coriander - vegetarian recipes

Try it! You will enjoy it!










coriander vegetarian recipes

dahi chutney recipe | dahi ki chatni | curd mint chutney | yoghurt mint dip

January 8 2018 hebbar's kitchen 

dahi chutney recipe | dahi ki chatni | curd mint chutney | yoghurt mint dipdahi chutney recipe | dahi ki chatni | curd mint chutney | yogurt mint dip with detailed photo and video recipe. a spiced and flavored yogurt dip made with strained yoghurt, mint and coriander leaves. it is a popular in both south india and north india and is mainly served as a side dish to hyderabadi biryani or as a dip to tandoor or tikka recipes. the recipe has resemblance to green chutney or mint chutney. Continue reading dahi chutney recipe | dahi ki chatni | curd mint chutney | yoghurt mint dip at Hebbar's Kitchen.

One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust

December 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Since this is our last recipe of 2017, we wanted to make sure that it’s a special one. It needed to check all the boxes we usually try to check with our recipes: nourishing, delicious, seasonal, beautiful, convenient, and a little bit unexpected. This veggie and lentil-centered one pan pie is all of those things. It’s very cozy and fun to prepare, too. If I had a choice, most of my savory dishes would be one-pan dishes :) Convenience is hard to beat. That little bit of initial effort you put into assembling all the ingredients for a single-pan dish pays off incredibly well when you end up with a big meal, plus a ton of leftovers for the week, having only used one pan or pot in the process. This one-pan dish is something like a vegetable pot pie, but the crust is made up of thinly mandolined winter roots – potatoes, sweet potatoes, and celery root. The filling is shredded Brussels sprouts, mushrooms, and red lentils (you can add barley, too, for a grain component) that cooks in a mixture of healing spices and coconut milk. The whole thing is packed with a great variety of plants. It’s perfect for those looking to up their intake of vegetables after the holidays, but still wanting to keep their cooking hearty and cozy. The ingredient that takes this dish into the complete meal category are the red lentils. Vegetable dishes are great on their own, but adding any kind of pulses (lentils, beans, chickpeas, dry peas) to your plant-centric meals will up their nutrition and ability to satisfy quite a bit. Pulses are incredibly nutrient-dense, like superfoods, but they are also very affordable, unlike most other superfoods, so it’s a win-win all around. Try adding about a half a cup of pulses to your meals a few times a week – your cooking will greatly benefit from them, and you’ll be on your way to discovering a whole new world of deliciousness (of you haven’t already, of course). Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Happy New Year! Thank you so much for visiting GK, trying out our recipes, and reading up on the self-care series. It all means so much to us .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post One Pan Brussels Sprout and Red Lentil Pie with a Root Vegetable Crust appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Big Batch Golden Milk

December 18 2017 My New Roots 

Big Batch Golden Milk So we moved. Across the ocean. Its been a wild ride so far with plenty of excitement and relief coupled with awkward transitioning, and astronomical culture shock (small town Ontario is preeeeeetty different from Copenhagen). Were also renovating a very old home by Canadian standards, and the hidden surprises lurking under every lifted floorboard are creating a project slightly larger and lengthier than predicted. But wouldnt it all be so boring and predictable without those fun discoveries?! Right! Who needs a kitchen anyway? Oh wait. Amongst the self-inflicted chaotic state of affairs, Ive actually found some peace in the simple living weve got going on. Since we dont really have any friends in our little village yet, theres been plenty of time to actually take care of myself and our family. Afternoons are spent building toy train sets, cooking big batch meals, and making snacks for the days ahead. Ive started taking aerial yoga and NIA, going for nature walks every day, and having candlelit baths on the regular. Funny what removing ones social life will make room for! An important part of my self-care routine these past weeks is my simple ritual of making golden milk. Warm, comforting, and satisfying, this drink has everything needed to combat winter blues and movers remorse (I kid, I kid). Usually I make golden milk on the fly, one cup at a time, but recently I realized how handy it would be to just make a huge batch and have it ready to spoon into some hot milk when the mood strikes. Genius. For those of you that arent yet familiar with this wonder drink, Im excited for the vibrant, spicy world that is about to open up to you. Golden milk, or haldi ka doodh, actually dates back thousands of years in Ayurvedic tradition where it has been used to aid digestion and respiration, prevent colds and flu, decongest the liver, ease sprained muscles and joint pain, purify the blood, clear the skin, and aid sleep. The main ingredient in golden milk responsible for all of this awesomeness is the curcumin in turmeric, a compound that is responsible for its vibrant hue. Curcumin has been widely studied for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties, but it is also supports detoxification, helps balance blood sugar, and lowers the overall risk of cancer. How do we get the most out of this powerful phytonutrient? Simply by combining it with black pepper and fat - two important ingredients in golden milk! A compound in black pepper called piperine actually helps the body absorb curcumin, and shows to increase the bioavailability of it by up to 2,000 percent. And the good news is, you only need a very small amount to reap the synergistic benefits. Then melt a little coconut oil in, and the curcumin can be directly absorbed into the bloodstream through the lymphatic system. That’s a cooperative one-two punch of absorption and deliciousness. Once mixed, your Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend will last for up to six months. Keep it in a cool, dry place out of direct light - a closed cupboard is perfect. Do not store it right next to the stove or on top of the fridge, where the warm environment will speed spoilage. We wanna keep our medicine fresh! The Big Batch Golden Milk recipe below makes about 120 servings, so there is plenty to divvy out to your most beloved, and even save some for yourself. Make sure to include the directions so that your lucky recipients can make golden milk themselves. Ive divided them below so that you can print out just the single serving instructions for your friends and family. I’ve also included a recipe if you want to sample just one cup for yourself before committing to an entire jar. My version of golden milk has a few more spices than some blends that Ive tried, but this unique combination just tastes that much better. If youre on a tight budget, or you simply cannot find some of the spices listed, leave them out. The main ingredients you need are the turmeric, ginger, cinnamon and black pepper. The others are there for added health benefits and of course flavour, but the recipe will still be delicious without them. The milk for this recipe is totally flexible. Coconut is classic, but almond, cashew, or hemp are tasty options. You can also do half milk, half water if you like. It will be less creamy, but its great if youre trying to make your milk stretch a little farther! The most important thing to remember when making golden milk is to not overheat the spices, as they will become bitter-tasting and therefore not all that enjoyable. If you choose to use milk in your recipe, warm it gently on the stove, then remove from heat and gently whisk in the golden milk spice blend. If youre going with water, do NOT pour boiling water over the spice blend, but instead pour the recently-boiled water into a cup, let it cool for 30 seconds or so, then whisk in the golden milk spice blend. I also advise you not to add the honey or coconut oil until the spices have been stirred into the liquid youre using, as theyll incorporate easier if the spices have dissolved. If you want to use a vegan sweetener, maple syrup is my favourite choice, but brown rice syrup, coconut palm sugar, and stevia are also good options. I also love adding a sprinkling of vanilla powder right at the end for some extra va-va-voom. I recommend enjoying your golden milk first thing in the morning (right after your lemon water, of course!), or right before bed. If its a particularly cold day outside, this intelligent spice combo will warm your cells up from the inside out. Or, if youre looking for a luxurious way to unwind down after a long day, I find that golden milk is also a very effective sleep tonic. Whatever the time you choose to enjoy this drink, you will absolutely love its warm, and satisfying vibes. Make it a ritual yourself: spoon lovingly, stir consciously and sip gratefully. One more thing I should mention, is that the Big Batch Golden Milk spice blend is not only delicious as a drink, but that it can also be incorporated into a number of your favourite recipes. Toss a teaspoon into a smoothie, stir some into your morning porridge or pancake batter, fold it into a basic cookie dough or cake batter, and even try it in curries, soups and stews. The flavour is warming and pungent, so use it anywhere youd like a burst of sunshiny spice that is as good as gold.     Print recipe     Big Batch Golden Milk Spice Blend Makes approx. 120 servings Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cup /­­ 200g ground turmeric 2/­­3 cup /­­ 70g ground ginger 1/­­3 cup /­­ 35g ground cinnamon 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground black pepper 2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cardamom scant 3 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground cloves 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 20g ground nutmeg 3 Tbsp. 20g ground star anise 1/­­4 cup 20g ground coriander Directions: 1. Combine all spices in a large bowl. Stir well, then transfer to a large jar or several smaller ones, and seal with an airtight lid. Keeps for up to 6 months.     Print recipe     Golden Milk Ingredients: 1/­­2 Tbsp. golden milk spice blend 1 cup milk of your choice (coconut milk is classic, but I also like cashew milk or hemp milk) 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. virgin coconut oil 1/­­2 – 1 tsp. sweetener of choice (I like raw honey) Directions: 1. In a small saucepan over medium heat, warm milk until just before it simmers. Whisk in golden milk spice blend until smooth. Remove from heat and stir in coconut oil and sweetener, if desired. Enjoy!     Print recipe     If you want to make just one batch of my golden milk, heres the single-serve recipe. Single-serving Golden Milk Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 tsp. turmeric 1/­­2 tsp. ginger 1/­­4 tsp. cinnamon pinch black pepper pinch cardamom pinch cloves pinch nutmeg pinch star anise pinch coriander I wish you all a super sweet holiday with tons of delicious food shared amongst family and friends, and that your 2018 is bursting with health and happiness. Much love to all out there, from my chilly, but cozy, little corner of the world to yours. xo, Sarah B *   *   *   *   *   * In wrapping up 2017, I cannot help but look on the Wild Heart High Spirit retreats with deep gratitude and pure joy. I had a strong vision for the endeavor from the beginning: gather women in a beautiful and serene space, teach them how to reconnect to their bodies through food and movement. But I never imagined just how deep these lessons would go, how profound the changes would be, and how much fun we would have! After three this year, I can confidently say these experiences are incredibly special, and I feel very lucky to work with such a talented partner to create them. Thank you to all of the women who have traveled from all corners of the earth to join us. We love you! Here are some highlights from our trips to Bali, Ibiza, and Portugal. Click on the images below to see photos from each of our magical locations. .       We also have some very special community partners who have generously made our experiences even more abundant! Big thanks to: Naturgligolie Coconut Bowls Jukserei Pachamama Raw Bite Four Sigmatic Gourmet Print Shop We are now weaving plans for future retreats. If you are interested in learning more or joining us one day, please sign up to our mailing list to be kept up to date. We hope to see you one day soon! The post Big Batch Golden Milk appeared first on My New Roots.

Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup

December 13 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup This post was created in partnership with USA Pulses and Pulse Canada. Here’s a simple, nourishing soup that will help ground you through any holiday craziness or, really, any kind of stress you might be experiencing. Pureed soups offer such an easy way to get lots of veggies into your diet, and the possibilities for pureed soup recipes are endless. Think of them as warm, savory smoothies, and you’ll see that almost anything goes. I love a smooth soup, but sometimes I crave a little more texture within that creamy format. Enter this Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale soup, which has it all in terms of texture: a smooth and silky base, with satisfying chunks of chickpeas and kale throughout. Root vegetables are the perfect thing to be eating right now, when our bodies require more high-quality fuel to keep warm. They gather all their energy underground, where they grow to become nutrient and calorie-dense. Roots are grounding in the most literal sense. Parsnips, carrots, sweet potatoes, celeriac, beets, rutabaga, and any other root veggies you can think of, will make for a great addition to your winter meals. This soup highlights parsnips, the roots that look like albino carrots and have the loveliest sweet and earthy flavor. They are pureed together with warming spices like turmeric and coriander, as well as home-cooked chickpeas, which make this soup even more hearty, and satisfying enough to be eaten as a light lunch. Whole chickpeas and ribboned kale are then warmed in the pureed mixture, to make for the perfect balance of creamy and chunky. Have you tried adding half a cup of pulses, like the chickpeas in this soup (along with beans, lentils and dry peas) to your meals throughout the week yet? We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: they are the perfect, nutrient-dense and affordable building blocks for healthy, hearty and sustainable meals. Head here for more of our recipes using pulses, and be sure to check out Half Cup Habit. Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup   Print Serves: 6-8 Ingredients 1 cup dried chickpeas - soaked overnight in purified water with a pinch of acv 2 bay leaves (optional) 2-inch piece of kombu seaweed (optional) sea salt 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 onion - chopped 1 tsp fennel seeds 1 tsp ground coriander 1 teaspoon ground turmeric pinch of red pepper flakes 3 garlic cloves - sliced 1 lb parsnips - peeled and roughly chopped black pepper - to taste 5 cups chickpea broth + more if needed (recipe below) 1 bunch kale - finely chopped zaatar, herbs/­­sprouts and nuts/­­seeds - for serving Instructions Drain and rinse the chickpeas. Combine them with 8 cups of purified water, bay leaves and kombu, if using, in a medium pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook, partially covered for about 30 minutes, or until the chickpeas are completely cooked. Add salt at the end. Discard the bay leaves and kobmu, then strain, reserving the chickpea broth. Warm the coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the onion, fennel, coriander, turmeric, red pepper flakes, and a pinch of salt, and sauté for 7 minutes, until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 more minute, until fragrant. Add the parsnips, 1 cup of the cooked chickpeas, more salt and black pepper, and 5 cups of the chickpea broth to the same pot. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook, partially covered, for about 15 minutes, or until the parsnips are completely cooked and soft throughout. Puree all the contents of the pot in batches in an upright blender. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Return the pureed mixture to the same pot. Add the kale to the pot and stir it in. If the soup is too thick at this point, add a little more of the reserved chickpea broth to achieve the desired soup consistency. Bring the soup to a gentle boil once more, and simmer, stirring often, for 10 minutes. Add the remaining cooked chickpeas and stir to warm them through. Serve the soup warm, sprinkled with zaatar and any herbs/­­sprouts or nuts/­­seeds of choice. 3.5.3226 You might also like... No-Recipe Healing Soup Sweet and Savory Energy Bites, What to Do with Leftover Nut Milk Pulp Spring Vegetables with Smoky Chickpea Croutons and Avocado Aioli Parsnip Cake with Candied Kumquats .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Bright & Grounding Chickpea, Parsnip and Kale Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Spicy Potato Curry

November 23 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Spicy Potato Curry Spicy Potato Curry is a flavorful side dish. This curry can be served with Roti, Paratha, Puri any way you serve, this taste delicious. - 2 Cup potatoes (boiled and roughly mashed) - 2 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable) - 1 tsp ginger paste - 1 Tbsp coarsely ground coriander (dhania) - 2 tsp coarsely ground fennel seeds (saunf) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1-1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 1 Tbsp ginger (thinly sliced) - 1 Tbsp green chili (thinly sliced into rounds) - Heat the oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add ginger paste, coriander, fennel seeds, and red chili powder, stir for about 1 minute - Add potatoes and salt mix with spices, lower the heat to low medium, let it cook for about 3 minutes stirring occasionally. - Add about 1-1/­­2 cups of water and mango powder stir and change the heat to medium high. As potatoes come to boil cover the pan and lower the heat to medium low and let it cook for about 4-5 minutes. - Adjust the water in gravy to your liking; gravy will thicken as it will cool. - Turn off the heat and add sliced ginger and green chilies and cover the pan. Serving Suggestions Serve Spicy Potato Curry with Samosa instead of chutney and let your guest says wow! I like to serve this over papdi, mathries, crackers, for that I like to keep gravy thick. The post Spicy Potato Curry appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Chipotle Corn Chowder

October 24 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Chipotle Corn ChowderThis sweet, satisfying Chipotle Corn Chowder is made with frozen whole kernel corn. The garnish of pimientos and parsley adds a dash of color. Chipotle Corn Chowder - 1 tablespoon safflower oil - 1 medium onion, minced or shredded - 1 carrot, finely chopped or shredded - 1 russet potato, finely chopped or shredded - 1/­­4 teaspoon celery salt - 2 cups vegetable broth - 1 16-ounce bag frozen corn kernels - Salt and ground black pepper - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground coriander - 1/­­2 teaspoon liquid smoke - 2 cups plain unsweetened almond milk - 1/­­2 cup raw cashew pieces, soaked for 3 hours, then drained - 1 chipotle chile in adobo sauce - 2 tablespoons minced fresh parsley - 1 2-ounce jar chopped pimientos, drained - Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, and potato. Cover and cook for 4 minutes to soften. Stir in the celery salt, broth, corn, and salt and pepper to taste. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer, stir in the coriander, liquid smoke, and almond milk, and cook, stirring frequently, for 5 minutes. - While the soup is simmering, combine the drained cashews and chipotle in a blender with 1 cup of the simmering broth from the soup. Blend until smooth and creamy, then add 1 more cup of the soup and blend until smooth. Stir the mixture back into the soup. Taste and adjust the seasonings. Ladle the soup into bowls and garnish with parsley and pimientos. Recipe from Cook the Pantry (C) 2015 by Robin Robertson. Photo by Annie Oliverio. Used by permission Vegan Heritage Press LLC. Save Save The post Chipotle Corn Chowder appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Curried Almond Sweet Potato Soup

October 3 2017 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Curried Almond Sweet Potato SoupThis Curried Almond Sweet Potato Soup has it all: great taste, vibrant color, and the creamy goodness of almond butter. For this recipe, I use Frontier brand organic curry powder, a heady blend of coriander, turmeric, cumin, mustard, fenugreek, cardamom, nutmeg, red pepper, cinnamon, and cloves, but most any curry spice blend should perform well. For a thinner soup, stir in a small amount of nondairy milk during the final heating. Curried Almond Sweet Potato Soup - 1 tablespoon neutral vegetable oil or 1/­­4 cup water - 1 large yellow onion, chopped - 1 clove garlic, chopped - 1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes - 5 cups vegetable broth or water - 2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks - 2/­­3 cup almond butter - 1 tablespoon curry powder - 1/­­4 teaspoon cayenne pepper - Salt - 1/­­4 cup chopped roasted almonds - Heat the oil or water in a large pot over medium heat. Add the onion and garlic, cover, and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. - Add the tomatoes, broth, and sweet potatoes. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to low. Cook, uncovered, until the potatoes are soft, about 30 minutes. - Stir in the almond butter, curry powder, cayenne, and salt to taste. Remove from the heat and allow to cool. - Puree the mixture in a blender or food processor until smooth, or use an immersion blender to puree the soup right in the pot. Heat the soup over low heat until hot. Serve sprinkled with the chopped almonds. From The Nut Butter Cookbook by Robin Robertson. (C)2014 Robin Robertson. Used by permission from Vegan Heritage Press. Photo by Lori Maffei. The post Curried Almond Sweet Potato Soup appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Curried Butternut Squash Soup

September 25 2017 Meatless Monday 

Butternut squash is roasted, cooked in ginger infused coconut milk and seasoned with cumin, coriander, cinnamon and red pepper. Try topping this hearty soup with our Spicy Peanut Chutney for a little extra punch. This recipe comes to us from Karen of Sprouts in the Hood. Serves 6 - 1 butternut squash* - 1 1/­­2 cups water - 1/­­2 cup light coconut milk - 2 tablespoons ginger, finely grated - 1 tablespoon olive oil - 1 red bell pepper, chopped - 1 large onion, finely chopped - 2 cloves garlic, diced - 2 teaspoons ground cumin - 1 tablespoon ground coriander seed - 1 teaspoon cinnamon - 1 teaspoon salt - 1 teaspoon ground hot pepper - spicy peanut chutney**, for garnish *To roast the butternut squash, preheat an oven to 400 degrees. Cut the squash in half and place cut side down on a large baking sheet. Roast for 45-55 minutes, or until the squash can be easily scooped out of its skin and tender when pricked with a fork. Scoop out the seeds and discard. Scoop out the flesh of the squash and set aside. **optional Place the roasted, seeded butternut squash flesh into a large soup pot. Add the water, light coconut milk and grated ginger to the pot and bring to a boil. Turn heat down to simmer. While the butternut squash coconut milk mixture is simmering, place the oil in a skillet over medium high heat. Add the red bell pepper, onion and garlic. Sauté for 3-5 minutes, or until the veggies soften and become fragrant. Add the sautéed veggies to the soup pot. Season the soup with ground cumin, coriander, cinnamon, hot pepper and salt. Simmer, uncovered, for 1 hour. Place the soup in a blender or food processor and liquefy. Garnish with peanut chutney, if using, and enjoy. The post Curried Butternut Squash Soup appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King

September 17 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King Today’s self-care dialogue is with LA artist and meditation teacher, Lauren Spencer King. We first learned about Lauren a few years ago, when we came across her bimonthly moon writings that ring incredibly true and clear up a lot of things for us every month. Since then, we’ve fallen in love with Lauren’s art and meditation work, which is centered around breath work and her extensive knowledge about the healing powers of minerals. Lauren was kind enough to open up a space for us in her 4 day online meditation workshop for stress and anxiety, and we had the most lovely and calming time following her techniques and suggestions, which we often use to this day. Lauren’s self-care routine is as inspiring as it is down to earth, with a focus on finding the wisdom in the inner self. In this interview, Lauren tells us about the Ayurvedic cleanse she’s on, what minerals she keeps next to her bed, her ideas about exercise and beauty, why she sees the concept of a work-life balance as a myth, and much more. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I think in my everyday things do feel open and free, its part of the benefit of being an artist and working for yourself. But, I do find routine within that freedom. Days are also made up of habits (good and bad), and trying to prioritize things that are important and meaningful. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I like to have a few hours to wake up and start my day. I like the quiet of the mornings, the possibility of a new day. Sometimes if I happen to wake up really early for some reason, like 5:00am, I like to read in bed for a bit, or watch a scary movie early in the morning. Its weird... I know. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? On good nights I am in bed early and read before I go to sleep. I love reading in bed, there is something about it that feels so intimate. On a not so good night I will work too late, and fall asleep to a movie. I do like to sleep with a few minerals next to my bed, some make their way under my pillow at certain times: purple fluorite to relax my mind, danburite for sweet dreams, aquamarine for calming, a piece of dream quartz, and a piece of shungite that is next to my phone (on airplane mode). Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: I am on an Ayurvedic cleanse right now. I have been working with this great Ayurvedic practitioner, her name is Meredith Carter. Years ago I did panchakarma (here), and if I could afford it I would do it annually. Its incredible. What I am doing now is like panchakarma lite! Breakfast – In the morning I make homemade almond milk. I will warm the almond milk and mix in my herbs and adaptogens, sometimes I will add fresh turmeric. I have been obsessed with making sweet potato toasts. I will top them with tahini and a cooked fruit compote (been loving cherry, wild blueberry, or pear ginger), with some pistachio nuts or pumpkin seeds. If I need some protein then I will eat two eggs toped with basil, and a tangerine. Lunch – I make fresh dahl with special non-heating spices and ghee, all of which I get from Surya Spa, they have the best mung beans and spices. Dahl is very healing. I will have a bowl full with some steamed chard or beet greens, black lava sea salt, toasted pumpkin seeds and lots of parsley or coriander on top. Snack – right now cherries are in season and they are making me so happy, I will have a bowl full of them with a handful of pistachios (lets be honest, like 1/­­2 a bag, I love pistachios). And some fresh ginger tea. Or I will make some beet hummus and have that with my favorite almond crackers. Dinner – I have been getting really into making soups! My two favorite are a green soup made with celery /­­ chard /­­ beet greens /­­ asparagus /­­ Japanese sweet potato. And a kabocha /­­ carrot /­­ginger soup. Or I will cook a big artichoke and dip the leaves into a melted ghee, lemon dip. -- Do you partake in caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? None, I have never even had a cup of coffee. I usually have a huge jar of warm water with lemon or fresh ginger in the morning. -- Do you have a sweet tooth? If so, how do you keep it in check? I used to when I was younger, until I developed all sorts of health problems because of it, some that I still deal with even over a decade later. I was living in Paris and eating nothing but delicious breads and sweets! It really took a toll on my body and since then I have cut both out. But, I still dream of flaky French almond croissants. Maybe in another life I will get to enjoy them again. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I love eating a spoonful of Chyawanprash in the morning. My good friend who runs Rebbl and develops all of their delicious drinks sent me a wellness mixture, it has very high grade reshi, ashwaganda and maca in it. I have that every morning. I love QuintEssentials 3.3 minerals. I also swear by Alexis Smarts flower remedies, she is amazing! I also almost always tend to all ailments physical and emotional with a homeopathic remedy from her. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly? I have an aversion to most forms of exercise, especially any kind of class where an instructor is wearing a headset and yells things at you like, Its almost swimsuit season, ladies. But sometimes I get into a routine where I go to yoga. I like to take hikes and go on walks, and I love to dance. But, my favorite is swimming. Recently I was swimming laps, and was having one of those days where I was feeling very unkind and judgmental of my body, and there was this older man in the lane next to me, he was a very serious swimmer, he might have even been a swim coach at some point, you could just tell. And I stopped to catch my breathe and he asked me how I had such a strong breaststroke. I told him it was because I was on swim team for years as a kid and maybe because I was tall. We talked for a bit about it and then I got back to my laps. And I started to think that in day to day life what I criticize most about my body in other contexts I use to my advantage. In this case, that my un-slender legs and bigger hips and butt actually made me a stronger swimmer and made my stroke more powerful. It really changed the way I thought about my body. I try to remember this. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? I really love natural beauty, which to me means being whole and owning all of who you are. You know, there are times when I see someone crying, and they dont maybe look their best, but they are so beautiful to me, because they are so present and authentic. Bodies arent meant to be perfect, thats not why we have them. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? I love oils and go through different phases of them on my face and body. Right now at night I use a hazelnut or arnica oil from a Paris apothecary for my face. I am also completely obsessed with Sans Ceuticalss Activator 7 Oil. I use it everywhere – body, face and hair! I dont really wear make up but when I do it is from RMS. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? I either dry brush or do abhyanga massage with basil oil every day, its more for the internal lymphatic system, but it makes my skin really nice. Eating well and drinking enough water are also key. And a little sun is always nice. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? Family heirlooms are very much welcome. I love using my jade face roller to refine the tone of my skin as well as relieve some tension I carry in my jaw. I also am into my second year of no bra, for the most part. For a few reasons, one of them being that they actually arent good for your body. No products with chemicals. My mum was a natural beauty, she really taught me what that was, she had a style that was all her own. She was radiant from the inside out. I sometimes think this is something you are born with. Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  Stress is often what I teach most about in class, because it has been the biggest teacher to me. I feel I am always at a growing edge with it. I try not to over schedule myself. Rest is a big part of being healthy for me. I have gone through some very difficult periods in my life of having sever adrenal fatigue, which comes from stress of all kinds. So, I have to listen really carefully not to push myself too hard, despite at times wanting to ignore my limitations. Recently I have been working with someone to understand the deeper level of stress that I unconsciously take on from people around me and from living in a city. It has been fascinating. -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? Yes, sometimes stress can not be avoided, like when I have a show, or need to be on the computer all day, or travel. Those are the big ones for me. I have to really work hard to stay grounded. Its really all sorts of little things, that when I do them really add up. And I just do the best I can, its not about perfection. Even stopping to dance the stress out of my body for five minuets really helps. Stress is more physical than we think. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? Stop everything. Get into bed in something comfy with socks. Sleeping as much as I can. Raw garlic. Olive Leaf supplements. Colloidal silver. Apple Cider Vinegar if I have a sore throat. Hot shower (or bath) with eucalyptus oil. Thieves oil on my chest and throat. Lots of water. -- Do you strive to maintain a healthy work/­­life balance or do those things overlap for you? What is your approach? I honestly think this idea of work /­­ life balance is a myth. At least it is for me. Sometimes its only about working on Fields of Study, sometimes I am all about being in the studio, sometimes its more relaxing and I can see friends and go on a trip or a weekend getaway. There is balance within the year if I am lucky. I recently just let this idea go, I was making myself feel so bad trying to make that ideal happen on a daily or even weekly timeline. I am also a bit of a workaholic, never feeling like I am doing enough. Thats something I am trying to work on. But, this pressure for balance seems like a modern day version of the women can have it all mantra. There are always compromises and I think its more empowering if we own that and voice it and have conversations about it. Instead of silently thinking that there is something wrong with us. Motivation -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? Its not one single thing, but if it was it would be learning to listen to my body. My health and understanding of health has come from a bumpy road of making lots little shifts. I dont believe in a one size fits all mentality for health. I think we are all different and in every moment we need different things. I am wary of the companies and self proclaimed health gurus out there right now that give sometimes ill informed blanket recommendations. I think it is up to us to empower ourselves and take the time to learn about our bodies and ourselves. Its important to have support and create a team of people that can help you. I have an amazing doctor, a homeopathist, an Ayurvedic practitioner, a woman who I do energy work with, and a therapist that have all at different times saved my life in various ways. It can take time, but finding the people that resonate with your understanding of health is key. I have learned so much about my body and what health and healing is from working with all of them. And remembering that deep and true healing takes time. Its always a process. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. What came to mind was this movie Agnes Martin made called Gabriel. Its terribly long and boring. It is about the boy on a walk in nature, and it is very stripped down and minimal, no dialog and most of the movie is silent, it has one tiny part with music. But, I think it relates to the way I think about self-care in a way because it is about listening to the subtleties, and how all of that gets lost when there is a lot going on. Once I really started refining my diet, routine, relationship to my energy, my intuition, etc... I started to really be able to notice those subtle changes and messages my body was sending me, and as time goes on I keep going deeper and deeper. Its like in Martins paintings, when color is introduced, it feels monumental. Like for me, bananas are just too sweet now. Knowledge -- You are well-versed in so many amazing practices! Could you tell us a little bit about each of them: – Your art (would love to know more about your process on the mineral paintings) After graduate school I started making my own watercolors out of historical pigments, mostly from minerals and some earth pigments. I taught myself how to make paints the way they were made for centuries before there were synthetic colors. The mineral monochromes are just one aspect of the work I make, and they are about many things. But, the main ones are a redirection of how we think about representation. I think of them as representational paintings, as they are made of the very thing they are depicting: malachite, azurite, agate, epidote... They are also about an interest in the healing powers of art. They are made with the intention that the viewer and the space receive the same healing properties of the minerals and the earth from which they are sourced. I usually pair them with a highly rendered graphite drawings or watercolors. –  Fields of Study and mineral meditations Some years back after teaching meditation for a bit I was longing for an alternative to what I was seeing in the ways of spiritual teachings and mediation work, both in approach and aesthetic. I wanted to support people and teach them tools they could use in their every day life, while also creating a container for all the things I was interested in and all the things that I brought into my own spiritual practice, which I feel I am always shaping and discovering. Something that would allow for a deep conversation that also had breadth, and was based in every day life and could be accessible. Something that could be malleable and evolve as I did. And Fields of Study was born. I originally wanted to open up a non-profit space that would be like a modern day community center with classes and workshops for the community, as well as have a little shop and a residency space. And someday this might happen. But for now its just me – working to change the world, one person at a time. I say this with some humor, but its also a very real desire to be in service and help instigate change. The same goes for how I teach about minerals, I want to present an alternative, something that resonates with me and represents how I grew up with minerals in my home because of my mother, who was a silversmith. The goal of all those workshops is really to show people that they know more than they think they do, about most things, minerals included. And its not really about helping people feel like they know everything, but showing them that when they ask and they trust themselves they can source the answers. The participants really end up teaching the workshop, which I think is pretty amazing. – Your Moon writings I have been writing about the moon twice a month for about six years now. It really came out of a desire to understand its energy on a deeper level, and also to check in with myself about what I was feeling on a bimonthly basis. Its hard to take credit for the writing as I feel I have gotten to a place with it where I just sit down to write and something comes through me. As out there as that sounds, thats really what happens. I just listen as best as I can, I have gotten pretty good at listening. Writing in this way has really strengthened my intuition, its really incredible. Its also nice to get conformations from people when they write to tell me how right on it was for them. It reminds me that we are all connected. Fun and Inspiration -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Swimming in the ocean. The hot springs in Ojai or a trip to Joshua Tree. A bad movie. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – The Golden Bough and She by Robert A Johnson Song/­­Album – Gamelan Orchestra music, JD Emmanuel, and Neil Youngs album Harvest Moon, particularly Natural Beauty. Its my favorite song. Movie – The Color of Pomegranates Piece of Art – Fragonard, Brancusi, and John McCracken. -- We are captivated by Joan Didion’s compact travel packing list. What are some essential objects that would be in yours? Funny enough I just re-read this essay from The White Album where she talks about her packing list related to her being a journalist. At the very end she mentions that the one thing she never had was a watch, which she supposes is some reflection of the climate of the late 60s. But, a watch is the thing I always have, perhaps that says something about me and the times we are living in now. When I travel I also always wear this gold Victorian compass. You never know when you will have to find your way home. -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? My Ayurvedic practitioner – Meredith Carter, my Homeopath – Alexis Smart, or anyone of the ladies on the @onigiriemoji Instagram feed I am a part of. Its a feed where a group of friends post what they are cooking and eating. Also, I wish you could have interviewed my mum, she was the best cook, I wish I learned more about cooking from her. Photos by Lauren Spencer King, Claire Cottrell and from Lauren’s shop. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Tonya Papanikolov Self-Care Interview Series: Renee Byrd Self-Care Interview Series: Pauline Chardin Self-Care Interview Series: Sarah Britton .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Lauren Spencer King appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah

August 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah Hope everyone is having a nice weekend. Just a quick check-in today with a salad we made for lunch during the week that turned out especially lovely. I recently revisited one of my favorite dessert recipes on this blog, the Sweet Dukkah Cigars. I enjoyed them so much, that I was inspired to make a savory dukkah to have for sprinkling on various salads and soups for the weeks to come. Traditionally, dukkah is an Egyptian spice, herb and nut mix, served as a dip for bread. Ours is packed with nuts (almonds and pistachios), seeds (sesame, chia, pumpkin), and invigorating spices (cardamom, cumin, coriander), and it can serve as the perfect finishing touch for a variety of dishes. This salad came together pretty effortlessly, thanks to the abundance of colorful summer produce, which doesn’t need much to taste amazing. There are steamed, multicolored beets, juicy, sweet peaches, spicy watercress, creamy avocado, and a refreshing mint vinaigrette. The dukkah contributes an extra punch of flavor and crunch. It’s vibrant, seasonal food, just the way we all like it :) Below are some links to things we’ve enjoyed looking at on the internet these past couple of weeks. Have a great Sunday. Magic Lessons with Elizabeth Gilbert – we love that so many inspiring people have podcasts nowadays, since they are our favorite thing to listen to while cooking. Just discovered this one from author Elizabeth Gilbert. Rosemary Auberson – interviewed on Apiece Apart Woman, we love her art Stevie Nicks singing Wild Heart backstage, 1981 – obsessed with this video Rachel Saunders – love this ceramicist’s work and instagram Healing Wise – can’t wait to read this book DOEN – love so many of the blouses from this brand Coming Soon – want many things from this home goods store. Love that you can shop according to astrological signs :) Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah   Print Serves: 4 Ingredients for the multi-seed dukkah ½ cup raw almonds ¼ cup sesame seeds ¼ cup raw pumpkin seeds 2 tablespoons chia seeds 7 green cardamom pods - crushed, green shells discarded ½ teaspoon cumin seeds ½ teaspoon coriander seeds ½ cup raw pistachios sea salt - to taste for the mint vinaigrette 4 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard ¼ cup olive oil ¼ cup minced fresh mint leaves for the salad 4-6 small beets - cut into wedges (we used a combination of red and golden beets) 2-4 ripe peaches or nectarines - sliced about 4 oz watercress or other salad greens 1 ripe avocado - sliced or cubed mint vinaigrette - from above multi-seed dukkah - from above mint leaves for garnish (optional) Instructions to make the multi-seed dukkah Preheat your oven to 350° F (180° C). Spread almonds on a baking tray, place in the oven and toast for 7 minutes. Add the sesame, pumpkin and chia seeds to the tray with the almonds and toast for another 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside. Toast the cardamom, cumin and coriander seeds in a dry pan over medium heat for a couple minutes, until fragrant. Remove from heat and grind the spices in a mortar and pestle or a spice/­­coffee grinder. Combine the toasted almonds and seeds, ground spices, pistachios and salt in a food processor and pulse until most of the nuts/­­seeds are broken dow, with some bigger pieces remaining. Set aside. to make the vinaigrette Combine the lemon juice and mustard in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Add the olive oil and whisk until fully combined. Mix in the mint leaves. Set aside. to make the salad Steam the beets in a bamboo steamer or in a steaming basket over a pot of boiling water for about 15 minutes, or until beets are soft. Let cool for safe handling. The beets should peel easily once cooked or you can even leave the skin on, if they are organic. Divide the watercress between plates, arrange the beets, peaches and avocado on top. Drizzle the salads with the mint vinaigrette and sprinkle with the dukkah. Garnish with more mint leaves, if using. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sorghum Beet Risotto Dragon Fruit Salad Sweet Potato, Fig and Eggplant Bowl with Hazelnut Vinaigrette Roasted Parsnip and Pomelo Salad .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Peach and Beet Watercress Salad with a Multi-Seed Dukkah appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Vegetable Cheela Rolls, vegetable Wrap

August 22 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Vegetable Cheela Rolls Vegetable Cheela Rolls is a healthy and delicious any-time meal. Cheela Rolls is a treat for people who are vegan and gluten free. Cheela is like a besan dosa, and can be used as a wrap and this cheela wrap with vegetables makes a wholesome meal. Cheela Rolls can be used as a snack and also for good a lunch box meal. For Cheela - 1 cup besan (Gram flour) - 2 Tbsp rice flour - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 3/­­4 cup water (to make batter) - 4 tsp oil For Filling - 3 cup cabbage (thinly sliced) - 1/­­2 cup carrots (shredded) - 1/­­2 cup bell pepper (thinly sliced) - 2 tsp oil (Canola or vegetable oil) - 1/­­2 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 1/­­2 tsp mustard seeds (rai) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­4 tsp chili powder - 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1/­­2 tsp sugar - 1 tsp lemon juice - Mix all the dry ingredients together, besan, rice flour, cumin seeds, and salt. Add the water slowly to make a smooth batter, consistency of Dosa batter. Set aside. - To make the filling: Heat the oil in frying pan over medium high heat. Oil should be moderately hot, add cumin seeds and mustard seeds, as the seeds crack. Add cabbage, carrots, and bell pepper. Stir-fry for about one minutes add all the other ingredients, coriander powder, chili powder, salt, sugar and lemon juice. Stir- fry for about three to four minutes, vegetables should be still crisp. Turn off the heat. - To make the Cheele: Use a heavy skillet and place on medium-high heat. Test by sprinkling a few drops of water on it. Water should sizzle right away. - Pour about 1/­­4 cup of the batter into the skillet and spread evenly with a back of spoon. Starting from the center, spiral the batter outward evenly to form a circle. - When batter starts to dry, gently spread one teaspoon of oil over it. Wait about 30 seconds; flip the cheela using a flat spatula. - Press the cheela lightly all around with the spatula to make cheela cook evenly. Turn the cheela and in the center of the cheele put about 1/­­2 cup of stir-fry diagonally and roll it. - Vegetable Cheela Roll is ready to serve. I like to serve this with Mango Pickle or Cilantro Chutney. - Enjoy! In the ingredients, we need about 4 cups total of sliced vegetable (this includes the cabbage, bell pepper, and carrots) Suggestions Use or preferred vegetables and also works good with any leftover vegetables. The post Vegetable Cheela Rolls, vegetable Wrap appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Gatte Ki Sabji (Rajasthani Cuisine)

August 1 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Gatte Ki Sabji Gatte Ki Sabji is a traditional dish from Rajasthan. These steamed gram-flour dumplings are cooked in a spicy gravy. This mouth-watering dish will complement any meal. Enjoy Gatte Ki sabji with roti or plain rice. The recipe is also vegan and gluten free. For Gatte - 2 cups besan (gram flour) - 4 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable oil) - 1 tsp salt - 1 tsp red chili powder (adjust to taste) - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing, asafetida is gluten free spice, but asafetida powder contains some wheat flour, gluten free asafetida, is available on amazon.) For Gravy - 3 Tbsp oil - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 1 tsp fennel seeds (saunf) - 2 bay leaves (tejpat) - 2 dry red chilies -  1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1/­­2 tsp turmeric (haldi) - 1 tablespoon coriander powder (dhania) - 1 tsp salt - 1 Tbsp Kasuri Methi - 1 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 1/­­2 tsp garam masala - Mix all the ingredients for gatte together and make a stiff dough, using water as needed. You will need about 1/­­3 cup of water. Knead the dough well, let it rest for 10 minutes. Divide the dough into 8 parts and roll them in calendar about half inch thick. - Bring about 4 cups of water to boil in a pan on medium high heat. Gently drop the Gatte logs in boiling water. After it comes to boil, cover the pan and reduce the heat to medium low, and cook them cover for about 12-15 minutes gate should be floating on the top and will have bubbles all around. - Take them out from water and save the water, this will be used for making gravy. let them cool for few minutes and cut them in about half inch-thick slices. - Heat the oil in heavy bottom pan over medium heat, add fennel seeds, asafetida, red chilies stir and add Gattes, stir-fry for about 4-5 minutes until they are light golden brown. - Add bay leaves, chili powder, turmeric, coriander powder, and salt, stir-fry for about 2 minutes. - Add the water we saved, and Kasuri Methi boil for about 10 minutes over low medium heat, covered. This is the time add more water to adjust the thickness of the gravy. As Gatte Ki Sabji will cool off it gravy will become thick. - Turn off the heat and add mango powder, and garam masala, Gatte Ki Sabji is ready to serve. The post Gatte Ki Sabji (Rajasthani Cuisine) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Grillable Veggie Burger – Black Bean Sunflower Seed Burger

June 6 2017 Vegan Richa 

Grillable Veggie Burger – Black Bean Sunflower Seed BurgerGrillable Veggie Burger. No Nuts. Easy Sunflower Seed Black Bean Burger with Veggies and spices. Pan fry, Bake or Grill. Serve with BBQ Sauce and other fix ins. Vegan Burger Recipe. Gluten-free option. Nut-free. Soy-free option It is time to fire up the grill and flip some veggie burgers. These hearty burgers are made up of black beans, brown rice, sunflower seeds and amazing seasoning. You can grill or pan fry the patties. Veggie burgers can be overly squishy (too many beans, too much moisture), or too crumbly (not enough binding, big unmashed ingredients such as whole beans or large chunks of onions, peppers, veggies). Both these issues can be solved with vital wheat gluten in the patties. I don’t like the texture of the patty with vital wheat gluten, so in these burgers just the right balance of cooked grains, beans and some breadcrumbs work well to make a sturdy grillable patty. With any veggie burger, mash the ingredients well and pack them well for sturdier results.  Black beans work really well in these burgers. You can also use kidney beans. The toasted sunflower seeds make these hearty. Whole coriander seeds, smoked paprika and lemon add complex flavors. These patties are a must make.  See 35+ Veggie Burger options here, no fake meats! Which beans/­­lentils are your favorite in a veggie burger?Continue reading: Grillable Veggie Burger – Black Bean Sunflower Seed BurgerThe post Grillable Veggie Burger – Black Bean Sunflower Seed Burger appeared first on Vegan Richa.

hariyali paneer tikka recipe | paneer hariyali tikka | dry paneer hariyali

May 24 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

hariyali paneer tikka recipe | paneer hariyali tikka | dry paneer hariyalihariyali paneer tikka recipe | paneer hariyali tikka | dry paneer hariyali with step by step photo and video recipe. basically the recipe follows the very similar recipe of an paneer tikka or any other tikka recipe. however for the tikka marination, pudina or mint leaves and coriander paste is added for the extra flavour. it tastes amazing when served with green chutney or a mix of tamarind and red chutney. Continue reading hariyali paneer tikka recipe | paneer hariyali tikka | dry paneer hariyali at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Aloo Gobi

December 4 2017 Meatless Monday 

Chunks of potato and cauliflower soak up the rich flavors of toasted cumin, turmeric and dried coriander in this traditional dish. Try serving this curry with basmati rice or the flatbread naan for a quintessential Indian feast. This recipe comes to us from Prerna of Indian Simmer. Serves 2 - 2 tablespoons olive oil - 1 teaspoon cumin seeds - or - 1 teaspoon mustard seeds - 1/­­4 onion, chopped - 2 tablespoons dried coriander - 1 teaspoons red pepper powder - I teaspoon turmeric - 1 teaspoon curry powder - 1 medium cauliflower, cut into bite sized florets - 1 potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 inch cubes - 1 tablespoon cilantro, chopped Place the oil in a medium wok or frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the cumin or mustard seeds and cook for 1-3 minutes, or until they start popping. When the seeds pop, add the onion. Cook for 3-5 minutes, or until the it turns golden. Season the onion with the dried coriander, red pepper powder, turmeric and curry powder, taking care to stir and ensure all spices are evenly distributed. Add the cauliflower florets and potato cubes. Stir, cover with a lid and turn heat down to medium low. Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 12-15 minutes or until the potatoes and cauliflower are al dente. Uncover, stir and cook 4-7 minutes more, or until the vegetables are fully cooked. Divide into 2 portions, sprinkle with cilantro and enjoy! The post Aloo Gobi appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1

November 1 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 This summer, we set out to share one practical, budget-friendly, and non-boring plant-based meal plan per season. Here is our meal plan for the Fall of 2017! We are really excited about the recipes in this one. It all starts out with cooking a pot of lentils and a pot of rice, roasting some winter squash, and prepping some kale. Those foundations then make their way into breakfast, lunch and dinner recipes that will take you through a whole week of nourishing and cozy fall meals. As usual, we are splitting this meal plan into two parts. This first part will focus on weekend prep, as well as breakfast and lunch recipes. Part 2 is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert recipes. Here we go! Menu (see Part 2 for dinner and dessert recipes) Breakfast Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins Lunch Grain Bowl with Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup Dinner Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers w/­­ Any Fixings of Choice Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew Dessert Rosemary-Roasted Plums with a Cardamom Sprinkle *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, its got all the ingredients youll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 large and 1 medium butternut squashes - 2 medium delicata squashes - 1 lb Brussels sprouts - 2 bunches kale (or 1 very large bunch) - 4 cups baby spinach - 1 jalape?o pepper - 1 lb crimini mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 3 large yellow onions - 2 heads of garlic Fruits - 2-3 green apples - 1 lemon - 1-2 limes (if using in place of brown rice vinegar for the marinated delicata) - 8 ripe plums Herbs  - rosemary - sage - green onions (optional) - thyme (optional) Other - 3 cups almond milk or other plant milk of choice - 1 13.5 oz can unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 28 oz can or box crushed tomatoes - 1 cup brown rice flour or other gluten free flour - sesame tahini - white sweet miso - burger fixings like buns, lettuce, or anything else you like w/­­ your veggie burgers - vanilla ice cream or plain yogurt to serve with the roasted plums (optional) - crackers to snack on with the hummus or sourdough bread to eat with the hummus, soup or stew (optional) Bulk - 2 1/­­4 cups dried green lentils - 3/­­4 cup millet - 1 1/­­2 cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for the grain bowl) - 1 cup other grain of choice for the grain bowl, or 1/­­2 more cup of brown rice - 5-7 Medjool dates - 2 cups pumpkin seeds – toasted - unsweetened coconut flakes (optional) - cacao nibs (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - neutral coconut oil - apple cider vinegar - brown rice vinegar (if not using limes for delicata marinade) - balsamic vinegar (optional) - tamari - olive oil - toasted sesame oil - tomato paste - coconut sugar - sea salt - maple syrup or honey - sriracha/­­chili sauce of choice - baking soda - baking powder Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - green cardamom pods - smoked paprika - black peppercorns - turmeric - red pepper flakes - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking grains and lentils helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the grains and lentils more nutritious. - Soak 3/­­4 cup of dried millet overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 2 1/­­4 cups of lentils overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups of brown rice (2 cups if you are using it for the grain bowl) overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. - If not using brown rice for the grain bowl, soak 1 cup of another grain of choice for the grain bowl in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners for the coming week. - Roast the butternut and delicata squashes to be used in Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. - Cook the lentils to be used in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. - Cook the brown rice to use in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl, if that’s your grain of choice for the bowl. - If you chose another grain for the grain bowl, cook it now as well. - Cook the kale and coconut kale to be used in the Grain Bowl and Veggie Burgers. - Make the Lentil and Squash Hummus to be used in the Grain Bowl, on the Veggie Burgers, and on crackers/­­bread as a snack throughout the week. - Marinate the roasted delicata squash to use in the Grain Bowl. - Make the Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup. - Bake the Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins. - You can also cook the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash for your breakfasts ahead of time, but I suggest making it in the morning. It’s pretty quick. Monday Night: Make the Veggie Burgers to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you’ve already cooked the squash, rice, kale and lentils that are called for in the recipe during prep day. Roast the plums for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the Veggie Burgers, Brussels Sprout Stew and the Roasted Plums are in Part 2.  - Make the Brown Rice, Lentil, Kale and Squash Veggie Burgers. - Make the Rosemary-Roasted Plums with Cardamom Sprinkle. Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the Veggie Burgers, prepare the Brussels Sprouts Stew for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. The recipe for the stew is in Part 2.  - Make the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew.   Prep 1. Winter squash is a beautifully versatile vegetable that can be used in millions of ways in both sweet and savory dishes. It’s always a great idea to roast a bunch of squash on the weekend, to use in all kinds of dishes throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use Butternut and Delicata Squashes in the Turmeric Millet Porridge with Roasted Squash, Apple and Squash Muffins, Lentil and Squash Hummus, Simple Butternut Squash and Green Apple Soup, Veggie Burgers, and Grain Bowl. See what I mean? It really is a super-vegetable. Roasted Butternut and Delicata Squashes   Print Ingredients 1 large and 1 medium butternut squash - cut in half lengthwise and seeded 2 medium delicata squashes - seeded and sliced into ½-inch rings neutral coconut oil - soft sea salt freshly ground black pepper Instructions Preheat the oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2-3 parchment paper-lined baking sheets. Arrange all the squashes on the baking sheets in a single layer. Oil them with the coconut oil and sprinkle with salt and paper. Roast the delicata squash for 10 minutes, then flip all the rings and roast for another 15-20 minutes, until cooked through and golden on both sides. Delicata squash skins are edible, so no need to peel off the skin. Roast the butternut squashes at the same time, for about 40 minutes or until soft throughout. You should end up with about 3 cups of roasted mashed squash flesh from the large butternut squash, which you will use for the hummus, muffins, porridge and burgers. The remaining 1 medium butternut squash will be used for the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. 3.5.3226   2. A pot of lentils, cooked on the weekend, can easily take you through a week of meals. They are nourishing, affordable, and can work as a base for so many meals. In this meal plan, we use French lentils in the Lentil and Squash Hummus, Veggie Burgers, and the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. Pot of Lentils   Print Ingredients 2¼ cups dried French lentils - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the lentils. Place them into a medium-large pot, cover with purified water, and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook for about 15-20 minutes, or until soft, but still intact. Add salt at the last 5 minutes. Drain and use in recipes right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   3. Similarly to lentils, a pot of rice or any other grains, prepared on the weekend, can help you pave the way to quicker and better meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, we use brown rice in the Veggie Burgers and the Grain Bowl (if that’s the grain you chose for your bowl). Serve any leftover rice with the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew. If you chose a different grain for your grain bowl, cook it now as well. Pot of Brown Rice   Print Ingredients 1½ cups brown rice (2 cups if using rice for your grain bowl) - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 2½ cups filtered water (3½ cups if cooking 2 cups of rice) sea salt Instructions Drain and rinse the rice. Combine it with the water and plenty of sea salt in a medium pot, cover with a lid and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 25-40 minutes, until all the water is absorbed and the rice is cooked. Use in recipes right away or store refrigerated in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   4. Blanching kale is one of my favorite, low maintenance ways of prepping a whole bunch of it for the week. In this meal plan, it will be used for the Coconut Kale and the Veggie Burgers. I also like to use the leftover kale cooking water for soups, stews, etc. In this meal plan, you can use the leftover kale broth for the Coconut Kale, the Brussels Sprout Tomato Stew and even the Simple Squash and Apple Soup. Half of this blanched kale gets stored away for later use in the Veggie Burgers, while the other half becomes the Coconut Kale for our grain bowl lunch. You’re going to love the coconut kale – it’s velvety, creamy, and keeps well throughout the week. Blanched Kale and Coconut Kale   Print Ingredients 2 bunches (or 1 very large bunch) kale of choice sea salt 1 can unsweetened Thai coconut milk Instructions Separate the kale leaves from the stems. Wash and tear the leaves into roughly bite-sized pieces. Reserve the stems to use in homemade vegetable broth in the future, if desired. Place the torn kale leaves in a large pot and cover with purified water. Add salt and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Drain the kale, reserving the cooking liquid for the Coconut Kale and the Brussels Sprouts Tomato Stew. Return half of the kale to the same pot. Squeeze the other half of the kale dry and store it away in an air-tight container, in the refrigerator, to use later in the veggie burgers. Add ½ cup of the reserved kale cooking liquid and 1 can of coconut milk to the pot. Bring to a strong simmer and cook for 10-20 minutes, until creamy. Add more of the kale cooking liquid throughout the cooking time, if needed. Taste for salt and adjust, if needed. Eat right away or store refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   5. The good news is, you already have all the important ingredients prepared for this hummus – you’ve cooked the lentils and roasted the squash, which you’re going to puree with autumn herbs, garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and olive oil. Though for efficiency’s sake, we use lentils instead of the traditional chickpeas here, the spread still very much tastes like hummus. And not just any hummus – it’s fresh, savory, earthy hummus that’s better than anything you can get at the store. Use it throughout the week in the Grain Bowl, on top of the Veggie Burgers, or as a quick snack with some crackers. Lentil and Squash Hummus   Print Ingredients ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons olive oil - divided 4-5 cloves of garlic - peeled and sliced 1-2 tablespoons chopped herbs, such as rosemary, sage and thyme 1 cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) sea salt freshly ground black pepper 1½ cups cooked green lentils (from above) juice from 1 lemon ¼ cup sesame tahini 3-4 tablespoons cold water toasted pumpkin seeds - for garnish (optional) Instructions Warm 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a small sauté pan over medium heat. Add garlic and herbs and sauté for about a minute, until garlic is fragrant and cooked, but not burnt. Add the squash, salt and pepper, and toss to coat. Stir around for a minute or so for the flavors to mix. Add the mixture to a food processor or a high-speed blender like a Vitamix. Add the lentils to the food processor/­­blender, followed by the lemon juice, sesame tahini, and more salt, to taste. Process until smooth, scraping the walls if needed. With the motor still running, pour in ¼ cup of the olive oil through the funnel, followed by the cold water. Pour in the water 1 tablespoon at a time until you achieve a desired, creamy consistency. Sprinkle the hummus with the toasted pumpkin seeds when serving, if using. Store the hummus in the refrigerator in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   6. Marinating vegetables is one of my favorite preparations, especially if I’m cooking ahead. It’s as easy as mixing up a marinade, and the veggies will only get more flavorful with each passing day. This miso-marinated delicata squash has got it all – it’s a little sweet, a little savory, and a bit spicy. It’s the perfect, powerful component to a memorable grain bowl, which is how it’s utilized in this meal plan. If you are planning on eating this squash at work/­­social settings, you might need to be cautious with the garlic – the squash is still really good without it! Miso-Marinated Delicata Squash   Print Ingredients 2 sliced and roasted delicata squashes (from above) 2 tablespoons white sweet miso paste 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey (not vegan) 2 teaspoons chili sauce, such as sriracha 4 tablespoons brown rice vinegar or lime juice 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons sesame oil 1 garlic clove - minced (optional) 1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion (optional) Instructions Place the sliced and roasted delicata squash in a shallow dish. In a small bowl, combine the miso with the maple syrup and sriracha, and mix until smooth. Add the rice vinegar/­­lime juice, tamari, and sesame oil, and mix until smooth. Mix in the sesame seeds, garlic and green onion, if using. Pour the marinade over the delicata squash and toss to coat. Cover and let marinate at room temperature for 1-3 hours. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226   Recipes 1. These gluten-free muffins make for a great breakfast or snack. They are very subtly sweet – sweetened only with dates – and get their soft, crumbly texture from the roasted squash that’s hiding in the batter. There are pockets of cubed apple throughout, and the pumpkin seeds on top add a nice bit of crunch. Date-Sweetened Apple and Squash Muffins   Print Serves: 10 medium-sized or 12 small muffins Ingredients 1½ tablespoons neutral coconut oil, plus more for oiling the pan ¾ cup brown rice flour or other gluten-free flour pinch of sea salt 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda 5-7 soft Medjool dates - pitted and soaked in 1 cup of hot water for 10 minutes ½ cup roasted mashed butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar 1-2 Granny Smith apples - peeled and finely cubed (optionally slice some of the apple to decorate the tops of muffins) 2 tablespoons chopped sage leaves (optional) pumpkin seeds - for sprinkling Instructions Preheat oven to 375° F (190° C). Prepare a muffin pan by thoroughly oiling the holes or lining it with paper muffin liners. Combine the flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda in a medium bowl. Put the dates in an upright blender, together with their soaking water. Add the squash and blend until smooth. Add the coconut oil and vinegar and pulse to combine. Pour the wet mixture into the bowl with the dry ingredients and quickly stir to mix. Fold in cubed apples and sage, if using. Fill the muffin holes with the batter until each hole is about ⅔ full. Sprinkle each muffin with pumpkin seeds and decorate with apple slices, if using. Bake for 25-30 minutes, until a toothpick comes out clean. Let cool a little, then remove the muffins from the pan and let them cool on a cooling rack. Enjoy right away or store in an air-tight container for up to 4 days. 3.5.3226   2. This millet porridge is warming, cozy, satisfying, and overall perfect for chilly fall mornings. Millet is a humble and affordable gluten-free grain, but it has the potential to be quite creamy and luxurious when cooked in plant milk with turmeric and squash. The porridge is pictured here topped with some of the roasted plums from Part 2 of this meal plan, which makes it even more special. Turmeric Millet Porridge   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons coconut oil or ghee (not vegan) 1 teaspoon turmeric a few grinds of black pepper (to activate the turmeric) ¾ cup millet - soaked overnight in purified water with a splash of apple cider vinegar 1½ tablespoons coconut sugar pinch of sea salt 4 cups almond milk or other plant milk (or 3 cups milk and 1 cup water) - divided 1 cup roasted butternut squash (from the large butternut squash from above) toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes - for serving (optional) Instructions Warm the oil/­­ghee in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the turmeric and black pepper, and stir around for about a minute. Add the millet, coconut sugar, salt and 3 cups of plant milk (or 2 cups of milk and 1 cup of water). Bring to a boil, lower the heat to a simmer and cook, covered, for 20 minutes. Stir periodically to prevent the porridge from sticking to the bottom. In the meantime, blend the squash and the remaining 1 cup of plant milk in a high-speed blender. Mix the blended mixture into the porridge after the 20 minutes of cooking and stir to combine. Simmer everything for another couple of minutes. (Alternatively, skip blending the squash and the remaining plant milk in a blender and add both the squash and the rest of the milk to the porridge, stirring to warm everything through. This will result in a less smooth porridge with some pockets of squash, which I like as a nice change from a smooth porridge). Serve the porridge topped with toasted pumpkin seeds and coconut flakes, if desired. Store in an air-tight container for up to 5 days. Reheat gently over medium low heat with more ghee/­­coconut oil and a splash of plant milk or water. 3.5.3226   3. This grain bowl will come together very quickly during a weekday lunch, since you’ve already gotten all the components ready during prep day. As an alternative to the bowl, you can spread the hummus on some sourdough bread and top that with the squash for an open-faced sandwich, with the coconut kale on the side. Marinated Delicata Squash, Coconut Kale, and Lentil Hummus Grain Bowl   Print Ingredients cooked brown rice or another grain of choice (from above) coconut kale (from above) miso-marinated delicata squash (from above) lentil and squash hummus (from above) toasted pumpkin seeds Instructions Heat up the rice and coconut kale in a pan or saucepan with a bit of oil or water. You can also gently heat the miso-marinated squash, but be careful not to heat it too much because of the miso. Serve all the components together in a bowl, sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds. 3.5.3226   4. Our second lunch option is a very lovely and very simple pureed fall soup, with flavors of butternut squash, green apple, and autumn herbs. Simple Butternut Squash and Apple Soup   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon neutral coconut oil 1 large yellow onion - chopped 1 green apple - peeled, cored and chopped 2 garlic cloves - sliced 1 teaspoon coriander seeds - preferably freshly ground about 1 tablespoon chopped sage and rosemary sea salt freshly ground black pepper flesh from 1 medium roasted butternut squash (from above) Instructions Warm the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, apple, garlic, coriander and herbs, if using, and sauté everything for 10 minutes. Scoop the flesh out of the roasted squash and add it to the saucepan, followed by the sea salt, pepper and 3 cups of purified water. Bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes, until all the flavors are combined well. Carefully blend everything in an upright blender until smooth. Taste for salt and adjust if needed. Serve right away or store in an airtight container for up to 5 days. 3.5.3226 Continue to Dinner and Dessert Recipes > > >  You might also like... Moroccan Stew and Sunshine Crackers from The First Mess + a Giveaway Pumpkinseed Butter Goji Cookies Squash Noodle Soup with Healing Turmeric-Ginger Broth, Roasted Carrots... Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 2 .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Fall Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

hummus recipe | hummus dip recipe | 2 ways easy hummus recipe

October 4 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

hummus recipe | hummus dip recipe | 2 ways easy hummus recipehummus recipe | 2 ways easy hummus dip recipe with step by step photo and video recipe. usually the hummus dip is served along falafel or grilled chicken or even grilled eggplant. but it can also be scooped as spread with flat bread or pita bread with choice of veggies garnishing. there are several flavored hummus recipe, and this post describes the basic and coriander jalape?o flavored hummus recipe. Continue reading hummus recipe | hummus dip recipe | 2 ways easy hummus recipe at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway

September 27 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + GiveawayThis post was created in partnership with Raw Rutes, fermenting crock giveaway below. I grew up with home-pickling and fermenting as the norm. Food in the Soviet Union was not only scarce, but also highly seasonal, so if you didn’t take care to preserve some tomatoes or cucumbers for the winter, you wouldn’t be able to taste any until the next summer. My mom made sure to stock our cool basement with jars of pickles, tomatoes, and fruit preserves every summer, as did pretty much every woman around. Other common fermentation projects included kombucha (or the ‘tea mushroom’ as we call it) way before it was cool, kefir, and of course sauerkraut. I can’t say that I’ve continued all these traditions. I do make my own kombucha, but I can’t motivate myself to do a big batch of pickles, and you can buy such good ones in the store anyways. Same goes for tomatoes, especially since California grown ones are available all year round, and will do if a big craving hits. Sauerkraut is a different story though, because it takes very little work, and the return is so good. I’ve fermented sauerkraut in jars and in big pots, inventing weighted contraptions out of any appropriately-sized object I could find, but what I’ve always dreamed about is a nice, clay fermenting crock with custom weights that fit inside perfectly. The two things that have stopped me from getting a proper fermenting crock were the hefty price tag and the considerable size that they usually come in, which is not very countertop-friendly. I was incredibly excited when Raw Rutes reached out about their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock, because it addressed those two points perfectly. It’s petite and sits on my countertops very compactly, yet it can still fit two small-medium heads of shredded cabbage. It’s also quite a bit more affordable than traditional crocks. I love that it’s a clean white too, because they are often brown – not my favorite color, at least for my kitchen. If you’re not familiar with fermenting crocks, the main thing to know is that they make the whole fermenting process really easy and safe. All you have to do is shred whatever vegetables/­­fruits you want to ferment, salt them with either salt or salty brine until they are covered with water, weigh them down, and leave them be for a few weeks while they magically transform. The natural clay that the Yaozu crock is made with makes the environment clean and safe, and the water channel up top takes away the need for an airlock. The crock comes with clay weights, which fit inside perfectly, and ensure that all your veggies are submerged in the brine, which prevents any mold from developing. It’s truly a magical pot. For my first fermenting project, I wanted to do a sauerkraut that was a bit more colorful and exciting than the traditional kind. I used purple cabbage together with blueberries and apple, with a bit of coriander seeds for extra interest in flavor. It took about a week and a half, and came out really delicious. The predominant flavor is of sauerkraut, but there are juicy, sweet and salty bursts from the blueberries, as well as a bit of crunch and sourness from the apple. I can’t wait to experiment more. I even know my next project – the fruit kimchi from Sandor Ellix Katz’ book, The Art of Fermentation. Making your own kraut/­­any fermented vegetables is a really addicting activity. Once you try your first batch, you won’t be able to stop, which is great, since fermented foods are so nourishing. Probiotics are on the tip of everyone’s tongue nowadays – we’ve all heard that having a balanced microbiome is key for good health. Completing little fermenting projects at home and enjoying the results daily is the perfect, incredibly affordable way to contribute to that gut health of yours :) Giveaway: Raw Rutes, the charming online shop full of back-to-basics kitchen tools, is giving away their Yaozu 2 Liter Fermenting Crock to one Golubka Kitchen reader. To enter to win, leave a comment here with your favorite item from the Raw Rutes offering or favorite fermented food until October 11th, 2017 (USA only). Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut   Print Serves: about 2 large jars Ingredients 2 small-medium heads of red cabbage 2-3 tablespoons sea salt 2 green apples - peeled and sliced into 1-inch sticks 12 oz blueberries 2 teaspoons coriander seeds (optional) Instructions Rinse your cabbages and remove the outer leaves. Save a few of the leaves and set them aside. Cut the cabbages in half and cut out the core. Cut each cabbage half into quarters and shred on a mandolin slicer or with a sharp knife. Put the shredded cabbage in a large bowl and mix in the salt, then massage it well until the cabbage starts to release juices. Let the cabbage sit in the bowl for about 30 minutes to release more juices. Mix in the apple slices, blueberries, and coriander with your hands. Pack everything tightly into your fermenting crock using your fist. Cover the surface with the reserved cabbage leaves - this will make sure that nothing will float to the top. Place the ceramic weights on top. At this time, all the contents of the crock, including the ceramic weights, should be completely submerged in juices. If thats not happening, let everything sit for a few more hours and see if the cabbage releases more juices to submerge. If there is still not enough liquid after a few hours, make brine with 1 cup filtered water and 1 teaspoon sea salt. Pour the brine into the crock, until the weights are just covered with the liquid. Its important to have everything submerged in liquid at all times to prevent any mold from forming. Pour brine or filtered water into the water channel and cover the crock with its lid. Let everything ferment for 1-2 weeks, tasting periodically, until the flavor is sour to your liking. Refill the water in the water channel as it evaporates. After a few days of fermenting, the brine should be nice and bubbly. If you have a cool basement, you can also start out the fermentation in a warmer room for the first week, and then move the crock to the basement to finish off the process (the basement should not be too cold!). Once your sauerkraut is done, pack it into clean glass jars, covered with brine, and keep it refrigerated. Save some of leftover brine to use as a starter in your next fermentation project, which will kick-start the process much quicker. You can also take little shots of the brine for a nice probiotic, booster. Have fun! 3.5.3226 You might also like... No Bake Blueberry Coconut Bars Roasted Parsnip and Apple Soup with Radish Greens Babamesco Dip Smoky Summer Vegetable Tangle .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Red Cabbage, Blueberry and Apple Sauerkraut + Giveaway appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cabbage Pakora (Bhajia)

September 21 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Cabbage Pakoras Cabbage Pakoras or Crispy Cabbage Fritters are a great any time snack. They especially taste delicious when they are served with Chutney and hot cup of tea. They are also easy and quick to make. Surprise your guests and treat them with these mouthwatering crispy cabbage pakoras. - 3 cup thinly sliced cabbage (patta gobhee) - 1 cup besan (gram flour) - 1/­­4 cup rice flour - 1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 2 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder (lal mirch) - 1 tsp salt - 1/­­8 tsp asafetida (hing) - 2 Tbsp chopped cilantro (hara dhania) - 1 Tbsp thinly sliced green chilie (adjust to taste) - Also need oil to fry - Combine all the dry ingredients, to cabbage besan, rice flour, cumin seeds, coriander, red pepper, salt, asafetida, cilantro, and green chili in a bowl. Mix it well. Add water as needed, mixture consistency should be of sticky soft dough. - Heat at least one inch of oil in a frying pan over medium high heat. To test, put one drop of batter in the oil. The batter should float and not change color instantly. - Place about one tablespoon of mix holding with your fingers into the oil. Do not overlap the pakoras. - Fry the pakoras in small batches; after you turn the pakoras one time press the pakoras lightly. - This will take five to six minutes per batch. Fry the pakoras, turning occasionally, until both sides are golden brown. - Repeat this process for the remaining batches. - The crispy, delicious Cabbage Pakoras are now ready to serve. Tips If the oil is too hot the pakoras will not be crisp; if the oil is not hot enough, the pakoras will be greasy. The post Cabbage Pakora (Bhajia) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

Stuffed Bell Peppers (Stuffed Capsicum)

August 29 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Stuffed Bell Peppers For these mouthwatering Stuffed bell peppers, I decided to make them into rings, which makes it easier and quicker to make. Bell peppers provide a very nice vibrant color to any dish. Stuffed bell peppers are delicious and can be served as appetizers or as a side dish. I hope you enjoy this recipe as much as I enjoy! - 2 bell peppers (capsicum, pahadi mirch) - 2 1/­­2 potatoes (boiled, peeled and roughly mashed) - 1 1/­­2 tsp salt - 1 tsp cumin seeds (jeera) - 3 tsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­2 tsp red chili powder - 1/­­2 tsp mango powder (amchoor) - 1/­­2 tsp garam masala - 1 Tbsp green chili (finely chopped) - 1 Tbsp oil (canola or vegetable) - Add all the spices to mash potatoes to make filling, salt, cumin seeds, coriander powder, red chili powder, mango powder, garam masala, and green chilies. - Cut tops and bottoms of bell peppers; discard seeds and membranes. - Stuffed the bell peppers and slice them in half inch thick, use sharp knife. Depends the size of bell peppers how many slices you will make. - Press them gently to make sure potatoes stays inside the bell pepper rings. - Heat the heavy flat bottom sauce pan on medium heat and generously grease the pan. - Spread the bell pepper rings into skillet, do not overlap. Cover the pan and let it cook for about 1-2 minutes. - Remove the cover and turn the rings gently and press them lightly to ensure potatoes stays into the bell pepper rings. I cover the pan to make sure bell peppers are cooked, make sure they are not mushy. Cook the bell peppers from each side till they are golden brown. Stuffed bell peppers ready to serve. - Stuffed bell peppers are ready, this is a very enjoyable dish, serve them as an appetizers or side dish. I like to serve them with stir-fry cherry tomatoes. Stuffed bell peppers are ready, this is a very enjoyable dish, serve them as an appetizers or side dish. I like to serve them with stir-fry cherry tomatoes. You can also use stuffed bell peppers to make sandwich, I like to use kaiser rolls with lettuce leaves, cheese, and slices of tomatoes. The post Stuffed Bell Peppers (Stuffed Capsicum) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.

medu vada recipe in mixie | uddina vada | medhu vadai | ulundu vadai

August 26 2017 hebbar's kitchen 

medu vada recipe in mixie | uddina vada | medhu vadai | ulundu vadaimedu vada recipe in mixie | uddina vada | medhu vadai | ulundu vadai with step by step photo and video recipe. the medu vada recipe is mainly prepared by soaking the ural dal for 3 hours which is later grounded to coarse paste. it is later flavoured with ginger, green chillies, dried coconut, coriander and curry leaves. it is then shaped to doughnuts and deep fried in oil until golden brown crisp.  Continue reading medu vada recipe in mixie | uddina vada | medhu vadai | ulundu vadai at Hebbar's Kitchen.

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce

August 9 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Sauce Hello! This is David & Luise. Remember us? During our almost eight years of blogging we have never left it silent for two months before. We’re going to do what we always do in these situations and blame the kids. Wether we miss a dentist appointment, forget to answer a text message, get a parking ticket or are two months late with a blog post, it’s always our kid’s fault. In this case however it’s actually somewhat true. We simply underestimated how much time and attention three kids on summer holiday takes. They have sooo much energy. I (David) have been thinking of ways to connect them (and with them I mean Isac) to the power grid so that they (he) could replace a nuclear power plant or two. And I could perhaps cash in a Nobel price for saving the world. Anyway, after a couple of weeks of feeling bad about not having a single second over to blog new recipes, we instead decided to give ourselves a summer break from it all. So we have been trying to keep up with our children’s pace (obviously impossible) and play on their rules (also impossible because they ignore rules) this summer. It’s been fun and much needed. But we are here now with plenty of new recipe ideas and projects. Lots of other things have happened during the summer. We almost bought ourselves a tiny smoothie bar in a park, we burnt pancakes from Green Kitchen at Home inside a jam-packed little book store in Bath and we have planned the release of the European languages next month, but we’ll find time to talk more about all that. For now, let’s just talk food. Before the summer and watermelon season is all over. This recipe has been going on repeat all summer. It’s actually a combination of two recipes which we recently realized work brilliantly together. A simple watermelon and halloumi salad and our Magic Green Sauce. We first got the idea to combine watermelon with halloumi from a recipe photo in a supermarket pamflett and from that combo, we’ve added some chickpeas, cherry toms and pumpkin seeds to make it less of a side and more of a meal. It’s a really nice combination. Rich and chewy halloumi, sweet and fresh watermelon, crunchy pumpkin seeds and a tangy, flavorful and slightly spicy sauce. If I wasn’t such a humble guy, I would say that it’s probably one of the best watermelon salads you’ll try this summer. Luckily, I’m super humble and will just say that it’s pretty good. A simple vegan option would be to replace the halloumi with marinated tofu. Just make sure to squeeze out the liquid before marinating it, so it soaks up all the flavor. Quinoa, black lentils or rice could also be a great addition if you want to make this salad more substantial. Here is a little salad assembling action by Luise. Technically, the Magic Green Sauce is just our take on Chimichuri with a more hippie name. We use lime juice instead of vinegar and have added a little avocado to give it the right balance between creamy and chunky and also a few drips maple syrup to round off the sharpness from the other flavors. The magic lies in its ability to transfer any simple dish into something flavorful. Apart from this salad, we also use it on scrambled eggs, as a dip for raw crudités, inside rye sandwiches and on top of shakshuka. We have made it with a number of different herb combinations and found that anything goes (but parsley, cilantro/­­coriander and mint is still a fav). Watermelon & Halloumi Salad with Magic Green Sauce Serves 4 Watermelon & Halloumi Salad 1 kg /­­ 2 lb watermelon 200 g /­­ 7 oz halloumi 150 g /­­ 1 cup good quality cherry tomatoes  1 can /­­ 200 g /­­ 1 cup cooked chickpeas  60 g /­­ 1/­­2 cup pumpkin seeds /­­ pepitas 2 large handfuls Mâche lettuce (or any tender lettuce) 2 tbsp olive oil 1 lime Salt Magic Green Sauce 1 large handful (30 g /­­ 1 tightly packed cup) mixed fresh herbs (we used parsley, cilantro and mint) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 120 ml olive oil Juice from 1 lime 1 tbsp capers 1 tsp maple syrup 1 clove garlic 1 small chili 1/­­2 avocado 1/­­2 tsp sea salt flakes Start by preparing the sauce. Add all sauce ingredients to a food processor and pulse a few times until coarsely mixed, check the flavor and consistency and add more salt, herbs or oil if needed. If you don’t have a food processor, finely chops herbs, capers, garlic and chili, mash the avocado and mix everything in a bowl together with olive oil, lime juice and maple syrup. Add salt to taste. Then set aside. Dice the watermelon and halloumi, quarter the tomatoes and rinse the chickpeas. Toast the pumpkin seeds on medium heat in a dry pan with a little salt until they begin to pop, then transfer them to a chopping board and chop coarsely. Add a little oil to the pan and fry the halloumi for a couple of minutes until golden on all sides. Arrange the lettuce in a bowl or on a serving platter. Add chickpeas, tomatoes, watermelon and halloumi. Squeeze over a little lime juice and drizzle with oil and toss until mixed. Top with pumpkin seeds and Magic Green Sauce, with extra in the side. Enjoy! ***************** PS! We are off to Rome now to celebrate that it was 10 years ago that my drunk feet tried to seduce dance Luise on a club by the Tiber while simultaneously using ALL my Italian pick up lines on her (took me approx 1 hour before I realized that she was Danish and not Italian!). We’re bringing all the kids this time and we’d really appreciate a comment if you know any good places to eat, fun playgrounds, outdoor pools or your favorite gelato bars. Grazie!

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1

July 19 2017 Golubka Kitchen 

Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 A few months ago, we asked if you would be interested in seeing semi-regular, seasonal meal plans here and heard a resounding yes. We love coming up with whimsical and creative, plant-based recipes to share here, but we also want this site to be a friendly space for busy people looking to eat more plants. You know, for those of you who might not have the time or brain space for making, say, an experimental aquafaba meringue, like we do. Meal planning is a great practice for saving money on groceries (and impulse takeout orders!), eating homemade meals (which inevitably equal healthier meals), and minimizing those situations of staring blankly into your refrigerator, wondering what to eat for dinner. Do I plan my meals? Sometimes. Ironically, I think that if cooking wasn’t my job, I would plan our family meals much more. But because I’m in the business of dreaming up recipes for this blog and for other publications, I often end up with random, non-coordinated dishes in my fridge, which then become our breakfast, lunch and dinner. For now, we are thinking of publishing one meal plan a season, while maintaining regular, single-recipe post programming the rest of the time. Not changing anything about the blog! Just adding to what’s already here. This is our meal plan for the Summer of 2017. I tried hard to make it comprehensive, practical, and budget-friendly, but also not boring and really delicious. It all starts out with cooking a big pot of chickpeas and making a batch of almond milk, and most of the recipes stem from there. We are splitting this plan into two parts. This first part will focus on the shopping list, prep, breakfast and lunch recipes. The second part is here, and it’s all about dinner and dessert. Here we go! Menu (for dinner and dessert recipes, see Part 2) Breakfast Almond Pulp Lime Ginger Granola Overnight Berry Chia Oats Lunch Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad Basil Zucchini Chowder Dinner Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas Zucchini Kimchi Tacos Dessert Peach and Blackberry Crisp *all recipes are vegan and gluten-free and will make enough for a week, for 2-3 people Shopping List (print) Bring this list with you when you go food shopping, it’s got all the ingredients you’ll need for the recipes in this meal plan. All the items are separated by category, to make the shopping easier and more efficient. Take the time to look over this list beforehand and cross out any items you already have. The hope here is that you own some of the pantry staples, spices, and maybe even some of the produce required, which will help minimize the list. Produce Vegetables - 1 cauliflower head - 1 small broccoli head - 5-7 small to medium zucchini - 3 corn ears or 1 corn ear and 2 1/­­2 cups frozen corn - 1 of each green and red (or yellow, or orange) bell peppers - 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - 2 portobello mushrooms - 2 medium carrots - 1 large and 1 small red onion - 2 yellow onions - 1-2 garlic heads (6-7 cloves) - 1-inch piece ginger - 2 avocados - 3-4 radishes (optional) Fruits - 3-4 limes - 3-4 lemons - berries: 1 pint fresh blueberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint fresh raspberries or 8 oz frozen, 1 pint strawberries – fresh (optional) - 1 cup blackberries – fresh or frozen - 3 ripe peaches or nectarines Herbs - 1 bunch (about 2 cups) basil - 1 bunch dill - 1 bunch cilantro - parsley (optional) Bulk - 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas - 2 1/­­2 cups raw almonds or 2 cups almonds and 1/­­2 cup walnuts/­­other nuts of choice - 3/­­4 cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds - 3/­­4 cup chia seeds - 3 cups gluten-free old fashioned rolled oats - 1/­­4 – 1/­­2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut Other - 1 13.5 oz can light unsweetened Thai coconut milk - 1 can green or black olives - about 1 cup kimchi - tortillas of choice (corn for gf) - sun-dried tomatoes packed in olive oil (optional) - vanilla ice cream to serve with the fruit crisp (optional) Pantry /­­ Refrigerator Staples - white miso paste - sunflower butter /­­ tahini /­­ almond butter - Dijon mustard - Sriracha or chili sauce of choice - neutral coconut oil - maple syrup - coconut sugar - arrowroot powder (optional) - vanilla extract (optional) - kombu (optional) - capers (optional) Spices - whole cumin seeds - whole coriander seeds - red pepper flakes - smoked paprika - chili powder - garlic powder - cayenne pepper - black peppercorns - bay leaves (optional) Day by Day Prep List Saturday Night (Night Before Main Prep Day): These are just quick tasks that need to be done the day before your main prep day. Soaking nuts and beans helps rid them of phytic acid, which makes them easier to digest. It also kickstarts the germination process, making the nuts and beans more nutritious. - Soak 1 cup of almonds overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. You may need to repeat it later in a week to make more almond milk if needed more for granola. - Soak 1 1/­­2 cups dried chickpeas overnight in plenty of purified water, with a splash of apple cider vinegar/­­lemon juice. Sunday (Main Prep Day): This is your main prep day, which you can also split into multiple days, depending on your schedule. You will find all the recipes for this prep day in this post, which includes two breakfast options and two lunch options for the whole week, as well as some simple prep for the dinners during the week. - Make almond milk for the overnight oats and granola, reserve the leftover almond pulp for the granola and fruit crumble. - Make the Almond Pulp Ginger Lime Granola - Cook the chickpeas to be used in the soup, fajitas, tacos and salad, reserve the cooking liquid for the soup. - Make the Overnight Berry Chia Oats - Make the Creamy Salad Dressing and the Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad - Make the Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder - Mix the Fajita Spice - Prep the veggies for the Fajitas Monday Night: Make the fajitas to have for dinner on Monday, Tuesday, and possibly Wednesday nights. This will be fairly quick, since you already prepped the vegetables and spice blend during prep day. Bake the crumble for dessert on Monday or Tuesday night, it’s quick and you will have enough for dessert for the rest of the week. The recipes for the fajitas and the crumble are in Part 2. - Make the Fajitas - Bake the Crumble (+ second batch of almond milk if you didn’t make it on prep day) Wednesday/­­Thursday night: Once you’ve finished eating the fajitas, prepare the Kimchi Zucchini Tacos for dinner starting Wednesday or Thursday night and until the end of the week. They are a very quick, weeknight friendly dish. These tacos would also work well as a lunch, if you need a break from the soup and salad. The recipe for the tacos is in Part 2. - Make the Tacos Recipes 1. Once you try making almond milk at home, it will be hard to go back to the store-bought kind, since it’s infinitely more delicious and affordable. In this meal plan, we also show you how to utilize the almond pulp that is left over from making almond milk in an addictive granola recipe. You will likely need to make two batches of almond milk throughout the week. You can make the first batch (to use for the granola and overnight oats) during the prep day, and the second batch on the day that you make the crisp, which will give you more milk to serve with the granola. You can also make both batches during the prep day. Almond Milk   Print Serves: about 4½ cups Ingredients 1 cup almond - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 4 cups purified water Instructions Combine the almonds with the water in an upright blender, blend until smooth. Strain the milk through a nut milk bag into a jar or bottle. Squeeze the pulp dry as much as possible and reserve the almond pulp to use for the granola and crumble. Store the milk in the refrigerator. 3.5.3226 2. This Ginger-Lime Granola is made with the pulp, leftover from making almond milk. Besides being zero waste, this recipe is also incredibly delicious, with bright flavors from ginger and lime, rich notes from shredded coconut, and crunch from pumpkin and chia seeds. It tastes great served with almond milk and fresh berries. Almond Pulp Ginger-Lime Granola   Print Ingredients reserved almond pulp from making almond milk ¼ - ½ cup unsweetened shredded coconut ½ cup pumpkin or sunflower seeds ¼ cup chia seeds 2 tablespoons melted neutral coconut oil ¼ cup maple syrup 1 tablespoon grated ginger zest of 1 lime juice ½ lime pinch of sea salt Instructions Preheat oven to 325° F (160° C). Combine the almond pulp, shredded coconut, pumpkin/­­sunflower seeds, chia seeds, coconut oil, maple syrup, ginger, lime zest and juice, and a pinch of sea salt in a large bowl. Mix thoroughly. Spread the granola mixture on a parchment paper-covered baking sheet in a somewhat even layer and toast for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and stir, breaking apart any large clumps. Place the sheet back in the oven and turn off the heat. Leave to dry in the oven for 1 hour. If granola is not completely dry by that time, turn the oven back on the lowest temperature and let dry for another 30 minutes or until completely dry and crispy. If you have convection oven, that setting is really useful here. Keep the granola in an airtight glass container at room temperature. Serve with almond milk and berries. 3.5.3226 3. Cooking a big pot of beans on a Sunday is always a good idea, since you will then have a solid base for all kinds of meals throughout the week. In this meal plan, the chickpeas are utilized in every savory recipe, making the dishes more nourishing and satisfying. Pot of Chickpeas   Print Ingredients 1½ cups dried chickpeas - soaked overnight, drained and rinsed 3-4 garlic cloves - crushed with a knife half a yellow onion 1-2 bay leaves (optional) 2-inch piece kombu (optional) sea salt Instructions While the granola is baking, combine the chickpeas with plenty of purified water in a soup pot. Add the garlic, onion, bay leaves and kombu, if using. The water level should be about 4 inches above the beans. Bring the chickpeas to a boil over high heat, lower the heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes. Check for doneness. If the chickpeas are soft, salt the water generously and cook for another 10 minutes, until the chickpeas are tender but still intact. Simmer longer, before adding salt, if chickpeas are not yet soft. Drain the chickpeas, reserving the cooking liquid. Youll need 1 cup of it for this meal plan, for the chowder. Optionally, freeze the rest of the liquid for future use in place of vegetable broth in any dish. 3.5.3226 4. These overnight oats are a breeze to put together and make for a satisfying, summery breakfast. We like our overnight oats to be chia-heavy, so this is something between a chia pudding and overnight oats, layered with juicy summer berries. Overnight Berry Chia Oats   Print Ingredients 2 cups rolled oats ½ cup chia seeds 2¾ cups homemade almond milk - from above ⅓ cup maple syrup splash of vanilla extract (optional) about 2 cups mix of fresh or frozen blueberries and raspberries, or any other berries of choice Instructions While the granola is baking and the chickpeas are simmering, combine the rolled oats and chia seeds in a large bowl. Add the almond milk, maple syrup and vanilla extract, if using, and stir to combine thoroughly. Spoon the oats between 2-3 clean jars in layers, alternating them with fresh or frozen blueberries, raspberries or any other berries of choice. Cover the jars with their lids and place in the refrigerator overnight. Enjoy for breakfast. 3.5.3226 5. I make this simple, creamy dressing all the time. It’s perfect in salads, as well as a sauce or dip for so many veggie dishes. Universal Creamy Salad Dressing   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons white miso paste 2 tablespoons sunflower butter, tahini or almond butter 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon sriracha or other chili sauce of choice juice of 2 large lemons, plus more if needed Instructions Combine all the ingredients, with the exception of the lemon juice, in a glass jar or a bowl. Mix until smooth. Add the lemon juice and stir until well combined. Store refrigerated in an airtight glass container. 3.5.3226 6. This rainbow salad is loaded with nourishing summer vegetables, chickpeas, olives, herbs and seeds. At the base of the salad is garlicky, sautéed broccoli, which keeps much better than greens and makes for a really sturdy bed for the veggies. When slathered in the creamy dressing (above), this salad is completely irresistible. Loaded Veggie Chickpea Salad   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower head - chopped 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above ¼ cup toasted sunflower or pumpkin seeds 1 small to medium carrot - shaved into ribbons with a vegetable peeler kernels from 1 corn ear ½ cup olives - halved or quartered ⅛ red onion - chopped ¼ cup chopped dill ¼ cup chopped parsley (optional) handful basil leaves - torn (optional) 3-4 radishes - sliced (optional) about 2 tablespoons chopped sun dried tomatoes (optional) 1 tablespoon capers (optional) 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 head broccoli - cut into florets sea salt 3 garlic cloves - sliced freshly ground black pepper about 6 tablespoons Universal Creamy Salad Dressing, plus more for serving - from above Instructions Place the cauliflower into a food processor and pulse a few times into rice-sized pieces. Combine the cauliflower rice, chickpeas, sunflower or pumpkin seeds, carrots, corn, olives, onion, dill, parsley and basil, as well as the radishes, sun-dried tomatoes and capers, if using, in a large bowl. Warm the coconut oil in a sauté pan over medium heat. Add the broccoli and salt and sauté until bright green, for about 5-7 minutes. Add the garlic and stir it around for 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the garlicky broccoli to the bowl with the salad. Season the salad with freshly ground black pepper and add about 6 tablespoons of the Creamy Salad Dressing. Toss to combine well. Store the salad refrigerated in an airtight container. Serve with more dressing. 3.5.3226 7. One of our favorite, easy summer soups, with delicate flavors of zucchini and basil, sweetness from corn, and creaminess from coconut milk. It makes for the perfect, light warm weather lunch. Zucchini and Basil Corn Chowder   Print Ingredients 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1 teaspoon cumin seeds 1 teaspoon ground coriander (optional) pinch of red pepper flakes 1 yellow onion - chopped sea salt freshly ground black pepper 2½ cups fresh or frozen corn kernels 3-4 small zucchini - cubed 3 garlic cloves - sliced juice of ½ lemon 1 can unsweetened light Thai coconut milk 1 cup reserved chickpea broth - from above 1 cup cooked chickpeas - from above 1 packed cup basil leaves, plus more for serving Instructions Warm the coconut oil in a medium soup pot over medium heat. Add the spices, onion, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and sauté for 5 minutes, until onion is translucent. Add the corn and another pinch of salt and sauté for another 5 minutes. Add the zucchini and garlic, and stir around for 1-2 minutes, until the garlic is fragrant. Add the lemon juice and let it absorb for about 1 minute. Add the coconut milk, chickpea broth and chickpeas and bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Measure 1½ cups of the soup into an upright blender, add the basil, and blend into a chunky puree. Return the pureed soup back to the pot and mix it in. Serve the soup garnished with more basil. Store refrigerated in an airtight container. 3.5.3226 8. Use this spice mix for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas, as well as in any other dishes, where a piquant savoriness would be welcome. Fajita Spice   Print Ingredients 2 tablespoons chili powder ½ tablespoon sea salt ½ tablespoon smoked paprika ½ tablespoon ground cumin, preferably freshly ground ½ tablespoon coconut sugar ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 teaspoon garlic powder (optional) a few grinds of black pepper Instructions Combine all the ingredients in a small jar with a tight fitting lid. Close the jar and shake until well-combined. 3.5.3226 9. Prep the vegetables for the Cauliflower Chickpea Fajitas ahead of time, in order to simplify your weeknight dinner. Fajita Vegetable Prep   Print Ingredients ½ cauliflower - cut into florets 2 portobello mushrooms - sliced 1 large red onion - chopped 1 red, yellow or orange bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 green bell pepper - seeded and sliced 1 poblano or jalapeno pepper - seeded and sliced Instructions Prep all the vegetables as specified in the ingredients list. Store the chopped cauliflower and mushrooms in separate containers. Store the chopped onion and all sliced peppers in one container. 3.5.3226 You might also like... Whipped Chocolate Chia Pudding Summer Greek Salad Pink Soup with Roasted Onions and Broccoli Lemongrass Mango Curry with Toasted Pumpkin Seeds .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Plant-Based Summer Meal Plan, Part 1 appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London

June 1 2017 Green Kitchen Stories 

Savory Yogurt Bowl + London We love yogurt in our family*. The unsweetened, thick, creamy and tangy kind. We enjoy yogurt for breakfast (with fruit) and sometimes dessert (with dates + chocolate + nuts). We top our soups with yogurt, we add it to smoothies and ice pops and we also dress our salads with it (Isac likes to dress himself with it as well). Yogurt works remarkably well both with sweet and savory flavors. And yet, the thought of making a yogurt bowl with savory toppings instead of sweet, had never struck us before. But as we were playing around with this crunchy cucumber and melon salad with spiced chickpeas, we (and with we, I humbly mean ME, MYSELF and I - as in, not David) had the simple idea to put them on a bed of yogurt instead of doing the usual yogurt dressing. In theory, it’s more or less the same thing but in reality it’s so much better. The warm, rich and spicy chickpeas on a bed of cold, thick and tangy yogurt, with the addition of a fresh salad with lots of crunch. It’s simple but yet so very good. And quick too. I’m sure there are plenty of savory yogurt bowls all over internet, but now they are also in our kitchen. *David and Isac are actually intolerant to dairy but yogurt is their weak spot. We buy oat yogurt for them but David often chooses a day of stomach ache just to enjoy a bowl of plain yogurt. And Isac has literally been caught with his hand in the yogurt jar more than once. Coconut yogurt has a fantastic taste and consistency but is simply too expensive to enjoy more than as an occasional treat (very keen on giving Ashley’s versions a try though!). Hey hey hey, wait a sec. This is David acting as proofreader today and I just noted Luise’s attempt at hijacking my idea. This recipe = my idea. Just wanted to make that clear. I’ll give the word back to her now. The salad is super quick as you just need to chop everything up. We found that crunchy vegetables like cucumber, celery, sturdy roman lettuce and radishes work really well here, with the avocado and melon adding softness and sweetness. The yogurt is, well, just yogurt. It needs to be quite thick to hold up the topping - our preference is Greek yogurt but choose whatever you prefer. The only thing that needs a little more preparation and heat are the spiced chickpeas. Even if the ingredient list looks long, it’s simply spices, oil and chickpeas and the result tastes way better than just using plain chickpeas. They have a rich, spicy and slightly nutty flavor which works so well with the freshness from the yogurt and the crunchy and sweet salad. VARIATIONS There are plenty of ways to vary this recipe and we’re going to leave you with a few ideas. - Whisk some creamy goat’s cheese into the yogurt. It will dissolve, become smooth and give the yogurt a more mature flavor. - If you don’t have all the spices at home for the chickpeas, use what you find. A bread spice mix works great along with a little cayenne. A turmeric or curry version would be interesting too. - You can skip the salad and pour the yogurt into small sealable jars with spiced chickpeas on top. Store them in the fridge for a quick snack. - Vegans can of course use a vegan yogurt option or simply settle for the salad with warm chickpeas stirred through. - Roasting the chickpeas in the oven together with eggplant or pumpkin could be amazing on top of the yogurt as well. Let us know if you have any other favorite variations on savory yogurt bowls and we can include them in this list. Savory Yogurt Bowl with Spicy Chickpeas & Cucumber Salad Serves 4, or 2 very hungry persons Cucumber & Melon Salad 1 cucumber 1 small (or 1/­­2 regular) melon (we used Piel de Sapo but honeydew would also work) 1 spring onion 2 celery stalks 10-15 fresh mint leaves 1 avocado 6 radishes 1/­­2 roman lettuce 1/­­2 lemon, juice 1 tbsp cold-pressed olive oil Spiced warm chickpeas 2 tbsp sunflower seeds 1 tbsp sesame seeds 2 tsp fennel seeds  1 tsp coriander seeds 1 tsp cardamom seeds 1/­­2 tsp sea salt 1/­­2 tsp ground cayenne 1/­­2 tsp ground cumin 1/­­2 tsp ground paprika powder 1/­­4 cup – 1/­­2 cup cold-pressed olive oil 1 x 14 oz /­­ 400 g can cooked chickpeas, drained and rinsed For serving 2 cups plain full-fat Greek yogurt  For the cucumber & melon salad:  Wash all produce. Cut cucumber and melon in large bite-size pieces. Trim and finely slice spring onion, celery and mint leaves. Cut the avocado in half and remove the stone, then cut into cubes. Trim the radishes and thinly slice them. And chop the roman lettuce. Place all prepared ingredients in a mixing bowl, squeeze over lemon juice, drizzle with olive oil and a little salt, give it a good toss and set aside. For the spiced warm chickpeas:  Add all seeds and spices (except for the ground spices) to a dry skillet, heat gently for a couple of minutes while stirring. When the spices starts to pop and smell fragrant, they’re done. Pour into a mortar and give them a few bashes with the pestle (alternatively on a cutting board and use the back of a chef’s knife). Transfer the seeds and spices back to the skillet. Now add oil (start with the lesser amount and add more later on if it looks dry), ground spices  and chickpeas and heat on low temperature for 2-3 minutes. Stir to combine. When the chickpeas are warm and covered in spices and seeds, remove from the heat. Dollop the yogurt into four bowls. Use the back of a spoon to smooth it out. Arrange the salad on one side of the yogurt and the spiced warm chickpea on the other side. Drizzle a little extra oil on top. Enjoy immediately while the chickpeas are still warm. ********* LONDON + BATH In all my excitement over a simple bowl of yogurt, I almost forgot to mention that we are coming to London and Bath next week for a couple of book events. We’re very excited and can’t wait to meet some of you! We’re having a supper club at Grace Belgravia on Monday 5 June, 7-10 pm. More info here. We’ll do talk and Q&A at Whole Foods Market in Kensington on Wednesday 7 June, 6.30 pm. More info and tickets here. We’ll also do a talk and cooking demo at Topping & Company Booksellers in Bath on Friday 9 June, 7.30 pm. More info and tickets here. Finally, we’re having a hands on cooking class at Bertinet Kitchen in Bath on Saturday 10 June, 10 am. Tickets here (only one left). Big love!

Chana Chaat (Spicy Snack)

May 8 2017 Manjula's kitchen 

(adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({});   Chana Chaat Chana Chaat is a healthy and delicious snack. I am using kala chana for this recipe. Kala chana looks like chickpeas, but brown in color. This is a delightfully sweet and tangy snack. Channa Chaat will also make a very enjoyable lunch box meal. - 1 cup kala chana - 2 Tbsp oil (Canola, or vegetable oil) - 1 Tbsp ginger (finely shredded) - 1 Tbsp green chili (finely chopped) - 1 Tbsp coriander powder (dhania) - 1/­­4 cup tamarind pulp (this is available in India grocery store or you can make it at home soaking the tamarind and squeeze the pulp. But not the concentrated tamarind) - 1 tsp red chili powder - 1 tsp salt - 1 tsp black salt - 1 Tbsp sugar - 2 tsp roasted cumin seed powder (bhuna jeera) - 1 cup potato (boiled peeled and cut in small pieces) - 1/­­2 cup cucumber (chopped in small pieces) - 1/­­2 cup tomatoes (chopped in small pieces) For garnishing - 1 Tbsp ginger (finely chopped) - 1 Tbsp green chilies (finely chopped) - 5-6 wedges of lemon - Wash and soak kala chana in approx. 4 cups of water, for at least 4 hours. The kala chana will double in volume after soaking. - In pressure cooker cook kala chana with 2 cups of water over medium high heat. As pressure cooker starts steaming turn the heat down to low medium and cook for about 15 minutes. Close the heat and wait until steam has stopped before opening the pressure cooker. Chana should be soft and tender. - Drain the water and save it for later use, this water is high in protein and can be used for making the soup or dals. - Heat the oil in a sauce pan over medium high heat. Add the chana, stir for few seconds. Add ginger and green chili, coriander powder, sauté for about 1 minutes. - Add salt, black salt, red chili powder, and sugar, add tamarind pulp. Cook for 3-4 minutes over low heat. If needed use few spoons of water, Chana mix should be moist. Turn off the heat. - Assemble the Kala Chana Chaat, add chopped potatoes, tomatoes, and cucumber, drizzle the roasted cumin seeds powder and mix it well. If desired garnish with sliced ginger, green chilies and drizzle the lemon juice. Prep Time of 10 minutes does not include soaking time. Suggestions You can serve chana chaat without adding the veggies, it tastes delicious. You can always adjust quantity of veggies to your choice. Also adjust the green chili and red pepper to your choice. After spicing the chana mix with cooked plain rice to make spicy delicious meal.   The post Chana Chaat (Spicy Snack) appeared first on Manjula's Kitchen.


You will enjoy these as well ...

Found an error?
Help to fix it! Tell it us!



Our sites missing something? Suggest new content or features!



Have you any comments?
Send it us!