couscous - vegetarian recipes

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couscous vegetarian recipes

Vegetarian Eggplant Tajine

July 9 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This Moroccan spiced stew features tender chunks of eggplant, tomatoes, and peppers, served over couscous with a sprinkle of fresh mint.

Live Longer — Fruits and Veggies Proven to Add More Life

March 27 2017 Meatless Monday 

Live Longer — Fruits and Veggies Proven to Add More LifeMarch is National Nutrition Month. So each week this month, were highlighting how certain foods can help improve specific health conditions. This is the fourth and final article in the series. Please share with friends and family who may be interested. Youve heard it many times from many different sources: doctors, talk shows, magazine articles, you name it. The way to stay healthy is to exercise regularly, watch your weight, get enough sleep and eat a sensible diet. But what if, just by choosing the right foods to eat, you could actually live longer? Thats not science fiction. Thats science fact. According to a study published in the Journal of American Medical Association, diets with a high intake of animal protein (meat) were positively associated with cardiovascular mortality. This means death caused by heart attack, heart disease or stroke. Furthermore, this danger is even greater for individuals with at least one lifestyle risk factor, such as smoking, obesity, high blood pressure or high cholesterol. And the size of this study was remarkably comprehensive, - over 130,000 people from all walks of life participated. Eating more plants - vegetables, whole grains and legumes - and fewer animal products can help you live a longer, healthier life, said Rebecca Ramsing, sr. program officer, Food Communities & Public Health Program at Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future. Taking meat off your plate a few days a week can make a long-lasting impact! On a brighter note, the study also indicates that diets with a high intake of plant-based protein - instead of meat - result in less deaths due to cardiovascular issues. This finding suggests the importance of the protein source you choose to eat regularly. In other words, people who choose more fruits, veggies, grains and nuts tend to be healthier and live longer. With this good news in mind, weve picked out one of our favorite recipes to help you savor all life has to offer. Bon appétit. Roasted Spring Veggie Couscous The post Live Longer — Fruits and Veggies Proven to Add More Life appeared first on Meatless Monday.

10 Terrific Cauliflower Rice and “Couscous” Recipes

March 14 2017 VegKitchen 

10 Terrific Cauliflower Rice and “Couscous” Recipes Heres a selection of cauliflower “rice” recipes (and a few cauliflower “couscous” recipes as well) that are easy, tasty, and just happen to be vegan. Cauliflower rice and couscous are clever ways to get a nutritious vegetable into your regimen, and good for anyone who avoids grain foods for any reason. Its also a good way to disguise vegetables for your picky eaters!The post 10 Terrific Cauliflower Rice and “Couscous” Recipes appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

10 Terrific Cauliflower Rice Recipes

March 14 2017 VegKitchen 

10 Terrific Cauliflower Rice Recipes Heres a selection of cauliflower “rice” recipes (and a few cauliflower “couscous” recipes as well) that are easy, tasty, and just happen to be vegan. Cauliflower rice and couscous are clever ways to get a nutritious vegetable into your regimen, and good for anyone who avoids grain foods for any reason. Its also a good way to disguise vegetables for your picky eaters!The post 10 Terrific Cauliflower Rice Recipes appeared first on Vegan & Vegetarian Recipes: VegKitchen.com.

Vegetarian Meal Plan | 01.09.17

January 6 2017 Oh My Veggies 

This weeks vegetarian meal plan includes: Brussels sprout and sweet potato Israeli couscous salad; tortellini and kale soup; portabella mushroom cheesesteaks; pasta with thyme cream & zucchini noodles; and potato pizza with kale pesto.

Weekly Plant-Based Dinner Plan, October 3 – 7, 2016

October 3 2016 VegKitchen 

Weekly Plant-Based Dinner Plan, October 3 – 7, 2016 For the first full week of October, weve got some tasty dinners that will power you through your busy week. Since today is the Jewish New Year, treat yourself to

Turmeric Lemon Rice Recipe

May 13 2016 Vegan Richa 

Turmeric Lemon Rice RecipeTurmeric Lemon Rice Recipe. 10 minute Golden Rice with turmeric, lemon and mustard seeds. Indian Lemon Rice. Use cooked brown rice, quinoa, millet or couscous or cauliflower rice for variation. Easy side. Vegan Gluten-free Soy-free Recipe. Pin this post.  This super easy flavorful rice is a great side with simple dals, veggie curries or anything really. I posted a bowl with the Mango Dal, Bengali Veggies with the turmeric rice last week and got many requests for the turmeric lemon rice recipe. So here goes.  TGIF! Make this 10 minute lemony turmeric rice. Or use other cooked grains or cauliflower. I usually use Basmati Rice or a mix of white and brown basmati. Add veggies along the way or just make the plain rice and serve in a bowl of choice. Curry leaves are available in Indian Stores or online on amazon. The fresh leaves can be frozen for months in an airtight container. Use fresh or frozen right out of the freezer.  Heat the oil. Once the oil is hot, add mustard seeds and let them really start to pop. If the mustard seeds don’t pop, they don’t release their amazing flavor into the food. This is one of the reasons, people often want to add more spices and flavors to the food, esp Indian food, as it feels like there isn’t enough in the dish. If the recipes call for roasting the spices with or without oil, the spices need to be roasted well for the flavor to really bloom into the dish.  See video below and notice those popping mustard seeds! Continue reading: Turmeric Lemon Rice RecipeThe post Turmeric Lemon Rice Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Celebrate Earth Day with Our Free Recipe Cards

April 18 2016 Meatless Monday 

Celebrate Earth Day with Our Free Recipe Cards Every year, Earth Day is a time to think about the new habits we can introduce that will benefit our planet. It’s also a perfect opportunity to share earth-friendly tips and resources with our communities. To help spread the message about how going meatless once a week can conserve water and energy and help lower greenhouse gas emissions, Meatless Monday is excited to share our latest free resource, printable recipe cards! Our first collection of recipe cards features six of our favorite plant-based recipes loaded with spring produce like asparagus, peas, radishes, carrots and mint. With the recipe on the front and fast facts about the Meatless Monday movement on the back, the resource looks fab printed in either color or black and white. So whether youre planning to talk about eating less meat at a local Earth Day event or just looking for an attractive reminder to skip meat once a week to post on your refrigerator, check them out today! Meatless Monday Printable Recipe Cards: Spring Veggies. And stay tuned as we continue to develop more cards featuring our awesome collection of delicious meatless recipes. Find these recipes and more in our new spring-themed printable recipe card pack: Mint Harissa Israeli Couscous Lemon Mint Quinoa Salad Green Tea Pesto Pasta Easy Veggie Lo Mein The post Celebrate Earth Day with Our Free Recipe Cards appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Harissa Carrots and Fennel with Lentils

January 14 2016 My New Roots 

Harissa Carrots and Fennel with Lentils My trip to Seattle to work on the Cody nutrition video series proved to be a pretty ragin food fest. The pre- and post-production days, along with nights off gave me some time to explore the city, meet the amazing locals, and sample, er, quite a bit of fantastic food. You know, for research purposes. When I travel, I put wish-list restaurants in two groups: the vegetarian restaurant, and the non-vegetarian restaurant that has enough veg-friendly options to be worth the visit. As much as I find a lot of inspiration at both of these types of establishments, they can also have their drawbacks. First, the vegetarian restaurant, bless them, can tend towards the dated, you know what I mean? Overly-sauced, overly-cheesed, overly seitan-ed out places that offer satisfying, but not very health conscious dishes reminiscent of 1997. Yea. The second place is great if you want to eat out with meat-loving friends (and thank goodness most American restaurants recognize that vegetarians dont always travel in packs!). The issue is that these places dont recognize that we also need substance. There are plenty of creative veggie-centric plates, but nothing that is going to really fill me up! When I was in Seattle, I rarely saw a single bean, lentil or a cube of tempeh on a menu. If I was lucky enough to see a whole grain, it was a sprinkle on top like a garnish. I feel like Im always compromising somehow, which sounds ridiculously gripe-y, but maybe this is my PSA to say that both types of restaurants are so close to getting it so right that it is worth putting it out there in hopes that someone hears my cry. One of my most favourite dishes at a hip and trendy non-vegetarian spot was a roasted carrot, fennel, harissa and yogurt combination, that was as strong in its presentation as it was in flavour. The plate was literally piled with roasted carrots and fennel - a stellar sight for ravenous eyes – bathed in the silkiest scarlet sauce, all nestled in a generous swathe of thick yogurt. It was kind of thing I could barely wait to dig into (I had to share with the rest of my table...rough!), and sad to see the server remove the licked-clean plate. BUT! Where was the rest of it? I realize that this was intended to be a side dish, but there were literally no other options on the menu unless I was to join my table mates and dig into a roast chicken. Being back home in Copenhagen in the thick of winter, I felt the urge to bring a little light and spice to the table. Fondly recalling the jolt to my taste buds that carrot dish conferred, I decided to make my own version that included a simple upgrade with lentils that any vegetarian would be happy to call dinner. Or anyone for that matter. Harissa is a north African chili pepper paste traditionally added to meat and fish stews, and to spice up couscous, but I think its delish with all the things, especially winter veg that could use a major flavour injection. If you have not made your own harissa before, its a relatively quick and painless process that can give your food a serious wake-up. It is bright, bold, spicy, smoky and just plain yummmm. It keeps well in the fridge and a delightful thing to have on hand when youre not really sure what to do with that pumpkin (slather it in harissa and roast it!) or that tempeh (marinate it in harissa and fry it!) or that kale (dress it in harissa and stuff your face!). If you cant wait another second to make this dish, you can also buy pre-made harissa paste at ethnic grocers and gourmet markets. Its sold in small tins, tubes, or jars - just look for versions without any preservatives or unpronounce-ables (but it goes without saying that the homemade kind is best, obvi). You can really use any kind of chili to make harissa, and I suggest a variety to achieve a deep and complex flavour. Some of the ones I chose (based solely on the fact that I already had them in my pantry) were smoked whole ?oras peppers, guajillo, and birds eye for some serious heat. Chipotle would be very tasty (its a good idea to have at least one smoked pepper variety), or de arbol, jalepeno, ancho...you get the idea. You can also make harissa with crushed chili flakes if that is all you have, just make sure that you balance it out with perhaps more tomato paste and roasted bell peppers. I believe that you should be able to eat a small spoonful of pure harissa without blowing your head off. Youre after something spicy, but also rich and savoury, so strike that balance as youre choosing the ingredients. Its Getting Hot in Here Chili peppers are a fantastic food to add to your diet, especially in the colder months, as they actually heat us from the inside out! Chilies contain an active substance called capsaicin that significantly increase thermogenesis (a.k.a. heat production), in our bodies. This is precisely why eating spicy food makes us turn read. break a sweat, and can even aid weight loss, as thermogenesis literally burns calories! These burned calories translate into warmth in the cells and therefore heat in the body. This is the exact same process that takes place in hibernating animals to stay warm. Other foods that have this thermogenic effect are horseradish, mustard, cinnamon, fennel seed, garlic, ginger, ginseng, and turmeric. I love this kind of dish from a construction standpoint. The first bites deliver the big bold flavours of the roasted veg dripping in smoky sauce alone, and then as you begin to go further and dig around, everything kind of melds together, creating mouthfuls with a little bit of this, a little bit of that. The lentils start hanging out with the lemon-spiked yogurt giving the smooth consistency some tooth and texture, which the veggies then become coated in. The harissa drippings work their way into all the nooks and crannies, and the mint pokes you every so often with a hello, my name is FRESH! It hits all the texture notes, the flavour notes, and youre left feeling, well, really satisfied. Not to mention, full. This dish is totally vegan aside from the yogurt, which could even be replaced with a cashew yogurt, like the one in my cookbook, or another plant-based one. You can even leave it out all together if you like, but its a great team player with the other elements. The lentils could easily be replaced by the beans of your choice, and the veg you can change up according to what you have available. You can even make the harissa dressing for any manner of green salad and serve it over raw things too. This dish would also be really tasty with some toasted nuts or seeds sprinkled on top.     Print recipe     Harissa Paste Makes about 1 1/­­4 cup /­­ 300ml Ingredients: 25g dried chilies of your choice (choose a few types and include one smoked and one spicy variety, if possible) 2 red bell peppers 6oz /­­ 170g can tomato paste (1 small can) 2 cloves garlic 2 tsp. cumin seeds 2 tsp. coriander seeds 2 tsp. caraway seeds 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice a couple pinches sea salt cold-pressed olive oil, to cover Directions: 1. Soak the dried chilies in just-boiled water for about 30 minutes until softened. Remove stems and seeds (wear gloves if youre handling really spicy ones). Save soaking liquid. 2. Preheat the oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Rub the bell peppers with a little coconut oil and place on a line baking sheet. Roast for 20-30 minutes until blistered and turning black in spots. Remove from oven and place in a bowl, cover with plastic wrap and let cool for 15 minutes (this process will help steam the peppers making them really easy to peel). Once cool enough to handle, simply slip the skins off of the peppers, remove the stem and seeds, and the discard them. Put flesh aside. 3. While the peppers are roasting, toast the spices in a dry skillet over medium heat until fragrant, 3-5 minutes. Transfer to a mortar and pestle or a spice grinder and grind until powder-y. 4. Peel garlic and place in the food processor. Pulse to mince. Add the soaked dried chilies, roasted red peppers, ground spices, tomato paste, lemon juice, and salt. Blend on high until relatively smooth (add some of the chilli soaking liquid to thin, if desired). Season with salt to taste and add more lemon juice if desired. 5. Transfer harissa to a clean glass jar and cover with a thin layer of olive oil - this will help prevent it from spoiling. Cover with a tightly-sealed lid and store in the fridge for up to one month.   Roasted Carrot and Fennel with Harissa, Black Lentils and Yogurt Serves 4 Ingredients: 1 pound /­­ 500g carrots 1 pound /­­ 500g fennel (about 2 medium bulbs) 2 medium red onions 1 Tbsp. coconut oil 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil a couple pinches salt and pepper 1 cup /­­ 250ml Greek-style yogurt (preferably goat or sheep) zest of 1 lemon pinch of sea salt 1 cup /­­ 225g black lentils (Du Puy or French lentils would also work), soaked if possible 1/­­2 tsp. sea salt 1 Tbsp. cold-pressed olive oil a handful of mint leaves, roughly chopped flaky sea salt, to garnish Harissa Dressing 1/­­4 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1-4 tsp. harissa paste, to your taste (I used 3 tsp.) 2 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lemon juice 1/­­2 Tbsp. maple syrup pinch sea salt, to taste Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400°F /­­ 200°C. Scrub carrots well and slice them in half lengthwise (if they are relatively large, slice them in quarters lengthwise). Wash fennel and slice lengthwise into thin sections. Peel and slice red onion into eights. Place carrots on a baking sheet and rub with a little coconut oil. Place fennel and red onion on a separate baking sheet and rub with a little coconut oil. Place in the oven to roast for 25-35 minutes until tender and charred around the edges (the fennel and onions may take longer than the carrots, so remove carrots first if necessary). Remove from oven and season with salt and pepper. 2. While the vegetables are roasting, cook the lentils. Wash lentils well, drain and rinse until water runs clear. Place in medium saucepan and cover with plenty of water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook covered for about 15 minutes. Add about a half teaspoon of salt, stir and continue to simmer covered, until the lentils are tender, about 5 more minutes. Drain and rinse. Stir in olive oil and season to taste. 3. While the lentils are cooking, whisk the dressing ingredients together. Start with a teaspoon of harissa paste and add more to suit your taste. The dressing should be spicy, but palatable. Add the roasted vegetables and fold to coat well. 4. Combine the lemon zest and yogurt. 5. To assemble, divide the yogurt and lentils among four plates. Pile the vegetables on top, sprinkle with flaky salt, mint, and drizzle any remaining dressing over the top. Enjoy. *   *   *   *   *   * Oh yea, Happy New Year everyone! I hope everyone’s 2016 has started off on the right foot. Here are a couple things I’ve been up to: Cody app and I have collaborated to create an online video series with 21 episodes geared towards anyone who wants to learn how to cook healthy, plant-based meals! I have been wanting to put together an educational + cooking video program for so long now, and I am very proud of how this has turned out. I hope you check it out. The entire program is on sale until the end of today (01/­­14/­­16, PST time zone) so act quickly if you want to get the bundle at a great price! We’ve added four brand-new and exclusive recipes to the My New Roots app. These recipes are specifically for cleansing and detoxification, so if you’re January hasn’t been as “clean” as you would have liked, maybe this will give you some inspiration! Update your app or download it now and get this recipe for Nori wraps with Cleansing Broccoli Pesto along with three other delicious and detoxifying delights (use the filter button to select “Super Clean 2016″) Check out the recipes here. And I was invited to speak on Jessica Murnane’s podcast, The Things that Freaked my Week. It was fun. Listen here. BIG love and best wishes for your year ahead. xo, Sarah B Show me your harissa on Instagram: #MNRharissa

Vegetable Couscous Stew

January 5 2016 Vegetarian Times 

1 To make Ras El Hanout: Combine all ingredients in small bowl. 2 To make Stew: Pour Ras El Hanout into large Dutch oven, and add onions, tomato purée, oil, garlic, and 6 cups water. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 30 minutes. 3 Add zucchini, carrots, turnips, and bell pepper; cover, and bring to a boil. Simmer 30 minutes, or until vegetables are tender. Stir in chickpeas just before serving. Slow-Cooker Option: Place Ras El Hanout and Stew ingredients (except chickpeas) in slow cooker, and set on medium or high heat. Cook 8 hours.Stir in chickpeas just before serving. 4 To make Couscous and Garnishes: Place couscous in large heat-proof bowl; place raisins in medium heat-proof bowl. Pour 4 cups boiling water over couscous, cover, and let plump 5 minutes. Pour 2 cups boiling water over raisins, and let plump 5 minutes. Fluff couscous, and drain raisins. 5 Serve Stew with couscous, raisins, and harissa.

Brussels Sprout and Sweet Potato Israeli Couscous Salad

December 14 2015 Oh My Veggies 

Roasted Brussels sprouts and sweet potatoes are tossed with Israeli couscous in this easy lunch salad.

Celebrate Whole Grains Month This September!

September 14 2015 Meatless Monday 

September is Whole Grains Month, and theres no better time to discover all the delicious, healthy reasons to eat whole grains! This year the Whole Grains Council is celebrating in September by running an Instagram photo contest throughout the month. The contest theme is Share the Goodness of Whole Grains, it’s a perfect excuse to share your favorite whole grains with others! Make some muffins for friends with whole-grain flour, whip up a flavorful cous cous dish for a potluck meal, or share your quinoa with coworkers. Click here to learn more about the promotions they’ll be hosting all month long. What are whole grains? All grains start out whole, but refined grains have certain parts of each grain taken away. Seeds, also called kernels, are made up of three edible parts - bran, germ, and endosperm. Whole grains are intact kernels, containing all three parts of the seed, while refined grains include only the endosperm. What makes whole grains so healthy? Whole grains are packed with fiber, protein, and essential nutrients for a healthy body. The bran and germ contain about 25% of a grains protein, a large amount of fiber, and at least seventeen key nutrients, making the whole grain a more nutrient-dense and healthy choice. Getting started with whole grains? Try these delicious whole grain recipes for Meatless Monday! Grains can be more than just baked goods! These recipes showcase some of the many ways to enjoy whole grains for any course at any meal. Blueberry Buckle Made with Whole Wheat or Spelt Flour, Spicie Foodie Indian Saffron Yellow Rice Pilaf, Ceara’s kitchen Quinoa Veggie Cakes, I Try to Eat Healthy Antipasto Couscous with Chickpeas, Bobs Red Mill Sorghum Salad with Cucumber and Feta, Naturally Ella Sweet Potato Black Bean Freekeh Salad, Nourish RDs Farro Caprese Salad, Bobs Red Mill The post Celebrate Whole Grains Month This September! appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Easy Jackfruit Curry

August 10 2015 Vegan Richa 

Easy Jackfruit Curry On a Jackfruit roll with this easy Jackfruit Curry. Simple, well spiced and delicious! Young Green Jackfruit is available in canned form in brine in Asian stores and some larger Indian stores. It is also available online on amazon or Indian stores. Jackfruit is called “Kathal” in Hindi which might be the name used in Indian stores. You might also be able to find the whole Green Jackfruit in the grocery section in asian stores or Indian stores depending on the store and season. Call and check before heading to the store as it is much cheaper in the stores than online.   Jackfruit has been used for ages in some cuisines. It is the largest tree borne fruit in the world and is rich in Vitamin C, B6 and potassium. It has a meaty interior with a mild flavor. The seeds of the fruit are edible too.  This Jackfruit curry uses a few spices. Use any that you have and add some garam masala. Cook longer to infuse the Jackfruit with flavor. Serve with rice, quinoa, couscous, flatbread or cooked grains of choice.Continue reading: Easy Jackfruit CurryThe post Easy Jackfruit Curry appeared first on Vegan Richa.

July 2015 Produce Picks: 5 Fruits and Vegetables to Use Now

July 10 2015 VegKitchen 

July 2015 Produce Picks: 5 Fruits and Vegetables to Use NowApricots – with all the melons and berries bursting onto the markets, dont forget about the stone fruits, especially apricots. These diminutive, smooth fruits often get overlooked, and theres more to do with them aside from eating out of hand or using in fruit salads, in both sweet and savory preparations. Here are a few: - Zucchini, Apricot, & Almond Salad - Lavender-Nut Chevre-Stuffed Apricots - Israeli Couscous Summer Pilaf Cherries – July brings out the best in these beloved sweet fruits. The best way to enjoy cherries is to just eat them out of hand, but there are other ways to use them other than putting them out in a bowl, though admittedly, pitting them can be a bit of a pain. Try some of these recipes; a few call for frozen cherries but of course, you can substitute fresh: - Cherry-Pomegranate Refrigerator Jam - Cherry-Basil Crumble Bars - Chocolate Cherry Bomb Smoothie - Kale Salad with Cherries and Lime Dressing Green beans – the season for fresh tender green beans is unfairly short; whereas these days you can get decent asparagus and greens all year round, it seems like midsummer is still the true season for perfect green beans that arent stringy and gnarly. Take full advantage! Youll find lots of ideas in our Green Beans category. Beets – Though available year round, midsummer is the time to get bigger bunches at great prices. Beets are a favorite among VegKitchen visitors, as several of our beet features are among our most popular. Beets can be a bit perplexing to prepare, so you may find How to Cook Beets (or use them raw) useful. Make sure to look for summer varieties like golden and chiogga beets. Youll find lots of great ways to use them in our Beets category. And if youd like a more curated set of our favorites, here are 5 Delicious Recipes for Using Beets. Eggplant – Eggplant lovers rejoice in midsummer, as this versatile veggie becomes widely available in all shapes and sizes, including your standard dark purple variety, plus white, striped, and the slender Japanese type. Youll find lots of tasty ways to use it in Eggplant: An Extravaganza of Recipes. For a curated set of ideas, see 6 Satisfying Eggplant Recipes.

Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway

March 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway When I first heard that Laura Wright was writing a cookbook about two years ago, I began a very impatient wait for a book that I knew would become very important to me, as well as a staple in my kitchen. Now that the wait is finally over, I truly haven’t been able to stop cooking from this masterpiece of a book, and it has exceeded all of my very high expectations. Every time I set out to read Laura’s blog, The First Mess, I know that I will be walking away with a smile, as well as inspired to cook something bright, comforting and nourishing to the core. Laura’s writing style is so uniquely heartwarming and honest, like being in a conversation with a dear old friend, and that tone is very much echoed in the very well-considered, homey recipes and beautiful photography in The First Mess cookbook. All of the recipes in the book are vegan and whole food/­­vegetable/­­fruit-forward, but more importantly, they are delicious, unique yet somehow familiar, considerate of time, and made with accessible ingredients. The book is for absolutely everyone, whether vegan, vegetarian, omnivore, health-conscious or not, and it will get you excited to cook. This all-inclusiveness and approachability is so hard to achieve with a plant-based cookbook, but that is Laura’s genius. Ever since receiving my copy a few weeks ago, I’ve been floating on a cloud of cooking inspiration, and I’ve already made the French Onion Lentil Pots, Roasted Chili Basil Lime Tofu Bowls, Mustard-Roasted Broccoli Paté, Lazy Steel Cut Oatmeal, Fudgy Nut and Seed Butter Brownies (twice), plus the two recipes in this post, all to insanely good results. I chose to feature the Moroccan Stew recipe here, since I think it really captures the essence of Laura’s cooking. The stew comes together quickly, with pantry and grocery store staples, yet it tastes completely new and luxurious. Plus, it’s a great recipe to make during this seasonal produce limbo that we are in right now. Of course, I couldn’t choose just one recipe to post, so I made the Sunshine Everything Crackers to snack on as well. They are so addictive! As well as gluten-free, colored golden with turmeric, and they taste like better, healthier cheez-its/­­goldfish crackers. We plowed through them in a few days, and they made for an excellent lunchbox snack for the kid, too. The First Mess cookbook comes out on March 7th, but you can preorder it now to save a few bucks and to receive the delicious-looking bonus recipe bundle that Laura created for preorder customers. G I V E A W A Y /­­/­­ We are giving away one copy of The First Mess cookbook. To enter, leave a comment here telling us about your go-to recipe for this transitional time of year, or your favorite recipe from The First Mess blog until next Wednesday, March 8th, 2017. Giveaway is for U.S. and Canada only. Reprinted from The  First  Mess  Cookbook  by arrangement with Avery Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA) LLC, A Penguin Random House Company. Copyright (C) 2017, Laura Wright. Sunshine Everything Crackers   Print Serves: about 60 1-inch (2.5 cm) crackers Ingredients 1 cup (250 ml) chickpea flour 1 cup (250 ml) gluten-free oat flour 2 teaspoons nutritional yeast 1 teaspoon fine sea salt 2 teaspoons garlic powder 1 teaspoon ground turmeric pinch of cayenne pepper (optional) ¼ cup + 2 tablespoons sunflower oil (I used neutral coconut oil) ¼ cup filtered water, plus extra if necessary ¼ cup mixed raw seeds (I used flax, hemp, sesame) Instructions Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). In the bowl of a food processor, combine the chickpea flour, oat flour, nutritional yeast, sea salt, garlic powder, ground turmeric, cayenne pepper, if using, and oil. Pulse the machine to get everything lightly mixed. Mix on high until you have a wet and uniform crumbly mixture. With the food processor on low, slowly pour the filtered water through the feed tube of the food processor. The cracker dough should start to form a large ball. If the ball isnt forming, add more water by the teaspoon through the feed tube. Open the lid of the food processor and add the mixed seeds. Pulse the dough a couple of times to distribute the seeds. Lay a sheet of parchment paper, about the size of a large baking sheet, on the counter. Dump the cracker dough onto the parchment and flatten it a bit with your hands. Lay another sheet of parchment paper on top of the dough. With a rolling pin, evenly roll the cracker dough out to roughly an ⅛ inch (3mm) thickness. Remove the top sheet of parchment paper. Carefully transfer the parchment with the rolled-out cracker dough to a large baking sheet. With a knife, score the cracker dough into a gird, forming 1-inch (2.5 cm) square crackers. Slide the baking sheet into the oven and bake until the edges of the crackers have browned slightly, about 20 minutes. Let the crackers cool completely before storing in a sealed container. The crackers will keep for about 5 days. 3.5.3226   Moroccan Stew   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients 2 teaspoons coconut oil 1 medium yellow onion - small dice 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 2 teaspoons ground cumin 2 teaspoons ground coriander ½ teaspoon dried chili flakes (optional) 2 cloves garlic - minced 3 to 4 Medjool dates - pitted and chopped 2 carrots - chopped into ½-inch (1 cm) pieces 1 large sweet potato - peeled and chopped into ½-inch (1 cm) pieces salt and pepper - to taste 1 can (28 ounces/­­769 ml) crushed tomatoes 3 to 4 cups (750 ml to 1 L) vegetable stock 1 yellow bell pepper - stemmed and chopped into ½-inch (1 cm pieces) 2 cups (500 ml) cooked chickpeas for serving pitted green olives lemon wedges cooked brown rice, millet or couscous Instructions Heat the coconut oil in a large, heavy-bottomed soup pot over medium heat. Add the onions and immediately lower the heat until they are sizzling quietly. When the onions are soft and translucent, add the cinnamon, cumin, coriander, and chili flakes, if using. Slowly sauté and stir the spiced onion mixture until the onions are quite soft, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the chopped dates, carrots, and sweet potatoes. Season the vegetables with salt and pepper. Stir to coat the vegetables in the spices and oil. Add the crushed tomatoes and stir. Add 3 cups (750 ml) of the vegetable stock. Bring to a boil uncovered, and simmer until the sweet potatoes are just tender, about 10 to 12 minutes. Add the yellow bell pepper and chickpeas and stir. Season the whole thing again with salt and pepper. If the stew seems too thick, add the remaining 1 cup (250 ml) of vegetable stock. Simmer until the yellow bell peppers are tender and the sweet potatoes are quite soft, about 5 minutes. Check the soup for seasoning and adjust if necessary. Serve the stew hot with a few green olives per portion, lemon wedges and warm cooked grain. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Caramelized Vegetables in Crispy Coconut Cups Mint and Chocolate Milkshake with Aquafaba Whipped Cream - Ice Cream S... Raw Pad Thai with Baby Bok Choy and White Crab Mushrooms Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Moroccan Aubergine & Chickpea Stew

November 25 2016 Green Kitchen Stories 

Moroccan Aubergine & Chickpea Stew Here is a dinner suggestion in case you are looking for a new recipe to try over the weekend. We first made this stew for lunch a few days ago. I’ll admit that it was slightly over-ambitious as a lunch project, but it did tick all the right boxes for a late november meal and we are pretty sure it is something you will appreciate as well. Both Luise and I are obsessed with Moroccan flavors. Our approach is rarely strictly traditional, we usually just throw a whole bunch of Moroccan-ish ingredients, like mint + cinnamon + cumin + raisins + pomegranate seeds + lemon + almonds into the same dish and then blindly call it Moroccan. That is also what we have done with this Aubergine & Chickpea Stew. It is a little bit like a winter version of our (favorite) Moroccan salad recipe from Green Kitchen Travels. It’s warm and comfy with large chunks of slow-cooked aubergine, super flavorful with sweetness from cinnamon, saffron and raisins, has crunchy toasted almonds on top and freshness from mint, yogurt and pomegranate seeds. If you skip the yogurt on top, it’s also entirely vegan. We have had it for lunch and dinner three times this week and we are still not tired of it. Ok, maybe just a tiny bit. Especially Elsa. She always tells us that “we are the worst parents ever” whenever we serve repeat-meals and photo shoot leftovers for dinner. Saffron is actually used as a Christmas spice in Sweden, so in case you are looking for an untraditional Christmas dinner, I think this would be a pretty great option. Especially with those pretty jewel-like pomegranate seeds on top. Our recipe is perfect for 4 persons but it can easily be doubled if you are cooking for a crowd, just use a large saucepan. In case you haven’t cooked with millet before, it is time to add it to your repertoire. It is a gluten free seed that is soft and flavourful and works perfectly as an alternative to couscous or bulgur. It also has a comfortably short cooking time. Moroccan Aubergine & Chickpea Stew Serves 4  2 tbsp coconut oil or olive oil 2 onions, peeled 3 garlic cloves, peeled 1 large chunk fresh ginger 1 aubergine 2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika 1 tsp sea salt 3 tbsp tomato paste 1  x 14 oz /­­ 400 g tin crushed tomatoes 3 cups vegetable stock 1/­­4 tsp /­­ 0,5 g crushed saffron or approx. 6 saffron threads 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g tin chickpeas /­­ garbanzo beans (or 200 g cooked chickpeas) 3/­­4 cup /­­ 100 g yellow or brown raisins 1 lemon, zest (save the rest of the lemon for the salad)  Cooked Millet 1 cup /­­ 200 g uncooked millet 2 cups /­­ 500 ml water 1/­­2 tsp sea salt Lemon, Avocado & Herb Salad 2 large ripe avocados, cut in half, destoned and flesh scooped out 1 large handful flat-leaf parsley (or coriander/­­cilantro), coarsely chopped 1 large handful mint leaves, coarsely chopped 1 lemon, juice 2 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil sea salt & ground pepper To Serve 1/­­2 cup /­­ 75 g toasted almonds*, coarsely chopped 1/­­2 pomegranate, seeds 1/­­2 cup /­­ 120 ml Turkish yogurt (optional) Add oil to a large saucepan on medium heat. Cut the first onion in large chunks and the second one finely along with the garlic and ginger. Add them all to the saucepan and let sauté for about 10 minutes or until soft. Meanwhile cut the aubergine into bite-size chunks. Add it to the pan along with all the spices and tomato paste. Let fry for 5-6 minutes, stirring frequently. Add a splash of water or oil in case the spices begin to burn against the bottom of the pan. Then add the crushed tomatoes, 2 cups of the vegetable stock and the saffron, stir around until it boils and then lower the heat. Put a lid on the sauce pan and let slowly simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the chickpeas, 1/­­2 cup of the raisins and the last of the stock (if it looks like it’s needed) and let simmer for 15 minutes more or until the aubergines are soft and tender, stir in the lemon zest right at the end of the cooking. Meanwhile, add the millet to a medium-sized sauce pan and dry-toast on low heat for 2-3 minutes, then add water and salt, increase the heat and bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and let simmer for about 8-9 minutes. Take it off the heat and let sit for a few minutes to absorb all the water. Add the remaining raisins and use a fork to integrate the raisins and fluff the millet. Prepare the salad by cutting the avocado into chunks, coarsely chopping the herbs and placing them in a bowl along with the pomegranate seeds. Whisk together lemon juice, oil, salt and pepper, add it to the bowl and toss. Serve in bowls with the stew scooped on top of the millet, the salad on the side and almonds, pomegranate seeds and yogurt on top. Enjoy! * We toast almonds by soaking raw almonds in heavily salted water for 20 minutes and then draining the water and roasting/­­toasting them in the oven on 300°F /­­ 150°C for 20 minutes. But you can also toast them in a pan. Or simply use store-bought dry-roasted almonds.

Tabbouleh Pasta Salad

August 1 2016 Vegan Richa 

Tabbouleh Pasta SaladTabbouleh Pasta Salad.  Parsley, tomatoes, fusilli pasta dressed with olive oil, salt, pepper and lemon. Fresh Summer Salad. Vegan Soy-free Recipe. Can be made gluten-free with gf pasta. Pin this Recipe.  Tabbouleh or Tabouli  is a middle eastern salad made with tomatoes, onion, chopped parsley, mint, bulgur (or couscous)  olive oil, lemon juice, and salt. It is generally available in similar forms in middle eastern restaurants as a side or a part of the mezze.  This past week has been very hot in here in the PNW and I have been craving cold things to eat. I made this salad the other day with whole grain fussilli with the rest of the ingredients as a tabbouleh. Cook the pasta. Chop all the veggies and parley. Toss well with freshly sqeezed lemon juice, fresh extra virgin olive oil, salt and pepper. Let chill for a few minutes and serve this hearty Summery Tabbouleh Pasta Salad. Continue reading: Tabbouleh Pasta SaladThe post Tabbouleh Pasta Salad appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Mushroom Couscous

April 20 2016 VegKitchen 

Mushroom Couscous This super-simple pearl (Israeli) couscous side dish gets its flavor from dried mushrooms. This goes with just about any kind of meal and serves 8 as a side dish. Recipes and photos from

8 Tips for Vegan Travelers

February 23 2016 Vegetarian Times 

8 Tips for Vegan Travelers Theres an unfortunate misconception that traveling as a vegan is difficult – making vegans feel that they cant travel (and also causing many travelers to feel they cant go vegan even though they want to, which Ive heard many times). However, its not difficult to travel as a vegan, once you know a few tips and tricks. Youll get to explore a side of local culture that few get to see and meet vegans around the world. Here are 8 tips to make vegan travel not only easy, but enjoyable: 1. Plan ahead The key to having an enjoyable vegan vacation is to make sure you plan ahead. Look up vegan-friendly restaurants in your destination before you go on Happycow, VegGuide and local websites. It’s also helpful to look up some phrases ahead of time such as: I am vegan. I do not eat meat, chicken or pork. I do not eat fish. I do not eat eggs. I do not drink milk, eat butter or cheese, or consume dairy products. Is there chicken/­­beef/­­pork/­­fish stock in this? Is there oyster sauce/­­fish sauce/­­shrimp paste in this? Is there lard in this? Plus, you can look up some common accidentally vegan dishes in your destination – for example in Greece, fava (a hummus-like bean purée) and Greek salad minus feta. 2. If you’re not into planning, make friends. In my book, The Essential Vegan Travel Guide, I talk about what to do if you don’t enjoy planning and don’t want to research all the restaurants in advance. Don’t fear if you don’t like research – it’s not compulsory. I’d suggest instead reaching out to your social network and seeing if they’ve been to your destination or know of anyone who has. Ask your local vegetarian and vegan friends if theyve been to your destination or know anyone there, and ask for advice on social media (post your questions on Facebook or Twitter using the hashtag #vegantravel, for example). 3. Have backups. While you shouldnt have any trouble finding vegan food if you do your planning as described above, its always a good idea to have a few backup options, such as knowing vegan options in chain restaurants if youre staying stateside, or how to order vegan in any restaurant. Or, keep a few emergency fruit and nut bars in your bag. 4. Choose where to stay carefully. You might want to consider staying somewhere with a kitchen, or at least a fridge (so you can have breakfast in your room). If you want somewhere with a kitchen, try to find a holiday apartment, hostel with shared kitchen facilities, Airbnb or VegVisits (an all-new vegetarian & vegan holiday rental listings site). 5. Don’t forget about toiletries! You will also want to make sure the toiletries you bring are vegan-friendly. If youre traveling by plane with a carry-on, youll need to make sure all liquids and gels are in 3.4oz or smaller containers and fit in a 1 quart-sized bag. You can buy empty 3.4oz plastic bottles in most drugstores and fill them with your own shampoo, soap, lotion, etc. You can also buy mini containers of some vegan-friendly products. You might also consider purchasing toiletries in non-liquid form. Lush, for example, make many vegan- and eco-friendly solid soaps, shampoos and toothpaste tabs. Or, go multipurpose: Dr. Bronners makes a liquid soap that can be used a soap, shampoo, toothpaste and laundry detergent. 6. Emergency cooking If youre going to be staying somewhere with a kitchen, you might want to know a few simple recipes you can make just in case, like one-pot pasta. Even if youre staying in a hotel, you can make a few basic recipes in your coffeemaker, like soup or couscous (yes, its really possible, and I have recipes for both in my book!). 7. Don’t starve because it’s Sunday. Be aware of local customs – for example, if most restaurants and businesses close on Sunday or Monday. If this is the case, make sure you look up and make note of some vegan-friendly restaurants that are open on Sunday – or stock your kitchen on Saturday. Be extra conscientious of your first and last meals, too. For example, you might want to make note of a vegan-friendly restaurant or two that are near your hotel and open when you arrive. The last thing you want to do is arrive somewhere tired and hungry (and possibly jet lagged) and then end up wandering the streets in a hungry state, desperate for somewhere to eat and arguing with your partner/­­travel companion/­­self. 8. Enjoy yourself! Lastly – and most importantly – have fun! With a little advance planning, you can have a stress-free vacation – because the last thing you want to do on vacation is be worrying about where to find food. Caitlin Galer-Unti is the author of The Essential Vegan Travel Guide, out now and available for purchase as a paperback or Kindle book on Amazon. Caitlin writes about how to find and make food that is sometimes healthy and always delicious on her blog, The Vegan Word, which has been featured on The New York Times and Yahoo!.

Tex-Mex Cauliflower Couscous

January 14 2016 VegKitchen 

Tex-Mex Cauliflower Couscous It may surprise you that its possible to get the feeling of eating rice using a vegetable, but this dish proves it true! The cauliflower is packed with nutrients, the beans add plenty of protein, the garlic will help boost your immune system and the cilantro will aid your digestion. This is a calorie-light dish that will fill you up and invite your tongue to explore novel textures.

Weekly Plant-Based Dinner Plan, December 14 – 18, 2015

December 14 2015 VegKitchen 

Weekly Plant-Based Dinner Plan, December 14 – 18, 2015 With the holidays fast approaching, no one has time for fussing with weeknight meals. Here are five mainstays that will be on the table in no time. Start the week with something super-easy.

10 Comforting Stuffed Vegetable Recipes

October 1 2015 VegKitchen 

10 Comforting Stuffed Vegetable RecipesStuffing vegetables is the surest way to turn them into cool-weather comfort foods that everyone will love -- easy enough for everyday dinners, yet festive enough for holiday menus. In the fall and winter, stuffable vegetables like peppers, eggplant, squashes, and potatoes are in abundance. Here are more tips at Stuffed Vegetables: A Basic Guide. Above, a VegKitchen classic -- Butternut Squash with Whole Wheat, Wild Rice, and Onions Stuffing, which makes a handsome centerpiece for Thanksgiving or Christmas Dinner. Winter Squash Stuffed with Mashed Potatoes and Peas makes a great alternative main dish for Thanksgiving, but its any time during fall harvest season or as a winter comfort food. Leslie Cerier’s Savory Stuffed Winter Squash is a festival of flavor and nutrition with organic chia seeds, herbs, and kasha. Choose any small winter squash, such as acorn or carnival. For Rice-Stuffed Delicata Squashes, the pilaf stuffing can be kept simple if a flavorful rice blend is used. You can substitute another grain, if you’d like. Zucchini becomes a whole lot more fun when you scoop out the center and stuff it with savory fillings. Taco Stuffed Zucchini from Oh My Veggies is a delicious example. Cristina Cavanaugh’s Loaded Sweet Potatoes with Chipotle Lime Tahini Sauce makes an everyday meal thats packed with flavor and nourishing ingredients. Couscous-Stuffed Eggplant is a delightful stuffed eggplant dish that can be filled with regular couscous, or try it with Israeli couscous. Quinoa, Black Bean, and Corn-Stuffed Peppers is a hearty rendition of vegan stuffed peppers. Roast your favorite combination of veggies at the same time to serve as a side dish. In Orzo and Rice-Stuffed Bell Peppers, orzo, a tiny, rice-shape pasta, makes a tasty filling. Or, you can use medium-grain brown rice in this recipe. In Mushroom-Stuffed Potatoes, a small amount of vegan cream cheese lends a rich flavor. For an easy meal serve them with a big tossed salad with chickpeas or beans, and you favorite steamed green veggie.  

10 Tasty Ways to Tempt Your Family to Eat More Vegetables

September 9 2015 VegKitchen 

10 Tasty Ways to Tempt Your Family to Eat More VegetablesRoast them. Roasting vegetables brings out their natural sweetness, and as with the vegetable fritters above, makes them a comfort food. Try Roasted Cauliflower, above, or combinations of cruciferous veggies (cauliflower, brussels sprouts, etc.), root vegetables, and squashes, Explore our wide array of Roasted Vegetable Recipes.  Oven-“fry” them. Potato Oven Fries need only a minimal amount of oil, a quick trip in the oven, some ketchup, and youre good to go. Try also: Sweet Potato Oven Fries. Or “unfry” them in a pan. Green Bean Fries become golden and crispy on the outside. They’re great just as they are; served with ranch dressing, they’re even harder to resist. Batter them up. Vegetable Fritters transform common veggies into soothing comfort foods with a mild batter. Try this with 2 to 3 different vegetables each time you make it as suggested in the post. Try also: Corn Fritters. Bake them into chips. Kale is the ideal candidate for this kind of treatment. Basic Baked Kale Chips are an addiction you wont mind giving into. Kids usually go for these in a big way. Try also: Pizza Kale Chips. Dip them. Sometimes the dip itself can be based on vegetables, like in Green Pea, Parsley, and Pistachio Dip, above. Hummus is a fantastic dip for raw vegetables, and its so easy to make at home. Theres just something about this high-protein Middle Eastern classic that appeals to kids of all ages. Try also: Green Bean and Cashew Paté. Stuff them. Vegetables just become a whole lot more fun when you scoop out their centers and stuff them with savory fillings. Taco Stuffed Zucchini from Oh My Veggies is a delicious example. Try also: Rice-Stuffed Delicata Squashes; Couscous-Stuffed Eggplant. Serve them cheesy. Mustard-Spiked Vegan Cheez-y Sauce gives broccoli, cauliflower, green beans, Brussels sprouts, and other vegetables a luscious finish. Blend them into soups. When cold weather sets in theres nothing more soothing than pureed soups like this Creamy Golden Potato Squash Soup. You can sneak all kinds of good ingredients into these purees! Try also: Vegan Cream of Broccoli Soup and Sweet Potato Soup. Bake them into sweet treats. Carrots, butternut squash, pumpkin, and zucchini are four vegetables that blend well into cakes, pies, and muffins. When you stop to consider it, pumpkin pie is actually a vegetable dish! Vegan Carrot-Walnut Muffins, above. are good for breakfast or for the lunch box. Try also: Zucchini-Raisin Muffins, Easy Vegan Pumpkin or Squash Pie. Use them as noodles. Zucchini Noodles are something that even the pickiest eater cant resist. Though zucchini isnt exactly a powerhouse of nutrition, you can augment these kinds of dishes with more nutrient-dense toppings. Youll need a spiral slicer to make the really fun shapes, but you can also use a vegetable peeler to make flat linguini. Try also: Zucchini Pasta with Mango, Avocado, and Black Bean Salsa.

8 Delicious Vegan Entreés Featuring Peanut Butter

July 30 2015 VegKitchen 

8 Delicious Vegan Entreés Featuring Peanut ButterEverything tastes better with peanut butter! Except, of course, for those with peanut allergies. Luscious and high in protein, peanut butter isnt only for PBJ sandwiches or desserts (though its awesome in both -- see our listing of sweet treats using it) Here are 7 tasty ways to use it in vegan main dishes. First off, heres an easy rendition of Cold Peanut Butter Sesame Noodles (above), with a dollop of tahini and a dash of spice. Delicious as a summer dinner served with an easy tofu dish and a simple salad of tomatoes, cucumbers, and basil. Another noodle dish, Kid-Friendly Peanut Butter Noodles is designed for kids whose preference runs to milder flavors. Adults can enjoy this basic recipe as well by spicing up their portion with hot sauce like Sriracha, or dried hot red pepper flakes, and a sprinkling of scallion. According to Isa Moskowitz, Curried Peanut Sauce Bowl with Tofu and Kale is the peanut sauce of the gods: a gingery peanut sauce with curry powder that will have you licking the spoon, then licking your plate ... Robin Robertsons West African Spinach with Spicy Peanut Sauce is delicious served over rice or couscous. Let your own heat tolerance be your guide on the amount of chiles to use. Admittedly rich, this traditional Southern-style Virginia Peanut Soup has an intensely nutty flavor. Even served in moderate portions, its immensely satisfying, and you can build a meal around it. Another soup you can look forward to that’s especially good for fall (but which can be enjoyed any time of year) is Broccoli-Apple Soup with Cashew or Peanut Butter. So rich and comforting, and filling enough to be a main dish serves with fresh bread and salad. In Dr. Joel Fuhrmans Spicy Thai Braised Kale and Tofu, peanut butter is the key to creating this tasty, nutrition-packed dish. Serve with brown rice or quinoa and a colorful salad for a great weeknight meal. Tempeh is a great source of protein, and peanut butter enhances its fermented flavor in this tasty Tempeh Satay with Asian Greens. Serve with your favorite grain.

This Week’s Meatless Meal Plan | 06.29.15

June 26 2015 Oh My Veggies 

On the menu this week: Tempeh Tacos, Couscous Bowls with Zaatar Chickpeas and Roasted Cauliflower, Smoked Cheddar Mac & Cheese with Baked BBQ Tofu, Green Goddess Wedge Salads and Grilled Veggie Banh Mi Sandwiches.


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