coriander - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!

Carrot beans poriyal recipe | carrot beans thoran | carrot beans stir-fry

Restaurant Highlight: Unity Diner in London, England

Gingered Winter Fruit Medley

Gujarati dal recipe | gujarati tuvar dal | gujarati toor dal










coriander vegetarian recipes

Authentic Moroccan Carrot Salad

December 10 2018 Meatless Monday 

This delicious way to serve carrots may be new to you, but carrot salad seasoned with fresh cilantro, garlic and aromatic spices has long been a tradition in Morocco. Pair this side dish with your next Meatless Monday meal to liven up the meal! This recipe comes to us from Safa of Moroccan Zest. Serves 4 -  1/­­2 pound carrots cut in slices -  1/­­2 lemon juice - 1 tbsp chopped parsley - 1 tbsp chopped coriander - 1 tbsp olive oil - 1/­­2 tsp of cumin - 1 clove garlic -  1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp of sweet paprika   Fill a saucepan with water, add salt and put on medium heat Add carrot slices and cook for 15 to 30 minutes until the carrots are tender Drain the carrots and leave aside In a pan, fry the garlic in 1 tablespoon of olive oil for 2 minutes in low heat Add the rest of the ingredients (spices, coriander, parsley, and lemon juice) and cook for 2 minutes while mixing. Add the carrots and sauté for 5 minutes. Let the Moroccan carrots salad a little bit cool down. It is best served tepid or cold. The post Authentic Moroccan Carrot Salad appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Weekday Cauliflower Dal

November 15 2018 Green Kitchen Stories 

Weekday Cauliflower DalWe had a little vote on instagram the other day, asking which recipe we should post on here next. I was absolutely convinced that these Peanut Butter & Jam Chocolate Cups would be the winner. But there was instead a surprisingly large majority asking for a cauliflower dal. I suppose most of you just want to cozy up with warm food that hugs the belly right now. And that is exactly what this is. A belly hugger and a particularly simple recipe that doesn’t require any fresh herbs or unusual ingredients. Just a handful of pantry staples and a little trick for a flavor packed topping. We’ll teach you more about the recipe and the topping in a bit. But before we do that, we wanted to show you this video that we made. It is part of a new mini series that we are doing on on youtube where we travel around Sweden to source local ingredients and cook with friends. In this episode we took the train to the west coast to pick apples with Linda Lomelino and then she bakes a classic Swedish Apple Cake. Fun times! Luise was quite nervous about releasing this because she speaks in front of the camera more than she has done before, so please give her a little extra love. We have two more episodes coming before this year ends. Back to the dal. If you are not familiar with the name, it is essentially an Indian Lentil Soup. We have been sharing a few different dal recipes on here and in our books and this is a mix of them all. It is not our fanciest version but instead something that you can make on any given weekday. A dal is one of those recipes that you learn once and then know and cook for the rest of your life. I promise. I have been making varieties of this soup since I moved to my first apartment and learned how to cook. All ingredients are easy to find and can basically go into the sauce pan at the same time. If there is one thing that you should give a little extra attention, it is to use a good curry spice blend. The use of spices can vary in curries, we particularly love a version that includes ground fenugreek. But you can use any curry mix that you like. If you have some mustard seeds, coriander seeds and/­­or cardamom seeds in your spice cabinet, you can grind them into your curry blend to boost it with extra flavor. Because freshly grounds seeds/­­spices always taste more. The trick When we were on Sri Lanka a couple of years ago, we learned a dal trick from a local woman. After having cooked lentils and spices into a pretty good dal, she put another pan on high heat, added ghee and more spices to it and, when super fragrant, she stirred them into the soup. Adding those warm spices and butter last minute just boosted the soup and made it insanely flavorful. For this recipe we use a similar method for garlic and mustard seeds that we then wilt down spinach into. You can stir down the spinach into the dal, but we instead serve it as a topping (because our kids prefer it without the spinach). We normally add toasted pumpkin seeds on top as well but didn’t have any at home this time. Weekday Cauliflower Dal  Serves 4 Notes: You can either serve the soup chunky or mix it smooth with a hand blender. Our favorite way is to just give it a super quick whizz with the blender to make it a little creamier and yet keeping texture from the cauliflower and potatoes. If you want it a little sweeter and creamier, you can replace 400 ml /­­ 14 oz of the water/­­stock with a tin of coconut milk. We don’t add chili to it because of our kids but that can obviously also go in along with the curry. 3 tbsp coconut oil or butter/­­ghee 1 onion 2 cloves garlic 1 tbsp ground curry spice blend 1/­­2 tbsp mixed mustard seeds, coriander seeds and cardamom seeds (or just add 1/­­2 tbsp extra ground curry) 1 large chunk (5 cm /­­ 2 inches) fresh ginger 1 cauliflower (approx 500 g /­­ 1/­­2 lb) 3 potatoes, coarsely diced 200 g /­­ 1 cup red lentils 2 soft dates, pitted and mashed 1 litre /­­ 4 cups water or vegetable stock 1 tsp apple cider vinegar   Garlicky spinach 2 tbsp coconut oil 2 tsp mustard seeds 2 garlic cloves, finely sliced 2-3 handfuls spinach   Tomato salad 10 cherry tomatoes 2 tsp olive oil 1 tsp apple cider vinegar salt & pepper Make the Cauliflower Dal: Heat coconut oil, onion and garlic in a large saucepan on low/­­medium heat. Add the curry, grind the extra spices in a mortar and add those as well (or just add more curry). Stir constantly with a wooden spoon until it smells fragrant, but be careful so the spices do not burn. If it feels too dry add a spoonful, or more, of water. Break the cauliflower into florets and chop the stem finely. Peel the potatoes and dice them into 1 cm /­­ 1/­­2 inch bits. Add both to the sauce pan along with the lentils and dates. Stir and sauté for about a minute before adding water or stock. Let simmer for 30 minutes or until the lentils are starting to dissolve and the cauliflower florets are tender. Stir carefully (if you want the cauliflower florets to stay intact) a few times. Add apple cider vinegar and salt to taste. Give the soup 2-3 pulses with a hand blender (if you like, see note above). Serve in bowls with a dollop of yogurt (coconut yogurt or regular yogurt) and top with garlicky spinach and tomato salad. Make the Garlicky Spinach: Heat coconut oil in a skillet. Sauté mustard seeds and garlic on low/­­medium heat until golden and fragrant. Add spinach and turn off the heat. Stir until wilted. Ready for serving. Make the Tomato Salad: Cut the tomatoes in halves and place in a bowl. Add olive oil, vinegar salt and pepper and toss to combine. Serve on top of the dal for a fresh zing of flavor.

Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel

November 14 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel Popping in really quickly today to share the recipe for this holiday table dessert contender – baked apples! These babies are fun to make and on the healthier side as far as desserts go, but still so satisfying and festive. They are taken up to that next level with the pockets of poppyseed dukkah cozied up inside each apple, as well as a crucial drizzle of homemade coconut caramel :D I first had the idea to make sweet dukkah (Egyptian spice and nut/­­seed mix, aka a condiment from heaven) a few years ago, when I wrapped it up in these Sweet Dukkah Cigars (which is another great dessert for coffee or tea time after a holiday meal). I do a mixture of walnuts and hazelnuts, sesame seeds, poppyseeds, aromatic spices, and dates. I especially love the combination of poppyseeds and caramel, so I upped them in this particular sweet dukkah recipe. The result: delicate, warm apples with a pleasant amount of fall-appropriate spice and crunch from the dukkah and delicate sweetness from the mandatory drizzle of coconut caramel. Some vanilla ice cream would be great on the side as well! Hope you enjoy these :) Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel   Print Serves: 6 baked apples Ingredients for the baked apples 6 small honeycrisp apples juice from ½ lemon poppyseed dukkah (recipe below) 1½ cup apple cider rosemary, thyme or other aromatic herbs for infusing the cider (optional) olive oil - for drizzling coconut sugar - for sprinkling coconut caramel (recipe linked) for the poppyseed dukkah 1 cup raw hazelnuts or walnuts, or a mix of both ¼ cup sesame seeds 4 tablespoons poppy seeds 3 green cardamom pods - crushed in mortar and pestle, green shells removed ½ teaspoon coriander seeds 1 teaspoon cinnamon ½ teaspoon nutmeg 3 soft dates - pitted and chopped pinch of sea salt Instructions to make the baked apples Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). Cut the top off each apple (refer to photos) and set aside. Carefully core the apples using a small knife or apple corer and drizzle the lemon juice over them. Generously stuff the apples with dukkah, piling it over the top. Close the apples with the apple tops and transfer the apples into a rimmed baking dish. Pour the apple cider over the apples and add the aromatic herbs to the bottom of the dish, where the cider accumulates, if using. Drizzle the apples with olive oil and sprinkle with coconut sugar. Bake for about 1 hour, until soft throughout, drizzling with the baking liquid every 15 minutes. Take care not to overbake the apples, as they might start coming apart at the seams. Let the apples cool just a bit and serve drizzled with the coconut caramel and sprinkled with more dukkah. A scoop of vanilla ice cream wouldnt hurt either :) to make the poppyseed dukkah Preheat oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread hazelnuts/­­walnuts on a baking sheet and toast for 5 minutes. Add sesame and poppy seeds and continue to toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven. Toast the cardamom and coriander seeds in a pan over medium heat until fragrant, for about a minute or so. Finely grind in a mortar and pestle. Add the hazelnuts/­­walnuts to a bowl of a food processor and pulse a few times. Add the sesame and poppy seeds, cardamom, coriander, cinnamon, nutmeg, dates and salt to the food processor. Pulse to combine to the consistency of coarse bread crumbs. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Raw Green Mountain Parfait Lychee Sorbet and Marinated Rhubarb Compote Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Bites .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Poppyseed Dukkah-Stuffed Baked Apples with Coconut Caramel appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Yellow Split Pea Coconut Breakfast Porridge

November 12 2018 Meatless Monday 

Pulses are eaten for breakfast in many cultures around the world, but its rare to see peas on a breakfast menu in the U.S. This recipe will change that! Savory split yellow peas are paired with rich coconut milk for a satisfying porridge that makes for a great way to start your day. This recipe comes to us from our friends at USA Pulses. Serves 5 - 1 teaspoon mustard seeds (optional) - 1 white or yellow onion, diced - 2 large or 4 small carrots, peeled and diced - 2 teaspoons grated or minced ginger (or 1/­­2 teaspoon ground ginger) - 1 teaspoon turmeric - 1/­­2 teaspoon cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper - 1 1/­­2 cups yellow split peas - 4 cups water - 1/­­2 cup coconut milk (canned, not boxed) - 1 tablespoon lime juice   Heat the coconut oil in a Dutch oven or a medium sized pot over medium high heat. Add the mustard seeds, if using, and allow them to cook until they start to pop. Stir in the onion and carrots. Saute the vegetables for 8-10 minutes, or until they’re very soft and the onions are clear, adding a tablespoon or two of water if the vegetables start to stick. Stir in the ginger, turmeric, cumin, coriander, salt, and pepper. Add the split peas and water and bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cover. Cook for 35-40 minutes, or until the split peas are tender. Check the split peas a few times to stir them and make sure they’re not sticking to the bottom of the pot; if they’re very thick, stir in a half cup of water. Once the split peas are very tender, stir in the coconut milk and lime juice. Check seasoning and adjust salt, pepper, lime juice, and turmeric to taste. Serve with rice and toppings of choice. Leftover porridge will keep for up to 6 days in an airtight container in the fridge. The post Yellow Split Pea Coconut Breakfast Porridge appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Aam Ki Launji, Sweet And Sour Mango Chutney

November 4 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Aam Ki Launji, Sweet And Sour Mango Chutney (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Aam Ki Launji, Sweet and Sour Mango Chutney Aam Ki Launji is packed full of flavors, creating a wonderful combination of sweet, spicy, and sour. This can be used as a side dish or as a condiment. My favorite way to serve Aam Ki Launji is with stuffed parathas. This is a quick and easy recipe that adds a lot to your palette! - 2-1/­­2 cup raw cooking mango (cut into byte size pieces, I used 1 mango) - 2 Tbsp oil - 3 dry red chilies (cut into pieces) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1/­­4 tsp nigella seeds (kalonji) - 1/­­4 tsp fenugreek seeds (methi dana) - 1 tsp fennel seed (saunf) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­4 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1 tsp salt - 3 Tbsp sugar (use as needed) - 1/­­4 cup water -  Heat the oil in a heavy bottom pan, over low heat. When oil is just warm add all the ingredients except sugar, red chilies and asafetida, fennel seeds, nigella seeds, fenugreek seeds, coriander powder, red chili, turmeric, sugar and salt sauté for few seconds. - Add the mango cubes, mix well add about 1/­­4 cup of water mix it well cover the pan. And let it cook on a medium heat for 7-8 minutes, while stirring occasionally. - After mangoes are cooked they are soft and tender add sugar and turn off the heat and cover the pan for few minutes. - Once Aam Ki Launji is cooled, you can refrigerate. For up to a week. Notes For this recipe, raw cooking mango works the best. These mangoes are now available year around in most Indian grocery stores. You may find that sometimes the mangoes have already started ripening and the color is not white when you slice inside, but it will still work. You can also use mangoes that are not ripe enough and too sour to eat for this recipe. If you think that the mango still needs some sourness, add in mango powder. The post Aam Ki Launji, Sweet And Sour Mango Chutney appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Gobi Pakoras (Crispy Cauliflower Fritters)

October 13 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Gobi Pakoras (Crispy Cauliflower Fritters) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Gobi Pakoras (Crispy Cauliflower Fritters) Gobi Pakoras or Crispy Cauliflower fritters are a mouthwatering appetizer. Crispy on the outside and soft on the inside, these pakoras are addicting! These work as a tasty pairing with your afternoon tea or a spicy delicious snack before any meal. - 3 cup cauliflower florets (cut into about 1 inch florets) - 1/­­3 cup besan (gram flour ) - 3 Tbsp corn starch (arrow root) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­4 tsp red chili powder - 1/­­8 tsp baking soda - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp ginger paste - 1 green chili (finely chopped) - 2 Tbsp cilantro (finely chopped, hara dhania) -  Boil the cauliflowers, add just enough water to cover the cauliflowers. After water comes to boil, cook for about 5 minutes over medium heat. Turn off the heat and drain the water. Let cauliflowers come to room temperature. Cauliflower should be just little tender, not soft. - In a bowl mix all the ingredients together, besan, corn starch, coriander powder, cumin seeds, red chili powder, salt, baking soda, ginger, green chili and cilantro. Mix it well. - Sprinkle the dry mix over cauliflower, gently mix it coating all the cauliflower with spices, add water little at a time as needed, I used about 1/­­4 cup of water. - Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium high heat. The frying pan should have about 1 inch of oil. To check if the oil is ready, put little batter in the oil. The batter should raise to the top but not change color right away. - Drop the cauliflower slowly in the oil making sure dont overlap them. - Fry the cauliflowers until they turn golden brown, turning them occasionally. This should take about 6-8 minutes. - When they are golden brown, take them out with a slotted spoon. Place them on a paper towel to absorb the extra oil.   Note: We are not making a batter, use just enough water to coat the cauliflower florets evenly with spice mix. If you fry them on high heat Pakoras will not be crispy and if they are fried on very low heat Pakoras will be greasy. They especially taste delicious when they are served with Tamarind Chutney and hot cup of tea. They are also easy and quick to make. Surprise your guests and treat them with these mouthwatering crispy gobi pakoras. You will also like to see the recipe for Paneer Pakora and Chai. Enjoy! The post Gobi Pakoras (Crispy Cauliflower Fritters) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Vegetable Tagine

October 6 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegetable Tagine Tagine is a dish typical of Maghreb cuisine. A dish with a thousand versions, tagine is prepared with ingredients and spices that differ from one region to another. Everyone can adapt it as they please. But don’t worry that it will be complicated and take a long time to prepare; its a simple dish that anyone can make. The recipe is perfect for using all the leftover vegetables you have at home. I love these simmered dishes that take a little bit of everything. Traditionally, tagine is eaten directly from the dish--which sits in the center of the table--with a piece of bread. You will love the fragrant juice and tender vegetables of this tagine.   Save Print Vegetable Tagine Prep time:  15 mins Cook time:  40 mins Total time:  55 mins   Servings: 2-3 Ingredients 2 potatoes 2 carrots 2 tomato 1 yellow pepper 1/­­2 cup spinach (fresh or frozen) 1 can chickpeas 1 onion 1 clove of garlic 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 teaspoon of paprika 1 teaspoon coriander 1 teaspoon Turmeric Salt Pepper 1½ cups of water Instructions o Heat the oil in a pot. Peel the garlic and onion, slice, and pour into the pot. o […] The post Vegetable Tagine appeared first on VegKitchen.

Grilled Fig Salsa

September 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

This delicious upgrade to traditional chips, salsa, and guacamole incorporates grilled figs for extra depth and flavor. This recipe comes to us from Jackie Newgent, RDN. Serves 6 Serving size: 2 large crisps with 3 tablespoons each fig salsa and whipped avocado - 6 blue or yellow corn tortillas (5- to 5 1/­­2-inch diameter) - 1 tablespoon avocado oil - 1/­­2 teaspoon sea salt, divided - 5 large or 8 medium fresh Black Mission figs, grilled* or fresh, diced - 1/­­4 cup diced red onion - 1/­­4 cup loosely packed, roughly chopped fresh cilantro leaves - 1/­­2 small jalape?o pepper, with seeds, minced - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground coriander, divided - Juice of 1 lime (2 tablespoons), divided - 2 medium Hass avocados, peeled, seeded and cubed   *Lightly brush the cut surface of halved figs with avocado oil. Grill or pan-grill over direct medium-high heat until rich grill marks form, about 4 minutes, on cut side only. Preheat the oven to 425° Brush both sides of the tortillas with the oil. Cut in half and arrange in a single layer on a large baking sheet. Sprinkle with 1/­­8 teaspoons of the salt. Bake until crisped, about 10 to 12 minutes. Transfer the tortilla crisps directly to a cooling rack. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, gently stir together the figs, onion, cilantro, jalape?o, coriander, 1 tablespoon of the lime juice, and 1/­­8 teaspoon of the salt. In a large mixing bowl with an electric mixer, blend the avocados and remaining 1 tablespoon lime juice, 1/­­4 teaspoon salt, and 1/­­4 teaspoon ground coriander until creamy and fluffy. Serve the tortilla crisps topped with avocado dip and the fig salsa.   The post Grilled Fig Salsa appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Coconut Spinach and Lentil Dal

September 18 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Coconut Spinach and Lentil DalThis Coconut Spinach and Lentil Dal recipe combines two Indian classics: lentil dal and saag paneer. The spinach from saag paneer (without the cheesy cubes of paneer) is paired with a protein-rich lentil dal in a creamy coconut sauce. Coconut Spinach and Lentil Dal This recipe combines two Indian classics: lentil dal and saag paneer. The spinach from saag paneer (without the cheesy cubes of paneer) is paired with a protein-rich lentil dal in a creamy coconut sauce. - 1 cup dried lentils - 1 teaspoon ground turmeric - Salt - 1 tablespoon neutral vegetable oil or 1/­­4 cup water - 1 medium yellow onion, chopped - 1 clove garlic, minced - 2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger - 1 hot green chile, seeded and minced - 1 teaspoon ground cumin - 1 teaspoon ground coriander - 1 teaspoon garam masala - Pinch ground cardamom, optional - 1 14.5-ounce can diced fire-roasted tomatoes, drained and finely chopped - 8 to 10 ounces fresh or frozen spinach, steamed and chopped - 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro leaves - 1 13.5-ounce can unsweetened coconut milk - Combine the lentils in a large saucepan with 3 cups of water. Bring to a boil. Decrease the heat to low, add the turmeric, and simmer partially covered for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Uncover and continue to simmer until the lentils are soft and the liquid is absorbed, about 15 minutes. - While the lentils are cooking, heat the oil or water in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic, ginger, and chile, and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the cumin, coriander, garam masala, cardamom, if using, and tomatoes, stirring constantly for about 30 seconds longer. Stir in the spinach, coconut milk, and cilantro and simmer for 5 minutes. Add the spinach mixture to the lentils and stir well to combine. Taste to adjust the seasonings, if needed. Serve hot. This recipe is from Vegan Without Borders (C) Robin Robertson, 2014, Andrews McMeel Publishing, photo by Sara Remington. The post Coconut Spinach and Lentil Dal appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Paneer Methi (Methi Malai Paneer) Recipe by Manjula

September 7 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Paneer Methi (Methi Malai Paneer) Recipe by Manjula (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Paneer Methi (Methi Malai Paneer) Paneer Methi is a delicacy of Northern India. This recipe is paneer with creamy gravy flavored with dry fenugreek leaves known as Fasoori Methi. Paneer Methi is a perfect side dish for formal dinner or even a quiet dinner where you want to impress someone. Any way or time you serve this, it is delicious. - 1-1/­­2 cups paneer cubed in about 1/­­2 inch pieces (used 8oz paneer) - 1-1/­­2 cups tomatoes (chopped) - 1 Tbsp ginger (chopped) - 1 green chili (chopped) - 2 Tbsp oil - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1/­­4 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1/­­4 tsp red chili powder (lal mirch) - 2 Tbsp cashew powder (kaju) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1 tsp fennel seed powder (saunf) - 1 Tbsp dry fenugreek leaves (kasoori methi) - 1 tsp salt - 1-1/­­2 cup milk - 1/­­4 tsp garam masala -  Rub the kasoori methi between your palms and remove the stems if there is any, set aside. -  Blend tomatoes, ginger, green chili to fine paste. Set aside. - Heat one teaspoon of oil in a pan on low heat stir fry the paneer until they are light gold in color, take them out. - Heat the remaining oil in a sauce pan on medium heat. When the oil is moderately hot add cumin seeds. (Cumin seeds should crack right of way). Lower the heat too low, add asafetida, turmeric, chili powder, and cashew powder stir for a minute. - Add tomato paste, coriander, fennel seed powder, salt and kasoori methi, keep stirring till tomato start leaving the side of the pan, this should take 3-4 minutes. Add milk, and cook for 2-3 minutes. Add paneer and let it cook over low heat for 2-3 minutes. This is the time you can add water as needed if gravy is too thick. Add garam masala stir and turn off the heat. -  Paneer Methi is ready.  To make vegan, Substitute paneer with tofu and milk with coconut milk Serve Paneer Methi with Naan, or Lacha Paratha. The post Paneer Methi (Methi Malai Paneer) Recipe by Manjula appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Masala Lauki Ki Sabji

August 19 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Masala Lauki Ki Sabji (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Masala Lauki Ki Sabji Lauki is a simple and healthy vegetable side dish that is also known as opo squash, or Bottle Gourd. Lauki is a staple vegetable in most Indian homes because of its many known health benefits. The vegetable itself is rather bland, so I love manipulating its flavor.  - 1 medium size lauki peeled and cut into bite-sized pieces (will make about 4 cups) - 2 medium size tomatoes (finely chopped – will make about 1 cup) - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable) - 1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 2 Tbsp besan (gram flour) - 1/­­8 tsp fenugreek seeds (methi) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1 tsp shredded ginger (adrak) - 1 Tbsp finely chopped green chili - 1 tsp salt - 2 Tbsp finely chopped cilantro (hara dhania) -  Heat the oil in a saucepan. Oil should be moderately hot. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil. If the cumin seed cracks right away, the oil is ready. -  Add the cumin seeds, asafetida, and fenugreek seeds stir for few seconds. Lower the heat add the besan (besan gives the light aroma and thickness to the gravy) and stir for few seconds. Add coriander powder, red chili powder, turmeric, ginger and green chili stir for few seconds then add tomatoes and salt. Increase the heat medium high. Cook stirring until spices start leaving the oil this should take about 3-4 minute. - Last add lauki and about 1 cup of water and let it cook until lauki is tender. This should take about 10 to 12 minutes.  Notes: lauki can take longer in cooking and more water depends how tender the lauki. Serving suggestion: Masala Lauki can be served with Roti or paratha, or  dal paratha       The post Masala Lauki Ki Sabji appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Matar With Spicy Gravy (Green Peas Masala Curry)

July 30 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Matar With Spicy Gravy (Green Peas Masala Curry) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Matar With Spicy Gravy (Green Peas Masala Curry) Matar With Spicy Gravy is a super delicious side dish made using green peas which tastes amazing in combination with either roti or rice. Matar with spicy gravy is one of my favorite side dish. - 2 cup green peas (I am using frozen peas) - 1 cup tomatoes (chopped ) - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1 Tbsp besan - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania ) - 1/­­4 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder (lal mirch) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 Tbsp ginger paste - 1 Tbsp green chili (finely chopped) - 1/­­4 tsp garam masala - Heat the oil in a saucepan. Oil should be moderately hot. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil. If the cumin seed cracks right away, the oil is ready. - Add the cumin seeds, and asafetida, after cumin seeds crack add the besan ( besan gives the light aroma and thickness to the gravy) and stir for few seconds. Add all the ingredients except green peas, tomatoes, ginger, green chili, red chili, coriander, turmeric, and salt. Cook stirring until spices start leaving the oil this should take about 3-4 minute. - Next add green peas and about 1-1/­­4 cups of water and let it cook until peas are tender. This should take about 4-6 minutes. -  Serving suggestion: Matar With Spicy Gravy can be served with any bread or rice. The post Matar With Spicy Gravy (Green Peas Masala Curry) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

dahi chutney recipe | dahi ki chatni | curd mint chutney | yoghurt mint dip

January 8 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

dahi chutney recipe | dahi ki chatni | curd mint chutney | yoghurt mint dipdahi chutney recipe | dahi ki chatni | curd mint chutney | yogurt mint dip with detailed photo and video recipe. a spiced and flavored yogurt dip made with strained yoghurt, mint and coriander leaves. it is a popular in both south india and north india and is mainly served as a side dish to hyderabadi biryani or as a dip to tandoor or tikka recipes. the recipe has resemblance to green chutney or mint chutney. Continue reading dahi chutney recipe | dahi ki chatni | curd mint chutney | yoghurt mint dip at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Big Batch Golden Milk

December 18 2017 My New Roots 

Big Batch Golden Milk So we moved. Across the ocean. Its been a wild ride so far with plenty of excitement and relief coupled with awkward transitioning, and astronomical culture shock (small town Ontario is preeeeeetty different from Copenhagen). Were also renovating a very old home by Canadian standards, and the hidden surprises lurking under every lifted floorboard are creating a project slightly larger and lengthier than predicted. But wouldnt it all be so boring and predictable without those fun discoveries?! Right! Who needs a kitchen anyway? Oh wait. Amongst the self-inflicted chaotic state of affairs, Ive actually found some peace in the simple living weve got going on. Since we dont really have any friends in our little village yet, theres been plenty of time to actually take care of myself and our family. Afternoons are spent building toy train sets, cooking big batch meals, and making snacks for the days ahead. Ive started taking aerial yoga and NIA, going for nature walks every day, and having candlelit baths on the regular. Funny what removing ones social life will make room for! An important part of my self-care routine these past weeks is my simple ritual of making golden milk. Warm, comforting, and satisfying, this drink has everything needed to combat winter blues and movers remorse (I kid, I kid). Usually I make golden milk on the fly, one cup at a time, but recently I realized how handy it would be to just make a huge batch and have it ready to spoon into some hot milk when the mood strikes. Genius. For those of you that arent yet familiar with this wonder drink, Im excited for the vibrant, spicy world that is about to open up to you. Golden milk, or haldi ka doodh, actually dates back thousands of years in Ayurvedic tradition where it has been used to aid digestion and respiration, prevent colds and flu, decongest the liver, ease sprained muscles and joint pain, purify the blood, clear the skin, and aid sleep. The main ingredient in golden milk responsible for all of this awesomeness is the curcumin in turmeric, a compound that is responsible for its vibrant hue. Curcumin has been widely studied for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties, but it is also supports detoxification, helps balance blood sugar, and lowers the overall risk of cancer. How do we get the most out of this powerful phytonutrient? Simply by combining it with black pepper and fat - two important ingredients in golden milk! A compound in black pepper called piperine actually helps the body absorb curcumin, and shows to increase the bioavailability of it by up to 2,000 percent. And the good news is, you only need a very small amount to reap the synergistic benefits. Then melt a little coconut oil in, and the curcumin can be directly absorbed into the bloodstream through the lymphatic system. That’s a cooperative one-two punch of absorption and deliciousness. Once mixed, your Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend will last for up to six months. Keep it in a cool, dry place out of direct light - a closed cupboard is perfect. Do not store it right next to the stove or on top of the fridge, where the warm environment will speed spoilage. We wanna keep our medicine fresh! The Big Batch Golden Milk recipe below makes about 120 servings, so there is plenty to divvy out to your most beloved, and even save some for yourself. Make sure to include the directions so that your lucky recipients can make golden milk themselves. Ive divided them below so that you can print out just the single serving instructions for your friends and family. I’ve also included a recipe if you want to sample just one cup for yourself before committing to an entire jar. My version of golden milk has a few more spices than some blends that Ive tried, but this unique combination just tastes that much better. If youre on a tight budget, or you simply cannot find some of the spices listed, leave them out. The main ingredients you need are the turmeric, ginger, cinnamon and black pepper. The others are there for added health benefits and of course flavour, but the recipe will still be delicious without them. The milk for this recipe is totally flexible. Coconut is classic, but almond, cashew, or hemp are tasty options. You can also do half milk, half water if you like. It will be less creamy, but its great if youre trying to make your milk stretch a little farther! The most important thing to remember when making golden milk is to not overheat the spices, as they will become bitter-tasting and therefore not all that enjoyable. If you choose to use milk in your recipe, warm it gently on the stove, then remove from heat and gently whisk in the golden milk spice blend. If youre going with water, do NOT pour boiling water over the spice blend, but instead pour the recently-boiled water into a cup, let it cool for 30 seconds or so, then whisk in the golden milk spice blend. I also advise you not to add the honey or coconut oil until the spices have been stirred into the liquid youre using, as theyll incorporate easier if the spices have dissolved. If you want to use a vegan sweetener, maple syrup is my favourite choice, but brown rice syrup, coconut palm sugar, and stevia are also good options. I also love adding a sprinkling of vanilla powder right at the end for some extra va-va-voom. I recommend enjoying your golden milk first thing in the morning (right after your lemon water, of course!), or right before bed. If its a particularly cold day outside, this intelligent spice combo will warm your cells up from the inside out. Or, if youre looking for a luxurious way to unwind down after a long day, I find that golden milk is also a very effective sleep tonic. Whatever the time you choose to enjoy this drink, you will absolutely love its warm, and satisfying vibes. Make it a ritual yourself: spoon lovingly, stir consciously and sip gratefully. One more thing I should mention, is that the Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend is not only delicious as a drink, but that it can also be incorporated into a number of your favourite recipes. Toss a teaspoon into a smoothie, stir some into your morning porridge or pancake batter, fold it into a basic cookie dough or cake batter, and even try it in curries, soups and stews. The flavour is warming and pungent, so use it anywhere youd like a burst of sunshiny spice that is as good as gold.     Print recipe     Big Batch Golden Milk Spice Blend Makes approx. 120 servings Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200g ground turmeric 2/­­3 cup /­­ 70g ground ginger 1/­­3 cup /­­ 35g ground cinnamon 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground black pepper 2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cardamom scant 3 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cloves 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground nutmeg 3 Tbsp. 20g ground star anise 1/­­4 cup 20g ground coriander Directions: 1. Combine all spices in a large bowl. Stir well, then transfer to a large jar or several smaller ones, and seal with an airtight lid. Keeps for up to 6 months.     Print recipe     Golden Milk Ingredients: 1/­­2 Tbsp. golden milk spice blend 1 cup milk of your choice (coconut milk is classic, but I also like cashew milk or hemp milk) 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. virgin coconut oil 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. sweetener of choice (I like raw honey) Directions: 1. In a small saucepan over medium heat, warm milk until just before it simmers. Whisk in golden milk spice blend until smooth. Remove from heat and stir in coconut oil and sweetener, if desired. Enjoy!     Print recipe     If you want to make just one batch of my golden milk, heres the single-serve recipe. Single-serving Golden Milk Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 tsp. turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. ginger 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon pinch black pepper pinch cardamom pinch cloves pinch nutmeg pinch star anise pinch coriander I wish you all a super sweet holiday with tons of delicious food shared amongst family and friends, and that your 2018 is bursting with health and happiness. Much love to all out there, from my chilly, but cozy, little corner of the world to yours. xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * In wrapping up 2017, I cannot help but look on the Wild Heart High Spirit retreats with deep gratitude and pure joy. I had a strong vision for the endeavor from the beginning: gather women in a beautiful and serene space, teach them how to reconnect to their bodies through food and movement. But I never imagined just how deep these lessons would go, how profound the changes would be, and how much fun we would have! After three this year, I can confidently say these experiences are incredibly special, and I feel very lucky to work with such a talented partner to create them. Thank you to all of the women who have traveled from all corners of the earth to join us. We love you! Here are some highlights from our trips to Bali, Ibiza, and Portugal. Click on the images below to see photos from each of our magical locations. .       We also have some very special community partners who have generously made our experiences even more abundant! Big thanks to: Naturgligolie Coconut Bowls Jukserei Pachamama Raw Bite Four Sigmatic Gourmet Print Shop We are now weaving plans for future retreats. If you are interested in learning more or joining us one day, please sign up to our mailing list to be kept up to date. We hope to see you one day soon! The post Big Batch Golden Milk appeared first on My New Roots.

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa

November 7 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa We finally pulled together another meal plan! This ‘mini’ is very simple, seasonally-inspired, and will leave you with a bunch of nourishing food for the week. Everything starts out with a pot of black beans, a batch of roasted sweet potatoes, and a jar of homemade harissa (so easy to make, and such a flavor bomb ingredient!), which will then make their way into three interconnected savory meals and one snack. Ready? Menu - Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup - No-Huevos Rancheros - Curried Cauliflower Rice and Beans - Harissa Black Bean Dip *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free, see the recipes for serving sizes Shopping List (Print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan mini. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Add whatever other ingredients you’ll need for the week here, if doing shopping for the whole week. Produce - 1 large head of garlic - 3 medium sweet potatoes - 3 large yellow onions - 1 large carrot - 2-4 celery ribs - 1 bunch kale (2 packed cups) - 3 limes - 2 lemons - 1 large bunch of cilantro - 2-3 avocados - 1/­­2 lb crimini mushrooms - 1 small head of red cabbage - 1 large head of cauliflower Bulk - 4 cups black beans - 2 cups Basmati rice - 3 large prunes Spices - black pepper - curry powder (1 tablespoon) - bay leaves - 8 dried chipotle chilis - whole caraway seeds - whole coriander seeds - whole cumin seeds - harissa paste – if not making your own Staples - neutral coconut oil or avocado oil - red wine vinegar - sea salt - tahini - kombu (optional) - balsamic vinegar (optional) Other - corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - 8 sun-dried tomatoes Basic Prep 1) Cook the Black Beans Pot of Black Beans   Print Ingredients 4 cups black beans 2-3 garlic cloves - smashed 2-3 bay leaves 1 sheet of kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions Soak the beans overnight or up to 24 hours in plenty of purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar. Drain and rinse the beans. Place them in a large soup pot with plenty of purified water (about 10 cups). Add the garlic cloves, bay leaves and kombu, if using. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Taste for doneness. If the beans are not completely soft and buttery inside, continue to cook until fully done. Salt at the last 10 minutes. Drain, saving the cooking liquid. Discard the bay leaves and kombu, if using. 3.5.3226   2) Cook the Rice Pot of Basmati Rice   Print Ingredients 2 cups basmati rice Instructions Cook 2 cups of basmati rice according to the instructions on the package (if your rice came in a package). Or cook the rice according the this method, or any other rice cooking method you prefer, like in a rice cooker, etc. You should end up with about 5-6 cups of cooked rice. 3.5.3226   3) Roast the Sweet Potatoes Roasted Sweet Potatoes   Print Ingredients 3 medium sweet potatoes avocado oil or other neutral oil of choice sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Peel and cube two of the sweet potatoes and place them on the trays. Sprinkle with avocado oil, salt and pepper, toss to cover and spread into a single layer. Leave the third sweet potato whole, just scrub it and prick with a fork, and place on one of the baking trays. Roast the sweet potatoes for 20-30 minutes, until the cubed ones are soft and browned in places. Toss at half time. The whole sweet potato will take a little longer to bake. Cook it until its easily pierced with a knife. Store the potatoes in an airtight container in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226   4) Make the Harissa (you can also buy harissa paste) Harissa   Print Adapted from Vibrant Food Serves: about 1 cup Ingredients 8 dried chipotle chilis 8 sun-dried tomatoes 1 tablespoon whole caraway seeds 1 tablespoon whole coriander seeds 1 tablespoon whole cumin seeds 1 large garlic clove - minced ¼ cup olive oil juice from ½ lemon 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon sea salt Instructions Place the chipotle chilis and sun dried tomatoes in a medium bowl and cover with boiling water. Cover the bowl and let soften for about 30 minutes. Toast the caraway, coriander, and cumin seeds in a dry pan over medium heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes, stirring regularly. Grind the seeds using a spice grinder, dedicated coffee grinder, or mortar and pestle. Drain the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes. Remove the seeds and stems from the chilis (wear gloves to protect your hands if sensitive to spice). Place the chilis and sun-dried tomatoes in a food processor, add the toasted and ground spices, garlic, olive oil, lemon juice, vinegar, and salt. Process into a slightly chunky paste. Refrigerate in an air-tight container for up to 1 month. 3.5.3226   Recipes This soup is cozy and incredibly quick to put together once you’ve done all the prep. It gets its rich, earthy flavor from the black bean broth and harissa. Roasted sweet potatoes bring more depth and nourishment to the table, and kale provides a dose of dark leafy green magic. Roasted Sweet Potato and Black Bean Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large carrot - sliced 2-4 celery ribs - sliced thin 3 large prunes - chopped sea salt 3 garlic cloves - minced 3 cups cooked beans (from above) 3 teaspoons harissa or more to taste (from above) 5-6 cups black bean broth (from above) 2 cups packed chopped kale leaves 2 cups roasted sweet potatoes (from above) splash of balsamic vinegar (optional) juice of 1 lime cilantro - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, celery and prunes, and sauté for 8 minutes, until the vegetables are soft. Add salt and garlic, stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans, harissa and black bean broth, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 30 minutes, until all the vegetables are completely cooked. Add the kale, sweet potatoes, splash of balsamic vinegar, if using, and more black bean broth, if needed. Bring back to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for another 10 minutes. Add the lime juice. Taste for salt and spice and adjust if needed. Serve over the prepped rice, garnished with cilantro. This soup freezes very well. 3.5.3226   This huevos rancheros-inspired dish utilizes crimini mushrooms, together with the already prepped black beans, sweet potatoes, and harissa, to make a delicious topping for warm tortillas. Everything comes together in a flash, and it’s a meal that can be easily eaten for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. No-Huevos Rancheros   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped sea salt ½ lb crimini mushrooms - sliced 1½ cups cooked black beans (from above) harissa - to taste (from above) roasted sweet potatoes (from above) corn tortillas or other tortillas of choice - warmed or charred avocado - sliced or cubed shredded red cabbage - for garnish lime - for serving cilantro leaves - for garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a medium pan over medium heat. Add the onion and salt and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add mushrooms and sauté for 8-10 minutes, until all the liquid released by the mushrooms evaporates. Add the beans, harissa, and prepped sweet potatoes (amount to taste), and stir to incorporate and warm everything through. Serve the mushrooms and beans over tortillas, topped avocado, shredded red cabbage, a squeeze of lime, and cilantro. 3.5.3226   This re-imagined rice and beans recipe gets its bright flavor from the addition of curry, which is always great at providing a shortcut to flavor. It’s also full of cruciferous goodness from cauliflower, a little zing from lime, and some serious freshness from the essential topping of cilantro. Curried Cauliflower Rice And Beans   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 2 tablespoons neutral coconut oil or avocado oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 large cauliflower - chopped into small florets sea salt 5 garlic cloves 1 tablespoon curry powder, or more to taste 3 cups cooked black beans (from above) 3 cups cooked basmati rice (from above) juice of 1 lime cilantro - to garnish Instructions Warm the oil in a large saucepan. Add the onion, cauliflower and salt, and sauté for about 15-20 minutes, until the cauliflower is soft. Splash some water in the pan if things begin to stick. Add garlic and curry powder, and stir around for 1 minute. Add the beans and rice, and stir to mix everything together until warmed through. Pour the lime juice over top and stir to incorporate. Serve, garnished with cilantro. 3.5.3226   A flavorful dip is a great thing to have on hand at all times. It saves the day during snacking emergencies, but can also be spread on sandwiches and dolloped into bowls. Homemade dips are usually cheaper, healthier, and more flavorful than store-bought ones, and they’re easy to make. All of that is definitely the case with this black bean dip, which is made with the remaining, prep day black beans and whole baked sweet potato. If you happen to have any chipotle in adobo, those are a great addition to this dip as well. Harissa Black Bean Dip   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients the rest of the cooked black beans (from above, about 4 cups) 1 whole roasted sweet potato (from above) - peeled ¼ cup tahini juice from 1 lemon harissa (from above) - to taste sea salt black bean broth (from above) - for thinning, if needed Instructions Combine the beans, sweet potato, tahini, lemon juice, harissa, and sea salt to taste in a food processor and blend until smooth. Add some black bean broth if necessary to thin the dip out. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve, garnished with more harissa, toasted sesame seeds, and a drizzle of good olive oil. This dip freezes well if you end up with leftovers. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sweet Potato and Kale Salad Winter Root and Fennel Soup with Greens and Caramelized Cauliflower Coconut-Ginger Eggplant Fried Rice Vegetarian Spring Pho with Sweet Potato Noodles and Heirloom Beans .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Meal Plan Mini: Black Beans, Sweet Potatoes, Harissa appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Coconut Curry Noodles and Butternut Squash

October 30 2018 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Coconut Curry Noodles and Butternut SquashButternut squash adds a touch of sweetness to the coconut-curry sauce in this Coconut Curry Noodles recipe from One-Dish Vegan. Mix and match vegetables or make it as spicy as you like--begin with as much or as little cayenne as you like and then garnish with sriracha or sambal oelek for more heat.   Coconut Curry Noodles and Butternut Squash Butternut squash adds a touch of sweetness to the coconut-curry sauce. Mix and match vegetables or make it as spicy as you like--begin with as much or as little cayenne as you like and then garnish with sriracha or sambal oelek for more heat. - 2 teaspoons neutral vegetable oil - 3 shallots (chopped) - 1 tablespoon (8 g) grated fresh ginger - 3 tablespoons (45 ml) wheat-free tamari - 1 tablespoon (6 g) yellow curry powder - 2 teaspoons ground coriander -  1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne, or to taste - 2 teaspoons sugar - Salt and freshly ground black pepper - 2 cups (475 ml) vegetable broth - 1 small butternut squash, peeled and cut into 1/­­2 -inch (1.3 cm) dice (about 3 cups) - 8 ounces (225 g) dried rice noodles - 2 cups (140 g) chopped bok choy or other leafy greens - 1 can (14 ounces, or 395 ml) of unsweetened coconut milk -  1/­­2 cup (8 g) chopped fresh cilantro - 2 scallions, chopped - Lime wedges, to serve - Sriracha or sambal oelek, to serve (optional) - Heat the vegetable oil in a large pot over medium heat. Add the shallot and ginger and cook, stirring, for 1 minute to soften. Stir in the tamari, curry powder, coriander, cayenne, sugar, and salt and pepper to taste. - Stir in the broth and then add the squash. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat to a simmer. Cover and cook for 20 minutes or until the squash is tender. Add the bok choy and simmer for another 10 minutes. - While the vegetables are cooking, soak the rice noodles in a bowl of hot water and set aside. When the noodles are soft, drain them and add them to the vegetables. - Stir in the coconut milk and heat until hot--but do not boil. Taste and adjust the seasonings if needed. - Serve in large bowls and garnish with cilantro and scallions. Serve with lime wedges and sriracha (if using). From One-Dish Vegan by Robin Robertson (C) 2018 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Used with permission. The post Coconut Curry Noodles and Butternut Squash appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Tofu and Vegetable Stew

October 10 2018 VegKitchen 

Tofu and Vegetable Stew My kitchen is a laboratory of vegetarian meals. These days, I’m still experimenting with new ingredients, new meal ideas, and revisiting classic dishes to make vegetarian versions. Last week, I wanted a comforting hot meal, and nothing is better than a good stew to get better! This stew is so consistent and comforting that it has even been gobbled up by my family members who aren’t vegetarian. The taste is amazing, the texture is interesting, and it has great nutritional value. Because of the tofu in the recipe, this stew provides plant-based protein to the body. Tofu is the traditional meat substitute that comes to mind when considering vegetarianism or a meatless diet. Despite its neutral taste and soy composition, the tofu quickly absorbs the flavor of the food with which it is prepared! Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 30 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Ingredients 400 gr firm Tofu 3 Potatoes 3 Carrots 3 celery 1/­­2 cup puree of tomatoes 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 onion 1 clove garlic 1 teaspoon of dry oregano and basil 3 tablespoons of fresh coriander Salt pepper Instructions Over medium eat brown cook the onion and garlic in a little olive oil for 3 […] The post Tofu and Vegetable Stew appeared first on VegKitchen.

Baked Falafel

September 26 2018 VegKitchen 

Baked Falafel One bite of this baked falafel and you will be seduced for sure! Its secrets lie in its “perfume” (using different herbs), and in the use of a good cooking olive oil. These falafels are a very practical treat for a light meal, a weekday dinner, or even a buffet. They immediately became one of my favorites and I think they will become yours too! Preparation time: 15 min Cooking time: 15 to 20 minutes Servings: 4 Ingredients 1 can chickpeas 1/­­4 cup flour the zest of a lemon 1 teaspoon coriander 1 teaspoon parsley 1 teaspoon mint 1 teaspoon tahini salt pepper extra virgin olive oil Preparation Preheat oven to 375 ° F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Place the chickpeas in the blender bowl with the herbs and start blending. Then add lemon zest, tahini, salt, pepper, and flour. Continue mixing until you have a fairly homogeneous dough. Pour everything onto a plate or into a salad bowl and use wet hands to make patties. Lay them on the baking sheet as you go. Season with salt, drizzle with olive oil and bake for 15 to 20 minutes until it forms a crust and the falafels are slightly […] The post Baked Falafel appeared first on VegKitchen.

Chana with Sweet Potatoes

September 24 2018 Meatless Monday 

One of Indias most popular dishes -- Chana Masala -- features chickpeas simmered with tomatoes. This recipe features sweet potatoes and greens to make the dish even more interesting and satisfying. This recipe comes to us from Oldways. Serves 4   - 1/­­2 large onion, chopped as you like - 1 tablespoon vegetable oil of your choice - 1 teaspoon cumin - 1/­­2 teaspoon cinnamon - 1/­­2 teaspoon turmeric - 1/­­2 teaspoon coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cloves - 1/­­4 teaspoon red pepper flakes - 1-2 cloves garlic, minced - 1 tablespoon freshly grated ginger - 1 (15 oz) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed - 1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes - 2 small or 1 large sweet potato, cut in chunks - 1/­­2 (15 oz) can light coconut milk or 1/­­4 can of regular coconut milk - 1 cup chopped spinach or other greens   Heat the oil in a large skillet, and cook the onion 4-5 minutes until soft and slightly golden. Add the dry spices. Amounts dont need to be exact; start with these amounts, and adjust to your taste later. Add the garlic and ginger then continue cooking gently for ten minutes to allow the flavors of all the spices to marry with the onions. Now add the tomatoes, chickpeas, sweet potatoes (cut large or small, depending on how you like them) and coconut milk. Bring to a boil, cover, and simmer on low for 45 minutes. The potatoes will soften sooner than that, but keep cooking to develop the flavors. Just before youre ready to serve, add the chopped greens and cook for a few minutes until the greens are wilted. Add salt to taste, and serve with brown rice or some other grain, or with some whole wheat naan. Active time: 1 hour The post Chana with Sweet Potatoes appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegetarian Chili with Corn and Soy Beans

September 15 2018 VegKitchen 

Vegetarian Chili with Corn and Soy Beans Here is a tasty recipe for a small budget. This is where the chili comes in--this great classic, a thousand times reinvented. This is a really simple version that is prepared in a single saucepan in an hour! If you want to spoil yourself a little bit more, serve it with a vegetable sour cream, avocado, fresh tomato cubes, and organic corn chips. But its honestly so tasty that you can eat it plain! You can also serve it as a garnish on fries, on nachos, on a baked potato, on a veggie dog, or even in a sloppy joe! The possibilities are endless when you have a creative imagination. Preparation: 5 minutes Cooking: 1 hour Total: 1 hour 5 minutes Servings: 4   Ingredients  1 tablespoon olive oil 1 large chopped onion 3 chopped garlic cloves 1 can (28 oz) drained diced tomatoes 1 can (28 oz) crushed tomatoes 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 to 2 tablespoons chili spices 1 tablespoon ground cumin 1 tablespoon ground coriander 1 tablespoon sugar 3/­­4 cup frozen corn kernels 3/­­4 cup canned red kidney beans, rinsed and drained 3/­­4 cup thawed frozen soy beans (edamame)   Preparation In a saucepan, heat the oil to medium […] The post Vegetarian Chili with Corn and Soy Beans appeared first on VegKitchen.

Lal Mirch Ka Achar (Red Chili Pickle)

September 2 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Lal Mirch Ka Achar (Red Chili Pickle) (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Lal Mirch Ka Achar, Red Chili Pickle Red Chili Pickle is a delightful way to spice up any meal. Indian meals are generally served with a variety of condiments, of which pickles are the most common. This one is a rather hot and spicy pickle, not for the timid palette by any means. - 10 whole red chili (jalapeno or cayenne) - 3 Tbsp coriander (dhania) - 1-1/­­2 Tbsp fennel seeds (saunf) - 1 tsp fenugreek seed (dana methi) - 1 tsp yellow mustard seeds (peele sarso) - 1 tsp nigella seeds (kalongi) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1 Tbsp salt - 3 Tbsp oil, I prefer mustard oil (can use olive oil) -  Wash and dry the chilies and cut the chilies in 1/­­8-inch pieces. - Combine coriander, fennel, fenugreek seeds, mustard seeds, and nigella seeds roast them over low heat for 1-2 minutes till spices becomes aromatic. Grind coarsely. - Heat the oil on medium heat, after oil is very turn off the heat and let it come to the room temperature. Set aside. - Mix the roasted spices, salt, mango powder, and turmeric to the red chilies, and mix it well. Pour oil over the mixture and mix well. - Keep the pickle in a glass jar. Let the jar sit two days at room temperature or few hours in direct sunlight. Pickle is ready to serve.  Chili Pickle will be good for a week at room temperature or keep in the refrigerator up to one month. Suggestion For a milder pickle, remove the pepper seeds, or sometimes chilies are not hot then add some red chili powder. The post Lal Mirch Ka Achar (Red Chili Pickle) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Aloo ki Kachori

August 12 2018 Manjula's kitchen 

Aloo ki Kachori (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Aloo Ki Kachori (Kachori With Potato Stuffing) Aloo Ki kachori is a delicious, spicy, fried puff bread. Aloo Ki kachori can be part of the main meal or it can even be served for breakfast with a hot cup of chai. This kachori also makes a mouthwatering appetizer that can be served with Green Chutney as chaat. For Dough - 1 cup all-purpose flour (maida, plain flour) - 2 Tbsp sooji (samolina) - 1/­­4 tsp salt - 2 Tbsp oil (canola, vegetable) - 3 drops lemon juice - 1/­­3 cup chilled water (approximately ) For Filling - 1 cup boiled peeled potatoes (roughly mashed) - 1 Tbsp oil (canola, vegetable) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 Tbsp green chili finely chopped - 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro (hara dhania) To Make Dough -  Mix the flour, sooji, salt, lemon drops and oil. note lemon should be just 3-4 drops, we are not adding to flavor, lemon is added to give the crispness. - Add the chilled water slowly, mixing with your fingers as you pour. - Do not knead the dough. The dough should be soft. - Cover the dough and let it sit for at least fifteen minutes. Make Filling -  Heat the oil in a frying pan on medium high heat. Test the heat by adding one cumin seed to the oil; if it cracks right away oil is ready. - Add cumin seeds as cumin seeds crack, add all the ingredients, potatoes, red pepper, green chilies, cilantro, and coriander powder, mix it well while stirring the mix keep pressing. - Filling should be not very dry, this should take about 5 minutes. - Stir in garam masala and amchur. Add more salt or amchur according to taste. - Let the filling cool to room temperature, mix it well this should have texture of firm dough. To make Kachoris -  Take the dough and knead it for a minute. Divide the dough in twelve equal parts. - Mash the dough lightly and divide in 12 parts filling should be about same size as dough. - Take one part of the dough and with your fingers flatten the edges and make into 3-inch circle. Leaving center little thicker then edges. - Mold the dough into a cup and place filling in the center. Pull the edges of the dough to wrap the dal filling. Proceed to make all 12 balls. - Let the filled ball sit for three to four minutes before rolling. It helps spreading the filling evenly. - Set the kachoris on a surface with the seams facing up. Using the base of your palm, slowly flatten them into about three inches in diameter, or use the rolling pin roll the kachori with light hand. - Heat the oil in frying pan over medium heat frying pan should have about one inch of oil. To check if oil is ready put a little piece of dough in the oil. Dough should sizzle and come up very slow without changing the color. - Fry them on medium-low heat. After they start to puff, slowly turn them over. Fry until golden-brown on both sides. If the kachoris are fried on high heat, they will get soft and will not be crispy. Serve the kachories with cilantro chutney or tamarind chutney. The post Aloo ki Kachori appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset

January 16 2018 My New Roots 

Kichadi: The Realistic Reset Happy 2018 dear friends! I hope that you all had a restful and relaxing holiday, and that youre ready to take on the new year. As most of you know, the past few months have been all-over-the-place (literally) for my family and I, so Ive been giving myself plenty of freedom when it comes to what Im eating and how often Im exercising. With my regular routines out the window, Ive felt an immense sense of liberation - its great to let go once in a while! - but now its gotten to the point where my body is really craving some stability and grounding, especially after the holidays. Sometimes I like to go drastic and embark on a 10-day juice fast or something like it, but my body and my mind arent feeling a hard-core anything at the moment, so Im turning to kichadi to gently ease my way back into eating with more balance. Kichadi, sometimes called and spelled khichdi, kitchari, kitcheree or khichri, is the famous one-pot wonder Indian dish that combines rice and lentils or quick-cooking pulses or legumes, such as mung beans. Its best known in Ayurvedic tradition as a cleansing and complete protein meal, very easy to digest, and a cinch to make! It is delicious, super comfort food, and even if youre not down with eating the exact same thing for every meal for several days in a row, youll be thrilled to learn its also the perfect thing to tuck into on a cold winter night. Because of its simplicity and ease, many people find that doing a kichadi “mono-diet” is very pleasant and far less of an ordeal than a juice fast for example (although I need to be clear that a juice fast is far deeper and more effective). Taking three to seven days to eat this dish exclusively gives the digestive organs a serious break since kichadi is very easy to break down and assimilate. And because digestion is at the core of human health, putting a practice in place that supports this essential process makes room for the miracle of self-healing: something the body is constantly striving for, but often distracted from by poor dietary and lifestyle choices. When we forgo processed foods, alcohol, caffeine, and common allergens for a few days, we give our bodies the space it needs to do what it naturally does anyway: clean itself up! I like to eat a kichadi diet in the colder months when the weather is unfriendly and I need some reassuring, grounding, warm food - and juicing sounds about as fun as a hole in the head. Its also a wonderful way to glide yourself into the process of cleansing if youve never tried it before. Since it doesnt involve abstaining from food, most first-timers find it totally do-able, and dare I say it, enjoyable! Ive just completed three days of eating kichadi for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and Im feeling sooo much more balanced, clear-headed, and energized - the ways I would like to feel at the beginning of a brand new year! I hope that this simple and realistic reset is up your alley, and that you give it a go. First things first, youre going to need to do a bit of planning for the kichadi diet. Set a realistic goal for yourself - ideally youll be eating this dish for at least three days, up to seven, but if one is all you can handle, that is okay too. Since youre eating throughout this practice, going about your regular life is usually fine, but if you want to go the extra mile and give yourself a real treat, do the kichadi diet over a long weekend or break from work so that you can focus on some other cleanse-enriching experiences, such as a massage, a sauna visit, daytime napping, reading an actual book, and maybe even going offline completely. Gasp! I started my kichadi diet on a Monday and carried out my normal routine with work and family life, and just made sure to give myself lots of juicy personal time in the evenings (essential oil bath, yin yoga sesh, early lights out etc.). Aside from a cleanse-classic mood swing on the last day, no one around me even noticed what I was doing. Since they were too busy eating pizza.    Before you begin youll want to start by cutting back on alcohol, caffeine, sugar, meat, dairy, processed foods, and anything else you know is throwing you off balance. If you abstain from these things for at least a couple of days before you begin, your experience will be much smoother, as you won’t be distracted by gnarly withdrawal symptoms while you’re trying to chill. You can also add any bad habits you have to your hit list, and reduce or eliminate the daily practices that arent making your life extra groovy. Whatever day you are starting the kichadi on, soak the rice and pulses /­­ legumes together the night before. This step is important for improving the digestive qualities of kichadi, but if you are really pressed for time or you forgot, get them in water as soon as you can. Remember that even soaking for an hour is better than nothing! Cook the kichadi daily if possible, since the fresher the food is, the more energy, or prana it contains. My recipe makes about six servings for my appetite (eight for people who eat less) and I can easily stretch one batch over two days if no one else in my family wants it. Regardless, youll have to make at least two batches if youre going for three days, and I would not recommend keeping kichadi around for longer than that. Freezing is an option, but freeze it in the portion size youd want to eat so that youre not heating more than you need at one sitting.        Daily routine The night before: soak the rice and pulses together in plenty of filtered water overnight. Morning: upon rising, drink a large glass of warm water with freshly squeezed lemon juice, followed by another glass of pure water. Make your first batch of kichadi, and enjoy it for breakfast. Store leftovers in the fridge. Midday: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for lunch. Evening: Drink a couple large glasses of water at least 30 minutes before eating. Heat your desired amount of kichadi and enjoy it for dinner. Night time: Drink a cup of herbal detox tea if desired, enjoy something that nourishes you (bath, meditation, stretching) and go to bed early. Repeat for three to seven days. Kichadi Reset tips 1. Eat when youre hungry. This may seem like an obvious one, but many people eat according to the clock, instead of listening to their bodies. Take these days to really tune in and see when your body actually desires food, and how much you need to eat to feel satisfied. When you feel real hunger, your body is giving you the signal that it is actually ready to receive. 2. Cook mindfully. Remember that cooking is something to be grateful for. If you normally approach cooking from a lets get this over with standpoint, use this opportunity to make your meal prep a ceremony, and see it as a gift to yourself. Take your time washing and cutting vegetables, delight in the sound of the spices popping, the scent that wafts up while youre peeling ginger. The attention and intention you put into your food will come back to you, and nourish you in ways that you never thought possible. 3. Keep things interesting, by adding a squeeze of lime instead of lemon to your kichadi. You can use parsley instead of cilantro, and adjust the spices to suit your personal taste. If you really need some variety, top the kichadi with some of your favourite sprouts, grated raw carrot, or fold in some spinach while its still hot. 4. Cravings are normal, especially when youre knowingly depriving yourself! If you feel a craving coming on, first identify what the craving is. Be curious...maybe it has nothing to do with the food, but more your emotional or mental state. If you really cant shake the feeling, drink water first, then try a piece of fruit, or some raw veggie sticks. 5. Drink a lot of water. The body functions optimally when properly hydrated. It is especially important when were resetting, since were letting go of things that need to be flushed out. Water is essential to this process, but it will also prevent cravings, combat fatigue and brain fog, and keep the bowels moving. Remember to drink water away from mealtimes for optimal digestion (30 minutes before eating, 2-3 hours after unless youre very thirsty). Other beverages, even if they are mostly water like coffee and tea, are not water. Only water is water. After the Kichadi diet Although it is extremely tempting to celebrate and indulge after denying oneself certain things, this is not the best time to do so. Even though this process keeps your digestive system humming along, your body is still in a sensitive place. Introduce new foods slowly, and keep combinations small and uncomplicated (i.e. dont have a meal with 20 different foods together). Limit meat, dairy, sugar, and processed foods for as long as possible. That congratulatory slice of cake should wait until youre pretty much back to normal, or maybe even find an alternative ; )     Print recipe     Simple and Cleansing Kichadi Serves 6-8 Ingredients: 1 Tbsp. coconut oil or ghee 1/­­2 Tbsp. cumin seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. mustard seeds 1/­­2 Tbsp. coriander seeds 1/­­2 tsp. ground turmeric 1 cinnamon stick 1-2 Tbsp. minced ginger (to taste) 1 large tomato, chopped (optional) 2 medium yellow onion, diced 2 medium carrots, chopped 1 small /­­ 250g sweet potato (or other seasonal root veggie), chopped 1 cup /­­ 200g brown rice 1/­­2 cup /­­ 110g mung beans or brown lentils 1 tsp. fine grain sea salt 1 cup /­­ 140g green peas, frozen or fresh 4 cups /­­ 1L water (or more, as needed) a couple handfuls finely chopped cilantro lemon to garnish Directions: 1. If possible, soak the rice and pulses together overnight, or for 8-12 hours. Drain and rinse very well. 2. Melt the oil in a large stockpot. Add the cumin and mustard seed and fry just until the mustard seeds start to pop. Add the remaining spices, stir and then add the tomato and ginger (if youre opting out of the tomato, simply use a few splashes of water). Fry for a couple minutes until fragrant. 3. Add the onion, carrots, sweet potato, brown rice, mung beans, salt, and water. Bring to a boil, reduce to simmer and cook for about 45 minutes, until the rice and beans are soft. About five minutes before serving, add the peas whether fresh or frozen, and cook until they are warm. Add more water for a stew-y consistency, or if the pot becomes dry while cooking. 4. Serve kichadi hot, garnished with cilantro and a squeeze of fresh lemon juice. Give thanks and enjoy. I hope that many of you try the kichadi diet out, and rejoice in the fact that there is no need to do something radical and overly deprivational during the winter. This is a time for closing in, for being quiet and gentle, and nourishing oneself in a tender way. And remember, you can enjoy this delicious kichadi even for a day, and any season of the year when you need to find your equilibrium once again. Its a tasty way to come back to center, every time, anytime. In health, vibrancy, and abundance for the year ahead, Sarah B. Show me your kichadi on Instagram: #mnrkichadi The post Kichadi: The Realistic Reset appeared first on My New Roots.

One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust

December 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Since this is our last recipe of 2017, we wanted to make sure that it’s a special one. It needed to check all the boxes we usually try to check with our recipes: nourishing, delicious, seasonal, beautiful, convenient, and a little bit unexpected. This veggie and lentil-centered one pan pie is all of those things. It’s very cozy and fun to prepare, too. If I had a choice, most of my savory dishes would be one-pan dishes :) Convenience is hard to beat. That little bit of initial effort you put into assembling all the ingredients for a single-pan dish pays off incredibly well when you end up with a big meal, plus a ton of leftovers for the week, having only used one pan or pot in the process. This one-pan dish is something like a vegetable pot pie, but the crust is made up of thinly mandolined winter roots – potatoes, sweet potatoes, and celery root. The filling is shredded Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and red lentils (you can add barley, too, for a grain component) that cooks in a mixture of healing spices and coconut milk. The whole thing is packed with a great variety of plants. It’s perfect for those looking to up their intake of vegetables after the holidays, but still wanting to keep their cooking hearty and cozy. The ingredient that takes this dish into the complete meal category are the red lentils. Vegetable dishes are great on their own, but adding any kind of pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas, dry peas) to your plant-centric meals will up their nutrition and ability to satisfy quite a bit. Pulses are incredibly nutrient-dense, like superfoods, but they are also very affordable, unlike most other superfoods, so it’s a win-win all around. Try adding about a half a cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – your cooking will greatly benefit from them, and you’ll be on your way to discovering a whole new world of deliciousness (of you haven’t already, of course). Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Happy New Year! Thank you so much for visiting GK, trying out our recipes, and reading up on the self-care series. It all means so much to us .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup

December 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Here’s a simple, nourishing soup that will help ground you through any holiday craziness or, really, any kind of stress you might be experiencing. Pureed soups offer such an easy way to get lots of veggies into your diet, and the possibilities for pureed soup recipes are endless. Think of them as warm, savory smoothies, and you’ll see that almost anything goes. I love a smooth soup, but sometimes I crave a little more texture within that creamy format. Enter this Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale soup, which has it all in terms of texture: a smooth and silky base, with satisfying chunks of chickpeas and kale throughout. Root vegetables are the perfect thing to be eating right now, when our bodies require more high-quality fuel to keep warm. They gather all their energy underground, where they grow to become nutrient and calorie-dense. Roots are grounding in the most literal sense. Parsnips, carrots, sweet potatoes, celeriac, beets, rutabaga, and any other root veggies you can think of, will make for a great addition to your winter meals. This soup highlights parsnips, the roots that look like albino carrots and have the loveliest sweet and earthy flavor. They are pureed together with warming spices like turmeric and coriander, as well as home-cooked chickpeas, which make this soup even more hearty, and satisfying enough to be eaten as a light lunch. Whole chickpeas and ribboned kale are then warmed in the pureed mixture, to make for the perfect balance of creamy and chunky. Have you tried adding half a cup of pulses, like the chickpeas in this soup (along with beans, lentils and dry peas) to your meals throughout the week yet? We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: they are the perfect, nutrient-dense and affordable building blocks for healthy, hearty and sustainable meals. Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a pinch of acv 2 bay leaves (optional) 2-inch piece of kombu seaweed (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 onion - chopped 1 tsp fennel seeds 1 tsp ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground turmeric pinch of red pepper flakes 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 lb parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped black pepper - to taste 5 cups chickpea broth + more if needed (recipe below) 1 bunch kale - finely chopped zaatar, herbs/­­sprouts and nuts/­­seeds - for serving Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Combine them with 8 cups of purified water, bay leaves and kombu, if using, in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook, partially covered for about 30 minutes, or until the chickpeas are completely cooked. Add salt at the end. Discard the bay leaves and kobmu, then strain, reserving the chickpea broth. Warm the coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, fennel, coriander, turmeric, red pepper flakes, and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the parsnips, 1 cup of the cooked chickpeas, more salt and black pepper, and 5 cups of the chickpea broth to the same pot. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook, partially covered, for about 15 minutes, or until the parsnips are completely cooked and soft throughout. Puree all the contents of the pot in batches in an upright blender. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Return the pureed mixture to the same pot. Add the kale to the pot and stir it in. If the soup is too thick at this point, add a little more of the reserved chickpea broth to achieve the desired soup consistency. Bring the soup to a gentle boil once more, and simmer, stirring often, for 10 minutes. Add the remaining cooked chickpeas and stir to warm them through. Serve the soup warm, sprinkled with zaatar and any herbs/­­sprouts or nuts/­­seeds of choice. 3.5.3226 You might also like... No-Recipe Healing Soup Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.


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