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7 Squash Recipes You Absolutely Need to Make This Fall

14 Restaurant Chains Offering Meatless Monday Options

Tomato curry recipe | thakkali curry | tomato kura recipe

Everything Bagel Tofu










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14 Restaurant Chains Offering Meatless Monday Options

yesterday 06:01 Meatless Monday 

14 Restaurant Chains Offering Meatless Monday OptionsFast-food and quick-service restaurants all across the country have recognized that customers want to incorporate more plant-based foods into their diet. And were thrilled! Today, it is easier than ever to join the Meatless Monday movement. Last week, McDonalds announced their plan to test their own version of a meatless burger in collaboration with Beyond Meat. They join a growing list of chains offering some sort of plant-based alternative to their menu. And while plant-based burgers are getting all of the media attention, many national chain restaurants are serving a variety of meatless veg-forward options that deliver that same fast-food flavor using grains, legumes and fresh vegetables. For all of you looking to go meatless on Monday , weve compiled a list of the most popular national chain restaurants that are offering plant-based options on their menus.   Bareburger    View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Bareburger (@bareburger) on Oct 3, 2019 at 3:10pm PDT Bareburger  has your favorite, whether its the Beyond Burger, the Impossible Burger or a veggie packed black bean or sweet potato burger, they serve them all. The restaurant chain also serves plant-based eggs, tempeh bacon and the Beyond Bratwurst. Its pretty much plant-based heaven here.   Burger King   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Burger King (@burgerking) on Aug 22, 2019 at 7:34am PDT When the news first dropped that Burger King  launched its very own Impossible-Burger-Based Whopper , it became the largest chain to embrace plant-based meat - over 7,000 locations nationwide. And, at least according to this video taste test , self-proclaimed carnivores are just as wild about the plant-based option. The Impossible Whopper is served with tomatoes, lettuce, mayo, ketchup, pickles, and onions on a sesame seed bun.   Cheesecake Factory   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by The Cheesecake Factory (@cheesecakefactory) on Jun 18, 2019 at 12:00pm PDT Who would have thought that the Cheesecake Factory would be a pioneer in meatless dining ? Well, the chain has quite the selection of non-meat alternatives -- vegan Cobb salad, avocado toast, roasted artichokes, falafel salad, super antioxidant salad, and their version of the Impossible Burger (note: this one is not vegan because of the cheese and brioche bun, the latter is typically made with egg and butter).   Chopt Creative Salad Co.   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Chopt Creative Salad Co. (@choptsalad) on Mar 3, 2019 at 9:08am PST Although the chain is more-or-less confined to the East Coast, Chopt has wooed diners looking for a more diverse array of meatless options . They offer a long list of preconceived salad concepts, but they also give you the ability to customize your own. Choose from one of their classic salad and grain bowl combinations, or just let your inner chef guide lead the way.   Del Taco   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Del Taco (@deltaco) on Sep 2, 2019 at 11:03am PDT An early adopter of Beyond Meats plant-based crumbles , Del Taco offers a comprehensive list of meatless options that includes burritos, tacos, bowls and even a crunchy tostada. Looking for something a little more traditional? Try a bean burrito or black bean bowl.   Dunkin   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Dunkin (@dunkin) on Jul 24, 2019 at 11:21am PDT Besides their newly launched Beyond Meat breakfast sandwich , Dunkin’ offers a number of vegetarian options including a veggie egg white wrap and an egg and cheese sandwich on an English muffin.   Just Salad   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Just Salad (@justsalad) on Sep 12, 2019 at 8:00am PDT In September, Just Salad announced a partnership with Beyond Meat that brings Beyond Beef Meatballs to the menus of all 40 of their locations. But Just Salad is taking their meatless commitment one step further by removing all forms of beef from their menu . For Meatless Monday, try their Keto Zoodle Bowl, which contains Beyond Beef Meatballs, zucchini noodles, grape tomatoes, and roasted balsamic mushrooms.   Mellow Mushroom   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Mellow Mushroom (@mellowmushroom) on Dec 10, 2018 at 9:20am PST It’s plant-based pie paradise at Mellow Mushroom . Their meatless pizza options include dairy-free cheese, Follow Your Heart brand, and plant-based proteins, such as tofu and tempeh… plus every veggie topping you could possibly imagine. DIY your pie or opt for one of their curated specialty pizzas.   McDonalds   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by McDonalds Canada (@mcdonaldscanada) on Sep 26, 2019 at 3:29am PDT We bet you never thought youd see McDonalds on this list, but the Golden Arches have finally decided to try their hand at plant-based meat. McDonalds recently announced that they would be testing a P.L.T (plant, lettuce and tomato) in 28 locations in and around London, Ontario starting this week and lasting through the end of the year. Beyond Meat will be supplying the burger, but the sesame seed bun, tomato, lettuce, pickles, onions, mayo-style sauce, ketchup, mustard, and a slice of processed cheddar cheese will be classic McDonalds. As the worlds largest chain and one of the largest buyers of beef globally, the P.L.T. addition has enormous potential to positively impact the environment.   Panera Bread   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Panera Bread (@panerabread) on Oct 26, 2018 at 7:14am PDT Panera Bread has always been ahead of the pack when it comes to vegan and plant-based options, but theyve upped their game in recent years as the call for meatless options has gotten louder. Panera Bread has gone as far as launching an entire plant-based menu that lists a Greek Salad, a Modern Caprese Sandwich, a Mediterranean Veggie Sandwich, a Ten Vegetable Soup, and a variety of smoothies.   QDOBA   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by QDOBA (@qdoba) on May 28, 2019 at 9:07am PDT Following in the footsteps of other major quick-service chains, QDOBA has launched new vegan and fajita bowls in conjunction with Impossible Foods . But even without the plant-based beef, its easy to go meatless at Qdoba; try one of their tacos, burritos, or bowls with black or pinto beans, brown or cilantro-lime rice, and grilled veggies. And you can always add guac or salsa on the side.   Red Robin   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Red Robin Gourmet Burgers (@redrobinburgers) on Oct 7, 2019 at 10:34am PDT Red Robin has two options for meatless burger seekers. Their veggie burger is a mixtape of culinary inspiration -- cool avocado, Swiss cheese, roasted garlic aioli, and tomato bruschetta sit atop an ancient-grain veggie patty. If youre looking for a more traditional burger experience, you can swap in the Impossible patty on to any traditional Red Robin burger.   Subway   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by Beyond Meat (@beyondmeat) on Sep 5, 2019 at 2:26pm PDT Until recently, Subways plant-based options were limited to a simple veggie sandwich and salad. But theyve seriously upped their veg game with the addition of the Beyond Meat Meatless-Meatball Marinara - which boasts 24g of protein for a 6 sub. Leave off the cheese and pack it with veggies for an even more substantial plant-based lunch or dinner.   TGI Fridays   View this post on Instagram   A post shared by TGI Fridays (@tgifridays) on Oct 1, 2018 at 10:00am PDT At participating TGI Fridays , the Beyond Burger comes grilled and topped with white cheddar, lettuce, tomato, red onion, pickles and Fridays sauce. Of course, you can also order it in place of other burgers. Check out Meatless Mondays visit to TGI Fridays  as they launched their Beyond Burger.   Are you looking for more meatless dining options? Check out our list of best plant-based burgers .   Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , 

Overnight Apple Peanut Butter Oatmeal

October 7 2019 Meatless Monday 

This apple peanut butter oatmeal is made with whole grains, healthy fats, and fruit – what better way to start your day? Plus, using a slow cooker to make multiple servings saves time every morning of the week. This recipe comes to us from Oldways and The Peanut Institute . Want more meatless recipes like this? Subscribe to our newsletter  for a weekly selection of plant-based recipes delivered right to your inbox! Serves 4 - 1 cup steel cut oats - 1/­­4 cup light brown sugar - 1 teaspoon vanilla extract - 1/­­2 teaspoon ground cinnamon - 1/­­4 teaspoon salt - 1/­­4 cup creamy peanut butter - 2 medium apples, peeled, cored, and cut into 1/­­2-inch pieces   Coat the inside of a 5-6 quart slow cooker with cooking spray. Combine the oats, brown sugar, vanilla extract, cinnamon, salt, and 3 1/­­4 cups water in the slow cooker. Add the peanut butter and whisk to incorporate. Stir in the apples, cover, and cook on low heat for 8 hours. Incorporate the somewhat crusty oatmeal stuck to the sides and bottom by stirring for 2-3 minutes. Serve warm. Active time: 10 minutes Total: 8 hours The post Overnight Apple Peanut Butter Oatmeal appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day

October 4 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day Happy October! Today we’ve got the coziest recipe for ushering in the first full month of fall – a cauliflower bake from Amy Chaplin’s beautiful new cookbook, Whole Food Cooking Every Day. This recipe has everything we ever want in a comforting, fall dish: mushrooms, caramelized onions, chickpeas, and hearty greens, all covered by a fluffy, almost cheesy blanket of vegan cauliflower souffle. We’ve been so excited for the release of this cookbook, being huge fans of Amy’s work. Her first book is a true bible of whole food cooking, filled with kitchen wisdom and an incredible variety of plant-forward recipes. We learned so much from that volume, like the fact that it’s best to cook beans with a sheet of kombu for better digestion and that making a curry spice blend at home is very much worth it for the unbelievable flavor. Much like Amy’s first cookbook, Whole Food Cooking Every Day is monumental and thorough, with beautiful photography woven throughout. The book is organized in a brilliant way – each chapter presents a base recipe, which is then elaborated on with different ingredient variations. The Cauliflower Bake chapter that we worked from features a recipe for a fluffy cauliflower topping, which can go over a number of different fillings. Here are some examples of other base recipe chapters: Genius Whole-Grain Porridges, Gluten-Free Breads, Simple and Healing Soups, Baked Marinated Tempeh, Seeded Crackers, Easy Cakes. Don’t all of those sound amazing? If you’re ever in the market for a trusted resource on colorful, everyday whole food cooking, look no further. We hope you’ll enjoy the cozy bake Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day   Print recipe from Whole Food Cooking Every Day by Amy Chaplin Serves: 4-6 Ingredients for the cauliflower topping 1 large head (2½ lbs) cauliflower - cut into 1½ florets ½ cup raw pine nuts, cashews, or macadamia nuts 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 3 tablespoons nutritional yeast, plus more to taste ½ teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste for the mushroom and onion filling 3 tablespoons extra-virgin coconut oil 1½ lbs shiitake mushrooms - stems removed and caps thinly sliced 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme 3 medium onions - quartered and thinly sliced lengthwise ½ teaspoon fine sea salt, plus more to taste 6 cups (6 oz) sliced Swiss chard - tough stems removed 1½ cups cooked chickpeas (1/­­4 cup cooking liquid reserved) or 1 15 oz can (drained) 1 tablespoon tamari 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar ¼ cups filtered water if using canned chickpeas 2 teaspoons arrowroot powder 1 tablespoon filtered water freshly ground black pepper Instructions to make the cauliflower topping Set up a steamer pot with about 2 inches of filtered water in the bottom (the water shouldnt touch the bottom of the basket) and bring to a boil over high heat. Arrange the cauliflower florets in the steamer basket, cover, and steam for 10-12 minutes, until the cauliflower is cooked through but not falling apart. Remove from the heat and set aside. Put the nuts, olive oil, yeast, and salt in a high-powered blender and add the steamed cauliflower. Starting on low speed and using the tamper stick to help press the cauliflower down, blend, gradually increasing the speed to high, until completely smooth and thick; use the tamper stick to keep the mixture moving and to scrape down the sides as you go. This will take a couple of minutes. Season with more nutritional yeast and salt to taste and blend to combine. to make the mushroom and onion filling, and assemble Preheat the oven to 375°F (190° C). Warm a large skillet over medium-high heat and pour in 1 tablespoon of the oil. Add half the shiitakes and the thyme, stir to coat with oil, and cook for 10-12 minutes, stirring only every minute or two (to allow the mushrooms to brown), until the shiitakes are golden brown. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. Repeat with another tablespoon of oil and the remaining mushrooms. Wash and dry the skillet if there are blackened bits on the bottom. Add the remaining tablespoon oil to the pan, then add the onions and cook over medium heat for 8 minutes, or until beginning to brown. Cover the pan, reduce the heat to low, and cook for 10 minutes, or until the onions are soft and lightly browned. Remove the lid, add the salt, and cook uncovered for another 5 minutes, or until the onions are caramelized. Add the chard, cover, and allow to steam for 3 minutes, or until tender. Add the chickpeas, cooked mushrooms, tamari, balsamic vinegar, and chickpea cooking liquid or ¼ cup water, raise the heat, and bring to a simmer. Dissolve the arrowroot in 1 tablespoon water, stir, and drizzle into the simmering mixture, stirring constantly. When the mixture has returned to a simmer, remove from the heat and season to taste with pepper and more salt. Transfer the mixture to an 8-inch square or equivalent baking dish and smooth the surface. Spread the cauliflower topping evenly over the filling. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the filling is bubbling and the topping has begun to set. Turn on the broiler and broil the bake for 3 to 6 minutes, until the topping is golden and browning in parts. Remove from the oven and allow to sit for a few minutes before serving. Once cooled, leftovers can be stored in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 3 days. To reheat, put the bake in a baking dish, cover, and warm in a 400° F (200° C) oven until heated through. Notes Here are some modifications we made while making the recipe based on what we had on hand. It turned out delicious this way as well. - We used half shiitakes and half crimini mushrooms. Crimini take a little longer to brown but otherwise work well here. - We used sage instead of thyme and also topped the bake with some crispy fried sage. - We used coconut aminos instead of tamari - those two are pretty interchangeable. - When baking, the filling tends to bubble up and drip out of the dish, so its helpful to set the baking dish over a baking sheet, to catch the drippings and avoid a smoking oven. 3.5.3226 The post Mushroom and Onion Cauliflower Bake from Whole Food Cooking Every Day appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Cozy Pantry Stew

September 29 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Cozy Pantry Stew Hello friends! We’re back from a little hiatus having to do with my wedding. I married my love of many years under the September full moon in upstate NY, and it was such a fun party. The wedding took all of our time and energy, since we did everything we could ourselves together with friends and family. That’s why it’s been extra quiet around here. I’m sharing a few wedding photos at the bottom of this post, but otherwise it’s back to regular programming around here! We’re excited to cook with all the fall produce popping up right now and have a few digital cookbook projects in the works for the coming months. We missed this space and YOU. On to this life saver of a stew. I don’t know if this is the case for you, but in our house, when we say we have nothing to eat, most of the time it’s not really true. That type of talk usually comes from laziness or not being in the mood for whatever ingredients we do have on hand. Both my husband and I are avid home cooks and generally obsessed with good food, so we have a well-stocked pantry. This year, we’ve been trying to be more mindful of those ‘nothing-to-eat moments’ and have been cooking more from the pantry. The results always save us money and end up tasting more nourishing than any takeout ever would. This stew is something that we make all the time, using pantry staples and odds and ends from the fridge. It’s flavorful, soul-warming, and so easy. Scrapping together meals out of seemingly nothing is one of my favorite ways to cook – I love anything having to do with economy in the kitchen. (Tamar Adler’s An Everlasting Meal is one of my favorite books). It’s like a game and so endlessly satisfying when that meal appears out of ‘thin air.’ I know everyone’s pantries are vastly different, but if you’re a vegan/­­vegetarian-inclined cook, I have a hunch that you’ll have at least some of these ingredients on hand. I love keeping red lentils around because they cook almost instantly and taste great – these make up the base of our stew. Then come the aromatics. Dig up those unused carrots and celery out of the crisper (soak them in cold water for a few hours if they’re really limp) and find an onion (or an unused half of one!), shallots, or leeks. That classic trio of onion, celery, and carrots help build great flavor for soup like nothing else does. Then, see if you have some leftover white wine in the fridge and grab a few cloves of garlic. Wine gives this stew that extra something and truly takes it to the next level. If you don’t have an open bottle, you could also open one to cook with and enjoy with dinner. Any other extras are up to you and your pantry/­­fridge. When it comes to spices, dried herbs are great, as well as turmeric, but you could also add coriander, cumin, or even curry. The stew pictured here has cherry tomatoes and sweet potato. Tomatoes add umami and I wouldn’t skip them, but if you don’t have fresh ones, you could add a little bit of canned tomatoes or even tomato paste. Sweet potato is totally optional, but use it here if you have one, or a regular potato, squash, or even cauliflower. At the end, wilt in some greens and finish the stew off with lemon juice for brightness. Add any garnish you like or have, like yogurt, herbs, or pan-fried mushrooms (as pictured), and you’re done! The description is long because I wanted to lay out our logic, but the stew itself comes together very quickly. Hope you’ll give this one a try

Easy Chilled Beet Soup

August 2 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Easy Chilled Beet Soup This soup tastes like you’re eating the garden in the best possible way. In Russia, we call it svekolnik, but similar recipes can be found in other Eastern European countries like Lithuania, Poland, etc. It tastes incredibly refreshing and life-giving, and the preparation couldn’t be simpler, with only 7 core ingredients. For beet skeptics, this chilled approach might be your key to enjoying beets, since their flavor is quite mild here. The mandatory dollop of yogurt or sour cream (we love coconut yogurt here) takes everything to the next level, so make sure not to skip it :) The cool thing about this soup is that it uses the entire beet, tops and greens included. You don’t have to have the tops to make it, but if your beets come with bushy tops, don’t throw them away. It’s no secret that beet tops are incredibly nutritious, so that contributes to the whole life-giving, garden feel of this dish. Typically, svekolnik recipes call for eggs, but since we keep things plant-based around here, we’ve come up with two delicious alternatives. I’ve been making this soup with white beans all summer long, and they fit in perfectly, so that’s one of them. And then recently, it occurred to me that silken tofu has a similar texture to egg whites and could be delicious in this recipe, like it usually is in Japanese cold tofu dishes. It worked – tofu is totally tasty and texturally perfect here, and, like the beans, it adds extra protein and makes the soup more satiating. We hope you’ll give this beet soup a try sometime this summer. Wishing you a beautiful weekend :) Easy Chilled Beet Soup   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients 5 medium beets, tops included if present sea salt freshly ground black pepper 16 oz silken tofu or white beans juice from 2 small lemons 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar 4-6 small cucumbers, like Persian - cubed dill/­­parsley/­­green onion - chopped yogurt or cashew sour cream/­­other sour cream of choice - for serving Instructions Separate the beets from their tops, if present. Wash and scrub the beets clean and place them in a soup pot. Separate the beet stems from the leaves, setting the leaves aside until ready to serve the soup. Finely chop the stems and place them in the soup pot. Cover the beets and stems with water by about 2. Season with salt and pepper - this water will become your broth. Bring up to a boil and boil for 20-25 minutes, until the beets are tender throughout. Carefully remove the beets from the broth with a slotted spoon or tongs, leaving the stems in the pot. Let the beets cool or run them under cold water, then peel off the skins. Grate the beets on a box grater or with the grater attachment of a food processor. Return the grated beets back to the pot with the broth. Add the tofu or beans to the pot, along with the lemon juice, vinegar, and another pinch of salt if needed. Put the pot in the refrigerator to chill completely for 2-4 hours or overnight. Once chilled, taste for salt, pepper, and vinegar, and adjust if needed. To serve, place about 1 small cubed cucumber in each bowl. Finely chop the beet greens and add a handful to each bowl. Pour the soup over the vegetables, making to sure to catch plenty of the grated beets and tofu/­­white beans. Garnish with lots of herbs and a mandatory dollop of yogurt or cashew sour cream. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 The post Easy Chilled Beet Soup appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day!

July 10 2019 Robin Robertson's Global Vegan Kitchen 

Celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day! Did you know July 14 is National Mac and Cheese Day? I cant think of a better way to celebrate this classic comfort food that to enjoy some delicious vegan mac and cheese. In honor of this special day, Im sharing one of my favorite recipes from my upcoming book, Vegan Mac & Cheese. In the coming weeks, Ill be providing sneak peeks of whats inside the book.  For now, enjoy this recipe for Buffalo Cauliflower Mac and celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day. And, in case you missed it....when you pre-order Vegan Mac & Cheese on Amazon, my publisher will send you free bonus recipes. Buffalo Cauliflower Mac Buffalo cauliflower has been making the rounds, so it should come as no surprise that it turns up in a mac uncheese. The cheesy, saucy macaroni is a perfect foil for the spicy hot cauliflower. Sauce: 1 large russet potato, cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) chunks 1 large carrot, cut into 1-inch (2.5 cm) chunks 21/­­2 cups (600 ml) vegetable broth 2/­­3 cup (40 g) nutritional yeast 2 tablespoons (30 ml) tamari 1/­­2 teaspoon onion powder 1/­­2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt Cauliflower: 1 head cauliflower, cored and cut into bite-size pieces Olive oil cooking spray 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/­­4 teaspoon salt 1/­­3 cup (80 ml) hot pepper sauce, preferably Frank’s RedHot 4 tablespoons (56 g) vegan butter, melted 1 tablespoon (15 ml) apple cider vinegar 1 teaspoon paprika Macaroni: 16 ounces (454 g) elbow macaroni, or other small pasta shape   Sauce: In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, combine the potato, carrot, and vegetable broth. Bring to a boil and cook for 15 minutes, or until the vegetables are tender when pierced with a fork. Carefully transfer the mixture to a blender or food processor. Add the nutritional yeast, tamari, onion powder, and garlic powder, and salt. Blend until the sauce is smooth. Tasste and add more salt if needed. Set aside. Cauliflower: Preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Arrange the cauliflower in a single layer on the prepared pan. Spray the cauliflower with cooking spray, then and sprinkle with the garlic powder and salt. Roast for 20 minutes, then transfer to a large bowl and add the hot sauce, butter, vinegar, and paprika. Stir well to coat. Return the cauliflower to the baking sheet and arrange it in a single layer. Bake for 10 minutes longer. Macaroni: Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the pasta and cook according to the package directions until al dente. Cook the macaroni in a pot of boiling salted water until it is al dente. Drain well and return it to the pot. Stir in the reserved sauce and place the pot over low heat. Cook over low heat for a few minutes to heat through. Stir in the buffalo cauliflower and gently stir to combine. Serve hot. The post Celebrate National Mac and Cheese Day! appeared first on Robin Robertson.

Twice Baked Salsa Potatoes with Fajita Veggies

May 6 2019 Oh My Veggies 

Do you ever go to a restaurant and order the same dish every time? For better or worse, I’m a person who likes routine. Usually when I find something I like at a restaurant, I stick with it. My husband always ribs me for ordering the same thing time and time again, but it works for me, so why not, right? But there was one Mexican restaurant that we used to go to and both of us would order the same thing every time we went there–Veggie Fajitas. And then we’d both get a side of spicy, cheesy mashed potatoes. Even my husband couldn’t branch out and try something different because the fajitas were just so flippin’ good. But then! One hot August afternoon, we went to get our usual fajitas-and-potatoes combo and what the server brought out to us shook me to the core. Oh yes, I was shook! Instead of the usual zucchini, onions, mushrooms, and corn, there on our fajita plate was a sad, soggy mix of onions, peas, and carrots. Frozen veggies! Frozen veggies that do not even belong in fajitas! Who puts frozen peas in fajitas? Who?! And even more importantly, why? As much as […]

Vegan Chickpea Brownies Grain-free GF

April 13 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Chickpea Brownies Grain-free GFVegan Chickpea Brownies. Grain free Brownies with chickpeas and nut butter or seed butter. These Vegan Gluten free Brownies Can be made without nuts. Fudgy Healthy No Added Oil, No Added refined sugar Jump to Recipe I am always playing around with beans and lentils in desserts And the successful results show up on the blog! You all have been loving my lentil brownies and this Chickpea Cookie Pie. In this version, I use chickpeas for a fudgy delicious brownie! These Vegan Chickpea Brownies need a few ingredients, cooked chickpeas, nut butter or seed butter, chocolate in various forms (melted, chips and cocoa powder), vanilla, almond flour and baking powder. They are also grain-free!, have no added refined oil or added refined sugar. There might be sugar, oil in the chocolate chips depending on which you choose to use. There are brands that use just cocoa butter and are unsweetened or sweetened with stevia. These Brownies are smoother(no bean skin!), fudgyier and tastier than bean brownies and use less sugar and fat than regular brownies. Everything gets added to a food processor to process to a smooth stiff batter, which is spread in a brownie pan and baked. Serve these warm with vegan ice cream!Continue reading: Vegan Chickpea Brownies Grain-free GFThe post Vegan Chickpea Brownies Grain-free GF appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese

April 3 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese This might be our favorite recipe so far this year! We were craving bolognese, but were also mindful of the fact that it’s spring, which generally has people cooking lighter, greener fare. So we compromised and came up with a vegetable-packed bolognese that doesn’t depend on canned tomatoes. Instead, we start with fresh cherry tomatoes, bell pepper, zucchini, and tons of basil. Tempeh and mushrooms bring savoriness and meatiness, while some pantry staples help build the deep flavors that you’d generally expect from bolognese. The result is super flavorful and amazing on pasta, but it also feels lighter and more spring-appropriate than your traditional bolognese. We’ll be showing how to make this recipe step-by-step on our Instagram Stories later today, so check that out if you’re interested in trying it :) If you’re doubtful about including zucchini in bolognese, give it a chance! When roasted, it has a nice, meaty texture that goes perfectly with the mushrooms and tempeh. In addition to that, some of the zucchini gets blended into the sauce, which makes the whole thing super creamy. This recipe is also great for tempeh skeptics. The tempeh just takes on the flavors of the sauce and aromatics here and contributes a meaty bite, without any other foreign flavors. We’re having a bit of a tempeh obsession right now and it’s so good in this dish. That’s pretty much it! Hope you try this one and thanks so much for all your comments on last week’s giveaway. Zucchini, Tempeh and Mushroom Bolognese   Print Serves: 6 Ingredients 8 oz tempeh 2 tablespoons tamari 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar ⅓ cup cashews ⅓ cup sun dried tomatoes (dry, not oil-packed) 10 oz cherry tomatoes - halved 2 zucchini - cut in half lengthwise 1 red bell pepper - cored and quartered 1 lb crimini mushrooms - quartered sea salt freshly ground black pepper avocado oil or other roasting oil of choice 1 yellow onion - chopped 3 cloves of garlic - minced 1 tablespoon tomato paste splash of red wine (optional) ¼ cup nutritional yeast 12 oz pasta or more - for serving 1 bunch of basil - chopped, plus more for garnish Instructions In a bowl, crumble the tempeh and drizzle with the tamari and balsamic, toss to coat. Soak the cashews and sun dried tomatoes in hot water. Preheat oven to 400° F (200° C). Prepare 2 parchment paper-covered baking trays. Arrange the tomatoes, zucchini, bell pepper, and mushrooms on the trays. Sprinkle everything with salt and pepper, drizzle with oil, and mix to coat. Place the trays in the oven and roast for 35-45 minutes, until all the vegetables are soft and all the liquid thats been released by the mushrooms cooks off. Meanwhile, heat oil to a large pan set over medium heat (if you dont have a large pan, consider using a soup pot here). Add the onion and sauté for 7 minutes, until translucent. Add the marinated tempeh, stir once, and then let sit without stirring for a good 3-4 minutes, so that it thoroughly browns. Stir and sauté for another 3-4 minutes, until completely browned. Stir in the garlic at the end. Add the tomato paste and a splash of wine, if using, and stir to coat. Once the vegetables are done roasting, in an upright blender, combine 1 roasted zucchini half, all of the bell pepper, all the tomatoes, about ⅓ of the amount of the mushrooms, the drained cashews and sun dried tomatoes, nutritional yeast, and about 3 cups of water or broth. Blend until smooth, taste for salt and adjust if needed. Cube the remaining roasted zucchini. Add the sauce to the pan with the tempeh, along with the cubed zucchini and remaining mushrooms and bring up to a simmer. Let the sauce reduce for 10-15 minutes. Meanwhile, cook the pasta. Once the sauce is done cooking, stir in the basil. Serve the bolognese over pasta, garnished with more basil. Notes This bolognese keeps really well, so we suggest cooking as much pasta as youre planning on eating that day and serving it with the sauce bit by bit. That way, you can enjoy properly cooked, al dente pasta every time. 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired

March 7 2019 Golubka Kitchen 

Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew – Abruzzo Inspired We’re continuing with our series of Abruzzo-inspired, plant-based meals today (all our previous recipes are linked below). We love this style of cooking, because it’s focused on an elegant kind of simplicity that really lets every single ingredient shine. Italians tend to take the integrity of their ingredients really seriously, which we experienced first-hand everywhere we ate and cooked in Abruzzo. That obsession with quality ingredients really comes through in the amazing flavor of seemingly very basic dishes. This golden, warming stew was inspired by a seriously unforgettable cabbage and potato stew we tried in Abruzzo. We added our own spin to it – white beans and mushrooms – but the core stayed the same. It’s got just the type of soul-warming energy that we want in our kitchens and on our stoves during a decidedly un-spring like, snowy March. There are still spots open for our retreat in Abruzzo this coming October! You can read all about our past retreat here, complete with photos and testimonials. This time around, we will be focusing on re-centering and relaxation, together with exploring beautiful Abruzzo. We are super excited to have an on-site yoga/­­meditation instructor and an on-site acupuncture physician, both offering daily services. We’ll be hosting a bunch of fun workshops like medicinal jams, vegan cheese, meal planning, and homemade skincare (wink wink Magic Moisturizer). Also: visits to an olive grove, winery, and a family truffle plantation. You can see our whole sample itinerary here, and book here! Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! This stew is all about the combination of the fragrant, golden broth and the rustic, chunky pieces of variously textured veg. There’s tender, silky cabbage, carby goodness from the potatoes, and meatiness from the mushrooms and white beans. Onion, carrots and garlic establish a solid flavor base, and the addition of nutritional yeast, mustard, red pepper flakes, and lemon brings even more depth and a kick of zing and spice. We are crazy about this recipe. You can also watch us making this stew step-by-step later today on our Instagram Stories (it will be saved to our highlights as well). Hope you give it a try! For more of our Abruzzo-inspired recipes, check these out: Pasta e Ceci, The Simplest Lentil Soup, Ciabotta, Rhubarb Jam Cookies. And all scenery photos in this post are from our past retreat in Abruzzo this fall. Click Here to book our Abruzzo Retreat! Having the opportunity to explore a lesser known region of Italy to find its hidden gems in the Culinary arts was such an enriching experience! Getting to see first hand how the people in these areas live, visiting locals in their homes... From truffle hunting to tasting oil from 600 year old olive groves... Wild foraging for greens & making pasta in an Italian womans kitchen.... Not the typical trip to Italy. It was a delightful & delicious experience! - Rachel, Alabama I loved the retreat. It was well managed, we had the best food, awesome accommodation, great people, perfectly sized travel group and great tour guides. I had looked very much forward to this retreat and it was even better than I imagined. You created an amazing experience, with wonderful and very unique accommodations, the best meals I have ever had, set in a beautiful landscape, off the beaten path. The silence was palpable and so welcome to step out of the noisy and hectic lifestyle most of us have these days. I seriously consider joining you again, so I can have more of those meals, go back to the medieval village of Santo Stefano and the unique scattered hotel. We also had an awesome group, which made it even more special! - Claudia, Massachusetts It was a trip of a lifetime. Abruzzo could not have been more beautiful! I loved the diversity of the land, the hiking, cooking and loved loved loved the food. I also was glad that it was not a large group...I liked the intimacy of the smaller number of participants. It truly was a remarkable 6 days and you all were so kind, knowledgeable and pleasant to be with. - Helen, Michigan Thank you for the wonderful trip. It was so much more than I thought it would be. A deep dive into the food, culture and people of Abruzzo. I had experiences that I could never have on my own. I thought we were a good mix of ages, interests and countries. Diversity makes things so interesting. - Maudia, Michigan Ive been to Italy before but never like this! We visited magical places that Id never know about on my own: Santo Stefano with its fairytale charm, the beautiful truffle plantation, ancient olive grove, a winery located right in a family homes basement... Every single one was a unique, unforgettable experience. Thank you! - Katya, Sochi Golden Potato, Cabbage, and White Bean Stew   Print Serves: 4-6 Ingredients olive oil 1 medium onion - diced 2 large carrots - finely cubed sea salt 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast generous pinch of red pepper flakes 3 cloves of garlic - minced 4 oz shiitake mushrooms - stems removed, sliced 1 lb any starchy potatoes of choice - cut into 1 chunks freshly ground black pepper 1½ tablespoons Dijon or grainy mustard 2 bay leaves 7 cups water or veggie broth/­­broth from cooking the white beans 1 small Nappa or white cabbage - cored and cut into 1 chunks 2½-3 cups cooked white beans juice from 1 lemon handful of parsley - chopped, for serving Instructions Heat up a soup pot over medium heat and add some olive oil for sautéing. Add the onion and carrots, along with some salt and pepper, and sauté for about 8-10 minutes, until the onion and carrots are soft. Add the nutritional yeast, red pepper flakes, garlic, shiitake, and another pinch of salt. Stir and cook for another 8 minutes, or until the mushrooms are cooked through and any liquid that they release is evaporated. Add the potatoes, black pepper, mustard, and another pinch of salt, and give everything a stir. Add the bay leaves and water/­­broth and bring up to a simmer. Be mindful to use less salt if you are using a salted broth or more salt if using water. Using a wooden spoon or spatula, deglaze any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Simmer, partially covered, for 20-25 minutes, until the potatoes are tender. Add the cabbage and white beans, and bring the stew back up to a simmer. Simmer, partially covered, for another 15 minutes, until the cabbage is silky and tender. Turn off the heat. Add the lemon juice and stir it in. Taste for salt and pepper and adjust if needed. Serve the stew, garnished with parsley and a drizzle of olive oil. Enjoy! 3.5.3226 You might also like... 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20 Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com

December 31 2018 Vegan Richa 

20 Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com20 Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com . Popular Recipes that made the top recipes from 2018 with a few of my favorites and also some recipes that have been consistently loved from the archives! Glutenfree Soyfree options Its a wrap! 2018 has been an year of ups and downs, in health, blogging, life and everything. My digestion issues meant I was eating less of legumes and you probably noticed that slight shift on the blog from a whole lotta chickpeas to more of mushrooms and tofu. I do make a lot of legume based meals, but with from scratch cooked beans rather than canned and also eat it only on the day they are cooked (no leftovers for me). So a lot of meals get out to the neighborhood! (if you are in seattle main area and would like some, ping me on fb. I don’t deliver, you pick)   Blogging is now pretty competitive with all the amazing new blogs with great photography and content. The competitiveness of it as a business can get to one. My plan for 2019 is to continue to do what I love, i.e. develop amazing recipes, and then delegate and find help for the rest. There will always be people who can do things better in some ways, and stressing about it gets me nowhere. So lets just create and eat amazing food!  What I also learnt is that you the readers have various interests when it comes to food. Quick recipes obviously always work. There are tons of those already out there, some on the blog and books too. And even though a good portion of my recipes use a few more ingredients and a few more steps, you choose to trust them and love the results! I am incredibly thankful that you do! Thank you for the support and love this year. Here is to many more! Wish you all a very Happy 2019! Here are the popular recipes from the year with a few of my favorites that were not as popular and also some recipes that have been consistently loved from the archives! What did you try from the blog this year that you were not sure about but turned out amazing? Let me know in the comments.Continue reading: 20 Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.comThe post 20 Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder

December 30 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder Erin Lovell Verinder is a herbalist, nutritionist and energetic healer living in the wilds of the Byron Bay hinterland in Australia, working with clients locally in her Sydney clinic and worldwide via Skype. Routine -- Is routine important to you or do you like things to be more open and free? I honestly love both. I keep certain parts of my day very structured especially around work days and where I can, I claim open space. I follow structure to bring in the foundations of support that are essential for me to thrive and maintain my balance. Like slow mornings, connecting to nature, enjoying a whole nourishing breakfast. But then I open up my days where possible to flow & allow spontaneity. -- What do your mornings look like? If they differ from day to day, describe your ideal morning. I keep my mornings slow and sacred, it’s been a very intentional movement towards this over the years. I wake with the sunlight pouring into our bedroom, we live in an old church and the light in here is just next level serene. I always keep the blinds open to allow my body rhythms to harmonize with the sun and moon cycle. This regulates your cortisol and melatonin in such a fundamental way. I allow myself to wake slowly, no rush, no jump out of bed, no alarms, no startle response! I will then take time to do some stretching sequences with conscious breath, and then sit for a 20 minute meditation. Followed by a morning dog walk around our very green country town. Other mornings it’s a swim in the ocean with my husband and a lazy lay on the sand. After this, it’s breakfast time. I brew a tea, or make a tonic and take that out into the garden. I really feel it’s so important to have a whole breakfast, and we really honour that in our household, we sit and chat and connect over a meal before the day unfolds. I do my absolute best to only engage in anything work related after 8am and completely screen free before then is the daily goal. -- Do you have any bedtime rituals that help you sleep well? Yes! I am super ritualistic about the evening wind down. I ensure I am off all screens at least two hours before sleep. I feel this is so greatly important to allow our bodies to align and flow into the yin cycle of the night. I switch off all overhead lights and only use very warm low light lamps as the sun sets. This is another trick to converse with your body to wind down, let go of any tasks and prep for rest. I read, write, listen to music and savour evenings for creative flow and conversation with my husband. -- Do you have any kind of mindfulness practice?  Many. I practice conscious breath and meditation as my main allies. But I also spend A LOT of time with plants, growing, making, conversing and in nature scapes. This is for me the ultimate mindfulness practice of oneness, presence and connection. Sustenance -- Describe your typical or ideal meal for each of these: Breakfast – Scrambled eggs with turmeric, garlic and greens, avocado and some home fermented veggies on the side.  Lunch – Wild caught Mahi Mahi with tarragon, parsley, lemon and garlic cooked in ghee, on top of a bed of greens with some roasted sweet potato on the side. (Literally one of my favourite dishes ever) Snack – I love smoothies. Often a smoothie, my current fav is Strawberries, cashew nut butter, cashew nut mylk, collagen, hemp seeds, tocos, cinnamon, vanilla powder & ashwaganda powder. Dinner - San choy bow, with a rainbow of veggies & lots of bold ginger flavour in vibrant cos lettuce cups. -- Do you do caffeine and in what form? If not, what is your drink of choice in the morning? I actually do not, I am completely stimulant free. I have not always been, but just find myself so very sensitive to any stimulants these days. I used to love love love a great spicy black chai tea but since going caffeine free I have replaced it with a dandelion chai blend I make myself that is just so warming and grounding I adore it. Plus no crazy energy spikes and lows, so thats a plus! -- Do you have a sweet tooth and do you take any measures to keep it in check? At the same time when I let go of stimulants, I completely let go of sweets- even natural sweeteners. In the past I have been an avid lover of raw chocolate and quite the connoisseur (ha) but these days I make my own carob chocolate that has no sweetener in it at all. I love carob as it’s very sweet naturally so you can get away with no added sweeteners. I pair it with vanilla powder and they work synergistically to give a natural sweetness that I find so comforting. -- Are there any particular supplements, herbs, or tinctures/­­tonics that you take regularly and find to be helpful with your energy level and general wellness? I do utilize supplement support as needed, this shifts as my body shifts. I love Vitamin C on so many levels but particularly for its adrenally restorative healing elements, so it is absolutely in my daily supplement routine, alongside Magnesium citrate on the daily. With herbs, I will vary what I am taking depending on my needs. I add herbal powders and medicinal mushrooms to my tonics and smoothies. Currently my favourites are Withania (Ashwaganda) and Reishi. I also am a huge lover of infusions (long loose leaf herbal brews) and always have a big jar of an overnight infusion with me to sip throughout my day. My most utilized blend would be Nettle leaf, Oat straw and Hibiscus. Earthy, calming, tangy and nourishing. Exercise -- Do you exercise and do you have a particular exercise routine that you repeat weekly?  Years go I had a heinous back injury, I herniated multiple discs from overexercising. My approach and relationship to body movement completely shifted after this, from rigorous to gentleness. It is still an area of my life I have to encourage myself back to and approach more as an act of self love. Taking care of my temple. I walk my pups daily, I love pilates and swimming, I have begun the be.come project and absolutely LOVE the approach to body movement with body positivity, inclusivity, no need for any equipment and in the comfort of my own home. This all feels really supportive and a mix of gentle yet effective support for me and my body. -- Do you find exercise to be pleasurable, torturous or perhaps a little of both? How do you put yourself in the right mindset in order to keep up with it? I am not a natural athlete by any measure! I have recently connected to how emotional it can be to return to body movement when you have been through a big physical injury/­­body change/­­life change. So for me the way I psyche myself up to do a session is to come from self love, to know this is a loving act of care for my body. That really helps me so much. Also knowing there are no rules to how you must move your body, allow exercise to meet your vibration- yin, yang and all between. Shifting the type of body movement I do with my menstrual cycle/­­hormones is so key. Be your own compass. Beauty -- What is your idea of beauty – external, internal or both? Authenticity, when someone is just purely themselves and at ease with it. I find it absolutely stunning. -- What is your skincare approach – face and body? Oils, oils and more oil. I swear by the dewy hydration of oils. I am pretty low maintenance with skin care, and have noticed I need a lot less intervention since moving to the sea and swimming in the ocean most days. The salt magic is so nourishing for the skin. I also find the sun very healing, contrary to the fear of UV rays we have been indoctrinated with! I use a homemade herbal balm for a lot of applications, hair mask, makeup remover, and moisturizer. It is a power packed plant based mix, and such a heavenly blend. I also use Ritual oil, a moringa and blue lotus oil as a body moisturizer.  I am in my mid 30s and really notice my skin responds so well to the dewy goodness of oils. I practice dry body brushing also, which I feel is so wonderful to aid stagnation and lymphatic flow. I use a jade roller which I keep in the fridge for extra lymphatic cooling, and use on my face every few days with oil. I always end my showers with cold water, to add in a hydrotherapy element. I wear very little makeup, but when I do it is always natural, as clean as can be. I love RMS and Ere Perez. -- Are there any foods, herbs or supplements you find to be helpful to your skin/­­hair/­­general glow? The importance of a vibrant whole foods diet and hydration is EVERYTHING! So many compounds in our foods, fruit + veggies are anti aging and collagen boosting anti oxidant heros. I drink 3+ litres of filtered water daily and do my very best to eat a rainbow of seasonal organic fruit/­­veggies daily and honestly I rely on this to support my health, skin and hair primarily. I do add in a marine based collagen daily to either smoothies or tonics. Also I am in a stage of encouraging my hair to grow, and am using nettle, rosemary and horsetail infusions as a hair rinse. I also massage in olive oil and rosemary oil into my scalp, truly it is so simple and aids hair growth. -- Do you have any beauty tips/­­tricks you’ve found to be especially useful throughout the years? A low tox life is key. Keep your stress in check, move your body, eat as clean as possible – mostly plants, organics or pesticide free produce, clean water and clean air. The most incredibly glowy humans I know follow this ethos. This has been my guideline and I am often told I really do not look my age. I am so at ease with ageing but it is always nice to hear you are maintaining a youthful glow! Stress, etc. -- Do you practice any consistent routines in order to avoid stress?  I really do. I work for myself and direct all of my offerings at this point. This can be demanding and means work can have a never-ending feel. There are always so many thoughts, needs and energy streams flowing into my work life. I also feel when you work as a space holder and in the healing realms, your energy output can be hefty. Burn out is high in this line of work, as you truly want to assist so deeply to aid others, we can often throw our needs to the side. I have learnt this many times in my years as a clinician/­­healer. I implement a lot of consistency with a structured clinic week~ limiting the amount of clients I see weekly to where I feel my energy is at and how many clients I can truly be present for. I balance myself with time off, away from screens, in nature and welcome in receiving energy to counteract my giving energy. My self care practice is the core of how I seek balance. I am actually freakily good at giving back to myself, which I believe enables me to do what I do! -- If stress cannot be avoided, what are your ways of dealing with it? For me, it is much healthier to come at it head on.. (typical Aries answer!) I do my finest to address the stressors, and clear the way. Whether this means a mountain of admin,  which is often a stressor for me as I not a natural lover of admin. I bunker down, switch off all other distractions, play some flute music or chants, burn some incense and get in the zone. When I exit that zone I feel so accomplished and reward myself with an ocean swim, or a nature walk to balance out the mental space I have been in. -- What measures do you take when you sense a cold/­­general feeling of being under the weather coming on? First and foremost I rest. Immunity can be a very strong conversation our bodies communicate to us with the message of needed REST. My go to supplement and herbal approach is to take a high dose of Vitamin C consistently in divided doses throughout my day, I also add in zinc supplements. I always have an immune focused liquid herbal tonic in my first aid support cabinet, so I begin this at a high frequent dose to meet the acute presentation of a cold/­­virus~ generally dosing up to 4 x daily. Usually it will have Echinacea, andrographis, elderberry, manuka, thyme in it. I love medicinal mushrooms to support immunity so I will take a blend of Reishi and Chaga in higher doses. I avoid raw foods and focus on lots of cooked warming nourishing food to feed the cold, congees, broths, soups, stew. I also make fresh oregano, thyme with sliced lemon &  ginger tea. If I really honour the rest that is needed, the cold/­­rundown feelings will shift very swiftly. -- How do you reconcile work-time with free-time? Do those things overlap for you or do you keep them distinctly separate? The best thing I ever did was to get a separate work phone. I have a dedicated phone that my clients can contact me on, so in my free time it is left at home or on silent. This has helped me enormously create healthy boundaries. I also do not have my work emails on my phone, so I do not check them at all unless I am sitting down at my computer to work. It is so important to be available to your own process and own life, especially when you are in the field of assisting others. These simple interventions help fortify those boundaries greatly for me. Motivation -- Describe the actions you take or mindset you try to tap into in order to stay on track with your self-care practice and being nice to yourself? I return to softness with myself if I lose my way a little. I do my best to not judge or engage in negative self talk. I soften and return to my centre. We all have patterns we are cycling. Although I feel I am quite a master of my own self care practice I definitely can get caught up in my workload a fair bit. One thing I do consciously do is to book a treatment in weekly in some form, usually a bodywork-massage session. I find this tactile healing so restorative. -- What do you consider to be the single most important change youve made to your routine or lifestyle in terms of wellness? I recently moved from the mountains to the sea, although they are both completely beautiful nature rich locations I was very much in need a big environment change for my own health and wellbeing.  Having lived in a very cold environment mountain side for 10 + years I was craving the warmth, the salt and the sun. Being by the ocean and soaking up the sun rays has been so fundamentally healing for me at this point. Total game changer! The power of changing your environment is so potent when you feel the call to do so. -- How do you deal with periods characterized by a lack of inspiration or procrastination? I acknowledge that this too shall pass, it is transient. I do my best to trust my own creative genius. I am quite a forward motion person, so when I am feeling uninspired it absolutely can get me down. I am naturally a procrastinator in many ways, which can be so frustrating but saying that I also have the ability to then smash out the tasks in an uncanny way! I often find when I am not in such a wonderful place with myself I feel that sense of stagnation, so I do my very best to get to the roots of that stagnation. Often it takes me getting into nature to be re inspired, crafting out some quiet space to re energize and tackle the task head on. I try to ask myself what is the block, and unpack the block to free up the energy flow. -- A book/­­movie/­­class that influenced your view of self-nourishment or self-care. As cheesy at it sounds I LOVED Practical Magic, the witchy plant potions and the apothecary Sandra Bullocks character opened was a total inspiration for me as teenager.. & still is now (lol). Knowledge -- What was your path to becoming a herbalist, nutritionist, and energetic healer? How do all of those practices interweave for you? I was always drawn to the esoteric realms and the mystery of nature. As a little girl I loved being outside, I loved the flowers, the trees, the plants, the grasses, the oceans, the mountains. I loved being an observer and always felt so held when I was in nature. As soon as I began to understand that plants could have a positive effect on our health, it just fascinated me. Learning about folklore of plant medicine, applications and remedies drew me into a language I wanted to be fluent in. I believe that much of our call to the plant path is remembering, these plants  have been with us through our ancestral lines for eons. My career began really at the age of 16 with energetic healing, I met a group of wild women up north in Australia and was welcomed into circles, introduced to the concepts of healing, and recognized as a student of these realms. I learnt reiki which led to crystal healing, then to sound healing, colour therapy, kinesiology.. I went to a college for 2 years to learn energetic healing in depth and graduated by the age of 19 holding full in depth sessions on auric healing and clearing energetic blockages. For me it felt too much too soon. So I went and travelled, met my husband in the USA and studied a whole lot more. When I returned to Australia I wanted to anchor my knowledge of healing with more grounded modalities so I began studying Naturopathic medicine. I forked off into a Bachelor of Western Herbal Medicine and Nutritional Medicine. I loved learning about plants and food as medicine, I loved the union of science and grass roots knowledge. Over years of being in practice, I have found that there is no way or no need to seperate these modalities. I weave them all in together to ultimately support the client in a very holistic way. I approach my practice with this lens of perception. I lead with intuition, and merge functional testing, pathology testing, traditional folk medicine, evidence based plant medicine, nutritional medicine, and energetics all to support. I believe there are always energetics involved in a health presentation, along with the demand for nutritional healing as powerful ally, and herbal medicine to assist, shift and support. Aligning these healing modalities is a potent combination. Essentially the basis of Naturopathic Medicine is individualised care, no one case is the same. This ethos rings true to me, there is not one client I have worked with that is the same as any other. How can we approach health in one way, or believe there is one remedy for one presentation? It goes against the nature of our uniqueness! My practice is about honouring the individuals path, story and health goals. -- You put a lot of emphasis on gut health in your practice and believe it to be the root to all balanced health. Can you talk a little bit about why you see this as such an important aspect of wellbeing?  All diseases begin in the gut – Hippocrates had it right! So many issues stem from the gut, it is the root of our health. With the emergence of continued evolving science we are seeing so much more information come to light around the microbiome/­­microbiota, which is truly wonderful. Much of our immunity is linked with gut health, it impacts mental health greatly with our second brain residing in the gut producing neurotransmitters, it is involved in the auto immune expression, it defines our ability to absorb and produce nutrients/­­vitamins/­­minerals, it impacts our metabolism, it is directly connected to our stress response and digestion responds accordingly.. And so much more... I work very closely with digestive healing with each and every one of my clients as I believe this is a key element to balanced health and shifting imbalanced symptoms. Many of my clients present with poor digestion and we dig like detectives to get to the roots, often it is a leaky gut like picture – with parasites, yeast overgrowths or SIBO which we generally detect via functional testing. Once we have a good sense of what is actually happening in the gut, we go in with a supportive treatment plan – lifestyle, supplemental, nutritional and herbal interventions. It always astounds me how health can transform so greatly, from imbalanced to balanced with the right support, intention and dedication. Our bodies are so wise, and so willing to transform. -- What is your favorite way of incorporating herbal medicine into your (or your clients) everyday life? I personally incorporate it in so many ways. I make my own products and use them on my skin and in my home on the daily, I drink herbal teas and infusions daily and use tonic herbs to support my body/­­being. I have a herbal garden that is buzzing right now, so connecting with the plants via gardening is medicine to me. There is something so potent about growing and caring for a plant and utilising her healing, knowing the story of the plants beginnings enhances the healing power I believe. For clients~ it really depends but I do always advise infusions to become a part of their everyday lives. They are so very simple and accessible, basically a long brewed overnight tea! If you are working with me in a session we will touch on many ways to incorporate plant medicine into your life, from the herbs that are suitable for your current process, to cleaning up your skin care with more plant love, to working with herbal tablets/­­liquid tonics for marked support. Fun and Inspiration -- What is something you are particularly excited about at the moment? This next year feels so full of creativity, as I expand and launch multiple new offerings. Right now I am in a potent brewing stage, so I look forward to it all coming to fruition! -- What do you do to unwind or treat yourself? Days off at the beach, going into the bush, gardening in my medicinal plant patch, reading a great book, screen free days, massages, hugs with my husband & dogs. -- A book/­­song/­­movie/­­piece of art to feed the soul: Book – Braiding Sweetgrass – Robin Wall Kimmerer Song –  Stay – Cat Power/­­ Ba Movie –  Call me by your name Piece of Art –  A oil pastel pencil drawing gifted to me by my husband and family by my dear friend and incredible creator Chanel Tobler called Curves like jam -- Is there anyone you would like to hear from next in this interview series? Emily Lami from Bodha, she is a scent magician. You might also like... Self-Care Interview Series: Sana Javeri Kadri Self-Care Interview Series: Sasha Swerdloff Self-Care Interview Series: Lucy Vincent Self-Care Interview Series: Ally Walsh .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Self-Care Interview Series: Erin Lovell Verinder appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Gingered Winter Fruit Medley

December 7 2018 VegKitchen 

Gingered Winter Fruit Medley This simple and pretty combination of winter fruits -- pears, apples, oranges, and pineapple, spiced with crystallized ginger -- is a refreshing finish to any meal. It’s pretty enough to serve as a Christmas dinner dessert, accompanied by your favorite cookies. Recipe adapted from Vegan Holiday Kitchen. Photos by Susan Voisin. 5.0 from 1 reviews Save Print Gingered Winter Fruit Medley Author: Nava Recipe type: Winter dessert /­­ Christmas Cuisine: Healthy Prep time:  20 mins Total time:  20 mins Serves: 8   This simple and pretty combination of winter fruits is a refreshing finish to any meal, and pretty enough to serve as a Christmas dinner dessert, accompanied by your favorite cookies. Ingredients 2 pears, any variety, or two different types, including Asian pears, cored, seeded and diced 2 Granny Smith apples, cored, seeded, and diced 2 small oranges, such as clementines, peeled and sectioned or 2 small blood oranges, peeled and diced One 20-ounce can unsweetened pineapple rings or chunks, drained ½ cup dried cranberries ¼ cup sliced crystallized ginger, or more or less to taste Two 6-ounce containers  pi?a colada or vanilla nondairy yogurt (soy or coconut) Ground cinnamon or freshly grated nutmeg Instructions Combine all the ingredients except the yogurt in a serving bowl […] The article Gingered Winter Fruit Medley appeared first on VegKitchen.

Creamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curls

November 28 2018 Vegan Richa 

Creamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curlsCreamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curls. 20 Gm of Protein. Vegan Tuscan Garlic “Chicken” And pasta. Vegan Recipe Can be Soyfree with Mushrooms or Seitan. 30 Mins. Gluten-free and nutfree option  Jump to Recipe  This Luscious 30 Minute pasta is a vegan version of a dish I used to get in some restaurant more than a decade ago. Wow that was specific Anywho, the Creamy garlicky sauce with sun dried tomato some grilled chickin gets a vegan makeover! The Soy curls and soaked in garlic veggie broth, then toasted with more garlic and freshly ground black pepper. Then added to the cream base. Sun dried tomato, herbs, fresh thyme, pasta such as farfalle or fettuccine. Bliss.  This sauce and pasta are flexible to taste and ingredients. Use gluten-free pasta if needed, some nutfree non dairy cream for no nuts and use seitan, tofu or mushrooms to sub soy curls.  Easy, Quick and Delicious! Lets make this Luscious Meal. Continue reading: Creamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curlsThe post Creamy Sun Dried Tomato Pasta with Garlic Soy curls appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites

August 15 2019 My New Roots 

Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites This post is a long time coming! And Im so excited to finally be sharing my bedroom with you all. Weve now been in our home for a year and a bit, and although its (still!) not complete, were enjoying working on the finishing details here and there. Honestly, I dont think we will ever be done, and that is okay. This entire experience has made me way more patient, realistic, and Ive learned to set my expectations super low on every project so that instead of being disappointed, Im often positively surprised! We moved with just boxes, zero furniture, and essentially had to start over in that department. That meant a new bed, a new mattress and all new linens, since we decided to make the jump from a queen size mattress to a king (literally one of the best life decisions, ever). My husband and I are both DIY-ers, and serious thrift store shoppers, and we knew that we wanted to build a bed ourselves, then find the rest of bedroom furniture second-hand. The one place where we knew we wanted to really take our time considering was a mattress and the bedding. If you read this blog, you probably care about your health to some degree. Like me, you may prioritize buying organic produce, splurge on environmentally-conscious clothing, and look to sustainable skincare and beauty products. But have you ever thought about your bedroom environment? We spend a third of our life in bed (at least we should), so its just as important to consider the things that we interact with in our homes, not just what goes in and on our bodies. In fact, the greatest exposure to chemicals you can have in a day, could be while youre sleeping. When I started looking into buying a mattress, I found the options were totally overwhelming. And with so many retailers moving to online platforms and selling directly to consumers, prices have been slashed considerably, and the deals are tempting. Mattresses are one of those things that seem pretty innocuous, and maybe even a place to save a few bucks. But dig a little deeper and youll see that the thing you spend so much time on, is not the thing you should spending less money on, as youll be paying for cheaper materials with your health. Modern, conventional mattresses are made with a laundry list of harmful substances that can be affecting you and your family. One of the most offensive ingredients found in conventional mattresses is memory foam made from polyurethane; a highly flammable, petroleum-based material. Polyurethane foam emits Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) that can cause eye, nose and throat irritation, headaches, nausea, and can also damage the liver, kidneys and central nervous system, according to the Environmental Protection Agency and the Occupational Health and Safety Administration. Un-ironically referred to as solid gasoline, polyurethane foam is typically wrapped in or treated with fire retardant chemicals to meet the Federal and State flammability standards in the US, otherwise it would be totally unsafe. Which brings me to the second thing to watch out for in mattresses, and that is chemical fire-retardants (CFRs). These are compounds added to the materials in a mattress to protect you, and they are an inexpensive way to meet safety standards. The issue is that CFRs do not fully bind to materials, and are released into the air through the mattress, then build up in the body causing some people lifelong health issues.   Formaldehyde, antimony, boric acid, and halogenated flame retardants are some of the most damaging CFRs found in modern mattresses, and the frustrating thing is that companies are not required to disclose which ones they are using. Unless a mattress company is explicitly eliminating these chemicals from their production and using a natural material alternative, they are likely using one of the harmful chemicals listed above. I looked at a number of organic /­­ natural mattress companies in my research, and the one that stood out to me was Naturepedic. They are made with certified organic cotton, wool, and latex. For heavy-duty support without any health or allergy concerns, Naturepedic only uses the highest quality innersprings available made from recycled steel.. , and steel, with Naturepedic ensured  the purity of every material used, along with fair labour practices. I reached out to Naturepedic, to see if they would be open to me trying a mattress out and blogging about it. They agreed, and sent me their EOS  (Ergonomic Organic Sleep) mattress that allows for fully customized layers for finding the exact right amount of firmness (you can even choose different support styles from your sleep partner, or swap out the layers down the line in case your preferences change). Id never heard of anything like that before, and though it was so brilliant! I went to the showroom in Toronto to try out the mattress in person, which was very helpful, but you can also just order online if you know what kind of consistency you like. The mattress components were delivered to my door, and it was easy to assemble, as everything gets zipped into a giant, certified organic cotton casing. After spending the last twelve months on this bed, I can confirm that its been the best year of sleep in my entire life (even post-child, haha!). Besides the fact that I love going to bed knowing that I am breathing completely clean air, and that the materials that went into the mattress were made with a deep commitment to protecting the environment, its simply the most supportive and comfortable mattress Ive ever tried. Period. I cannot recommend this mattress enough! The other thing to consider when outfitting your bedroom is the bedding itself. Because we come into direct, skin-to-product contact with these textiles, its essential to choose something non-toxic. Most bedding on the market is made with cotton, one of the most chemical-laden crops grown. According to Pesticide Action Network North America, Conventionally grown cotton uses more insecticides than any other single crop and epitomizes the worst effects of chemically dependent agriculture. Each year cotton producers around the world use nearly $2.6 billion worth of pesticides -- more than 10 per cent of the worlds pesticides and nearly 25 per cent of the worlds insecticides. If youre going to sleep in cotton, choose organic whenever you can. Linen is a great alternative material because it is a much lower impact material on the environment, and requires very little intervention to be grown. Coyuchi is a brand recommended to me by my dear friend Elenore, who has the highest standards I know of Coyuchis textile line is not only 100% organic, but also consciously processed, meaning that they use low-impact dyes for colour that is kind to the planet and our sensitive skin. Coyuchi offered to send me some bedding to try out and I was instantly obsessed. Their textiles are beyond delicious, super soft, and incredibly comfortable. For a duvet cover, I chose the Crystal Cove pattern in white. I loved this choice since its reversible - a textured weave that looks cozy in the winter, and a crinkled cotton underside, which I like to face up in the summer. I also love their Topanga Matelasse blanket, shown here in warm stripe, which is also reversible (super convenient if you want to change up the look of your bedding with a quick flip!). For winter, their Cloud Brushed flannel sheets are super luxurious, and especially enjoyable its very hard to find organic flannel! Words cannot describe the feeling of slipping into these on a chilly night. The giant back pillows in the bed are also from Coyuchi, and are perfect if you have an open-frame bed without a headboard. I like to sit up and read in bed, and these pillows are firm enough to act as a headboard itself. When youre shopping for any kind of textile (bedding, furniture, or clothing), the most important mark to look for is the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) certification. GOTS is recognized as the world’s leading processing standard for textiles made from organic fibers. It defines high-level environmental criteria along the entire organic textiles supply chain and requires compliance with social criteria as well. Unlike most textile and mattress companies, both Coyuchi and Naturepedic are GOTS certified and adhere to their strict standards for agriculture and labour. Okay, lets get to the recipe! I experimented with these breakfast bites for a long time. At first, I was blending up cashews to make flour, but that got expensive, and ultimately I wanted the recipe to be allergen-free (so the nuts had to go!). As an alternative, I opted for hemp seeds, which worked beautifully. Its easy to make your own hemp flour in a food processor in a few seconds. Ive been using it baked goods lately and love how moist and tender the results are! I used strawberries and rhubarb for these nuggets of joy, but since were moving into stone fruit season, Ill soon be switching it up and using peaches, plums, pluots, apricots, and cherries in their place. Any fruit will work as long as its not super moist (like melons). Raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries would be lovely here too. Simply use 1 cup of chopped fresh fruit in any combination that tickles your fancy. To change up the flavour even more, add orange zest, warm spices like cinnamon and cardamom, or even some cacao powder for a chocolate version. Yum! I really wanted to make a successful vegan version of these, so I tried using banana in place of the egg. The results were decent, but a little too moist. If I made these again, I would use the banana plus a tablespoon of ground flax seeds. If any of you do that, please let me know in the comments!     Print recipe     Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites Makes 12 Ingredients: 1 1/­­2 cups /­­ 215g hemp seeds 1/­­4 cup /­­ 35g arrowroot 1/­­4 tsp. flaky salt, plus more for garnish, if desired 1 tsp. baking powder 1 egg (or 1 ripe banana, mashed) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml pure maple syrup 2 tsp. vanilla extract (or 1/­­2 tsp. vanilla powder) 1/­­2 cup /­­ 85g chopped strawberries 1/­­2 cup /­­ 60g chopped rhubarb (2-3 slim stalks) expeller-pressed coconut oil for greasing (or use muffin liners Directions: 1. Lightly grease a 12-cup muffin tin with coconut oil. Preheat oven to 350°F /­­ 175°C. 2. Wash the strawberries and rhubarb well. Slice the rhubarb into small discs, and cut the strawberries into small chunks. Reserve 3 strawberries for topping the breakfast bites, if desired (remove greens, then slice them top to bottom). Set fruit aside.  3. In a food processor, blend hemp seeds until theyre a fine powder (dont go too far or youll end up with hemp seed butter!). Add the arrowroot, salt and baking powder and pulse a few times to combine. 4. In a medium bowl, whisk the egg or banana, maple syrup, and vanilla extract together. Add the hemp seed flour blend, and stir to combine. Fold in the rhubarb and strawberries. 5.  Spoon a heaping tablespoon of the batter into each prepared muffin tin. If desired, place a slice of strawberry on top of each bite. Set in the oven and bake for 25-30 minutes, until lightly golden. 6. Remove from the oven and let cool completely. 7. Enjoy! Store leftovers in an airtight container in the fridge for five days. Aside from getting the chemicals out of your space, here are five other ways to improve the health of your bedroom, and your sleep! Add plants - having a couple of living things in your sleeping space keeps the air clean and fresh. Snake plants, areca palms, aloe vera and orchids are especially helpful, since they absorb CO2 at night, even when they are not photosynthesizing.  Consider airflow - keeping a window cracked at night is a good way to get some fresh air while you sleep. If its noisy outside, keep your window open during the day to ensure full air exchange, and close it right before bed. It’s very important to keep the air in your space fresh and moving. Salt rock lamps - these are said to purify the air by omitting negative ions. I cannot confirm this in any way, but I can confirm that the light they give off is incredibly soothing and helps me wind down at the end of the day. Overhead lighting is very stimulating (and let’s be honest, not overly sexy). Keep the devices out - dont work in bed, and avoid using your phone before snoozing. Blue light from screens inhibits our bodys ability to make melatonin, our sleep-wake hormone. If you choose to keep your phone in your room overnight, set it to airplane mode while you sleep so youre not exposing yourself to radiation from EMFs (Electromagnetic Field).  Beeswax candles - yes, its cozy to burn candles before bed, but paraffin candles pollute the air, full stop. Soy is a better alternative, but beeswax is my favourite since it actually helps purify the air by omitting negative ions, and removing dust and dander. Show me your Hemp Breakfast Bites on Instagram: #mnrbreakfastbites Special thanks to my dear friend Sara for taking these photos of me (and putting up with my awkwardness for at least two hours!). http:/­­/­­matandsara.com/­­ The post Strawberry Rhubarb Hemp Breakfast Bites appeared first on My New Roots.

Chili Lime Roasted Veggies & Jackfruit with Jalapeno Cream Sauce

July 11 2019 Vegan Richa 

Chili Lime Roasted Veggies & Jackfruit with Jalapeno Cream SauceThis Chili Lime Roasted Veggie & Jackfruit Bowl with Jalapeno Cream Sauce has so much flavor! The veggies and jackfruit are roasted in 1 sheet pan and dressed with creamy jalapeno sauce. Add the veggies & Chili Lime Jackfruit to tacos or burritos! Vegan Gluten-free Soyfree Recipe. Nutfree option.  Jump to Recipe Its Bowl Season! Today’s bowl is a mix of textures and flavors and is hearty, spicy and delicious! Veggies are tossed in homemade taco seasoning and lime zest. Jackfruit is coated tomato paste and taco spice. Peppers and are seasoned with lime, salt and pepper and everything is spread in one pan to roast. The veggies and jackfruit are super flavorful and can be served as a bowl, over salad, or in tacos and wraps. Wait there’s more. The easy creamy tangy jalapeno cream sauce! Dress these Taco seasoned veggies in my from scratch jalapeno cream sauce, to take them to the next level. Don’t be discouraged by the list of ingredients. Many are repeated spices, taco spice, salt and lime. The cream sauce can be made ahead. Once all the veggies are prepped, just mix them with the spices, spread and bake. Jackfruit with the crispy edges, Cauliflower which we all already know works so well with taco spice, peppers add fajita flavor. Lets get to it!Continue reading: Chili Lime Roasted Veggies & Jackfruit with Jalapeno Cream SauceThe post Chili Lime Roasted Veggies & Jackfruit with Jalapeno Cream Sauce appeared first on Vegan Richa.

12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From Plants

June 10 2019 Meatless Monday 

12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From PlantsProfessional athletes use their bodies in incredible ways. Whether serving as a human bulldozer or striking a ball with colossal force, their bodies require loads of fuel in order to function as powerfully and efficiently as possible. And as the athletes prove below, fuel can come in many forms, and plant-based fuel has helped many achieve great things. Read on to see what this diverse bunch has to say about running on plants.   Lewis Hamilton, Formula 1 Champion I have plenty of protein in my diet and Ive gained muscle, and Im healthier and happier than Ive ever been. Wish I did it sooner. Five-time Formula 1 world champion Lewis Hamilton, via Instagram , discussing the benefits of adopting a plant-based diet. According to Forbes, Hamilton was the world’s 12th highest-paid athlete in 2018 and is the highest-paid Formula 1 driver. Hamilton sites his concerns for the environment around climate change and animal welfare as his motivations for switching to a plant-based diet. He is vocal across his social media platforms about the benefits of plant-based eating and encourages his fans to also reduce meat in their diets.     Venus Williams, professional tennis player “I was diagnosed with an autoimmune disease, and I wanted to maintain my performance on the court. Once I started, I fell in love with the concept of fueling your body in the best way possible [through raw, vegan food], she told Health . “Not only does it help me on the court, but I feel like I’m doing the right thing for me.”       Derrick Morgan, American professional football player “Overcoming the preconceived notions is the biggest part. I was a part of it. I used to believe athletes had to eat meat to maintain play, then I educated myself,” Derrick Morgan, NFL football player to ESPN . Morgan is a 100 percent plant-based athlete who has encouraged many of his Tennessee Titans teammates to join him in eating plant-based. He and many of the Titans players have also attributed improved energy, reduced inflammation and better performance to switching to a meatless diet.     Kyrie Irving, professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics I’ve been on more of a plant-based diet, getting away from all the animals [products], Irving told ESPNs Chauncey Billups . Irving also credits plant-based eating with giving him more energy and endurance, which helps him sustain a high performance level throughout games. So my energy is up, my body feels amazing.       Hannah Teter, American Olympian snowboarder “I feel stronger than I’ve ever been, mentally, physically, and emotionally, Teter told HuffPost . My plant-based diet has opened up more doors to being an athlete. It’s a whole other level that I’m elevating to. I stopped eating animals about a year ago, and it’s a new life. I feel like a new person, a new athlete.”       Scott Jurek, American Ultramarathoner I grew up hating vegetables, eating meat and potatoes, he told GQ . When I was in college I started reading more about different diets and the vegetarian and vegan diets really came up quite a bit. As I worked in hospitals through physical therapy school it became clear to me that I needed to change my diet to avoid the health problems I was seeing. It was definitely a long-term decision rather than one made for short-term performance gains.       Jermain Defoe, English professional footballer I think Ive managed [to adopt veganism] successfully, he told the Guardian . I dont find anything hard to give up, as such, because I know the feeling scoring goals gives me. So, while getting in an ice bath isnt nice, I just think: You know what? Im going to do this and be rewarded. Its hard but in another way its easy because all I want to do is play well and score goals.       Tia Blanco, Puerto Rican professional surfer “I feel really great eating a plant-based diet and love the way it makes me feel physically and mentally, she said in an interview with Teen Vogue . Many of us know the effects of diet on one’s health, but fail to realize that diet plays a huge role in more than just your personal well-being.”         Austin Aries, American professional wrestler Im usually concerned with keeping my calories up to maintain my size, though I adjust my calories depending on if I need to bulk up or cut weight, he told Mens Journal . I try to limit my intake of things like soy, gluten, and overly processed foods. The easiest way to do this is by making sure Im eating a variety of different foods every day. This also ensures I am consuming all different types of plant-based protein to cover the full amino acid profile as well as my vitamins and nutrients.     JJ Redick, American professional basketball player for the Philadelphia 76ers During the season, my main focus is staying healthy and feeling strong, he said in an interview with Mens Journal .  Ive always had a leaner frame, so balancing my intake of protein, fat, and carbs is an important focus that guides my food choices. Ive found that incorporating plant-based protein items like Beyond Meat into my diet can deliver just as much protein, if not more, than some traditional meat items, while making me feel healthy, fit, and agile.       David Carter, American professional football player Football is a machismo sport, which is great, but everything can’t be machismo. On the field and at practice, yes, you can be machismo, but when it comes to diet, you need to have compassion for your body, he told NFL.com in an interview.         Barny du Plessis, British professional body builder and Mr. Universe winner I am the best Ive ever been. I feel fantastic, no aches, pains or niggles. No delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMs) after heavy sessions, du Plessis said in an interview with the Thinking Vegan . All my workouts are on fire; endurance and energy are awesome, strength and power are as good as I want them to be. I feel really healthy, fit, and buzzing with energy. I feel lighter, and not bloated, but Im still as heavy as I was when eating meat and animal products. Being leaner on more calories - thats always a good thing!     FREE ORGANIC GOYA FOR A YEAR Dont miss your chance to win ONE YEAR of FREE ORGANIC GOYA PRODUCTS! Meatless Monday has teamed up with Goya to promote their Dont Panic, Its Organic giveaway. Check out Goyas organic products and enter to win Goya goodness for a year . Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post 12 Athletes Who Get Their Fuel From Plants appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Stadiums Up Their Game with New Meatless Options

April 15 2019 Meatless Monday 

Stadiums Up Their Game with New Meatless OptionsWhether youre in it for the love of the game or the delectable ballpark eats, baseball season is in full swing. In 2019, stadiums are offering more meatless options than ever before: From the Impossible Burger to falafel-packed pitas to meat-free Philly cheesesteaks, theres no shortage of tasty ways to fill up at the concession stands. Find a few notable favorites below. Photo Credit: Beyond Meat Dodger Stadium Burgers and hot dogs are ballpark staples, and now meatless options are, too, at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. Find the Impossible Burger topped with herb mayo, lettuce, tomato and onions at Field Section 47 and Reserve section 29, according to Eater . Beyond Meat is also available, in the form of a Dodger Sausage , at Field 10, Loge 133, and Reserve 4.   Citi Field Mets fans can whet their appetites at the Goya Burrito Bar (Section 414), where they can choose from bean, rice and veggie burritos, bowls, or nachos, Eater reported. In the mood for something else? Youre in the right place, as AM New York highlighted. Score a margarita pizza cupcake (Jim Beam Highball Club on the Promenade),  Shake Shacks Portobello Shroom Burger (Section 140, Field Level Concourse), a veggie taco at El Verano Taqueria (Section 139, Field Level Concourse), or a veggie dog at Hain Celestial Gluten Free & Organic Stand (Section 105).   Globe Life Park Stadium The Texas Rangers provide their fans with a meatless haven at Globe Life Park Stadium . The Ballpark Vegan (near section 16) serves up a variety of meatless eats, including a Beyond Burger topped with vegan cheese, street tacos loaded with Beyond Meat crumbles and vegan chili.   T-Mobile Park If you have tickets to a Seattle Mariners home game, come hungry ! Find the seemingly ubiquitous Impossible Burger at Lil Woodys Burger & Shakes (at the Pen). This version is built the old fashioned way, topped with chopped onion, diced pickle, tomato, lettuce, ketchup and mayo. Hit It Here Café (Right Field Hit It Here Terrace) serves a fully vegan Beyond Burger, which is paired with vegan Just Mayo. At The Natural (Section 105), Beyond Meat is served in the form of a sweet and spicy sausage. Here you can also order avocado toast - not yet a ballgame staple, but whos to judge? At Paseo (Edgars Cantina and Edgars Home Run Porch), you can chow down on the Tofu Delight Sandwich, which features sautéed organic tofu with garlic aioli, caramelized onion, cilantro, pickled jalape?o and romaine lettuce, all served on a toasted baguette.   Yankee Stadium Yankee Stadium boasts tons of meatless dining options. At Bareburger (section 132), choose between the Beyond Sausage sandwich, avocado bites or the Changeup Burger (Impossible Burger, pickled red onions, spinach, guacamole, spicy pico de gallo on a sprout bun). At the Toyota Terrace (in the right field bleachers), try a crispy buffalo cauliflower bun thats served with celery slaw and creamy bleu cheese. If youre craving something sweet, its important to know theres a Ben & Jerrys Scoop Shop located in Sections 125 and 318.   Oracle Park The three-time World Champion San Francisco Giants are winners in more ways than one: Their stadium food options are truly trophy-worthy. The venue hosts a culinary garden behind the centerfield wall, from which two restaurants source fresh produce like kale and avocado. Beyond an assortment of fresh veggies, there are tons of meatless meals available here. The Garden Table offers an Impossible beef-based chili, and the standard Impossible Burger is available at Derby Grill outposts. Guests can go beyond classic ball game fare with the rice bowl (baby bok choy and baked tofu) or the noodle bowl (roasted eggplant, wok-seared bell peppers, crispy tofu) at Fongs , located on the second floor promenade.   Citizens Bank Park Grammy Award-winning musician Questlove has certainly upped the Philadelphia Phillys cool factor. Launched at the end of March 2019, the teams Citizens Bank Park is now serving Questloves Cheesesteak , a meatless riff on the citys iconic dish made with - you guessed it - Impossible Meat (Sections 108 and 120). In addition to the new menu item, plant-based meals can be found at Shake Shack, the first sit-down Shake Shack in a sports venue (near the Third Base Gate) and at Harry the Ks Broadcast Bar and Grille, which is serving up curry cauliflower lettuce (Left Field Gate).   Did we miss one your meatless stadium faves? Tell us about it by leaving a comment on our Facebook  page or post it using #MeatlessMonday. Want to bring Meatless Monday to your local stadium or community? Become a Meatless Monday Ambassador today ! Meatless Monday is a global movement, followed by millions, with a simple message: one day a week, cut out meat for personal health and the health of the planet. To find out more, follow us on Facebook , Twitter , Pinterest , or Instagram ! The post Stadiums Up Their Game with New Meatless Options appeared first on Meatless Monday.

Vegan Chickpea Brownies

April 13 2019 Vegan Richa 

Vegan Chickpea BrowniesVegan Chickpea Brownies. Grain free Brownies with chickpeas and nut butter or seed butter. These Vegan Gluten free Brownies Can be made without nuts. Fudgy Healthy No Added Oil, No Added refined sugar Jump to Recipe I am always playing around with beans and lentils in desserts And the successful results show up on the blog! You all have been loving my lentil brownies and this Chickpea Cookie Pie. In this version, I use chickpeas for a fudgy delicious brownie! These Vegan Chickpea Brownies need a few ingredients, cooked chickpeas, nut butter or seed butter, chocolate in various forms (melted, chips and cocoa powder), vanilla, almond flour and baking powder. They are also grain-free!, have no added refined oil or added refined sugar. There might be sugar, oil in the chocolate chips depending on which you choose to use. There are brands that use just cocoa butter and are unsweetened or sweetened with stevia. These Brownies are smoother(no bean skin!), fudgyier and tastier than bean brownies and use less sugar and fat than regular brownies. Everything gets added to a food processor to process to a smooth stiff batter, which is spread in a brownie pan and baked. Serve these warm with vegan ice cream!Continue reading: Vegan Chickpea BrowniesThe post Vegan Chickpea Brownies appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Bali Butter

March 12 2019 My New Roots 

Bali Butter I miss Bali. Or maybe I just miss the warmth, the sun, the vibrancy, the life bursting forth from every nook and cranny. I miss living outside, I miss my eyes being assaulted by colours, and layers upon layers of wild sounds, but hey, its March in Ontario and this is a familiar feeling. Are you feeling it too? A couple weeks ago when I was in the depths of yet another snowstorm, feeling like spring may never come, I came up with this recipe to remedy my winter woes. Its called Bali Butter - and its the most delicious thing to cross my lips since I could see grass outside my window. A rich combination of cashews, coconut, and cacao, blended together with coconut sugar and salt, its like the nut butter of DREAMS in all of its salty-sweet-crunchy-chocolatey glory. And I am really excited to share this one with you, wherever you and no matter what season youre experiencing. What does one do with Bali Butter, you ask? Let me tell you, it goes on all. the. things. Pancakes, waffles, smoothie bowls, toast, rice cakes, ice cream, fruit salad, porridge, yogurt, and fingers! You can stuff dates with Bali Butter, stick them in the fridge and have something delicious on hand to satisfy those salty-sweet-fat cravings too. Slice a banana lengthwise, slather Bali Butter in the middle and sandwich it together again. I even like it with carrot sticks. No joke. I chose to use coconut sugar in my Bali Butter because its one of the main sweeteners used on the island and you can easily find it everywhere. Some of you may be curious about using liquid sweetener as an alternative, but the problem with using something like maple syrup or honey, is that it causes the nut butter to seize up. Fat is hydrophobic (translation: its afraid of water) and will stiffen when it comes into contact with anything that contains it. Using a solid sweetener, like coconut sugar, avoids this problem and keeps the finished product relaxed and runny. If you dont want to use coconut sugar and you dont mind a less-spreadable version of Bali Butter, sweeten it with whatever you have on hand. I think Ive talked about all of these ingredients respectively, but for the heck of it, lets recap why theyre awesome! Coconut - Once a maligned food for its saturated fat content, coconut has taken center stage in the wellness world, as scientific research has confirmed that the type of fat in coconut integrates differently in the body, compared to other saturated fats. MCTs (medium-chain-triglycerides) are a type of fat that can be broken down quickly and used as fuel, instead of being stored, so its prefect for people who enjoy an active lifestyle. Coconut also contains a surprising amount of protein, about 14% by weight, and impressive amounts of manganese.   Cashews - Contrary to popular belief, cashews have a lower fat content than most nuts. And 66% of their fats are heart-healthy, monounsaturated fats, like those found in olive oil. Cashews are an excellent source of copper, and a good source of magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc. They also contain good amounts of fiber, so that they keep you feeling full for longer.  Cacao - One of the best sources of magnesium found in nature, in addition to containing high amounts calcium, zinc, iron, copper, sulfur, and potassium, cacao is a nutritional powerhouse. It also contains many chemical compounds that enhance physical and mental well-being, including alkaloids, proteins, magnesium, beta-carotene, leucine, linoleic acid, lipase, lysine, and some neurotransmitters such as dopamine and anandamide - which explains why eating chocolate makes you feel so darn good! Coconut sugar - Sometimes called coconut palm sugar, this incredibly delicious sweetener is high in minerals, such as potassium, magnesium, zinc and iron. It is happily low glycemic, ranking 35 on the GI scale, compared to agave at 42, honey at 55, cane sugar at 68. This is due to coconut sugars composition of long-chain saccharides, which are absorbed by the body at a slower rate than something like refined white sugar. Coconut sugar also contains amino acids, which are thought to slow down the rate at which the sugar is absorbed into the bloodstream, acting as a buffer of sorts.  Some notes on the recipe. Its very important that you make coconut butter to start, as it creates the liquid base to help the get the cashews going in the food processor. Once youve made the coconut-cashew butter, feel free to stop there (it tastes incredible on its own), or go all the way as I have and add the cacao, coconut sugar and salt. I like to leave my Bali Butter out of the fridge, since it remains liquid and spreadable at room temperature. If you refrigerate it, Bali Butter with harden completely. You can roll it into balls and make yourself some pretty delicious little energy bites when its in this state, but its impossible to drizzle when chilled.   If youre into smooth nut butters, simply leave the cacao nibs out of the equation. They arent necessary for any other purpose than crunch, which I personally feel is essential, but I wont judge anyone for skipping them. Even though youre obviously crazy     Print recipe     Bali Butter  Makes 3 cups /­­ 750ml Ingredients: 3 cups /­­ 375g raw cashews 3 cups /­­ 240g unsweetened desiccated coconut   3/­­4 tsp. large flake sea salt (I used Maldon) 1/­­4 cup /­­ 23g raw cacao powder 3 Tbsp. coconut sugar 3 Tbsp. cacao nibs seeds from 1 vanilla bean Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 325°F /­­ 160°C. Spread cashews out evenly on a rimmed baking sheet and place in the preheated oven. Toast for about 10 minutes, keeping an eye on them so that they dont burn! Remove from oven and let cool. 2. While the cashews are in the oven, toast the coconut in a dry skillet over medium heat, stirring often, until slightly golden. Remove from heat and set aside. Depending on the size of your skillet, you may want to work in batches. 3. Place the coconut in a food processor. Blend on high, scraping down the sides every so often, until the coconut is creamy and smooth (this make take up to 10 minutes, depending on the strength of your food processor - be patient!). 4. Add the cashews to the food processor and blend on high until creamy and smooth. Add the remaining ingredients and blend on high. Taste and adjust saltiness /­­ sweetness /­­ chocolate levels to suit your taste. 5. Store Bali Butter in an airtight glass container at room temperature (out of the fridge) for one month. The post Bali Butter appeared first on My New Roots.

Sesame Garlic Broccoli Recipe

January 3 2019 Vegan Richa 

Sesame Garlic Broccoli RecipeThis Sesame Garlic Broccoli needs just 6 ingredients. It is vibrant with blanched broccoli and delicious with a simple dressing of garlic roasted with sesame oil. A perfect side. Vegan glutenfree nutfree recipe.  Jump to Recipe If you like broccoli, you will LOVE this simple 6 ingredient garlicky broccoli. Broccoli is blanched then mixed with slowly roasted garlic + sesame oil dressing. The key to amazing flavor is just the right golden brown garlic. Cook it over low heat so it doesn’t burn. Add some crisped tofu and more soy sauce to make a meal! Broccoli is one of those vegetables that divides the house. There are some that absolutely adore it in any shape and form, and some (read me) that need it generally chopped up in some format with loads of flavor. I used to not like broccoli, then I made dishes like broccoli fritters and broccoli veggie balls and slowly appreciated the vegetable. Chop the broccoli smaller or larger for this recipe. The Garlic sesame flavor works amazingly well here. Continue reading: Sesame Garlic Broccoli RecipeThe post Sesame Garlic Broccoli Recipe appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com

December 31 2018 Vegan Richa 

Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.comBest Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com . Popular Recipes from the year with a few of my favorites and also some recipes that have been consistently loved from the archives! Glutenfree Soyfree options Its a wrap! 2018 has been an year of ups and downs, in health, blogging, life and everything. My digestion issues meant I was eating less of legumes and you probably noticed that slight shift on the blog from a whole lotta chickpeas to more of mushrooms and tofu. I do make a lot of legume based meals, but with from scratch cooked beans rather than canned and also eat it only on the day they are cooked (no leftovers for me). So a lot of meals get out to the neighborhood! (if you are in seattle main area and would like some, ping me on fb. I don’t deliver, you pick)   Blogging is now pretty competitive with all the amazing new blogs with great photography and content. The competitiveness of it as a business can get to one. My plan for 2019 is to continue to do what I love, i.e. develop amazing recipes, and then delegate and find help for the rest. There will always be people who can do things better in some ways, and stressing about it gets me nowhere. So lets just create and eat amazing food!  What I also learnt is that you the readers have various interests when it comes to food. Quick recipes obviously always work. There are tons of those already out there, some on the blog and books too. And even though a good portion of my recipes use a few more ingredients and a few more steps, you choose to trust them and love the results! I am incredibly thankful that you do! Thank you for the support and love this year. Here is to many more! Wish you all a very Happy 2019! Here are the popular recipes from the year with a few of my favorites that were not as popular and also some recipes that have been consistently loved from the archives! What did you try from the blog this year that you were not sure about but turned out amazing? Let me know in the comments.Continue reading: Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.comThe post Best Vegan Recipes 2018 from VeganRicha.com appeared first on Vegan Richa.

Sweet Potato Tzimmes

December 21 2018 VegKitchen 

Sweet Potato Tzimmes An Eastern European standard, tzimmes is a roasted vegetable dish that is made a number of ways, depending on the occasion. For the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashana, the appropriate ingredients include carrots and sweet potatoes, with the added sweetness of fresh and dried fruits. Recipe adapted from Vegan Holiday Kitchen. Photos by Susan Voisin. Save Print Sweet Potato Tzimmes Author: Nava Recipe type: Jewish holiday Cuisine: Vegan /­­ Jewish New Year /­­ Healthy Prep time:  30 mins Cook time:  45 mins Total time:  1 hour 15 mins Serves: 8   Ingredients 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 cup chopped onions 3 large carrots, sliced 3 large sweet potatoes, cooked, baked, or microwaved in their skins, then peeled and sliced 1 large apple or pear, cored and sliced ½ cup chopped prunes ¼ cup chopped dried apricots ½ cup orange juice, preferably freshly squeezed 1½ teaspoons cinnamon ½ teaspoon each: ground ginger and salt ⅓ to ½ cup chopped walnuts, optional Instructions Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Heat the oil in a large skillet. Sauté the onions over medium heat until translucent. Add the carrots and continue to sauté until onions and carrots are golden. In a mixing bowl, combine the onion-carrot mixture with all the […] The article Sweet Potato Tzimmes appeared first on VegKitchen.

Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats + A Day of Eating Video

December 6 2018 Golubka Kitchen 

Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats + A Day of Eating Video Hi friends! Today we’re sharing a new video as part of a video series we are working on, where well be going through a whole day of plant-based meals, as well as little tricks, ideas, and inspirations around the kitchen. We’ve always been fascinated with peoples everyday routines (which is why we have the self-care interview series), and we love getting a peak at how they sustain themselves throughout the day, so we thought it would be fun to film something similar. Todays video has a shortcut recipe for creamy steel cut oats, as well as ideas for lunch, a pick-me-up hot chocolate, dinner, and an end of day treat. All the recipes mentioned in the video are linked below. Let us know what you think! Ever since I discovered steel cut oats, I haven’t been able to go back to rolled oats for porridge purposes. They just seem so sad and mushy, compared to the al dente, textured goodness that are steel cut oats. The only thing that puts steel cut oats at a disadvantage is that they take a while to cook – 30 or so minutes, which is an amount of time that most busy people don’t have in the mornings. Thankfully, there’s a shortcut! It involves quickly bringing your steel cut oats to a boil the night before and leaving them to sit overnight, and you end up with a pot of creamy, dreamy oats in the morning. In the fall, I like to have them with apples, but the possibilities for flavoring and toppings are endless here. Here are all the other recipes mentioned in the video: Nettle Infusion – full of vitamins and minerals, great for hair, nails, and skin, and I actually like the taste, too. Harissa – a powerful, North African condiment that can really take a meal to the next level. Our Plant-Based Meal Plan – the link is to the most recent meal plan we posted, but you can also see all of our meal plans here. Black Bean Sweet Potato Soup – this is such a cozy, fall soup (that uses harissa!) Tahini Hot Chocolate – I drink a variation of this drink every day that I’m working from home. It’s a great pick-me-up, and full of healthful ingredients, too. Red Lentil Stew – this Ottolenghi recipe is so solid and delicious. We also have a step-by-step, no-recipe red lentil soup recipe saved in our Instagram highlights. Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats   Print Serves: 1 Ingredients ¼ cup steel cut oats pinch of sea salt a few shakes of cinnamon, or to taste 1¾ cup water 1 apple lemon juice (optional) 2 teaspoons coconut sugar (optional) plant milk of choice - for reheating (optional) hemp hearts or other nuts or seeds - for sprinkling on top almond butter - for garnish Instructions The night before you want steel cut oats for breakfast, combine the steel cut oats, salt, cinnamon, and water in a pot with a lid. Place the pot over high heat and bring up to a boil. Turn off the heat immediately as the oats start boiling. Leave the pot with the oats to sit on the stove top, covered, until morning. In the morning, the oats will be cooked and creamy. The next morning, cut your apple in half and core. Grate half of the apple and mix it into the pot with the oats. Slice or cube the other half of the apple, for topping the porridge. Optionally, mix the apple slices/­­cubes with a few squeezes of lemon juice and coconut sugar for a more impactful topping. Reheat the oats with the grated apple over medium high heat, mixing regularly. If the oats seem too watery, cook them for about 5 minutes, and theyll thicken up. On the other hand, if youd like the oats to be more creamy, reheat them with a splash of plant milk or water for a creamier consistency. Serve, topped with sliced apple, hemp heart or other nuts/­­seeds, and almond butter. Notes This recipe is highly customizable: use any seasonal fruits or berries you have on hand in place of apples, mix in cacao powder and top with banana for chocolate oats, switch up the toppings...the possibilities are endless! 3.5.3226 You might also like... Sprouted Spelt Pancackes Sweet Potato Buckwheat Snack Bars with Cardamom Carrot Cake Smoothie Bowl Creamy Steel Cut Oats with Spring Vegetables .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb { background: !important; -webkit-transition: background 0.2s linear; -moz-transition: background 0.2s linear; -o-transition: background 0.2s linear; transition: background 0.2s linear;;color:!important; } .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover{background:#ffffff !important;color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover .yuzo_­text, .yuzo_­related_­post:hover .yuzo_­views_­post {color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb a:hover{color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb:hover a{ color:!important;} .yuzo_­related_­post .relatedthumb{ margin: 0px 0px 0px 0px; padding: 5px 5px 5px 5px; } The post Shortcut Apple Steel Cut Oats + A Day of Eating Video appeared first on Golubka Kitchen.

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi

November 14 2018 My New Roots 

Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi   You know that game where you give someone a word and they have to make up a story with that word in it? Im like that, except with food. Give me an ingredient, and magically, as if out of nowhere, an entire recipe (or several!) will appear in my head. I could even give you the amount of salt it needs, how the vegetables should be sliced, the oven temp, and what it should be garnished with. Its a tad psycho, but my best party trick hands down. When my friend Christiann Koepke emailed me about coming to visit her in Portland, driving to the Pacific coast, and photographing some recipes together, I was all in. And then when she suggested we put seaweed into something (because ocean) it was like someone had opened the flood gates in my brain and alllll the ideas came rushing to me. Neat! And very convenient. But what do we really want to eat at the beach when its chilly and maybe windy, maybe raining, maybe freezing-raining (it is the Pacific Northwest, after all)? The answer is soup. And I knew it was going to be a creamy, dreamy, sea veggie-kissed broth with all the tasty toppings.     When seaweed is a featured ingredient in a recipe, I tend to channel Asian flavours like miso, ginger, wasabi, toasted sesame, to compliment to the unmistakably briny, salty, ocean-y flavour of seaweed. Eaten as a staple food throughout China and Japan for thousands of years, sea vegetables are rich in essential minerals, trace minerals, chlorophyll, iodine, fiber, and lots of protein. Some sea vegetables even contain vitamin B12 - a rare element for a plant! Sea vegetables are less complex than their land-dwelling relatives. Without intricate root systems or tissues, seaweeds get their nutrients from the waters they grow in. To survive, they form root-like parts to attach themselves to rocks or other stable elements. There are three categories of sea vegetables; brown, red, and green. Brown algae thrive in cool water at depths of around 50 feet. The most commonly known brown seaweed is kelp, which can grow up to 1,500 feet (500 meters) long! Red algae, like dulse, contain elements that can gel foods. Green sea vegetables bridge the gap between land and sea plants, as they can store food as starch, just like vegetation found out of the water. The most popular kind of green algae is nori, which is what your sushi comes wrapped in.      Seaweeds range in flavours from mild to wild. Some are sweet and nutty, while others are pungent, funky, and an acquired taste. If youre a seaweed newb (which most Westerners are), I suggest starting out with a less challenging one, like arame. Arame is in the brown category of sea vegetables, but when you buy it, it will appear closer to jet black. It has a stringy texture, and almost looks like wiry hair, but will soften into tender, noodle-y strands after being soaked. Before it is packaged, arame must be cooked for seven hours, and then dried in the sun. To use, simply re-hydrate by soaking it in room temperature water for 10-15 minutes until it is soft and has doubled in volume. Arame is very high in calcium, rich in iron, potassium, vitamin A and the B vitamins. And like other brown seaweeds, arame contains sodium alginate, a compound that helps to convert heavy metals in the body into harmless salt, which is easily excreted. Besides soup, I like to put arame in stews, stir fries, and salads (heres a great recipe from the archives...check out that incredible food photography!). The flavor of arame is saline and a bit funky, but mostly sweet. The texture is like an al dente pasta, and I think it adds amazing meaty-ness to a dish, with its satisfying chew.     This soup is well balanced, and hits all the notes: sweet and creamy from the butternut, savoury from miso, chewy from the arame, warming from the ginger, spicy from the wasabi, and nutty and crunchy from the toasted sesame. You could theoretically use any kind of winter squash here, like a Hokkaido pumpkin, acorn or delicate squash. Scale back on the ginger and perhaps leave out the wasabi if youre making this for kiddos. And if you dont have arame, or youre simply not into sea vegetables, leave it out, or replace with some coconut bacon. It should be noted that once youve added the miso to the soup base, its important that you dont let it boil if you reheat it. Miso is contains delicate probiotics and enzymes that will be destroyed by high heat. The soup freezes well, but leave the wasabi out until you serve it since the flavour will fade if once its frozen.             Print recipe     Butternut Squash Miso Soup with Wasabi and Arame Serves 4 (Makes 8 cups /­­ 2 liters) Ingredients: 1/­­2 cup /­­ 10g dried arame 1 large yellow onion 1/­­2 tsp. fine sea salt 4 cloves garlic 2 1/­­2 Tbsp. /­­ 25g minced fresh ginger approx. 3 lbs. /­­ 1 1/­­2 kg butternut squash 2 Tbsp. expeller-pressed coconut oil 4 cups /­­ 1 liter water, more if needed 1/­­4 cup /­­ 60ml white miso, or more if desired 3 Tbsp. black sesame seeds 1 tsp. wasabi powder microgreens and wasabi arugula for garnish, if desired Directions: 1. Place the arame in a medium bowl and cover with a few inches of water. Let soak while you cook the soup. 2. Roughly chop the onion, peel and mince the garlic and ginger. Peel and cube the butternut squash. 3. Melt the coconut oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add the onions and salt, cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until the onions are translucent. Add the garlic and ginger, stir, and cook for another couple of minutes. When fragrant, add the butternut squash, stir and cook for 4-5 minutes with the lid on. Add the water, replace the lid, bring to a boil, and then reduce to simmer. Cook until the squash is tender, about 15 minutes. 4. While the soup is simmering, toast the sesame seeds by placing them in a small skillet over medium heat. Stir occasionally until they begin to pop. Remove from heat and let cool completely. 5. Carefully transfer the soup to a blender (or simply use an immersion blender), and blend on high until completely smooth. Add more water to thin, if necessary. 6. Place miso and wasabi powder into two small, separate bowls. Add a bit of soup to each bowl, stir well, then add just the miso blend to the blender, and blend once again to incorporate. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. Keep the wasabi to the side until serving. 7. Drain and lightly rinse the arame. 8. To serve, place the piping hot soup into bowls, drizzle with the wasabi and swirl, sprinkle with sesame seeds. Top with a handful of the arame, some microgreens, and enjoy.   Christiann and I had such an incredible time at the ocean, pulling this whole miracle off together. The weather - although abysmal every other day that week - was beyond beautiful from the moment we set foot on the sand, to the second we decided it was time to call it a night (and then it started pouring, ha!). We caught an epic sunset by the fire, exhausted and so grateful for the stars aligning in every way possible, to make this day possible. And it was such an honour to work alongside a photographer that has inspired me for years - if you havent checked out her genius yet, here is a link to her website and Instagram. Thank you, Christiann for making this dream a reality! I had such a blast! We have another post coming up in the New Year I cannot wait to share it with you, dear friends. Big love to all and I hope autumn is treating you well. Happy American Thanksgiving to all my loves stateside! xo, Sarah B photo credits: images 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 Christiann Koepke *   *   *   *   *   * Good news friends! Due to the overwhelming feedback, we’ve extended the period of sign-ups for the Life-Changing Loaf Subscription Box that can be shipped before the holidays. If you’re looking for a great gift for a family member or friend (or need to hand out suggestions for yourself!), this is the perfect thing – it’s the gift that keeps on giving To give the box as a gift, simply click “ship to a different address” when you check out. Thank you for all the support so far! Your loaf is on the way!     The post Butternut Miso Soup with Arame and Wasabi appeared first on My New Roots.


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