blogs because I will continue sharing the tips I have learned over the years. It might just solve the one problem you could not figure out. The post How to Save The Chutney appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Ragda Puri Chaat

February 26 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Ragda Puri Chaat (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Ragda Puri Chaat Ragda Puri is a chaat dish that will leave you licking your fingers. Made with crunchy puris, ragda, and chutney, this recipe is the perfect addition to any chaat menu. This appetizer is easy to make and tastes delicious.  - 24 Puries (I am using store bought) - 1 cup vatana - 1 cup potato (boiled peeled and cubed in small pieces) - 1 tsp salt - 1 tsp black salt - 1/­­4 tsp black pepper - 2 tsp sugar - 1 Tbsp dry roasted cumin seed powder (bhuna jeera) - 1 Tbsp dry roasted coriander powder (bhuna dhania) - 2 Tbsp ginger (chopped) - 1 small green chili (chopped) - 1/­­2 cup cilantro (chopped) - 1 Tbsp tamarind chutney - 1 Tbsp lemon juice - 1 Tbsp green chili (finely chopped, optional) For Serving - 1/­­4 cup tamarind chutney (use more as needed) - 1/­­4 cup fine sev -  Wash and soak vatana in three cups of water for at least 8 hours. After soaking vatana will be about 2 1/­­2 times the volume of the original. -  Put the vatana in a pressure cooker with 2 1/­­2 cups of water. When the pressure cooker starts to steam, turn the heat down to medium and cook for 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and wait until steam has stopped before opening the pressure cooker. Vatana should be soft and tender. I have used instant pot, because it is more convenient. - Blend cilantro, green chilies, and ginger, tamarind chutney, and lemon juice. - Mix cilantro paste and all the spices, salt, black salt, sugar, black pepper and finely chopped green chili this is optional, to boiled vatana mix the spices well. This is known Ragda. Add hot water if needed Ragda should not be very dry it should have thick gravy, Ragda thickens in consistency as it cools. - For serving, make a small hole on top of each puri and arrange them on a platter. Stuff them with the ragda. Drizzle with tamarind chutney and sev. Ragda Puri Chaat can be prepared few days in advance When you are craving for chaat. This is a Healthy Chaat, Ragda has no oil, and can be served by itself, over crackers, over bread, roll with any indian flat bread, or make sandwich . Check the recipe for Pani Puri , and Tamarind Chutney    The post Ragda Puri Chaat appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Jalape?o Cheddar Crackers

February 1 2019 Oh My Veggies 

With the Super Bowl right around the corner, I feel like I should post something snacky. I’d probably be a bad food blogger if I didn’t, right? But I have to confess, I won’t be watching the Super Bowl this weekend. Football is the worst, you guys. The worst! There are some sports that I kind of understand. Like soccer. Kick the ball into the net. Easy! But with football, there’s just too much going on. There’s running and numbers on the field and a weird shaped ball. Confusing! When we had to play flag football in gym class, the teacher never even bothered to explain how to play because I guess, like breathing and sleeping, everyone just innately knows. So I’d just run in whichever direction seemed appropriate and when it looked like someone wanted to throw the ball to me, I’d shake my head, wave my arms, and mouth the word “NOOOOOOO!!!!” And if I did, for some reason, end up with the ball, usually I’d throw it to whomever was closest to me, whether they were on my team or not. Because I did not want the ball. And then everyone would yell at me. Oh, they […]

Split Pea Pesto Spread

November 12 2018 Meatless Monday 

This flavorful spread pairs split peas with pine nuts, basil and garlic, adding a punch of protein to the traditional pesto recipe! Its perfect to serve on crostini with your choice of toppings. This recipe comes to us from our friends at USA Pulses. Serves 4 - 1/­­2 cup cooked split peas - 1/­­4 cup pine nuts, toasted - 2 cups fresh basil - 2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped - 1/­­2 cup Parmesan cheese, shredded - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­2 cup olive oil   Combine the split peas, pine nuts, basil, garlic, Parmesan and salt in a food processor. Pulse for about 10 seconds until roughly chopped and combined. Slowly add the olive oil with the food processor running, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed. Continue to pulse until mixture reaches desired consistency. Use immediately as pasta sauce, or spread on crostini or crackers with your toppings of choice. Transfer unused portion to air-tight container and store in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. The post Split Pea Pesto Spread appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Swedish Breakfast + Win a trip to Sweden!

October 3 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Swedish Breakfast + Win a trip to Sweden! Hi! We had to take some time away from this space while finishing the manuscript for our next book but we are super happy to be back here blogging again. We have got a couple of fun recipes lined up for the next weeks but are starting off with our favorite meal of the day and a competition with a seriously AMAZING prize! Keep reading to see how you can win a trip for two to Sweden to stay at forest restaurant and resort Stedsans in the Woods. First let us talk about this week’s recipe. If you are following us on social media you know how fond we are of porridge. Oat is the quickest and most common porridge grain but today we are sharing the recipe for another favorite - a simple and warming buckwheat and cardamom porridge topped with Swedish blueberries, nut butter and foamy oat milk. Buckwheat groats take a little longer to cook than oats but they provide a uniquely chewy and soft texture. We cook them with dried prunes or dates for a little sweetness and the trick for the best texture is to cook it until all water is absorbed. If you haven’t tried buckwheat porridge before, consider this your wake-up call! And now on to the competition. In collaboration with Visit Sweden, we are giving away a trip for two to Stedsans in the Woods, a fantastic restaurant experience and resort in the middle of the forest. To enter the competition, prepare a Swedish inspired breakfast (think porridge, muesli, berries, buttermilk, crisp bread, open faced sandwiches, boiled eggs etc) and share it on instagram using the hashtag #VisitSwedenFood. Together with a jury from Visit Sweden, we will choose the best contribution and announce the winner on 1 November 2018. The competition is open worldwide. The price includes flights/­­transportation for two people, transfer to/­­from Stedsans in the Woods and one night for two people in a double room at Stedsans in the Woods cabin/­­tent stay on Thursday, Friday or Saturday from May 2019. See whats included here. Buckwheat & Cardamom Porridge with Blueberries  Serves 4 1 cup /­­ 200 g whole buckwheat groats 2 cups /­­ 500 ml water 1 pinch sea salt 1/­­4 tsp ground ginger 1/­­4 tsp cardamom seeds (or ground) 3 dried prunes, stones removed and chopped Toppings wild blueberries (thawed frozen works well) nut butter Oat milk, foamed hazelnuts, chopped hemp seeds Rinse the buckwheat in hot water. Add buckwheat, water and the rest of the ingredients to a sauce pan, bring to a boil and lower the heat. Let gently simmer for about 20 minutes. Stir occasionally to prevent it to sticking to the bottom of the pan. When the water is absorbed the porridge should be just about ready, but keep stirring for another minute or so to get the perfect texture. Serve in bowls topped with blueberries, nut butter, oat milk, chopped hazelnuts and hemp seeds.   Crisp Bread Sandwich Serves 4  4 crisp breads or seed crackers 4 tsp butter (sub for olive oil for a plant-based alternative) 4-8 thin slices hard cheese (we use a variety called Prästost), use mashed avocad for a plant-based option 1/­­2 cucumber, sliced thinly 8 cherry tomatoes, sliced sprouts or mini greens salt & black pepper olive oil to drizzle Spread the crispbread with butter. Add a few slices of aged cheese to cover and top with thin slices of cucumber and tomatoes. Sprinkle with mini greens, salt and pepper and drizzle with a bit of olive oil over. This competition is arranged in collaboration with Visit Sweden. The value of the price is approx. 2 500EUR. Any tax will be paid by the winner.

Khasta Mathri - Indian Savory Crackers

August 26 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Khasta Mathri - Indian Savory Crackers (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Khasta Mathri – Indian Savory Crackers Khasta Mathri is a popular, classic savory snack. You can serve these Mathries with pickle at tea time or you can enjoy as is! For all the upcoming holidays, Mathries make a good snack to have around to serve to all guests. They also make for a simple but special homemade gift. - 1 cup all-purpose flour (maida or plain flour) - 2 Tbsp sooji (semolina flour) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­4 tsp black pepper (crushed) - 1/­­4 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1/­­2 cup chilled water - 2 drops lemon juice - oil to fry -  Mix the flour, sooji, salt, black pepper, cumin seeds, lemon drops and oil. Note lemon should be just 2-3 drops, we are not adding this to flavor, lemon is added to give the crispness, also Mathries will absorbed less oil. - Add the chilled water slowly, mixing with your fingers as you pour. Do not knead the dough. The dough should be soft. -  Cover the dough and let it sit for at least fifteen minutes. Divide the dough into about 20 equal parts, I decided to make 14. - Take each part of the dough and make a flat ball shape. Roll them into 2-inch circles. Prick each mathri with a fork about 6-8 places, both sides each, to prevent puffing the mathri when frying. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on low medium heat. The frying pan should have at least 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put a small piece of dough in the oil. The dough should make the oil sizzle and come up slowly. -  Fry mathri in batches, making sure to place just enough mathri to cover the frying oil. Fry them until both sides are a light golden-brown. This should take about 5-7 minutes. Take them out over paper towel, which will absorb the extra oil Suggestions Serve the Khasta Mathri with cranberry pickle, or Chatpata Aloo Khasta Mathris can be stored for a couple of months in airtight containers. If the mathris are cooked on high heat, they will be soft.   The post Khasta Mathri – Indian Savory Crackers appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Happy Mothers Day!!

May 12 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Happy Mothers Day!!Happy Mother’s Day to all the great mothers out there! As you know, this Sunday is the big day! I’m sure you are in the midst of planning something special for Mothers Day. Now that Spring is officially here and the weather has been great here in San Diego, I think a fun idea is to celebrate with a picnic. It’s an easy and simple way to enjoy the abundant sunshine and fresh air. My grandkids especially enjoy picnics because they can run around and use up their energy! We enjoying playing frisbee, soccer, and most importantly munching on delicious treats. When my grandkids get together there is always the sound of laughter. It means so much to me that I get to watch them. It’s the best excuse to bring the family together. Here are some ideas of delicious munchies to bring to a picnic: Bread Pakoras Puries rolled with Chatpate Aloo (spicy potato): Puri Chatpate Aloo Masala Mathri You can pair the above with a variety of chips, cookies and fruit. I also like to bring homemade lemonade to cool off. Lemonade The post Happy Mother’s Day!! appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 Minute

December 22 2017 Vegan Richa 

Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 MinuteEverything bagel Seasoning Vegan Cheese Ball. No soaking, blending, straining needed! 10 minute vegan cheese ball. Gluten-free. Can be soy-free Cheesy Balls and dips are always popular at potlucks and events. But most recipes need a blender or processor, lots of wait time, straining and handling. You dont need to do any of that with this cheese ball. It takes just 5 minutes to put together, 35 mins to bake and its ready to serve! Put the almond flour, spices, flavor ingredients in a bowl, mix well to combine, knead for a minute to combine and bring together, done! Roll it in everything bagel seasoning or other spices or seeds /­­crushed nuts, and bake at low heat. Cool and serve with veggies and crackers. Easy as that. Perfect to start up the Holiday Dinner. Happy Holidays Everyone!Continue reading: Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 MinuteThe post Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 Minute appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Raw Vegan Cheddar Cheese Spread

June 28 2019 VegKitchen 

This vegan cheddar cheese spread is made with raw cashews and sun-dried tomatoes and requires no cooking. Serve as a spread for raw veggies, fruit, crackers, slices of bread, or for sandwiches. From The Complete Idiots Guide to Vegan Cooking* by Beverly Lynn Bennett and Ray Sammartano. The post Raw Vegan Cheddar Cheese Spread appeared first on VegKitchen.

Artichoke-Spinach Dip

May 30 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Artichoke-Spinach Dip Artichoke-Spinach Dip I love anything with artichokes: grilled fresh baby artichokes are the beyond compare.  When I can’t get fresh artichokes, I satisfy my craving with frozen, jarred, or canned.  I like to put marinated artichoke hearts in salads and that the creamy and delicious artichoke-spinach dip is a longtime favorite.  In fact, Im such a fan of that dip that Ive developed a few other ways to use it such as a pasta sauce, or as a tasty filling for palmiers. First, the dip itself.  Sometimes I make it with a homemade cashew cream cheese (see Veganize It!), but more often than not, I opt for saving time and use a commercial vegan cream cheese.  The dip is quick and easy to make and can be made ahead of when you need it.  You can pop it in the oven just before serving time or do what I usually do:  heat it in a small slow cooker. Artichoke-Spinach Dip 1 (10-ounce) bag baby spinach, lightly steamed, then squeezed dry 1 cup vegan cream cheese 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1/­­4 cup nutritional yeast 3/­­4 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder 3/­­4 teaspoon salt 1/­­4 teaspoon ground black pepper 2 (12 -ounce) jars marinated artichoke hearts, well drained and blotted dry Preheat the oven to 400 degrees °F. Lightly steam or microwave the spinach for 1 minute or until wilted.  Allow to cool. Combine the cream cheese, lemon juice, nutritional yeast, onion powder, garlic powder, salt, and pepper in a food processor. Blend until very smooth. When the spinach is cool enough to handle, squeeze any liquid from it and add it to the mixture in the food processor.  Add the artichokes and pulse to combine, leaving some texture. Do not over-process. Transfer to an ovenproof baking dish, and bake uncovered for 15 minutes, or until hot. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly. Serve with toasted French bread slices or your favorite crackers. Makes about 3 cups Slow Cooker Variation:  Instead of baking in the oven, transfer the dip to a small (1 quart) slow cooker and cook on High for about 2 hours, or until hot.  As a pasta sauce: To transform this dip into a great pasta sauce, simply thin it out with your favorite unsweetened plant milk until its the perfect consistency.  Then, add a little more onion powder, maybe some more nutritional yeast, and a little extra salt and pepper.  Heat until warm and toss with freshly cooked pasta.  Palmier filling: Another favorite way to enjoy the creamy goodness of artichoke-spinach dip is to use it as a filling for these light and flaky palmiers, made with vegan puff pastry, available in the freezer case of most supermarkets.  Best of all, these palmiers freeze well, so if you only need enough for a few people, you can freeze the second roll (unsliced) and thaw when needed. Artichoke-Spinach Palmiers  1 recipe Spinach-Artichoke Dip (see above) 1 package frozen puff pastry, thawed (Pepperidge Farm brand is vegan) Unfold one sheet of puff pastry onto a flat work surface. Spread half of the artichoke-spinach mixture onto the pastry sheet, spreading to within 1/­­2 inch of the edges. Roll up one long side of the dough to the middle of the dough, then roll up the other side of the dough so the two rolls meet in the center. Repeat with the remaining dough sheet and filling mixture. Refrigerate for 45 minutes. Preheat the oven to 400°F. Using a serrated knife, cut each roll into slices, slightly less than 1/­­2-inch thick. Place each slice, cut-side down, on parchment-lined baking sheets, allowing about 1-inch of space in between each slice.  Use a metal spatula to flatten the palmiers to 1/­­4-inch thickness.  Bake for 20 minutes or until golden brown. Serve warm.   The post Artichoke-Spinach Dip appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Gur Para (Punjabi Sweet Snack)

March 17 2019 Manjula's kitchen 

Gur Para (Punjabi Sweet Snack) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Gur Para, Punjabi Sweet Snack Gur Para is a traditional Punjabi treat. This is made in preparation for festivals such as Holi, Makarshakrantri, and Diwali. Gur Para makes for a great homemade gift because of its long shelf life. It can be stored for up to 2 months in an airtight container. This is a super simple recipe that only requires a few ingredients.   For Dough - 1 cup all-purpose flour (plain flour, maida) - 2 Tbsp sooji fine (samolina) - 2 Tbsp oil - 1/­­3 cup water, use as needed For Syrup - 3/­­4 cup gur (jaggery) - 1 tsp oil - 1/­­4 cup water Making Para -  Mix flour, sooji, and oil, and mix it well to get consistency of breadcrumb.  Add water as needed to make firm but smooth dough. Cover with damp cloth and set aside at least for ten minutes. - Knead the dough for another minute and divide in two equal parts. - Take each part of the dough and make a flat ball shape. Roll them into 8-inch circles and thickness of salted crackers. - Cut each of the rolled dough into about half inch wide and 2 inch long pieces. Note: you can cut them in your desire shape. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium heat. The frying pan should have about 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put little piece of dough in the oil. The dough should make the oil sizzle and come up slowly. - Fry the paras until both sides are light golden-brown. Let them cool off to room temperature before coating them. Making Sugar Syrup -  Put the water and gur in a frying-pan and bring to a boil on medium heat. Keep stirring till gur is dissolve, syrup should be about 1 thread, to check the right consistency of syrup drop the syrup in cold water and you should be able to roll into ball. Close the heat. - Put all the paras to the syrup and mix it well, making sure all the paras are coated with syrup. Keep stirring every few minutes and keep separating them. After they are just warm, take them out on a greased plate, making sure that paras are not clumped together. - Allow them to cool. Gur paras can be stored for several weeks in airtight container. Notes: If Syrup consistency is not right paras will be sticky, if paras are little sticky let them dry for longer. You will also like to see these recipes they are good for gifting and easy to make Moong dal Ladoo, Apple Coconut Burfi, Besan Save   The post Gur Para (Punjabi Sweet Snack) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Less Waste: Broccoli Stem ‘Tartare’

February 27 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Less Waste: Broccoli Stem ‘Tartare’ It seems like a lot of people still see broccoli stems a scraps to be thrown away, but the truth is that broccoli is delicious in its entirety. The stems make up the bulk of the weight for a reason – they are totally edible, incredibly tender inside, and very versatile. To prep them, all you have to do is peel away the tough outer skin, and you’ll be left with a velvety ‘heart,’ which kind of reminds us of an artichoke heart. It can be utilized in so many ways – in fried rice, soups, salads, gratin, latkes, and even apps. This ‘tartare’ is an unexpected little number to serve on a snack platter, but we think that it will pleasantly surprise any guests. It comes together with the help of staple pantry ingredients, and tastes indulgent…but in reality you’re eating a bunch of broccoli. Win-win all around. We came up with the idea for this recipe because broccoli stems get incredibly tender when steamed, and they take on flavor really well, like little sponges. We’ve seen various plant-based ‘tartare’ done before, like carrot tartare and avocado tartare, so we had the idea to try out something similar with broccoli stems. We marinated the stems with classic tartare ingredients like mustard, capers, and red onion (or shallot), and were so pleased with the result. Give broccoli stems a chance! And enjoy :) Broccoli Stem Tartare   Print Serves: 3 cups Ingredients 4 broccoli stems (or 5-6 if theyre particularly thin) ⅛ of 1 red onion - finely chopped 2 teaspoons capers - minced 4 teaspoons mustard (mix of Dijon and grainy or just 1 type) 4 teaspoons apple cider vinegar 2 teaspoons tamari sea salt black pepper red pepper flakes 5 tablespoons olive oil any herbs of choice - for garnish (optional) Instructions Prepare a steamer or steaming basket and boil water for steaming the broccoli stems. Peel the broccoli stems with a vegetable peeler, making sure to peel away all the tough outer skin, until youre left with the tender inner stem. Roughly chop the stems into about ½ thick rounds and place in the steamer basket. Steam for 10 minutes, or until very tender but not mushy. Once ready, chop the broccoli stems into finer pieces. You can chop them finely for a smoother tartare or leave them chunky for one with more bite. Meanwhile, in a large mixing bowl, combine the onion, capers, mustard, apple cider vinegar, tamari, salt, black pepper, and red pepper flakes to taste, and mix. Pour in the olive oil, whisking it in to emulsify. Add the broccoli stems and mix to coat in the dressing. Transfer the tartare to an airtight container and ideally refrigerate for 30 min to an hour before serving, to allow the broccoli stems to marinate, and also for the olive oil to thicken, which will make the tartare easier to spread. Serve with your favorite crackers or toasted bread, garnished with any herbs of choice. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Fruit Leather Puzzle Tofu Saag Paneer, Spring Style Raw Onion Bread Pink Soup with Roasted Onions and Broccoli .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Less Waste: Broccoli Stem ‘Tartare’ appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Ring in the Chinese New Year with these 7 Meatless Recipes

February 4 2019 Meatless Monday 

Ring in the Chinese New Year with these 7 Meatless RecipesHappy Year of the Pig to everyone who celebrates the Chinese New Year around the world. We invite you to include Meatless Monday dishes in your celebratory feast and wish you good fortune and great prosperity for the coming year. According to myth, the Jade Emperor called a meeting of all the animals in the zodiac. On the way, the pig stopped to eat but then fell asleep- thats why the pig is the last sign in the 12-year cycle. A Pig Year is considered favorable and brings good luck and wealth. This vibrant annual celebration takes place not only in Mainland China and South East Asia, but also in areas with significant Chinese populations such as the U.S., the U.K., and Australia. In addition to setting off firecrackers and honoring your ancestors, eating is a big part of the celebrations. Historically eaten by Chinese royalty, wonton soup is a perfect hot starter. Dumplings are a favorite and can be easily made with vegetables. A pretty jicama-stuffed bao surrounded by steamy dough is the perfect New Years treat. And for dessert, good fortune fruit can be served, such as oranges and tangerines. Celebrate the Year of the Pig with a Meatless Monday feast! Homemade Dumplings/­­Potstickers This recipe , including how to video , comes to us from Madeline Lu. Check out her food and travel blog  for culinary and wanderlust inspiration. Vegetable Congee This recipe comes to us from Tina Jui of The Worktop . Find the original Vegetable Congee Recipe  and additional photos on The Worktop. Wonton Soup This recipe  comes from Ashley at Eat Figs, Not Pigs . Check out her blog  for more delicious recipes. Jicama Bao This recipe comes to us from WoonHeng . Follow her on Instagram  for more great plant-based recipes. Pan-Fried Vegetarian Dumplings/­­Potstickers Try this incredible two-tone veggie dumpling recipe  from Red House Spice . Her blog is a great resource for dumpling making techniques and tips. Fried Brown Rice with Vegetables This recipe was developed by Alexandra Shytsman of The New Baguette  and is featured in her free Weeknight Cooking E-book . Easy Veggie Lo Mein This recipe comes to us from Karen of The Tasty Bite . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, look for us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Ring in the Chinese New Year with these 7 Meatless Recipes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Meet honeygrow’s CEO and Their New, Seasonal Plant-Based Dishes for Meatless Monday…and Every Day of the Week

January 7 2019 Meatless Monday 

Meet honeygrow’s CEO and Their New, Seasonal Plant-Based Dishes for Meatless Monday…and Every Day of the Weekhoneygrow , the trendsetting DIY eatery with feel-good vibes and locally sourced ingredients, is joining the global Meatless Monday movement. And they just launched two savory and seasonal meatless dishes that you definitely need to try-and fall in love with. We did! Look for these new featured meatless items at honeygrow:   Soulfull Oats Salad (S.O.S.) - is a seasonal winter salad with organic baby arugula, roasted shaved local Brussels sprouts, roasted sweet potato spirals, dried cherries, ricotta salata, house-made multi-seed crackers (made with Soulfull Oats *), with a pomegranate vinaigrette. *A special note - for every S.O.S salad sold, honeygrow and The Soulfull Project will donate a portion of sales to local food banks in the US.     Vegan AF - is a winter stir-fry with sweet potato and zucchini spirals, house-made vegan chorizo, roasted spicy tofu (non-GMO), mushrooms, kale, red onions, bell peppers, cilantro, spiced agave cashews, and a smoked paprika-tomato sauce.     Meatless Monday checked in with honeygrow CEO and founder, Justin Rosenberg, to learn more about the healthy options at all 29 locations of his super busy and popular restaurant concept.     1. What was the impetus for including plant-based dishes on your menu and working with Meatless Monday? honeygrow was created with plant-based options in mind--I was vigorously vegan when I conceived of the brand. Finding meatless options for lunch every day at my desk job was a constant struggle. Working with Meatless Monday is a perfect fit since our menu is designed to be completely customizable. 2. Why is it important to you to offer customers a wide selection of customizable plant-based options? As someone who is seeking plant-based options, particularly when Im on the go, choices are key. We want to be able to provide plant-based options and we know that people want to be creative with their food. With our style of service + range of options, anyone can come in and customize any dish to their preferences. 3. What is your favorite honeygrow dish to eat on Meatless Monday? Right now, its the Vegan AF--its our first stir-fry that features sweet potato and zucchini spirals, house-made vegan chorizo, roasted spicy tofu (non-GMO), mushrooms, kale, red onions, bell peppers, cilantro, spiced agave cashews, and a smoked paprika-tomato sauce. Its hearty, a tad spicy, and ridiculously good. On January 4th, Meatless Monday hosted a Facebook Live event from a honeygrow location in Brooklyn. Find out more here .   Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. If youre as inspired by honeygrow as we are, wed love to talk to you about promoting and implementing Meatless Monday in your restaurant, hospital, K-12 school, college or university. Contact us here online  or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, or Instagram! The post Meet honeygrow’s CEO and Their New, Seasonal Plant-Based Dishes for Meatless Monday…and Every Day of the Week appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Lentil Pâté

November 10 2018 VegKitchen 

Mystify your family by serving this delicious veggie pâté with lentils. A delicious source of protein for breakfast or dinner, serve them on bread or crackers with a touch of mustard--satisfaction guaranteed! Save Print Lentil Pâté Serves: 2 cups   Ingredients 1 tablespoon of olive oil 1 onion, chopped 2 clove garlic, minced 2 tablespoons of nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon of tamari 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/­­2 teaspoon ground clove 1/­­4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1 cup dried green lentils, rinsed salt and pepper, to taste 3 cups of vegetable broth chopped fresh parsley, to taste Instructions In a saucepan over medium heat, heat oil and add onion and garlic. Sauté for about 4 minutes or until onion is tender. Add yeast, tamari, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, and lentils. Season to taste, mix well, and cook for about 5 minutes. Add the vegetable broth. Bring to a boil, reduce to low heat, and simmer uncovered for about 25 minutes or until the lentils are tender. Stir regularly while cooking. In a food processor or hand blender, reduce the mixture to a smooth, even purée. Transfer the mixture to an airtight container and allow to cool in the refrigerator for 1 hour. When ready […] The article Lentil Pâté appeared first on VegKitchen.

chekkalu recipe | pappu chekkalu | andhra style spice rice cracker

September 26 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

chekkalu recipe | pappu chekkalu | andhra style spice rice crackerchekkalu recipe | pappu chekkalu | andhra style spice rice cracker with step by step photo and video recipe. south indian recipes are generally famous for its dessert and healthy breakfast recipes. having said that, there certain snack recipes which are made for festival and occasions. one such deep fried snack is pappu chekkalu recipe, known for its spicy taste and for its crispiness. The post chekkalu recipe | pappu chekkalu | andhra style spice rice cracker appeared first on Hebbar's Kitchen.

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus

June 14 2018 My New Roots 

Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus If there is one trick Ive learned in all of my years cooking, both at home and in restaurants, it is this: caramelized onions can make almost anything taste amazing. Theyre the ridiculously simple, yet magical ingredient that turns an ordinary dish into something so rich-tasting and satisfying that people go ...oh hi excuse me, this is incredible. I think the simple reason that caramelized onions taste so good, is because they are a labour of love. Not like an all-day stirring the pot kinda deal, but most definitely a food that you cant just leave on the stove and dive into an Instagram vortex. No. Caramelized onions take care and attention, at least for the better part of half an hour, and the results are so worth it I bet youll catch yourself multi-tasking at the stove tonight just to have some on hand to gussy up your omelet this weekend (boss move there, by the way). The more accurate reason that caramelized onions taste so good however, isnt technically caramelization - its called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction is a browning reaction similar to caramelization, but with one distinct difference: caramelization is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars, while Maillard is a chemical reaction between reducing sugars and amino acids (proteins). And yes, there is enough protein in an onion to elicit this response - how thrilling for us! Although the Maillard reaction is very complex and complicated, what we do know is that it requires heat to transform and rearrange sugars and amino acids to create new and fantastic flavour molecules in and on your food, making it even more delicious. If youve ever eaten a golden slice of toast, enjoyed a rich cup of coffee, or nibbled on a grilled vegetable, youve experienced the pure pleasure that all of this this chemical commotion is responsible for. Science! Harnessing the power of the Maillard reaction can make you a better cook, because things that are browned properly taste more intensely, more complex, and well, better. Without even being aware of it, its the reason youll reach for the roasted veggies with the crispiest edges, or the reason that you prefer a fried egg over a boiled one (no judgement!). There are a couple ways of making this spectacular series of chemical reactions work for you, and the first is high heat. Maillard will not occur at very low temperatures, especially in situations where the food is not in direct contact with the heat, like it is on a skillet or grill for instance. When youre roasting veggies, make sure the oven is at least 400°F /­­ 200°C. When youre making pizza, you can crank it up even higher, to get those beautifully blistered crust edges that make your mouth water. The second way is to keep the food youre cooking on the dry side. For instance, have you ever noticed how if you wash mushrooms (which you should actually never do), theyll never really get brown and crusty? Too much moisture! Instead, brush those fungi gently to remove any dirt or debris, then put them in a screeching hot pan with some ghee and dont stir them. I talk more about this technique here. This is the same reason you need a large pan for these caramelized onions, since theyll need the space to allow the water to evaporate around them. If the onions are too close together, theyll only steam each other. Eew. If you’re oven roasting vegetables for dinner, cut them in the morning and leave them out all day uncovered so that the surface water will evaporate, and the veggies will brown more easily. Yes, this seems like a bit of a hassle, but the culinary nerd in me admits that its cool because it works. So, where does the hummus come into this story? Well, hummus is pretty much a food group in my world. Ive made so many variations with so many kinds of legumes, spices, alt seed butters, toppings, and stir-ins, that I could hardly believe I had never tried it with the ingredient that could single-handedly save humanity: caramelized onions. I knew that deep richness of the onions would meld perfectly with the creamy dip, and make the flavour even better. I wasnt wrong! The only thing that I wanted to improve upon, was the protein content - not because Im obsessed with protein, but simply because I thought it could be higher. To do that I simply swapped out the traditional chickpeas for white lentils, or urad dal. We not only get more protein from this change-up, but almost double the fiber, with less sodium, less fat, and less sugar. Sweet. This dip is the perfect, rich compliment to all the crisp and light, early summer veggies popping up. I went to my friends farm and picked some seriously beautiful radishes and young carrots, which paired so well with the caramelized onion flavour. I also had some Life-Changing Crackers on hand, which always make dipping more delicious. One thing I changed from the first version to the third, was the onions on top. Instead of blending all of them into the dip, I used about a third of them on top, which allows you to scoop a few tender morsels up with each bite. This delivers even more caramelized onion flavour and texture, which, let us be reminded, is the whole point of this exercise. Even though this hummus keeps well for at least five days in the fridge (you can even freeze it!), it is best eaten freshly made at room temperature, since the flavour is at its peak then. And because you’re wondering, you can find white or ivory lentils at Indian grocers, Middle Eastern markets, or some natural food stores. They are the skinned and split version of urad dal, which is black, so make sure you buy the huskless version! If you cant find them at all, simply use chickpeas - it will be just as delicious.     Print recipe     Caramelized Onion and White Lentil Hummus Makes about 2 cups /­­ 500ml Ingredients: 3/­­4 cup raw white lentils (huskless split black mapte beans /­­ urad dal dhuli), soaked if possible 1 small clove garlic 3 Tbsp. tahini 3 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tsp. balsamic vinegar 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 1/­­4 tsp. ground cumin heaping 1/­­4 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper 1 batch caramelized onions (from the recipe below) cold-pressed olive oil, for garnish Directions: 1. Start by cooking the lentils. If youve soaked them beforehand (even an hour helps!) drain and rinse them very well. If youre starting from raw, place the lentils in the cooking pot, cover with plenty of water and vigorously swish them around with your hands. When the water becomes murky, drain and repeat until the water is clear, or mostly clear (this can take 3-4 rounds). Place lentils in the cooking pot and cover generously with water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to simmer and cook partially covered for about 20-30 minutes, depending on whether or not you soaked them. The lentils should be cooked until mushy. If the pot becomes dry during cooking, simply add more water. Once cooked, drain the lentils if there is any remaining water. Set aside to cool. 2. In a food processor pulse the garlic until finely minced. Add the tahini, lemon juice, balsamic, salt, cumin and pepper, then blend until combined. Add the cooked lentils and blend on high until smooth. Lastly, add about two-thirds of the caramelized onions, and pulse to incorporate them into the dip. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. 3. To serve, spoon the hummus into a serving bowl. Make a small divot in the center of the dip and spoon in the remaining caramelized onions. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with your toppings of choice (I used toasted black sesame and chive flowers for a splash of colour, but this is totally optional). Serve with crispy fresh veggies and crackers or toasted flatbreads. Enjoy. Caramelized Onions Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. neutral-tasting coconut oil or ghee 1 lb. /­­ 500g yellow onions 1/­­4 tsp. fine sea salt Directions: 1. Peel the onions and slice them as evenly as possible into half-rounds. 2. Melt coconut oil or ghee over medium heat in the largest skillet you have. Add the onions, then salt, and stir well to coat. Once the onions are coated, turn the heat down to a medium-low, stirring occasionally - more often towards the end - until theyve fully caramelized, about 25-30 minutes. If the pot becomes too dry during cooking, reduce the heat a tad, or add a teeny bit of water adn stir well. In the end, youre looking for soft, silky, and golden brown goodness! Store leftovers in the fridge for up to four days, or freeze for 3 months. If it’s your first time caramelizing onions and you’re feeling intimidated, here is a stellar step-by-step tutorial from Bon Appétit. It varies ever so slightly from my method, but you’ll get the picture! Big love and happy hummus, Sarah B. Show me your hummus on Instagram: #mnrcaramelizedonionhummus  *   *   *   *   * Hello dear friends! There are only a few spots left for our January 2019 Wild Heart High Spirit retreat and we’d love to see you in Bali!  Join us along with 15 other women to unwind, reconnect, and find the inspiration to ignite you on your health journey. Our thoughtfully-designed program will awaken and nourish your entire being – body, mind, and spirit! This is a true celebration of life, and we get to do it together in paradise! Come see what all the magic is about.  Much love, Sarah B, Mikkala and the Golden Circle Retreats team The post Caramelized Onion White Lentil Hummus appeared first on My New Roots.

Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 Minute – No soaking, straining

December 22 2017 Vegan Richa 

Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 Minute – No soaking, strainingEverything bagel Seasoning Vegan Cheese Ball. No soaking, blending, straining needed! 10 minute vegan cheese ball. Gluten-free. Can be soy-free Cheesy Balls and dips are always popular at potlucks and events. But most recipes need a blender or processor, lots of wait time, straining and handling. You dont need to do any of that with this cheese ball. It takes just 5 minutes to put together, 35 mins to bake and its ready to serve! Put the almond flour, spices, flavor ingredients in a bowl, mix well to combine, knead for a minute to combine and bring together, done! Roll it in everything bagel seasoning or other spices or seeds /­­crushed nuts, and bake at low heat. Cool and serve with veggies and crackers. Easy as that. Perfect to start up the Holiday Dinner. Happy Holidays Everyone!Continue reading: Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 Minute – No soaking, strainingThe post Everything Bagel Vegan Cheese Ball – 10 Minute – No soaking, straining appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Khichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or Saucepan

December 20 2017 Vegan Richa 

Khichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or SaucepanKhichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or Saucepan. Easy Lentil Rice Soup with Veggies.  Gift the jar full of lentils,, rice and spices. Empty into a pot with veggies of choice. Easy Weekday Dinner.  Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Nut-free Recipe. Tis the time to wrap up some fun gifts and this one is a must. When I made this jar, I thought, hey its khichdi, it is a super simple recipe. People can possibly just throw it all together at home within minute. But when its right there in the jar, it is as simple as putting it in the instant pot (pressure cooker) or saucepan with water and just a short wait to a fabulous meal. Khichdi or Kitchari is soup or dal and rice preparation that usually is very lightly spiced and served as light meal when you are sick or just to give the tummy a break.  The basic version is slightly bland with just 1 or 2 spices and kept so to be a light meal. You can add different spices, some vegetables, tomato etc to make it a hearty meal. The basic version is in my first book, green moong and brown rice version on the blog.  This bottled up kitchari makes a great gift. You will want to make and eat lots of kitchari after the big holiday meals and the jar makes it a 5 minute job. Empty contents in an Instant pot which you may have received as a gift or saucepan, add whatever veggies you like or not, add water and done! Serve as is or with some chutneys or papadum/­­crackers. Continue reading: Khichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or SaucepanThe post Khichdi in a Jar – Mixed Vegetable Kitchari Mix for Instant Pot or Saucepan appeared first on Vegan Richa.


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